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triangle community foundation

a journey of giving

2001


A

JOURNEY OF A THOUSAND MILES BEGINS WITH A SINGLE STEP.

 LAO-TZU

table of contents Our Mission ........................................................................................1 Annual Message ..................................................................................2-3 Board of Directors ................................................................................4 Committees & Staff..............................................................................5 Year in Review ......................................................................................6 Journey of Giving ................................................................................7 Strategic Impact: Mary & Van Meyer ..................................................8-9 Strategic Impact: John & Clare Plachetka ..........................................10-11 Strategic Impact: Capitol Broadcasting Company ..............................12-13 Catalyst Project & Committees ..........................................................14-15 Fund Information ................................................................................16-17 New Funds ..........................................................................................18-20 Existing Funds ....................................................................................21-24 Hitchings Society ................................................................................25 Grantmaking ......................................................................................26-29 Scholarships ........................................................................................30 Financials ............................................................................................31-32

2001

triangle community foundation


The mission of the Triangle Community Foundation is to expand private philanthropy in the communities of Wake, Durham, Orange, and Chatham counties. The Foundation perceives philanthropy to entail the gifting of assets for charitable purposes and the use of those assets to create meaningful impact.

strategic philanthropy

our mission

The Foundation thus encourages individuals, families, and corporations to become effective and strategic philanthropists. The Foundation achieves this by helping donors concentrate on and learn about the issues of most importance to them, and by connecting them with organizations, resources, and fellow donors to address those interests in creative and significant ways. In accomplishing its mission, the Foundation seeks to increase donors’ satisfaction with their philanthropy, and, more importantly, increase the influence of their giving and its benefit to the public good.

begin your journey with us. 1


annual message

guiding the journey of philanthropy

In June of this year, the Triangle Community Foundation, with Cisco Systems, hosted a kickoff event for the new Entrepreneurs Partnership, an association of Triangle-area entrepreneurs committed to philanthropy (see page 14). We wonder if John Morgridge, Cisco Chairman and the keynote speaker at that event, knew he was echoing Aristotle’s words when he said, “Good philanthropy is hard work. But it is the best hard work you’ll ever know.” The Triangle Community Foundation’s mission statement reflects the same sentiment: “...The Foundation perceives philanthropy to entail both the gifting of assets for charitable purposes [the “easy part”!] and the use of those assets to create meaningful impact [the “hard part”!].” Now in its 19th year, the Triangle Community Foundation has become more serious than ever about the hard part of its mission, and is finding that many of the philanthropists who have created one of the 532 funds in the foundation — some almost two decades ago and some two months ago — are eager fellow travelers.

TO GIVE AWAY MONEY IS AN EASY MATTER AND ANY MAN’S POWER. BUT TO DECIDE TO WHOM TO GIVE IT AND HOW MUCH AND WHEN, FOR WHAT PURPOSE AND HOW, IS NEITHER IN EVERY MAN’S POWER, NOR AN EASY MATTER.

 ARISTOTLE

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Specifically, in the past year the Triangle Community Foundation has intentionally and, we hope, carefully, enlarged its role in assisting donors in moving along a path toward philanthropy that is increasingly effective and satisfying. At the beginning of the road, for many, is a sense of obligation. It’s that conditioned reaction — even a sense of guilt — that causes us to pull out the checkbook in response to a colleague, a friend, or one of the dozens of appeals that arrive in our mailbox annually. Don’t get us wrong — the Community Foundation honors and celebrates the millions of Americans who give in all forms, day in and day out. But let’s be honest. Obligatory philanthropy—“checkbook philanthropy,” as it is sometimes called — is not much fun. And even worse, we experience that gnawing sense of doubt about whether it is even making a difference. Can the philanthropic experience be more? Yes, absolutely yes. Only a few steps beyond responsive, checkbook giving is philanthropy that is both purposeful and effective. The only difference between the two is a clear goal, which can be as simple as the answer to the question, “What do you care about?” Anyone who can answer that question, and has a desire to make a difference, can become an effective philanthropist. But there is an even higher destination in the journey of philanthropy. The most exciting, most rewarding, most satisfying philanthropy, like the proverbial trip to the mountaintop, is transformational. Every major religious heritage, and every testimonial of the fulfilled philanthropic experience, speaks the same truth: In the act of giving, the giver is transformed. Ultimately, philanthropy changes not only the external environment, but also the internal landscape of the philanthropist himself. Philanthropy begins to take on a deeply personal meaning. Families come together around common philanthropic values, binding them together in ways more powerful than even their blood or financial ties. The donor begins to feel compelled to share this meaning with others, testifying to the joy and satisfaction that philanthropy has brought to his or her life and creating an evergrowing circle of philanthropy in the community and beyond. And, finally, the artificial societal lines between donor and recipient, resource-provider and resource-user, begin to break down. The donor begins to identify with the recipient, to genuinely understand his or her circumstance, and to realize that they are not fundamentally different from one another. Community in its purest sense is realized.


During the past year, the Triangle Community Foundation has initiated three new activities to assist anyone who wants to take the next steps in the journey toward transformational philanthropy (see page 16). Strategic Impact Grants are the quickest and easiest route to philanthropic impact. Tell us what you want to accomplish, and we’ll find ways to make it happen. It’s that simple. The traditional mode of foundation grantmaking begins with myriad community nonprofit organizations making requests for funding. Strategic Impact Grants turn the traditional model on its head, and start with you, the donor. What issues are important to you? What changes would you like to see? What do you want your community legacy to be? We combine your interests with our extensive knowledge of the community’s needs, and actively reach out to those nonprofits doing effective work in those areas. Our goal is to create opportunities that both fulfill the donor’s interests and create positive, meaningful and measurable community change. Typically, we bring a menu of possible opportunities, and the donor is free to choose among them. Then we negotiate expected outcomes with the chosen organizations, monitor progress and report back to the donor. Everyone knows not only exactly how the grant was used, but more important, what its impact was. And because we actively seek out the organizations doing the best work, rather than waiting for them to find us, Strategic Impact Grants are more accessible and efficient for community nonprofits than a typical grantmaking application process would be. TCF’s Continuing Philanthropic Education Series gives every donor the opportunity to structure a personalized learning program on philanthropy. Want to learn more about who’s doing what in the environment, in the arts, or for our youth? Come to one of our programs or site visits. Wrestling with the big questions of how to address the issues of wealth, families, and philanthropy? Come hear a national expert on the topic. Want to become part of a community of donors with similar interests? Explore a giving circle. It’s all there, and open to anyone in the Triangle community.

guiding the journey of philanthropy

And what is the role of the Community Foundation in this journey? Boston College’s Paul Schervish describes our role in the lofty term “spiritual director.” We think a better analogy is more earthbound, more like the role of the sherpa. We’ll break the path, show the way, and do some of the heavy lifting, but you, the donor, are the traveler. You decide what mountain to climb, and by what route.

Finally, for those who want even more individual guidance in the philanthropic journey, we offer our Tailored Philanthropic Services. The Triangle Community Foundation can offer you, your family, or your company a series of facilitated discussions to help you: • identify and clarify philanthropic values, mission, and aims; • develop effective and satisfying approaches to fulfill your giving goals; • provide analysis and guidance about appropriate guidelines and decision-making processes; • research best approaches on issues within your areas of focus; • create grantmaking frameworks and implement funding strategies around focus areas; and • evaluate outcomes. We invite you to come journey with us. We’re excited to see where each path leads, and what transformations we’ll experience individually and throughout our community.

