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innovation How Your Agency Can Make Every Day Count Transportation Asset Management for Local Agencies

Director of Technology Transfer Retires After 31 Years of Service www.kyt2.com

A Technology Transfer Newsletter for Local Transportation Agencies Vol. 27, No. 1, 2011


How Your Agency Can Make Every Day Count Amy I. Terry, Program Assistant

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21st century solutions, we can improve safety, reduce congestion and keep America moving and competitive.

EDC is designed to identify and deploy innovation aimed at shortening project delivery, enhancing the safety of our roadways, and protecting the environment. This initiative directly corresponds to the mission of the Kentucky Transportation Center Technology Transfer Program to identify and promote the implementation of technologies to create a safe, fiscally responsible, efficient and environmentally sound transportation system.

Warm-Mix Asphalt (WMA) is the generic term for a variety of technologies that allow asphalt to be produced and then placed on the road at lower temperatures than the conventional hot-mix method. WMA production is at temperatures ranging from 30 to 120 degrees lower than hotmix. In most cases, the lower temperatures result in significant cost savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions because less fuel is required. WMA also has the potential to extend the construction season, allowing projects to be delivered faster.

or Kentucky’s highway community, meeting the challenges of today’s transportation needs while working more efficiently, sustainably, and cost effectively means going beyond innovation and ingenuity. It means making every day count. In 2010, the Federal Highway Administration began the Every Day Counts (EDC) Innovation Initiative.

Beyond the internal effort to make FHWA a greener agency and reduce their carbon footprint, EDC is built around two core objectives: Accelerating Technology and Innovation Deployment; and Shortening Project Delivery.

Accelerating Technology and Innovation Deployment EDC is not about inventing the next “big thing.” It’s about taking effective, proven and market-ready technologies and getting them into widespread use. By advancing

Warm Mix Asphalt

Prefabricated Bridge Elements and Systems With Prefabricated Bridge Elements and Systems (PBES), many time–consuming construction tasks no longer need to be done sequentially in work zones. An old bridge can be demolished while the new bridge elements are built at the same time off–site, then brought to the project location ready to erect. Because PBES are usually fabricated under controlled climate conditions, weather has less impact on the quality, safety, and duration of the project. The use of PBES also offers cost

Every Day Counts, continued on p. 14

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Transportation Asset Management for Local Agencies Todd Morrison, P.E., Safety Circuit Rider

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conomically, times are tough. New roads are being added to our systems. Our old roads and bridges are aging every day. Construction and maintenance costs are rising, while funding is becoming increasingly harder to obtain. At the same time the public expects the same level of service for less money. This leaves local agencies with difficult decisions to make.

they were not able to show the previous condition of the asset. Several agencies also lost out on funds associated with the American Recovery and Reconstruction Act of 2009 because they were not able to produce the necessary data. Local agencies that want to improve the effectiveness of their management of transportation assets can do so by focusing on two aspects to the way they make decisions.

There are many factors influencing the way local agencies make these decisions about managing their transportation assets (roadways, bridges, culverts, signs, guardrails, etc.). The traditional way of managing assets has been to let the assets deteriorate to a point at which the only repair option is a very expensive rehabilitation or a reconstruction. In today’s uncertain economic environment agencies have to approach the management of transportation assets differently than in the past. There are much more cost effective strategies that can be employed that retain the value of the asset for a longer period of time, that are cheaper to employ over the asset’s life, and that make better use of available funding. These are some of the founding principles of an asset management philosophy.

First, agencies can start to utilize asset management principles to help decide how best to spend available funds. Agencies that use these principles have benefited from the following: • Documentation of current conditions so they can assess their needs in terms of desired levels of performance. • Improved accountability in the decision process. • Better understanding of the risk associated with their decisions. • Better use of available technology to track asset needs. • Ability to better plan for changes in agency standards because of the availability of their asset inventory.

