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Making an iconic childhood brand relevant to adults


Background

Consumption

80% Market Share

It didn’t take long for the pop-tarts brand to become the leader in the toaster pastry category. Now, after 45 years, it dominates the market with an 80% share.

Innovation

XX

After achieving such a large share of the toaster pastry market, pop-tarts tried multiple times to expand. They failed in most international markets and both their “Go-Tarts” and “Snak-Stix” lines were discontinued in North America. Recently, pop-tarts has introduced “popsters” to the market as part of Kellogg’s 100 calorie pack line; suggesting pop-tarts might be trying to appeal to a more adult audience.

80%

20%

Currently, this iconic children’s breakfast is enjoyed by about 2/3 of American families. But it’s not just the kids who are eating pop-tarts: 20% of pop-tarts consumption in the U.S. is from adults.

Challenge pop-tarts hasn’t been very successful extending its brand through innovation. To grow the brand among adult consumers, pop-tarts needs to extend its line of toaster pastries to appeal to a broader spectrum of adult diets and pallets.

Through innovation and communication, make toaster pastries relevant to an adult audience.


Problem

NUTRITION

Unfortunately, as adults we can’t get away with eating the same foods for breakfast that we did when we were kids.

However, when pop-tarts toaster pastries are compared to popular treats such as cookies and brownies, their nutritional value starts to look a lot better.

Mostly because the nutritional value of foods like toaster pastries are viewed to be much lower than traditional breakfasts.

NUTRITION

Insight It’s not the pop-tart, it’s the time of day; pop-tarts are burdened by breakfast.

28/30 adults who were surveyed perceive pop-tarts to be more nutritious than treats; likening them [nutritionally] more to granola bars or muffins.

Solution Move pop-tarts from a guilty breakfast to a rewarding snack.


Target

“Corporate Warrior”

He is the first to arrive and the last to leave.

There are a lot of adults out there, so we narrowed the target audience a bit further. There are 37 million office workers in the U.S. who are working harder than ever for that next promotion or just to stay employed. They are the corporate warriors, and...

He does the work of three on the salary of one.

She lives an hour from the office, but her work is always close by.

Their office breaks are endangered.

Innovation Strategy To overcome the burden of breakfast, pop-tarts could benefit from associating itself with something that has already done so–coffee. Something the Corporate Warriors know all too well.

+

=


Communication Strategy

Leverage the fun of the brand to liberate a more enthusiastic break. A new line of pop-tarts toaster pastries meant to be enjoyed with coffee.

Point of Sale

Display in the coffee aisle.

Messages on the rear of the box can act as a sign to co-workers that they are taking a break.

Campaign: Take Back Break

On-shelf in the cereal aisle.

Out-of-home advertisements near public transit and office buildings.


Campaign Continued

The Prizes Through out-of-home and digital advertisements The “Take Back Break” campaign is designed to change attitudes towards breaking. The ads will call attention to the sad types of breaks the audience knows, and highlight how breaks should be spent; encouraging Office Warriors to take quality breaks.

When enough pop-tarts points have been collected through foursquare and off of pop-tarts boxes, they can be redeemed for pop-tarts prizes such as these: 200

USB Powered Toaster

points

pop-tarts rewards with foursquare 15

points

pop-tarts Scented Candles

Phone Case

80

points

To help make the new line of poptarts become thought of as a rewarding snack, we created a way to reward them for breaking using foursquare.

Various “breaks” will be set up by pop-tarts around the country. When users are near these break points, they can earn pop-tarts points for completing them.

Coozie

10

points


Extending the WWHSN Engagement Platform


Background

? N S H WW

As a branch of their “open happiness” campaign, Coke developed an engagement platform known as “where will happiness strike next” (WWHSN?) to live primarily in the digital space.

30

s o e d i V with over Views

4MM

Executions such as the “happiness truck,” the “happiness machine” and many more, were conducted spontaneously in over 10 countries. The results: around 30 viral videos with a total of 4 million views worldwide.


Problem

Methodology

Coke’s WWHS platform has not been fully engaging teens.

We gathered a group of diverse teens, chatted about life and happiness, then showed them the “happiness truck” video.

Challenge

Observations

With a global focus, extend the WWHS platform into something teens will want to engage with and spread.

Two interesting things happened: During the video they became noticeably happier and actually called out to friends in the room to come watch the video with them. Secondly, as soon as the video ended so did the happiness they were feeling. The happiness was only temporary.

Insight

Strategy

Happiness is contagious. But it’s not airborne.

Foster togetherness to spread a lasting infection of happiness.

The

Solution

Happiest

Happiness spreads fast, but dies quickly. In order for the feeling of happiness to spread among teens, Coke needs to bring them together and create a feeling that can outlive a 3 minute video.

Create a time of day specifically for teens that spurs engagement through togetherness.

hour


connecting Coke + Time One time of day that teens around the world share is the time right after school gets out; generally falling between the hours of 3:00 and 4:00 (while most adults are still working away), this time is perfect for Coke to engage teens.

There Is

SOMEthing

t n e r e f f Di About This

Highlight famous time keepers around the world to generate a curiosity about the Happiest Hour before it officially strikes for the first time.

Things may start to behave a bit differently between 3:00 and 4:00: Water fountains might start dispensing Coca-Cola. Vending machines might even drop a second bottle.

Hour The

Happiest hour During the hour, a facebook takeover will turn the colon + closing parenthesis combination (aka smiley face) into the iconic Coke bottle silhouette.

A double-dose of Coke for the price of one at a new location each day.


Web portal + SMS Messaging

The Happiest Hour web portal will only be accessible for use during the Happiest Hour itself. During all other hours of the day the portal will appear to be locked.

Ballsy? Maybe. But it’s all part of the mystery the Coke brand is known for. During the one hour it is open, via either the portal or SMS alert, users can track both what is going on in their area and what has already happened in other areas during their Happiest Hours.

Print + In-Store

What teens might find during the Happiest Hour: anything from 2 for 1 Cokes in Mexico, to Penguins, Igloos and snowball fights in India. The earned-media potential is great.

The best part is that the Happiest Hour doesn’t really end at 4:00. It just shifts. Thanks to my 8th favorite Canadian, Mr. Fleming, it’s always the Happiest Hour somewhere.


The

Happiest hour

AD: Ross Fletcher | CW: Ben Schneider CT: Greg Elwood | CS: Haywood Watkins CBM: Jerry Roback

AD: Julia Dorfman | CT: Chris Colliton CW: David Ashton + Matt Garcia CS: Matt Fischer | CBM: Jerry Roback


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