Shannon E. St. John President, Triangle Community Foundation

Richard T. “Stick” Williams Chairman, Triangle Community Foundation 3


board of directors Sara Brooks Strassle Immediate Past Chairman President and CEO Pilot Therapeutics, Inc. R. Peyton Woodson III Chairman, Foundation Leadership Council President Woodson Associates

Richard T. “Stick� Williams Chairman Vice President, Business & Community Relations Duke Power Company

Fred D. Hutchison Vice Chairman & Chairman-Elect Partner Hutchison & Mason

David R. Carr President Oak Value Capital Management, Inc. Jean Gordon Carter Partner Hunton & Williams Julius L. Chambers Chancellor, Retired North Carolina Central University Elizabeth B. Craven Trustee The Warner Foundation Alice K. Horton Community Volunteer

Anne Cone Liptzin, Secretary Community Volunteer

Carrie Bolton Chairman, Community Leadership Committee Minister Alston Chapel Church

not pictured: Ronald A. Strom, Treasurer and Finance Committee Chair President, Ron Strom Company

James H. Johnson Director of Urban Investment UNC-CH Thomas F. Keller R.J. Reynolds Professor of Business Administration Fuqua School of Business Duke University Peter J. Meehan Chairman Greenwood Group Inc. Robert D. Shertz President, Retired Litho Industries, Inc C. Hamilton Sloan Vice Chairman General Parts, Inc. George H. Hitchings FOUNDER 1905-1998

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committees & staff Foundation Leadership Council

Finance Committee Members

R. Peyton Woodson, III Chairman President, Woodson Associates Carol W. Bilbro Community Volunteer Arthur W. Clark Retired, Chairman of the Board, Peoples Security Life Insurance Co. Stephen D. Corman Former Chairman and CEO, PharmaLink Inc. Frank A. Daniels, Jr. Former President and Publisher, News & Observer Publishing Co. K.v.R. Dey, Jr. Retired President, Liggett Group, Inc. J. Floyd Fletcher Retired Executive & Community Volunteer William C. Friday Former President, William R. Kenan, Jr. Fund James F. Goodmon President and CEO, Capitol Broadcasting Co. Mary L. Hill Community Volunteer Kelly S. King President, Branch Banking & Trust Co. Louise W. McCutcheon Former County Commissioner & Community Volunteer Eugene J. McDonald President, Duke Management Company Charles B. Neely, Jr. Maupin Taylor & Ellis, P.A. Prezell R. Robinson President Emeritus, St. Augustine’s College LeRoy T. Walker President Emeritus, U.S. Olympic Committee

Ronald A. Strom, Finance Chair and Treasurer Glenn C. Andrews David R. Carr Stephen D. Corman Nancy R. Dougherty Thomas F. Keller Charles Leedy Richard W. McEnally Jonathan D. Scanlon Scott Schoedler Richard A. Urquhart, III Richard T. “Stick” Williams

Scholarship Committee Carolyn Leith John H. Lucas, Sr. Julie MacMillan Dietrich Morrison-Danner Patrick Oglesby Joseph D. Rowand Ken Soo

Staff Shannon E. St. John, President Marion Alston, Philanthropic Services Staff Associate Keith Burwell, Executive Vice President Beverley Francis, Director of Philanthropic Services Krystin Jorgeson, Finance Associate Darryl Lester, Director of Community Leadership Steve Michalak, Finance Director Jan Muller, Information Associate Natasha Samuels, Receptionist/Office Assistant Karen Sharpe, Executive Assistant Kristen Shipherd, Communications Manager Fred Stang, Director of Development Ivy Wingate, Philanthropic Services Officer

Community Leadership Committee Members Carrie Bolton, Chair Andrea Bazán Manson Elizabeth B. Craven Alice K. Horton James H. Johnson Anne Cone Liptzin Frank Phoenix Waltye Rasulala Robert D. Shertz C. Hamilton Sloan Mary Brent Wright

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year in review THIS YEAR: • Grant awards surpassed and broke all records in 2000-2001, rising to an all-time high of $14.1 million, more than doubling from last year’s $6.5 million in grants.

• Sixty-seven new funds were created and assets moved to $85 million. • After 14 years of residing in 100 Park Offices in RTP, the Triangle Community Foundation relocated to its new and more spacious location in the Imperial Center in the heart of the Triangle, 4813 Slater Road in Cambridge Hall, beginning a new chapter for the Foundation. • The Triangle Community Foundation was named the official charity of the SAS Championship Senior PGA Tour held in Cary this year. The Community Foundation provided research to SAS, helping them choose a community project that fit their charitable goals. Proceeds from the event will go to Community Learning Partners of Wake County, a newly formed nonprofit created through the merging of Community Learning Centers and Communities in Schools of Wake County. These funds will be used to create a new the SAS Learning Center in the Kentwood public housing community. • The Community Foundation kicked off its new Continuing Philanthropic Education Series by bringing in noted philanthropic adviser Charles W. Collier from Harvard University to discuss family wealth and passing on a tradition of philanthropy. In addition, philanthropic consultant Tracy Gary came to hold two seminars for Foundation constituents, one on women’s involvement in philanthropy and the other on becoming more strategic in giving. (The Foundation intends to hold many more sessions such as these in the future. Please visit http://www.trianglecf.org/continuing education.htm for the latest events and opportunities.) • The Triangle Community Foundation’s Catalyst Project took several important strides toward fulfilling its goal of increasing the permanent base of philanthropy in the region from $1 billion to $3 billion in twenty years. In just five years, the Project’s outreach has resulted in more than $235 million in new philanthropic capital for the region. For more information, see page 14.

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two thousand & one

• Over 1,885 donors contributed nearly $12.6 million in gifts.


journey of giving LIKE ALL JOURNEYS, PHILANTHROPY BEGINS WITH THE FIRST, TENTATIVE STEP — PERHAPS A MONETARY GIFT OR THE DONATION OF A FEW HOURS OF TIME TO A CAUSE THAT IS DEEPLY FELT.

BUT AS MANY PHILANTHROPISTS CONTINUE DOWN THIS PATH, OFTEN THE DESIRE TO DO MORE BECOMES STRONGER, AS DOES THE PASSION TO CREATE SIGNIFICANT CHANGE AND TO BECOME MORE EFFECTIVE IN GIVING.

This is the case with a number of the Triangle Community Foundation’s donors. Mary Meyer, after the loss of a close friend and a family member, felt compelled to take her community activism one step further. She created a new nonprofit that will meet the needs of the dying and those left behind, and she uses her fund at the Community

I’VE

ALWAYS FELT IT WAS REALLY IMPORTANT,

Foundation to feed this dream.

PART OF BEING HUMAN, TO BE INVOLVED IN

Dr. John Plachetka and his wife, Clare,

THE COMMUNITY IN MEANINGFUL WAYS.

also had a history of giving, but when they heard of a young boy’s plight, they used the

resources

of

the

 MARY MEYER

Community

Foundation to take actions that would forever change his life and theirs. Jim Goodmon and Capitol Broadcasting Company have built on the long legacy of charitable involvement of the company’s founders. A wonderful example of what a company can do, Capitol Broadcasting uses its fund at the Community Foundation to assist in their active community relations, and Jim Goodmon recently helped to spread the message of the impact that local companies can have on the region by creating charitable programs. As donors such as these continue down the path toward meeting their charitable goals, they are changing the face of the community one step at a time. We invite you to share this journey.

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strategic impact: Mary & Van Meyer

looking ahead to the end of the journey The Triangle Community Foundation connected Mary Meyer with likeminded individuals seeking to improve care for families struggling with end-of-life issues. Together their passion will change how people deal with death and dying.

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As with all journeys, there comes a time when the final destination is reached. With careful planning and assistance, hopefully this last stop leaves the traveler feeling a sense of accomplishment and peace and provides rich memories to sustain him and his fellow explorers. This is the hope of Mary Meyer, who is on a personal journey of her own to fulfill a dream — that with the proper support and resources, the community can recognize and talk openly about the most natural ending of all: death and dying. “I come to this work as a result of personal experience,” explains Meyer. “My sister-in-law Jill and my dear friend, Rhonda, were courageous women who died very young. They taught me several bittersweet lessons. One is that in tending to each other we must recognize equally spiritual, physical, emotional, and social needs. Through them I also learned much about living life fully, as well as understanding the issues families face when their loved one is dying.”