If changes are not made, there can be substantial consequences associated with continuing to manage assets ineffectively, including lost opportunities, deteriorated conditions, and increasing needs. Other potential consequences could include a loss of credibility with the public, or a loss of funding. Many agencies have lost access to FEMA funding because

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Secondly, agencies have placed a priority on preserving assets through the use of preventive maintenance treatments to: • Maintain assets in better condition for a longer period of time. • Preserve the large investments that have been made in these assets.

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Asset Management, continued on p. 6

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Earn hours toward the

County Elected Officials Training Incentive Program

The Department for Local Government has approved for participants of Roads Scholar and Road Master classes to receive training hours towards the County Elected Officials Training Incentive Program. Most Roads Scholar and Road Master classes are worth six training hours. Elected or appointed officials who wish to participate in the County Elected Officials Training Program will need to complete and submit the Participation Form before they will be included in the program. To download the form or for additional information on this program, please visit http://dlg.ky.gov/training. Information on the Roads Scholar/Road Master training program can be found below. Additional information about the Technology Transfer Program, including a schedule of classes or registration, can be found on our website at www.kyt2.com.

Roads Scholar Training Program Required Courses

• Basic Work Zone and Flagger • Drainage: The Key to Roads that Last • Low-Cost Roadway Safety Improvements • Managing People I • Risk Management/Tort Liability • Traffic Management through Signals, Signs and Markings

Optional Courses (choice of three)

• Asphalt Paving Best Practices • Communications I • Construction of Concrete and Cement Stabilization • Customer Service • Managing People II • Managing People III

Local Government Roads Scholar and Road Master Graduates at the 2010 graduation in Lexington are pictured here with State Highway Engineer Steve Waddle.

Road Master Training Program Required Courses

• Communications II • Developing Leadership Skills • Environmental Awareness • Snow & Ice Removal

Optional Courses (choice of three) Most workshops have hands-on activities as seen here in a Managing People course.

• Basic Plan Reading • Computer Familiarization • Erosion and Sediment Control • Hazardous Materials Awareness • Roadside/Vegetation Management • Small Bridges

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Patsy Anderson, Director of Technology Transfer, Retires After 31 Years of Service Joe Crabtree, Ph.D., P.E. Director, Kentucky Transportation Center

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One of the reasons Patsy has stayed with the Center for 31 years is that she loves her job. “How can you not like working here?” she is fond of saying. She also takes great satisfaction in the work she has done, as she recently remarked, “I loved building the program.” She is particularly proud of the Roads Scholar and Road Master programs, and she loves interacting with the participants of that program. She says, “The best part is seeing how proud the recipients are when they receive their certificates.”

atsy Anderson, Director of the Technology Transfer (T2) Program at the Kentucky Transportation Center, has retired after 31 years of service to the Center. Patsy is the only Director that Kentucky’s T2 Program has ever had. She built Kentucky’s Program from the ground up, starting in 1980 with a total annual budget of $20,000. In the early years, the program offered six training courses each year. By contrast, in 2010, the program provided over 200 courses, with more than 5,400 attendees. Patsy guided Kentucky’s T2 Program from its infancy to a position of national prominence. In 1984, the program was designated a national Local Technical Assistance Program, or LTAP. In 1988, the Roads Scholar program was begun. To date, there have been 1,977 graduates of that program. The Road Master program was begun in 1998. To date, this program has graduated 1,394 individuals.

After her retirement, Patsy plans to spend a good bit of time pursuing one of her other passions – gardening. She has been designated a “Master Gardener,” a program designed to provide horticultural training in exchange for volunteer hours in order to promote horticulture education within the community. Patsy plans to spend time working with local school children to help them begin community gardens. She also plans to spend more time with her threeyear-old granddaughter, Arabel, and she will be taking classes at UK as part of the Donovan Scholars program.

