Issuu on Google+

Making an iconic childhood brand relevant to adults



80% Market Share

It didn’t take long for the pop-tarts brand to become the leader in the toaster pastry category. Now, after 45 years, it dominates the market with an 80% share.



After achieving such a large share of the toaster pastry market, pop-tarts tried multiple times to expand. They failed in most international markets and both their “Go-Tarts” and “Snak-Stix” lines were discontinued in North America. Recently, pop-tarts has introduced “popsters” to the market as part of Kellogg’s 100 calorie pack line; suggesting pop-tarts might be trying to appeal to a more adult audience.



Currently, this iconic children’s breakfast is enjoyed by about 2/3 of American families. But it’s not just the kids who are eating pop-tarts: 20% of pop-tarts consumption in the U.S. is from adults.

Challenge pop-tarts hasn’t been very successful extending its brand through innovation. To grow the brand among adult consumers, pop-tarts needs to extend its line of toaster pastries to appeal to a broader spectrum of adult diets and pallets.

Through innovation and communication, make toaster pastries relevant to an adult audience.



Unfortunately, as adults we can’t get away with eating the same foods for breakfast that we did when we were kids.

However, when pop-tarts toaster pastries are compared to popular treats such as cookies and brownies, their nutritional value starts to look a lot better.

Mostly because the nutritional value of foods like toaster pastries are viewed to be much lower than traditional breakfasts.


Insight It’s not the pop-tart, it’s the time of day; pop-tarts are burdened by breakfast.

28/30 adults who were surveyed perceive pop-tarts to be more nutritious than treats; likening them [nutritionally] more to granola bars or muffins.

Solution Move pop-tarts from a guilty breakfast to a rewarding snack.


“Corporate Warrior”

He is the first to arrive and the last to leave.

There are a lot of adults out there, so we narrowed the target audience a bit further. There are 37 million office workers in the U.S. who are working harder than ever for that next promotion or just to stay employed. They are the corporate warriors, and...

He does the work of three on the salary of one.

She lives an hour from the office, but her work is always close by.

Their office breaks are endangered.

Innovation Strategy To overcome the burden of breakfast, pop-tarts could benefit from associating itself with something that has already done so–coffee. Something the Corporate Warriors know all too well.



Communication Strategy

Leverage the fun of the brand to liberate a more youthful break. A new line of pop-tarts toaster pastries meant to be enjoyed with coffee.

Point of Sale

Display in the coffee aisle.

Messages on the rear of the box can act as a sign to co-workers that they are taking a break.

Campaign: Take Back Break

On-shelf in the cereal aisle.

Out-of-home advertisements near public transit and office buildings.

Campaign Continued

The Prizes Through out-of-home and digital advertisements The “Take Back Break” campaign is designed to change attitudes towards breaking. The ads will call attention to the sad types of breaks the audience knows, and highlight how breaks should be spent; encouraging Office Warriors to take quality breaks.

When enough pop-tarts points have been collected through foursquare and off of pop-tarts boxes, they can be redeemed for pop-tarts prizes such as these: 200

USB Powered Toaster


pop-tarts rewards with foursquare 15


pop-tarts Scented Candles

Phone Case



To help make the new line of poptarts become thought of as a rewarding snack, we created a way to reward them for breaking using foursquare.

Various “breaks” will be set up by pop-tarts around the country. When users are near these break points, they can earn pop-tarts points for completing them.




AD: Ross Fletcher | CW: Ben Schneider CT: Greg Elwood | CS: Haywood Watkins CBM: Jerry Roback

Pop-Tarts case