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For others struggling with end-of-life issues, Mary Meyer recognized that the community didn’t offer all of the appropriate resources within one nonprofit organization or church group to assist them. Taking her history of community activism one step further, she decided to create a nonprofit organization that would tackle these issues. With support from her husband, Van, she created Project Compassion. One of the couple’s first steps in pursuing this dream was to create a donor-advised fund with the Triangle Community Foundation to seed the organization and to explore with TCF staff how to best go about achieving this goal. “Starting a new nonprofit is both exciting and challenging,” she relates. “Advice from those who have been involved in this arena is vital to our long-term

IT

IS GRATIFYING TO HAVE

A RESOURCE LIKE THE

success. It is gratifying to have a resource like the

TRIANGLE COMMUNITY

Triangle Community Foundation available to link

FOUNDATION

donors with nonprofits.” Working closely with Ivy Wingate, philanthropic services officer at the Community Foundation, Meyer began making even more strategic links within the community to move her vision forward.

AVAILABLE

TO LINK DONORS WITH NONPROFITS.

 MARY MEYER

Under Meyer’s leadership, a coalition of Triangle health care, aging, hospice, social services, and religious organizations was formed to begin to tackle end-of-life organizations. Symposia and workshops draw on area experts to speak on key topics, from advocating for loved ones in the hospital to spiritual care for the dying. Expressive arts workshops offer caregivers ways to cope with prolonged stress through art, music, and writing. “Talking Circles” provide small-group structured opportunities to share their stories about caring for the dying. These steps forward in Mary Meyer’s journey have encouraged her to keep moving along her path. “I’ve always felt it was really important, part of being human, to be involved in the community in meaningful ways,” she says. “I’m excited about the possibility of working with these groups to create change. People need to know it’s okay to speak on this subject. Death and dying are a very important part of our lives. People need information. They need support.” The Foundation was pleased to act as part of Mary’s support system. “What we do for donors is help them to discover their values and create a context for where these values can be played out in the community,” relates Ivy Wingate. “Mary is a wonderful example of someone who is living her values and passions.”

meyer family fund for compassion

issues. Together, they now offer a range of services for families in crisis and support

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s t r a t e g i c i m p a c t : J o h n & C l a re P l a c h e t k a

sound giving Knowing that he wanted to help a young boy regain his hearing, Dr. Plachetka turned to the Triangle Community Foundation for guidance. The Foundation investigated the options and provided him with a road map for him to fulfill his hopes for a boy’s future.

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A small notice in the weekly bulletin at St. Thomas More Catholic Church caught John Plachetka’s eye, and the story behind it captured his heart. The notice asked for donations to help pay for a cochlear transplant for a nine-year-old Mexican boy who had lost his hearing at age six following bouts with mumps and meningitis. As a father and a scientist, Plachetka knew that moving quickly would be critical to restore the boy’s hearing, language, and life. “It just occurred to me in that instant that if they got donations in the usual way, it would be a long time before they had enough money,” Plachetka recalls. “It seemed to me that significant action was needed now.” Above right: a letter from the boy’s family thanks the Plachetkas for their gift. Right: an initial test is conducted for the implant’s effectiveness.

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Not knowing exactly how to proceed, Dr. Plachetka, who along with his wife, Clare, advise the Plachetka Family Fund, contacted the Triangle Community Foundation. Beverley Francis, director of philanthropic services, investigated the boy’s short- and long-term needs and how to best support those needs. Based on this information, John and Clare Plachetka recommended a grant to El Centro Hispano, the organization collecting donations for the boy. The grant covered hospital costs for the August operation and the expected four years of rehabilitation services needed to restore the boy’s hearing. “It is a great feeling to be able to make a difference in a person’s life in this way,” Plachetka says: “The prospect that some day this boy will be better able to achieve his dreams than perhaps he could have because we helped restore his hearing — you don’t get a chance many times in your life to have an impact like that.” Plachetka’s journey of giving began at an early age. “When I went to Catholic grade school,

I T’ S

they provided us all children’s envelopes for

ORGANIZATION IN PLACE TO JUST

weekly giving. And, although my parents

CALL UP AND SAY,

weren’t affluent by any means, they set a great example by giving through the church and by private donations to help others in need.”

NICE TO ALREADY HAVE THE

‘SEND

MONEY’

TO HELP PEOPLE IN NEED.

 JOHN PLACHETKA

The Plachetkas had given to their church and other worthy causes throughout their lives. But after completing the initial public offering for Plachetka’s pharmaceutical development company, Pozen Inc., launched in 1996, they felt an increased sense of responsibility to give back to the community in which they had prospered. “One of the first things we did after the IPO was to establish a fund at the Triangle Community Foundation as a way to give back,” states Plachetka. The tifying and evaluating opportunities for philanthropy to managing the myriad research and administrative tasks needed to make grants. That allows the Plachetkas to focus on the part they enjoy most — the giving itself. “I’ve got a soft spot in my heart for disadvantaged people,” Plachetka says. “There’s a lot we can be doing and, quite frankly, should be doing. It’s nice to already have the organization in place to just call up and say, ‘Send money’ to help people in need.”

plachetka family fund

Foundation now helps the couple manage the homework of giving, from iden-

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s t r a t e g i c i m p a c t : C a p i t o l B ro a d c a s t i n g C o m p a n y

a tradition of service The Triangle Community Foundation supports Capitol Broadcasting’s vast charitable relations program, providing information about area nonprofits and reducing administrative hassles so that the company can focus their attention on building a healthier and more vibrant community.

I

It’s difficult to find a Triangle event or cause that isn’t sponsored in some way by Capitol Broadcasting Co. From Boy Scouts to breast cancer, YMCAs to arts councils, hundreds of fundraisers, nonprofit organizations, and community events bear the mark of support of the company and its well-known media outlets, WRAL-TV, WRAZTV, WRAL-FM, North Carolina News Network, and others. “It’s our owner, Jim Goodmon,” says Paul Pope, Capitol Broadcasting’s vice president for community relations. “Jim believes that the success of the company is due to the community support we have had, and he is very willing to give back to the community in return.”

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Paul Pope enjoys a moment at a community support event.


Jim Goodmon took his support of the community one step further this past February when he hosted an event to launch the corporate outreach for the Catalyst Project, a program started by the Triangle Community Foundation that aims to triple the base of permanent philanthropy in the Triangle from $1 billion to $3 billion within twenty years. This first corporate event brought together several heads of businesses in the area, hoping to encourage them to create a charitable giving program within their companies. “Every economic enterprise has a responsibility to be involved and take part in philanthropy,” Goodmon stated at the time. “This is a comfortable and very American notion. There is a responsibil-

THE TRIANGLE COMMUNITY

ity for the corporate sector, not only because

FOUNDATION

it’s the ‘right thing to do,’ but also because it

TREMENDOUS RESOURCE FOR

is good business to be involved.”

CAPITOL BROADCASTING CO.

“The Triangle Community Foundation has

IN TERMS OF BEING ABLE TO

been a tremendous resource for Capitol Broadcasting Company in terms of being able to screen organizations for us and provide

HAS BEEN A

SCREEN ORGANIZATIONS FOR US AND PROVIDE INFORMATION ON

THE FOUNDATION

information on nonprofits. The Foundation

NONPROFITS.

takes a lot of the legwork out of gifting, which

TAKES A LOT OF THE LEGWORK

is a valuable service for any company looking

OUT OF GIFTING, WHICH IS A

for help with their philanthropy,” said Pope. The company focuses its philanthropy partictance of the whole person, addressing emotional, educational, and physical needs. Capitol Broadcasting supports events that add

VALUABLE SERVICE FOR ANY COMPANY LOOKING FOR HELP WITH THEIR PHILANTHROPY.

 PAUL POPE

to the area’s quality of life and provide opportunities for family time. “It’s an ongoing effort,” says Pope. “Broadcasters are holders of a public trust and are charged with operating for the ‘public interest, convenience, and necessity.’ CBC takes that trust seriously. Its investments in news, public service, and the communities it serves far exceed the potential revenues generated by such efforts. It is not a matter of money, it is a matter of philosophy.”