Under Patsy’s leadership, Kentucky’s T2 Program has been a national leader and a model for other states to emulate. In 2007, she was awarded the National Achievement Award from the National Local Technical Assistance Program Association (NLTAPA) for her outstanding leadership, service to the industry, and profound impact upon the national LTAP program. For many people across the Commonwealth, the T2 Program is the “face” of the Center, providing a vital link between the available information and the people who need it. Patsy has been an active member of the American Public Works Association (APWA), the National Association of County Engineers (NACE), Kentuckians for Better Transportation (KBT), and many other transportation associations.

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All of us associated with Transportation in Kentucky owe a major debt of gratitude to Patsy for her outstanding service to the Commonwealth, the Transportation Cabinet, the University, and numerous county and local agencies across the state. She will be missed, and her contributions will forever be remembered.

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Asset Management continued from p. 3 • Reduce the life cycle cost of maintaining transportation assets, so available funding goes further. To get started in Transportation Asset Management an agency should ask and begin to answer these five questions. 1. What is the current state of our assets? • What do we own? • Where is it? • What condition is it in? • What is its remaining service life and economic value?

5. Which long-term funding strategy should be selected? • Does the selected long-term funding strategy align with agency policy goals?

2. What is the required level of service? • What is the demand by various stakeholders (e.g., public, elected officials)? • How different are actual conditions from desired conditions?

Any agency can begin practicing asset management, regardless of the condition of its assets or the amount of funding available, by building upon or enhancing current practices. There are many resources available to assist agencies in getting started.

3. Which assets are critical to sustained performance? • How do/can these critical assets deteriorate? • What are the likelihood and consequences of continued deterioration? • What does it cost to repair?

AASHTO Transportation Asset Management Guide. http://downloads. transportation.org/amguide.pdf

4. What are the feasible improvement strategies to consider? • What alternate repair options are the most feasible for our agency? • How do these strategies impact system performance and level of service?

FHWA Asset Management Primer, http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/infrastructure/ asstmgmt/amprimer.pdf NHI has developed a course: Asset Management for Local Agencies (NHI134088) http://www.ltap.org Note: The information on Asset Management for this article was extracted from the NHI course material: Asset Management for Local Agencies (NHI-134088).

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spotlight on partner associations

Kentucky Association of County Engineers & Road Supervisors

The Kentucky Association of County Engineers & Road Supervisors (KACERS) is here to serve as a mechanism to facilitate communication and coordination among Association members and other governmental, academic, and private institutions and associations, with the overall goal of improving local governmental services to citizens of the Commonwealth. KACERS provides a forum for training and the exchange of ideas and information. With your membership, you will become an active participant in advancing county engineering, road maintenance and management.

Membership Levels Regular Membership ($25): Any individual serving as a county judge/executive, magistrate or commissioner, local government public works supervisor, county engineer or road supervisor or their assistants shall be eligible for regular membership. While number of members is not limited, no county shall have more than three votes. No regular member shall cast more than one vote. Associate Membership ($25): Representatives of state and federal agencies, institutions of higher education, public agency associations, and others with unbiased and sincere interest in the affairs of the Association shall be eligible for associate membership. Associate members may speak from the floor of conventions and special meetings and shall be eligible for committee service, but shall not be entitled to vote or hold office. Agency Membership ($100): Agency membership is open to any local government entity and each agency membership will entitle the agency to representation by three individuals. Each agency membership will have one vote, with the County Judge/Executive, Mayor, or their designee responsible for casting the vote. Sustaining Membership ($100): Suppliers, vendors, contractors, consultants, and others in the same categories shall be eligible for sustaining membership. Sustaining members shall be eligible for committee service, but shall not be entitled to vote or hold office. Sustaining members shall speak from the floor by invitation only.

Upcoming Events KACERS is hosting the 2012 National Association of County Engineers Conference in Lexington April 1-5, 2012. We would love your participation in the planning and attendance of the conference. It is a great educational opportunity! For additional information, or to become a member of KACERS, contact Valerie Pitts at 859-257-7410 or vpitts@engr.uky.edu.

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Roads Scholar & Road Master Highlights Risk Management/tort liability Roads scholar required course Amy I. Terry, Program Assistant

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he function of government is to provide security and services for its citizens. Transportation is one of the services which governmental officials and employees are charged with providing. The goal of transportation should be the safe and efficient movement of people and goods, within reasonable fiscal constraints.

and local governments are charged with providing and maintaining reasonably safe roadways. As such, they must be aware of the possibility of lawsuits. Employees of these agencies should also realize that their personal actions might lead to exposure for their agencies and themselves.

While providing transportation services, the government is not the absolute insurer of the safety of a highway user. The total resources of any government are limited and it would not be realistic to expect that the bulk of all funding be devoted to keeping the roads in an absolutely sound and safe condition. However, the courts have consistently held that governments are required to maintain streets and roads in a reasonably safe manner. Failure to do so may result in liability if a user suffers injury. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

“It will help me be more aware of my surroundings and to be more alert in looking for different situations that could help save a life.� Risk Management/Tort Liability Participant

In order to succeed in a tort claim, a plaintiff must prove the following four elements: duty, breach of duty, proximate cause, and injury. To prevail in a tort case, the plaintiff must prove the existence of each of these elements. It is given that the Cabinet and local governments have a duty to provide a reasonably safe highway. The plaintiff must prove that the agency breached that duty causing a crash which resulted in an injury to the plaintiff. Motorists are not required to anticipate a hazard, danger, obstruction, or unusual condition unless warned.

Participants follow along with the presentation using provided workshop material.

The updated Risk Management/Tort

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Liability class provides employees with background information related to tort liability and risk management. A major part of the class summarizes past experience with lawsuits against government entities. The reason for the lawsuits and results are analyzed. The objective is to provide an understanding of the basis for past claims so the number of future claims and awards can be reduced. This will result in the ultimate objective of reducing highway crashes.

Ken presents the updated Risk Managment course to participants.

Since familiarity with legal terminology is helpful in understanding the tort liability

Research Engineer in the Traffic and Safety Section at the Kentucky Transportation Center. He earned his B.S. and M.S. in Civil Engineering at the University of Kentucky. Ken has conducted research in highway safety, evaluations of various traffic control and operations, and accident reconstruction. For a schedule of upcoming Risk Management/Tort Liability classes, see page 13 or visit our website at www.kyt2.com. Source: Roadway Related Tort Liability and Risk Management, Research Report KTC-10-07/SPR39910-1F, by Kenneth R. Agent, Transportation Research Engineer

Instructor Ken Agent and Dave Rodgers, city of Cold Spring, discuss the use of chevrons.

problem and potential solutions, definitions are provided for terms such as contributory negligence, breach of duty, standard of care, and notice of a defect. In addition, detailed information is provided on risk management principles, the description of trial process, trial preparation and involvement; and an introduction to accident reconstruction. The instructor for the course is Kenneth R. Agent, P.E. Mr. Agent is a Transportation

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ARY

Check out your world Asset management, risk management, and tort liability are the focus topics of this issue of The Link. Below are some resources related to these areas. Contact us to borrow any of the Library Resources. The Library has materials on many other topics that can support your work. We will be glad to search our resources – just let us know! Librarian Laura Whayne manages an extensive video collection of over 800 titles.

Materials to Consider: Library Resources AV-CD396 Asset Management for Local Agencies. DOT FHWA, NHI Course 134088.

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Laura Whayne, Librarian 800-432-0719 or 859-257-2155 E-mail: lwhayne@engr.uky.edu Fax: 859-257-1815

FHWA-HRT-05-077 Why Your Agency Should Consider Asset Management Systems for Roadway Safety.

Internet Sites: DOT FHWA Every Day Counts Initiative: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ everydaycounts/ Asset Management Resources. American Public Works Association: http://www.apwa.net/ resourcecenter/index.asp?Section=asset DOT FHWA Infrastructure Asset Management: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/infrastructure/asstmgmt/ index.cfm TR News (No. 270, 2010): http://onlinepubs. trb.org/onlinepubs/trnews/trnews270.pdf Asset management is the focus of the Sept.-Oct. 2010 issue of TR News by the Transportation Research Board.