C B C / W R A L C o m m u n i t y Fu n d

ularly on activities that recognize the impor-

Jim Goodmon

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c a t a l y s t p ro j e c t This innovative program that works to increase the base of permanent philanthropic capital in the Triangle region from $1 billion to $3 billion over the next twenty years has already yielded remarkable results. Through outreach efforts to four key groups — entrepreneurs, professional advisors, corporations, and financial institutions — the Project has already: • Identified $235 million in new, permanent philanthropic commitments, translating to $697 in new assets for every dollar expended in the Project. • Personally reached over 5,350 people in the four key groups with the message of philanthropy. The Catalyst Project also has:

• Created the nation’s first start-to-finish philanthropic venture capital fund. The Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund has successfully created a capital pool of $530,000 from 13 investors, and has now enrolled five Founder/Executive entrepreneurs representing four selected pre-liquid companies as participants. Participants commit equity in their company to the Fund, and in return may draw upon the Fund to make charitable grants. When the company achieves liquidity, the proceeds of the equity are split between participants and investors, and again may be used exclusively for charitable purposes. • Launched the Entrepreneurs Partnership, an informal network of local entrepreneurs committed to philanthropy. The official kickoff event on June 14 was headlined by John Morgridge, Chairman of Cisco Systems, who shared his personal philanthropic philosophy with 87 Triangle-area entrepreneurs. • Hosted the first-ever formal discussion of corporate philanthropy in our region, led by Jim Goodmon of Capitol Broadcasting Co. (see story on previous page). • Increased the number of current and deferred assets being held in partnerships with local financial institutions to $33.5 million.

c a t a l y s t p ro j e c t c o n t r i b u t o r s The Foundation is particularly grateful to the following individuals and companies who have made commitments to the Catalyst Project. Together, their contributions total over $1.9 million. When the long-term goals of the Catalyst Project are achieved, their gifts will leverage $2 billion in additional philanthropic capital for our region. Capitol Broadcasting Co. Carol W. and Robert H. Bilbro Carolina Power & Light Co. Arthur W. Clark Joseph H. and Barbara G. Collie Foundation Sandy and Stephen D. Corman Julia and Frank A. Daniels, Jr. Margaret B. Dardess Mr. and Mrs. K.v. R. Dey, Jr. Eno River Capital Peggy and Jim Fain Bill and Ida Friday Duke Energy Corporation First Union Foundation* A.J. Fletcher Foundation* Mary and Watts Hill, Jr. George H. Hitchings† Jonathan and Mary Howes

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William and Penelope Keadey, Jr. Thomas F. Keller F.M. Kirby Foundation Anne Cone Liptzin Litho Industries, Inc. E.J. McDonald Lou and Ben McCutcheon Richard W. McEnally Peter and Prue Meehan Coolie and Thaddeus Monroe Moore Family Fund Charles B. Neely, Jr. New Ventures in Philanthropy George W. Newton Qualex, Inc. Quintiles Transnational Corp. J. Gregory Poole, Jr. Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation* Joseph J. Ruvane, Jr.†

Clyde† and Hildegard Ryals Charles and Ann Sanders Becky and Ed Spence Shannon E. St. John and Tom Barber Sara Brooks Strassle Fred Stang and Claire Lorch R. Dillard Teer Family Carolyn and Norwood Thomas Triangle Community Foundation US Trust of North Carolina Ventana Community Fund Richard T. “Stick” Williams W. Charles Witzleben Woodson Family Foundation and eight anonymous donors. † Deceased *Contributors to Philanthropy Outreach Project, predecessor to the Catalyst Project


Corporate Outreach Committee Debbie Behnke, American Airlines Jack O. Clayton, Wachovia Bank Frank A. Daniels, Jr., Retired Kathryn M. Higgins, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC Lee Johnson, Mechanics & Farmers Bank Peter J. Meehan, Greenwood Group, Inc. Henry J. Scherich, Measurement, Inc. Harvey Schmitt, Greater Raleigh Chamber of Commerce James R. Talton, Impact Nancy H. Temple, Progress Energy W. Stephen Toler, Verizon South Edwin Vick, Kimley-Horn & Associates James Walker, The Advisory Group Thomas J. White, Greater Durham Chamber of Commerce R. Peyton Woodson, Woodson Associates Entrepreneurs Advisory Committee Fred D. Hutchison, Chairman, Hutchison & Mason PLLC David Barry, Triangle Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Frank A. Daniels, III, Vital Source Technologies Monica Doss, Council for Entrepreneurial Development Chris Evans, The Deepwood Group Kip Frey, InterSouth Partners, Inc. Paul Jones, Eno River Capital John P. McConnell, A4 Health Systems William M. Moore, Jr., Franklin Street Partners Mitch Mumma, InterSouth Partners Larry Robbins, Wyrick Robbins Yates & Ponton Matthew Szulik, Red Hat Software D. Michael Warner, The Warner Foundation Josef Woodman, ProAct Technologies Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund Advisory Board Thomas F. Darden, Cherokee Investment Partners, LLC Nancy and Dennis Dougherty, InterSouth Partners, Inc. Chris and Cathy Evans, The Deepwood Group Kip and Meredith Frey, InterSouth Partners, Inc.

Fred and Nancy Hutchison, Hutchison & Mason, PLLC Paul and Karen Mayer, Fusion Ventures Peter J. Meehan, Greenwood Group, Inc. Paul J. Michaels, Michaels & Oettinger, P.A. W. Carlton Midyette Family, Carolantic Realty Mitch Mumma, InterSouth Partners, Inc. Southeast Interactive Technology Funds, (David C. Blivin, Managing Director, Representative) D. Michael Warner, The Warner Foundation, Inc. Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund Participants Cogent Neuroscience Max Wallace Nitronex Bob Lynch Avesair Kimo Kong Beth Roach Jane Foreman AlphaVax Peter Young Financial Institution Partners Bank of America BB & T CCB Centura First Union Merrill Lynch Salomon Smith Barney US Trust of North Carolina Wachovia

Mary B. Mountcastle, Center for Community Self Help Martha G. Peck, The Burroughs Wellcome Fund Professional Advisors Committee Jean Gordon Carter, Chairman, Hunton & Williams William N. Keadey, Co-Chairman, Deloitte & Touche R. Daniel Brady, Nicholls & Crampton, P.A. Madison E. Bullard, Jr., Wyrick, Robbins, Yates & Ponton, L.L.P. Craig G. Dalton, Poyner & Spruill David R. Frankstone, Higgins Frankstone Graves & Morris PA Edward Fulbright, Fulbright & Fulbright, CPA, PA R. Michael Gray, KPMG Peat Marwick, LLP Katherine McKee Henrichs, Newsom, Graham, Hedrick & Kennon, P.A. Gregory Herman-Giddens, JD, LLM, Private Practice Marcus Hudson, Bayliss, Hudson & Merritt Joseph D. Joyner, Jr., Moore & Van Allen, PLLC Maria Lynch, Lynch, Eatman & Twiddy, L.L.P Larry H. Rocamora, McPherson & Rocamora, PLLC Walter R. Rogers, Jr., Smith, Anderson, Blount, Dorsett, Mitchell & Jernigan, L.L.P Edwin J. “Jack� Walker, King, Walker, Lambe & Crabtree

Philanthropic Advisory Committee William A. Bondurant, Consultant to Foundations Tammy S. Brown, CP&L David L. Dodson, MDC Joel L. Fleishman, Atlantic Philanthropic Service Company, Inc. Marilyn Foote-Hudson, GlaxoSmithKline Foundation William C. Friday, William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust Jane C. Kendall, North Carolina Center for Nonprofits Thomas H. McGuire, Jr. , A.J. Fletcher Foundation

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fund information

dream. plan. achieve.

THE JOURNEY INTO PHILANTHROPY BEGINS WITH CONTEMPLATING YOUR DESTINATION: WHAT IS YOUR DREAM? HOW FAR DO YOU WANT TO GO? HOW DO YOU INVOLVE YOUR FAMILY ALONG THE WAY?

STEP 1: CHOOSE

THE

TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

The Triangle Community Foundation has 19 years of experience in helping donors reach their philanthropic destination. Whether travelers wish to be personally involved in choosing the path their fund will take or prefer to sit back and let the Community Foundation handle the details, the Community Foundation can help design a road map tailored to each individual, family, or company. Fundholders find the Community Foundation to be a powerful way to support the causes of importance to them, and many utilize the Foundation’s resources to become more effective in their giving, to gain additional knowledge about community needs, and to connect with other donors to more powerfully address these needs. The Community Foundation offers:

Personalized Philanthropic Services. The Foundation has particular skill in working with donors and their families to design grantmaking programs tailored to meet their values and interests.