AV-CD191 Risk Management and Tort Liability on the Roadways: What You Need to Know to Protect Your Agency. AV-V962 Work Zone Tort Liability. TE7.N25 no.545-1 Analytical Tools for Asset Management. 2005. CLRP-02-04 Reducing Liability for Local Highway Officials. KRR-KTC-10-07 Roadway Related Tort Liability and Risk Management.

Visit the Library online or request publications at www.kyt2.com/library.htm View eNews archives, Library Back@Work, or checkout videos in the Online Video Lending Library!

MRUTC-05-01 Transportation Asset Management for Local Government Agencies: Threshold Levels and Best Practices Guide.

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Kentucky Transportation Center Opens New Traffic Operations Lab

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software used by Lexington and Louisville is operated by the lab.

The primary use of the CATS lab will be to support the development and delivery of a training course for Kentucky Transportation Cabinet signal technicians. Kirk, who is serving as director of the lab, says it will provide handson experience for the technicians.

The CATS Lab houses over $100,000 of software and hardware, the majority of which was provided by corporate sponsors Econolite Group, Inc. and Arrow Electric Co. and supported by the lab’s cooperating agencies, including the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Lexington Fayette Urban County Government and the Louisville Metro Government. “Without the equipment and technical support we have received from our sponsors and other agencies, it simply would have been impossible to put this facility together,” said Kirk.

Adam Kirk, PE, PTOE, AICP

he Kentucky Transportation Center (KTC) at the University of Kentucky recently opened its new Center for Advanced Traffic Solutions, or CATS, laboratory. Developed by KTC’s Adam Kirk and Pat Johnson, the new facility will provide traffic operations research, education and training.

“Experienced technicians can use the facility to develop, test and refine innovative signal operation strategies, without impacting traffic operations,” he said. “This is only possible through the interface with simulation.” Future uses for the lab will include undergraduate and graduate education and research, as well as allow the pursuit of state and national research opportunities. “It is our hope that this facility will serve to increase student interest in traffic operations while building the next generation of traffic engineers. If successful, graduates will leave UK having practical hands-on experience with equipment currently in use, and the advanced equipment that will be deployed in the future,” said Kirk The CATS Lab houses three complete signal controller racks, which include all the hardware that is used to operate traffic signals at intersections. In addition, a closed loop system, which is used to control multiple signals along a roadway, as well as the same central system

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Johnson, laboratory manger and former signal systems manager for Louisville Metro said, “The facilities in this laboratory allow us to duplicate virtually any type of signal operation from a single isolated intersection to a city-wide system.”

The CATS lab also aims to improve the experience for commuters to UK. CATS Lab staff have secured $200,000 in Highway Safety Improvement Program funds to work with Lexington to implement an advanced adaptive signal control system on South Limestone Street between Euclid Avenue and Waller Avenue. “Adaptive signal controls are the state-of-the-art in signal operations,” said Johnson. “They are used to adjust signal timing parameters in real time based on traffic demand and arrival patterns. What’s that mean? Less time waiting at red lights.” “As money for roadway improvements becomes even more scarce, it is imperative that we squeeze more efficiency out of our existing system. That is exactly what the CATS Lab is designed to do,” said Kirk. The CATS Lab is located in Room 260 of Anderson Tower. “If the lights are on, stop by and check us out,” said Johnson. For additional information, contact Adam Kirk, CATS Director at 859-257-7310 or akirk@engr.uky.edu.