YOUR OPTION FOR GIVING .

A fund may be established by an individual, family, corporation, or private foundation during a donor’s lifetime or by bequest. Several types of funds exist to best meet the needs of each donor. Donor-Advised Funds provide the greatest opportunity to become more strategic and involved in grantmaking. Individuals who choose the donor-advised fund option can take part in the Foundation’s Strategic Impact Grants (see next page) and can

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Geographic Flexibility. The primary focus of the Triangle Community Foundation is on the communities of Wake, Durham, Orange, and Chatham counties. However, donors may also recommend that grants from their fund go to nonprofit organizations elsewhere in the U.S. and beyond.

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Community Impact. The Foundation has expertise in identifying community needs, designing solutions, and targeting dollars for the greatest impact.

STEP 2: CHOOSE

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TO BE YOUR GUIDE .

A Charitable Legacy. Fundholders can create permanent endowments that will benefit the community for generations to come. Donors have the assurance that their legacy will continue into the future, no matter how circumstances change. Tax Benefits. As a public charity, the Community Foundation offers the highest level of tax benefits for any type of gift—cash, stocks, closely held securities, real estate, or personal property. Flexibility and Simplicity. Most funds can be established through a simple one-page governing document. The Community Foundation then handles all administrative details, from writing checks to nonprofits to providing customized financial fund statements. Cost Effectiveness. The Triangle Community Foundation pools the investment and administration of over 500 charitable funds, providing full services to each fund at a fraction of the cost of administering each separately.

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recommend grants to the charitable organizations of their choice, both within the Triangle and beyond, provided that the Foundation can confirm the charitable status of the grantees. Field-of-Interest Funds allow donors to address a cause or issue without the restriction of naming specific charities. The donor decides the purpose of the fund, such as meeting the needs of children or promoting the arts, and the Foundation identifies


projects that are effectively accomplishing that purpose over time. Unrestricted Funds are the broadest option for charitable giving. An unrestricted fund allows the Foundation to target dollars toward a wide range of community needs. Designated Funds are established by donors who wish to specify a particular charitable agency or organization to receive the proceeds of their fund.

A Supporting Organization is a type of private foundation that can be affiliated with the Community Foundation, reducing many of the administrative burdens for the donor. A number of the strict regulations and reporting hassles that affect private foundations do not apply. Donors have the added benefit of assistance from the Community Foundation’s staff with any grantmaking, financial, or administrative questions.

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STEP 3: LET THE PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES OF THE TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION BRING YOU CLOSER TO YOUR DESTINATION. The Foundation’s goal is to help people who have created funds in the Foundation achieve the full philanthropic expression of their values, increasing their satisfaction and enjoyment while targeting their grantmaking for maximum effect. To accomplish this goal, the Foundation offers services that help donors reflect upon and identify their charitable dreams, make grants that seek to fulfill those dreams, and connect them to other resources that will help increase the impact of those grants.

chosen organizations, monitors progress, and reports back to the donor to share the impact of the grant.

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By establishing a fund at the Triangle Community Foundation, donors can take advantage of the following services:

Grantmaking Support: The Foundation is constantly monitoring community needs and opportunities and is sharing them with interested donors. Strategic Impact Grants go one step further in meeting the charitable goals of donors and in having an impact on the community. The Foundation starts by working one-on-one with fundholders to outline their dreams for the community and then by identifying projects and organizations that work toward these goals. The Foundation negotiates expected outcomes with the

Philanthropic Education: “Whatever is good to know is difficult to learn.” The Foundation recognizes the challenges that arise on the road toward strategic philanthropy. The Community Foundation has initiated a program of learning opportunities — the Continuing Philanthropic Education Series — that focuses on issues such as creating a giving plan or how to involve your children in giving. The Foundation also provides site visits and van tours to help donors have more hands-on learning opportunities at local nonprofits. In addition, the Foundation encourages donors to come together to learn about and to collaborate on issues of importance to them. Tailored Philanthropic Services: The Foundation can help donors along the road to becoming more effective and strategic in their giving by meeting one-on-one with them to explore their individual passions and dreams for the community and how they can begin to address those goals. For families looking to come together around philanthropy, the Community Foundation also provides family facilitations and workshops to bring different generations together around charitable issues and to develop consensus on a charitable plan.

For more information on how we can support you on your journey to giving, contact the staff of the Community Foundation at (919) 474-8370 or info@trianglecf.org.

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new funds Donor-Advised Funds ACBC Fund: a fund established and advised by a donor who wishes to remain anonymous. Glenn and Suzanne Andrews Fund: a fund created and advised by the Andrews to fulfill their philanthropic vision for the community. Adam and Lissa Broome Charitable Fund: a fund established by the Broomes to explore and address their charitable goals. Alice and Lance Buhl Fund: a fund created by the Buhls to champion a number of causes of personal importance. Cancer Immunotherapy Research Fund: a fund created and advised by Dr. Johannes and LaDonna Vieweg to support cutting-edge cancer research. Perry Colwell Fund: a fund created by Mr. Colwell to meet a variety of community needs. Ellis and Bettsy Cowling DonorAdvised Fund: a fund created by the Cowlings as a way to use the services of the Foundation to bring additional joy and impact to their charitable giving. Craven Fund: a fund created and advised by Paul and Molly Craven as a way to fulfill their charitable goals for the community. Dougherty Family Charitable Trust Fund: a fund created by Dennis and Nancy Dougherty and advised along with their sons, Dennis Dougherty, Jr. and Charles Stubbs, as a way to involve the entire family in philanthropy. George and Mary Esser Fund: a fund created and advised by the Essers to meet a variety of charitable needs. Foreman Family Fund: a fund created by Jane K. Foreman, vice president of marketing at Avesair Inc., to address several charitable issues, with initial funding from the Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund of the Triangle Community Foundation. Four Feathers Fund: a fund created by anonymous donors to fulfill a number of charitable goals. Frey Family Trust Fund: a fund created and advised by Kip and Meredith Frey for supporting their charitable interests and involving their children in philanthropy. Greenwood Group / Manpower Charitable Fund: a corporate fund created by TCF Board member Peter Meehan, Lanty Smith, and Jeff Stocks

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of The Greenwood Group, which operates the largest U.S. franchise of Manpower Temporary Services, to address several charitable causes. B. T. Henderson, II Family Fund: a fund established in memory of B.T. Henderson, II by his family. Mr. Henderson was a partner in the law firm of Young, Moore & Henderson, where he specialized in labor and workman’s compensation law. The family will be recommending grants to a variety of charitable causes. Joan C. and Robert R. Huntley Fund: a fund created and advised by the Huntleys to explore and fulfill their philanthropic goals. Jones Family Fund: a fund created by Paul and Laura Jones to support their interests in children’s issues, education and training, and building economic opportunities, and to involve their children in philanthropy. Sarah and George Klunk Fund: a fund created and advised by the Klunks to have an impact on community needs. Kimo and Wendy Kong Fund: a fund established by Kimo Kong, President and CEO of Avesair Inc., as a participating fund of the Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund. Living Water Charitable Fund: a fund created and advised by Fate and Linda Thompson to support charitable organizations reflective of their values. Peter T. Loftin Foundation Fund: a permanent endowment, created and advised by Peter Loftin, Chief Executive Officer of BTI Telecom Corporation, to enable disadvantaged children and youth to experience artistic presentations, including presentations at the BTI Center for the Performing Arts, and for other charitable purposes. Laura Gail Lunsford Fund: a fund advised by Laura Gail Lunsford and her mother, Gillian Lunsford, as a way to support charitable causes of interest to the advisors and to utilize the expertise and community knowledge of the Foundation. Bob Lynch and Lisa van Capelle Fund: a fund established by Bob Lynch, president and CEO of Nitronex Corporation, as a participating fund of the Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund. Annette T. Marsland Fund: a fund advised by Annette T. Marsland and

her son John to use the Foundation’s resources to explore and support personal causes of interest. McCorkle Family Fund: a fund created by Wendy and Pope “Mac” McCorkle to support their active community interests. Alice Lenora McNeely Memorial Fund: a fund created and advised by donors who wish to remain anonymous. Meyer Family Fund For Compassion: a fund created by Mary and Van Meyer primarily to support Project Compassion, a community-based organization whose mission is to provide services and support to the dying and their family members. Micah Fund: an anonymous fund created by donors who wish to use the services of the Community Foundation as a way to express their faith through action in the spirit of Micah 6:8 - “What doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?” Orange County Medical Foundation Fund: a fund created by the Board of the Orange County Medical Foundation to improve the health and well being of the citizens of northern Orange County. It will support scholarships in health-related fields to graduates of northern Orange high schools and health and wellness programs in northern Orange County. Parker Family Fund: a fund created by Margaret Parker and her children, Benjamin Curtis Parker and Claire Parker Overcash, as a way to carry on the family tradition of philanthropy. The family will use the Foundation’s services to help identify charitable causes of interest. Erle and Mary Peacock Charitable Fund: a fund created and advised by the Peacocks to use the resources of the Foundation to explore their philanthropic interests and to address community needs. Plachetka Family Fund: a fund created by John and Clare Plachetka to use the Foundation’s community expertise to help them fulfill their charitable goals. Irene Rand Poole Endowment Fund: Created through the affiliation of the Irene Rand Poole Foundation with the Triangle Community Foundation, this Fund serves as a philanthropic vehicle for the interests of the J. Gregory Poole,


new funds Jr. family in partnership with the Community Foundation. Maurice and Marilyn Prevost Fund: a fund created by the Prevosts as a way to support a variety of charitable causes. Truby G. Proctor College Opportunities Fund: a scholarship created by Lee-Moore Oil Company in memory of their former CEO, Mr. Proctor. The fund will select ten eighth-grade students and follow their progress through high school, providing a scholarship award for college if they maintain their level of high achievement. Proia Family Fund: a fund created by Alan and Nancy Proia as a way to use the Foundation’s services to enhance their charitable giving. Roach Family Fund: a participating fund of the Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund established by Beth Roach, vice president of finance and operations at Avesair Inc., for her family to explore and address their charitable goals. Ross-Hadzor Fund: a fund created and advised by Susan Ross and Tom Hadzor to assist them in their active community involvement. Royalty Fund: a fund created by an anonymous donor as a way to support a variety of charitable causes. Schmitz Family Fund: a fund created in memory of Susan Schmitz Jones by her father, the late Howard Schmitz, and advised by her brother, Robert Schmitz, and her sister, Tory Morrell Schmitz. The family will use the Foundation’s services to identify charitable causes of interest to the family. Debbie Shelton Memorial Fund: a fund created in memory of Debbie Shelton by her husband Ken, her family, and friends. Shumannfang Fund: a fund created and advised by David and Barbara Shumannfang as a way to use the Foundation’s resources to have an impact on the social causes of concern to them. D. Joe and Victoria Smith Fund: a fund created by the Smiths as a way to share their good fortune from their entrepreneurial endeavors. Suzanne Carter Strassle Fund for the Arts: a fund created in memory of Suzanne Carter Strassle by Lyle and Sara Brooks Strassle to support the arts and artists in our community.

Threespokes Fund: a fund created and advised by Douglass Joyce and Colleen Zinn to fulfill a number of charitable goals. Allen and Kate Douglas Torrey Fund: a fund created and advised by the Torreys to support charitable causes of interest to them. The Vision Fund: a fund created, advised, and named by Margaret Parker because “philanthropy is rooted in a long-term vision that this world can be made a better place. The aim of Vision Fund grants is the improvement of educational, environmental, health, and housing conditions and opportunities for humankind at home and abroad.” The Community Foundation will help her meet these goals. von Windheim Family Fund: a fund created by the Jesko and Monika von Windheim as an effective and convenient method for managing their charitable contributions. Weaver Charitable Fund: a fund created and advised by Susan and Robert Weaver as a way to support a variety of charitable causes and to utilize the philanthropic expertise of the Foundation. Wellspring Fund: a fund created by Ann and Lex Alexander as a way to build upon their philanthropic traditions and to include their children in the joys of philanthropy. Wiseacre Farm Fund: a fund created by John Graybeal and Laurie Heise, owners of Wiseacre Farm in Pittsboro, as a way to meet their philanthropic goals. Women’s Wellness Fund: a fund created by the Steering Committee of the 2001 U.S. Women’s Open to support charitable causes that improve the health and well-being of women. The members of the Steering Committee serving as advisors to the Fund include Roberta Bowman, Duke Energy; Margaret Dardess, GlaxoSmithKline; Brenda Dougherty, Sprint; and Kathy Higgins, Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC. Young Family Fund: a participating fund of the Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund created by Peter Young, president and CEO of AlphaVax, Inc., as a way to involve his family in philanthropy. Youth Pro Musica Fund: a fund established to create and sustain opportunities for children to learn

Margaret Parker, The Vision Fund

DO NOT GO WHERE THE PATH MAY LEAD; GO INSTEAD WHERE THERE IS NO PATH AND LEAVE A TRAIL.

 RALPH WALDO EMERSON

The Youngs, The Young Family Fund

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new funds photo courtesy of the News & Observer

The Youth Pro Musica Fund supports choral music for children.

THE JOURNEY

IS

THE REWARD.

 TAO SAYING

photo courtesy of the News & Observer

The late William and Josephine Clement, William A. and Josephine D. Clement Endowment

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and perform choral music together so that they and their communities will enjoy the rewards of singing, and so that there will be future generations of people of varied backgrounds who are passionate about giving their time and talents as lifelong participants in local choirs. Field-of-Interest and Unrestricted Funds Community Group Houses Fund: a field-of-interest endowment created by the board of directors of Community Group Houses of NC, Inc., as its lasting legacy to the community. This nonprofit recently closed its doors after many years of successfully providing transitional housing for mentally ill patients. The Fund will provide grants to organizations serving the needs of individuals or families dealing with mental illness. James O. Duncan Scholarship Fund: a field-of-interest endowment created in memory of James O. Duncan by his wife, Ruth D. Duncan, as a lasting tribute to his spirit and life. In time the annual scholarship will be given to an outstanding Baptist student attending a divinity school program. Frank U. and Nelle Crowell Fletcher Fund: a field-of-interest endowment created through the estate of Nelle Crowell Fletcher and named in memory of Mrs. Fletcher and her late husband. The Fund will provide support for under-funded orphanages, scholarships for underprivileged people and literacy programs, especially for women. Howland - Dawson Community Endowment Fund: an unrestricted endowment created by Mary H. Dawson as a way to give something back to the community where she has lived and worked for many years. Litwack Family Endowment: a field-ofinterest endowment created by Mrs. Charlotte Litwack to assist people with basic human needs, including food, shelter, clothing and healthcare services, as well as assisting people with mentalhealth needs to purchase the medicine they need. Margot Meyer Richter Endowment Fund: a field-of-interest endowment created in memory of Ms. Richter through her Charitable Remainder Trust. The Fund will support the arts in Wake County. Ms. Richter was an active advocate for the arts, historic preservation and education.