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2011 Chainsaw Safety Training

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ake sure your crew is prepared for tree removal projects by signing up now for the Chainsaw Safety Training provided by the Technology Transfer Program of the Kentucky Transportation Center. The Center will provide two Demonstration Courses and two Hands-On Courses. The Chainsaw Demonstration Safety Training Course covers the basics of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), saw safety features and adjustments; reactive forces, basic directional felling and limbing; and topping. This full-day course will consist of classroom learning in the morning and in the afternoon participants will travel to a site where they will observe the demonstration portion of the training. The Chainsaw Hands-On Safety Training Course will take place outdoors and will consist of lecture and hands-on activities. The course will include work on springpoles and wedging; hands-on training in carburetor adjustment, chisel bit and round chain filing, as well as other topics. Each participant will cut down a tree as part of the course. All participants must bring a hard hat, hearing protection, safety glasses, chaps, boots and a chainsaw (one for every two participants – does not have to be in working

condition.) Participants who wish to participate in the Hands-On Training MUST attend the Demonstration the day before. The Chainsaw Safety Training is led by Tim Ard of Forest Applications Training Inc. He has over 28 years of safety training experience and has conducted training in 36 states. Space is limited so register now on our website, www.kyt2.com.

2011 Training dates Demonstration Course

August 9th - City of Murray August 11th - Shelby County

Hands-On Course

August 10th - City of Murray August 12th - Shelby County Additional information can be found on our website at www.kyt2.com or you may contact Dina Johnson at 859-257-5086 or djohnson@engr.uky.edu.

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TRAINING CALENDAR June - August 2011 * Indicates Roads Scholar course

# Indicates Road Master course

**Indicates Central Standard Time Zone

June 8 Construction of Concrete & Cement Stabilization........................Barren River Lake SRP, Lucas*** 9 Erosion & Sediment Control..............................................................Barren River Lake SRP, Lucas**# 14 Small Bridges.........................................................................................Receptions, Inc., Erlanger# 16 Drainage: The Key to Roads That Last............................................Kentucky Dam Village SRP, Gilbertsville*** 22 Basic Plan Reading...............................................................................Barren River Lake SRP, Lucas**# 23 Environmental Awareness..................................................................Barren River Lake SRP, Lucas**# 28 Managing People I................................................................................Holiday Inn Express, Somerset* 29 Developing Leadership Skills.............................................................Holiday Inn Express, Somerset# July 6 Work Zone Traffic Control Technician............................................Four Points by Sheraton, Lexington 7 Work Zone Traffic Control Supervisor............................................Four Points by Sheraton, Lexington 12 Asphalt Paving Best Practices.............................................................Jenny Wiley SRP, Prestonsburg* 13 Basic Work Zone and Flagger............................................................Jenny Wiley SRP, Prestonsburg* 14 Low-Cost Roadway Safety Improvements.......................................Natural Bridge SRP, Slade* 20 Hazardous Materials Awareness.........................................................Bowling Green Technicial College**# 21 Risk Management/Tort Liability........................................................Natural Bridge SRP, Slade* 26 Roadside/Vegetation Management...................................................Barren River Lake SRP, Lucas**# 27 Snow & Ice Removal...........................................................................Barren River Lake SRP, Lucas**# 27 Computer Familiarization...................................................................Bluegrass Community & Technicial College, Lexington# 28 Computer Familiarization...................................................................Bluegrass Community & Technicial College, Lexington# 28 Risk Management/Tort Liability........................................................Kentucky Dam Village SRP, Gilbertsville*** August 9 Construction of Concrete & Cement Stabilization........................Receptions, Inc., Erlanger* 10 Asphalt Paving Best Practices.............................................................Receptions, Inc., Erlanger* 10 Computer Familiarization...................................................................Somerset Community College# 16 Erosion & Sediment Control..............................................................Natural Bridge SRP, Slade# 17 Basic Plan Reading...............................................................................Holiday Inn Express, Elizabethtown# 17 KEPSC Inspector Qualification.........................................................Hilton Garden Inn, Bowling Green** 18 KEPSC Inspector Requalification.....................................................Home Builder’s Association of Owensboro** 18 Traffic Management Through Signals, Signs and Markings..........Kentucky River ADD, Hazard* 23 Communications I................................................................................Holiday Inn Express, Elizabethtown* 24 Snow & Ice Removal...........................................................................Kentucky Dam Village SRP, Gilbertsville**# 25 Environmental Awareness..................................................................Kentucky Dam Village SRP, Gilbertsville**# 30 Managing People III............................................................................Natural Bridge SRP, Slade* 31 Developing Leadership Skills.............................................................Natural Bridge SRP, Slade# To register for a class contact Nicole Worthy (nworthy@engr.uky.edu) at 800-432-0719 or 859-257-7364. Contact Martha Horseman, Training Manager, (mhorseman@engr.uky.edu) at 859-257-4531 with questions concerning the training programs.