Agency and Designated Funds William A. and Josephine D. Clement Endowment: a designated endowment fund established through a bequest from William A. Clement. The Fund provides for an annual Clement Award to a rising senior in the North Carolina Central University School of Business who demonstrates innovative leadership qualities in business. The Award honors Mr. Clement, a former NCCU trustee and strong advocate of the University for over 45 years, and perpetuates his commitment to provide mentors for young students. Meals on Wheels of Wake County Fund for the Future: an agency fund created to ensure that the citizens of Wake County will benefit from the organization’s services far into the future. Henry Miller Memorial Fund for the Wake County Library for the Wake Forest Branch: an agency fund created in memory of Henry Love Miller as a gift through Mr. Miller’s Charitable Remainder Trust. The gift from this former Mayor of Wake Forest will become part of the Wake County Public Library Fund and will support the Wake Forest Branch of the library. Morse Integrated Strategies Endowment: an endowment established by John and Libby Morse to continue their long-standing work tackling global issues that affect many communities, both here and abroad. Their fund will support Integrated Strategies Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit founded by the Morses that convenes multiple stakeholders across the world around broad issues, creates partnerships, and researches solutions to problems that affect people on every continent. Charles F. T. Nakarai Fund for Piano Competition: a designated endowment created by Charles F. T. Nakarai to support the awards for the annual Loren Withers Piano Competition sponsored by the Durham Music Teachers Association. North Carolina Grassroots Science Museum Collaborative Endowment Fund: an agency endowment created by this unique collaborative to increase the visibility and impact of North Carolina’s science museums. Emerson Waldorf School Fund: an agency fund created by the board of the Emerson Waldorf School in Chapel Hill to ensure its mission of educating children.


existing funds Donor-Advised Funds Adair Family Charitable Fund Richard Adelman and Jane Pinsky Fund Agape Fund Ajinomoto U.S.A., Inc. Fund Taylor Alexandra Albert Fund for Children Aldridge Family Endowment Alpha Delta Scholarship Fund Alpha Phi Alpha African-American Male Scholarship Endowment Fund Amazon Fund American Airlines Kids Are Something Special Funds Marcia Angle and Mark Trustin Fund Anna Family/RESOLUTE Building Companies Charitable Fund Anonymous Fund #2 Anonymous Fund #3 Anonymous Fund #4 Anonymous Fund #5 Anthony Family Fund Barber Family Funds Wade Barber Fund Becton Dickinson Research Center Fund Becton Tannenbaum Fund Bell-Blackburn Deviants from the Norm Fund Benezra Arts and Education Fund Bergman Fund Berkshire Fund Bilbro Educational Fund Donald L. and Maryann Bitzer Family Fund Blue Bird Fund Blue Heron Fund William and Gloria Blythe Fund 1994 William B. and Gloria N. Blythe Fund 1997 Borden Fund Kirk and Deanne Bradley Fund John and Katherine Bratton Fund BRB Fund Jerald A. Breitman and Stephen J. Dorn Fund Frederick P. Brooks, Jr. and Nancy Brooks Donor-Advised Fund Annalee Dale Cairns Memorial Fund John Cannon Memorial Fund CBC/WRAL Community Fund E. and E. Chanlett Fund Chantilly Fund Cistine Fund Larry and Suzanne Coats Fund Joseph H. and Barbara G. Collie Fund C. Perry Colwell/Betty J. Neese Donor-Advised Fund Ronald Gray Conrad Fund Evelyn V. Coonrad Fund Jon K. and Jane C. Cook Fund

Stephen and Sandra Corman Fund Crow Family Funds John and Louanne Crumpler Family Fund Daley Investments Fund Edgar Foster Daniels Trust Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund Julia and Frank Daniels Funds Lucy Cathcart Daniels Psychoanalytic Education Fund Teresa and Frank Daniels III Charitable Fund James E. and Margaret R. Davis Fund Lucinda Davis Fund Pam Davis Fund Arthur S. and Martha D. DeBerry Advised Fund deGrange Endowment Fund E. deGrange H. Scholarship Fund Denali Fund Deepwood Fund Ron E. and Jeanette R. Doggett Endowment Fund Durham Cerebral Palsy Foundation Fund Durham Library Fund Eclectic Chameleon Endowment Gertrude B. Elion Fund for Health Research Thomas and Ann Elleman Educational Fund Emma’s Fund H. Spencer Everett, Jr. Charitable Fund H. Spencer Everett, Jr. Family Endowment Fund Bettie Ann Whitehurst Everett Memorial Endowment Fund Fair Fund Fear Not Fund Fellowship Fund Fizz Fund Stuart Berg Flexner Memorial Fund George and Isabel Fowler Fund Michael and Cynthia Franken Fund William C. and Ida H. Friday Fund Friendship Fund Garda Funds Greg Gephart Fund Gilligan-Smiley Fund Grace Alston Glass Fund for Home Caregivers GlaxoSmithKline Special Projects Fund Golden Corral Charitable Fund James F. Goodmon Family Fund Gore Family Fund R. Wensell and Marion Norris Grabarek Fund Francis J. Grolimund and Joseph Costa Fund Stacy Guess Memorial Fund Halcyon Fund Ken and Maidi Hall Fund Hardy/Dale Fund

Robbie Hardy Endowment Fund Boyd White Harris, Jr. Memorial Fund B.W. Harris, III Family Fund Steve and Chasie Harris Fund Hartman Family Fund Clark and Karen Havighurst Fund Margaret and Carl Hibbert Charitable Fund Hil-Lev Fund Hill Family Fund William A. Hill Fund Willie B. and Bruce A. Hill, Sr. Fund George H. Hitchings Fund For Health Research and Science Education Ed S. and Mary Hayes Holmes Fund Samuel M. and Margaret U. Holton Fund Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill Endowment Fund George and Alice Horton Fund Horton-Carr Fund Patricia J. Hughes Fund Hulka Family Endowment Fund InSight Fund Brenda Jamerson Charitable Fund Jane and Jim Fund Jefferson Fund Jenny I Fund Jewish Family Fund John 3:16 Fund Orlan and Cornelia Johnson Family Fund Howard Allen Johnston Fund William and Mary C. Joslin Fund Jubilee Fund Margaret Q. Keller Endowment Allen and Pat Kelley Fund Banks and Dorothy Kerr Fund Dot and Grey Kornegay Fund Kristen Fund Roger and Beth Lamanna Family Fund Lia Fund Elizabeth and Robert Lyon Fund Margaret and Ross Macdonald Charitable Fund Robert and Christine Machemer Fund Magnolia Fund Louis and Fay Maira Scholarship Fund Isaac Hall Manning, Jr. Award for Excellence in Patient Care Fund James H. and Connie M. Maynard Fund Janet and Verne McKenzie Charitable Fund Mary Margaret McLeod Fund for Deserving Children in Lee County Mechanics & Farmers Bank Fund Peter J. and Prudence F. Meehan Fund Mesa Foundation Scholarship Fund Meyer Family Fund

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existing funds

The late Dr. Isaac Hall Manning, Isaac Hall Manning, Jr. Award

SUCCESS

IS NOT A PLACE

AT WHICH ONE ARRIVES BUT RATHER

THE

SPIRIT WITH WHICH ONE UNDERTAKES AND CONTINUES THE JOURNEY.

 ALEX NOBLE

Neighbors for Speed, NC, providing relief

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Mekye Malcolm Memorial Endowment Fund Moffitt Triangle Fund Moore Family Fund Libby and John Morse Fund Claude Morton, Jr. Scholarship Fund My Daily Health, Inc. Community Fund NationsBank Durham Advised Fund Native American Health Education (Hirschmann) Fund Neighbors for Speed, NC Fund James F. and Alice B. Newsome Endowment Fund Frances W. Nipper Fund North Carolina Jaycee Scholarship Fund Oakland Fund Pascal-Strom Family Funds Joseph S. Parker, Jr. and Loretha Brooks Parker Fund Petersen/Young Fund Peoples Security Insurance Advised Fund Phoenix Fund Poe-Smith Endowed Scholarship Fund Charles Chase Pratt Memorial Fund Nancy and Edwin Preston Fund Psychiatric Wellness Fund Caroline M. Punte Fund Qualex Inc. Fund Quintiles Gives Back Fund Joseph K. L. Reckford and Xiaomei Li Reckford Fund Rete Mirabile Fund Rickenbacker Fund Martin and Barbara C. Rodbell Fund Louise and Steed Rollins, Jr. Fund Mozette R. Rollins Fund Rotary Club of Chapel Hill Advised Funds Kenneth C. Royall, Jr. Fund Clyde and Hildegard Ryals Fund Leonard and Virginia Safrit Family Fund SALI Generations Fund Charles and Ann Sanders Fund Charles A. and Elizabeth Ann Sanders Fund Sangha Fund Scarborough-Hart Fund Schenk Fund Anthony Schomberg Fund Scott Family Endowment Fund Sethi Family Trust Fund Robert and Pearl Seymour Fund Lopa Shah Fund William W. and Jane B. Shingleton Fund Elizabeth Dodd Slight Charitable Fund Smiley-Gilligan Fund Charles Harrison Smith, III Scholarship Fund Shaler and Carolyn Stidham Fund Tim and Judy Taft Fund