Receive the most up-to-date information Check the website for new training announcements, updates to the training schedule and to register online. Go Green Send us your email address and receive the LINK and other publications by email. Contact Victoria Brock at 859-257-8267 or vbrock@engr.uky.edu to be added to the email list.

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Every Day Counts, continued from pg. 2 savings in both small and large projects. The ability to rapidly install PBES onsite can reduce the environmental impact of bridge construction in environmentally sensitive areas. Adaptive Signal Control Technology Poor traffic signal timing contributes to traffic congestion and delay. Conventional signal systems use pre–programmed, daily signal timing schedules. Adaptive signal control technology adjusts the timing of red, yellow and green lights to accommodate changing traffic patterns and ease traffic congestion. The main benefits of adaptive signal control technology over conventional signal systems are that it can: • Continuously distribute green light time equitably for all traffic movements. • Improve travel time reliability by progressively moving vehicles through green lights. • Reduce congestion by creating smoother flow. • Prolong the effectiveness of traffic signal timing. Adaptive Control Software Lite (ACS–Lite) is an example of adaptive signal control technology. ACS–Lite was specifically designed to be deployed using conventional control equipment, communications, and traffic sensors on arterial streets, making it a cost–effective alternative to other signal timing adjustment technologies Safety Edge The Safety Edge is a simple but extremely effective solution that can help save lives by allowing drivers who drift off highways to return to the road safely. Instead of a vertical drop-off, the Safety Edge consolidates the edge of the pavement at 30 degrees. Research has shown this “transition from on-roadway surface to shoulder and back is so smooth it defies assignment of any degree of severity”. The Safety Edge provides a strong,

durable transition for all vehicles. Even at higher speeds, vehicles can return to the paved road smoothly and easily. By including the Safety Edge detail while paving, this countermeasure can be implemented systemwide at a very low cost. The Safety Edge provides a more durable pavement edge that prevents edge raveling. FHWA’s goal is to accelerate the use of the Safety Edge technology, working with States to develop specifications and adopt this pavement edge treatment as a standard practice on all new and resurfacing pavement projects. Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil Instead of conventional bridge support technology, Geosynthetic Reinforced Soil (GRS) Integrated Bridge System (IBS) technology uses alternating layers of compacted granular fill material and fabric sheets of geotextile reinforcement to provide support for the bridge. GRS also provides a smooth transition from the bridge onto the roadway, and alleviates the “bump at the bridge” problem caused by uneven settlement between the bridge and approaching roadway. The technology offers unique advantages in the construction of small bridges, including: • Reduced construction time and cost, with costs reduced 25 to 60 percent from conventional construction methods. • Easy to build with common equipment and materials; easy to maintain because of fewer parts. • Flexible design that’s easily modified in the field for unforeseen site conditions, including unfavorable weather conditions.

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Shortening Project Delivery

CM/GC occupies the middle ground between the traditional Design-Bid-Build (DBB) and Design-Build (DB). In a typical CM/GC scenario, the owners of a project contract with a general contractor to serve as the construction manager, to provide the owner with constructibility, pricing, and scheduling information during the design process. As the design nears completion, if the owner and the construction manager are able to agree on a price for construction, they sign a construction contract and the construction manager then becomes the general contractor. CM/GC allows State DOTs to remain active in the design process while assigning risks to the parties most able to mitigate them.

Shortening Project Delivery Toolkit It’s a commonly held perception that it takes an average of 13 years to deliver a major highway project from planning through completion. This perception is based partly on the experiences of State DOTs and FHWA, and partly on data collected on projects that require the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). FHWA believes that using innovative approaches will improve project delivery times. The toolkit will present these approaches for addressing what FHWA identified as a number of frequently-cited problem areas. In addition to presenting these options, FHWA is prepared to play an active leadership role in helping the people who actually deliver projects - states, MPOs, contractors - understand and accept the new practices and new technologies. Content is currently being developed for this initiative and more information will be added throughout the summer of 2011.

Additional information including EDC upcoming events, summits and a forum can be found online at http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/everydaycounts/ index.cfm. Article and Photo Source: FHWA Every Day Counts website: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/everydaycounts/index.cfm

Accelerated Project Delivery Methods The Accelerated Project Delivery Methods (APDM) initiative is designed to help reduce the time it takes to deliver highway projects to the public. FHWA is confident that with accelerated project delivery methods, State DOTs can deliver projects 50 percent faster. EDC is promoting APDMs such as Design-Build (DB) and Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/ GC), which have proven to shave years off project schedules in some cases. With DB project delivery, the designer-builder assumes responsibility for the majority of the design work and all construction activities. This provides the designer-builder with increased flexibility to be innovative, along with greater responsibility and risk.

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Publication Statement

The LinkŠ is published quarterly by the Kentucky Transportation Center, College of Engineering, University of Kentucky, using funds from the Federal Highway Administration and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. The opinions, findings, or recommendations expressed in this newsletter are those of the Kentucky Transportation Center and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Federal Highway Administration nor the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet nor the University of Kentucky. Any product mentioned in The Link is for informational purposes only and should not be considered as a product endorsement. Comments may be addressed to: Kentucky Transportation Center, 176 Raymond Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0281. Phone: 859-257-7401 or 800-432-0719. Staff include: Joe Crabtree, Director, Kentucky Transportation Center Patsy Anderson, Director, Technology Transfer Program Mardi C. Miller, Editor, Publications/Marketing Manager, Technology Transfer Program

Kentucky LTAP Center

The Link is printed on recycled paper.

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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage Paid Lexington, KY Permit No. 51

Kentucky Transportation Center College of Engineering 176 Raymond Building University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0281 www.kyt2.com

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Safety Circuit Rider Program

T

he Safety Circuit Rider for the Technology Transfer Program uses crash data to locate high incident sites along roadways and assist communities in finding low cost roadway safety improvements. The Safety Circuit Rider works with local governments to remove fixed objects such as trees, brush, stumps, etc and to install signage per MUTCD guidelines. This free technical advice is helping communities across the state of Kentucky save lives every day.

For additional information contact Todd at: 270-404-4870 tmorrison@engr.uky.edu

In This Issue: Every Day Counts Initiative......................................2 Asset Management....................................................3 County Elected Officials Training Program...................4 Patsy Anderson Retirement.......................................5 Spotlight on Partner Associations..............................7

Todd Morrison, P.E., is the Safety Circuit Rider with the Technology Transfer program of the Kentucky Transportation Center (KTC). He has previously worked with KTC as a Technology Transfer Engineer. He has also worked with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet for 19 years. Todd has worked with environmental, work zone, construction, traffic, and maintenance concerns as an Environmental Coordinator, Maintenance Engineer, Resident Engineer, Engineering Supervisor, and as a Branch Manager for Operations.

Risk Management/Tort Liability...............................8 Library: Check Out Your World .............................10 Center for Advanced Traffic Solutions......................11 Chainsaw Training..................................................12 Training Calendar...................................................13 Safety Circuit Rider...................................Back Cover

KTC Link Newsletter Spring 2011  

Newsletter for the Kentucky Transportation Center

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