R. Dillard and Mildred R. Teer and Family Fund Telemark Fund Philip “J” Thomas Memorial Endowment Phil and Travis Tracy Family Fund Triangle Orthopaedic Associates Fund Tyler/Berger Family Fund Carolyn Underwood Fund Underwood Fund VanSant Family Fund Ventana Community Funds Von Duprin Fund Margret Maria Von Holten Fund Elizabeth G. Ward Fund Michael Warner and Elizabeth Craven Fund Philip Watts Foundation Fund R. Beverly R. and Katherine W. Webb Charitable Fund Burton J. and Nan S. Weiss Fund Marvin and Dianne Welton Fund Whitton and England Fund Widmark Family Fund Wilcox-Berteel Family Fund Alice Poe and F. Carter Williams Fund Willingham Family Fund H.M. Wilson, Jr. Memorial Children’s Fund Thomas G. and Nancy L. Wilson Family Fund Thomas G. and Nancy L. Wilson Fund Thomas G. and Nancy L. Wilson Fund II Katherine and Frank Woodman Memorial Fund Woodson Family Fund Yager Fund Zawadi Education Fund Unrestricted and Field-of-Interest Funds Triangle Community Foundation Endowment Fund The Triangle Community Foundation Endowment is the lifeblood of the Foundation’s work. The Fund is a permanent endowment that supports discretionary grants to other charitable agencies and the Foundation’s continued service to the community. Margaret G. Altvater Fund For Education Robert Franklin Black Scholarship Fund Manuel, Fotini, and Otis Capsalis Memorial Endowment Donna Cederberg and John Cederberg (sister and brother) Memorial Endowment Fund Central Carolina Bank & Trust Company Unrestricted Endowment Alice F. Eure Endowment Fund Bobbie Fletcher Fund Freudenberg Nonwovens Inc. Fund Fund for Women and Girls of Durham


existing funds Jeannette A. Gates Fund Claude and Eleanor George Fund GlaxoSmithKline Endowment Fund GlaxoSmithKline Opportunity Scholarship Fund Beth Glenn Memorial Scholarship Fund Elizabeth Wade Grant Endowment Fund Hanley-McCall Fund George Watts Hill Fund Hillside Class of ‘66 Alumni Scholarship Fund Hil-Car Harris Fund George and Beverly Hitchings Endowment Fund Linda A. Ironside Fund for the Arts Thomas S. Kenan III Endowment F. M. Kirby Endowment for Corporate Philanthropy Mitsubishi Semiconductor America Inc. Community Ventures Fund John Nelson and Corinne Moreno Scholarship Fund NationsBank Leadership Triangle Endowment Fund Peter John Neal Memorial Scholarship Fund George and Mary Newton Scholarship Norburn Family Fund Optimist Club of Durham Fund Irene Rand Poole Unrestricted Endowment Mel and Zora Rashkis Endowment Fund Margot M. Richter Fund Quota Club of Durham Fund Regional Community Endowment Fund Katherine “Kay” Segee Memorial Fund Send A Kid To Camp Funds Shaver-Hitchings Scholarship Fund Faith and Arnold Shertz Fund A Southern Season Community Service Fund Asa T. And Elna B. Spaulding Endowment Fund John and Otelia Stewart Endowment Fund Claude and Adele Thomas Fund Village Companies Foundation, Inc. Fund Barrie Wallace Fund for the Arts Kathryn H. Wallace Endowment for Artists in Community Service Carl G. Ward Fund Wright Refuge Fund Designated and Agency Funds Funds Benefiting the Arc of Durham County: Arc of Durham County Endowment Fund

Michael J. and Helen C. Vassiliades Memorial Endowment Fund for The Arc of Durham County

Beryl Fund Funds Benefiting the Beth Meyer Synagogue: Frances Pasteur Kanof Adult Education Fund Jeanne Laborwitt Library Fund Daniel and Alice Satisky Scholarship Fund

Better Health Endowment Fund Alton L. Bland, Jr. Memorial Fund Funds Benefiting Broughton High School Alumni Association: Needham Broughton High School Alumni Association Fund Mial Williamson Memorial Fund

Fred and Shirley Brown Memorial Scholarship Fund Capital Area Preservation Endowment Fund Caring House Management Reserve Fund Carolinas Council of Housing, Redevelopment, and Code Officials Scholarship Endowment Fund Carver Fund for Triangle Opera Minnie E. Chandler Endowment Fund for CONTACT Durham, Inc. Chamber Orchestra of the Triangle Endowment Fund to support endowed “chairs” of the Orchestra including: The Eva Eliel Podium; Conductor The Gettes Family Chair; Concertmaster The Louella Arnold Cammack Memorial Chair: Visiting Artists The Gregory Bateson Chair: Assistant Concertmaster The Blythe Family Chair: Principal Violin II The George Ciompi Chair: Violin The Carol Boren Owens Memorial Chair: Principal Viola The Trois Edwin Johnson Chair: Principal Cello The Charles M. and Shirley F. Weiss Chair: Principal Oboe The Whitehall at the Villa Fine Art and Antique Chair: Principal Flute The Anna and Simon Schwarz Chair: Principal Clarinet The Susan Jennifer Gettes Chair: Principal Bassoon The David Lindquist Chair: Principal Trombone The Mary and James Semans Chair The Deborah and Arthur Finn Chair The Robert Ward Chair: Composition

Funds Benefiting the Chapel HillCarrboro Public School Foundation: Anne Craig Barnes Education Enrichment Endowment Fund

Chapel Hill High School/PTSA Chair in Humanities Fund Glaxo Wellcome Excellence in Teaching Science Award Fund Kaiser Permanente Math and Science Teaching Chair Fund Zora Rashkis Teaching Chair in Language Arts Fund R. D. Smith Award Fund Phyllis Sockwell Chair for Excellence in Elementary Classroom Teaching Fund Bernadine Sullivan Teaching Chair in English Fund Upper Elementary Chair for Excellence in Teaching Innovation Fund

Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA Endowment Fund C.I.S. Scholarship Endowment Fund Clara Council Fund Community Disaster Relief Fund Cornucopia House Cancer Support Center Fund Council for Entrepreneurial Development Fund Lucy Daniels Center for Early Childhood Endowment Fund Catherine A. Dugger Memorial Fund Durham Arts Council Endowment Fund Durham County Habitat for Humanity Home Building Fund Durham County Habitat for Humanity Endowment Fund Durham Day Care Council Management Reserve Fund Funds Benefiting the Durham Public Education Network: Durham Public Education Network Endowment Fund Josephine Clement Fund for Public Education John H. Lucas Family Endowment for Wellness at Hillside High School

Durham Rotary Community Fund Eno River Endowment Entrepreneurs Philanthropic Venture Fund Mark Estill Endowment for the Mary Neal Child Care Center FGB – Extra Special Super Kid Scholarship Fund Fred and Margie Fletcher Volunteer Award Fund Fletcher Performing Arts Fund Gibbs Endowment Tommy Goldberg Memorial Scholarship Fund George R. Herbert Scholarship Fund Helen E. Heusner Endowment Fund Historic Preservation Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. Endowment Fund Joel M. Hobby, Jr. Endowment for the Raleigh Rescue Mission

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existing funds

Joe Woodman, advisor to the Katherine and Frank Woodman Memorial Fund

NO

JOURNEY CARRIES

ONE FAR UNLESS, AS IT EXTENDS INTO THE WORLD AROUND US, IT GOES AN EQUAL DISTANCE INTO THE WORLD WITHIN.

 LILLIAN SMITH

Holderness Fund Allison Elizabeth Hoof Memorial Scholarship Fund Jane Joyner Endowed Scholarship Fund Junior League of Durham and Orange Counties, Inc. Endowment Fund Henry and Dorothy Lingle Kamin Endowment Fund Pat Kelley Academic Achievement Award Funds Honey Kirschbaum Memorial Fund Kate Parks Kitchin Scholarship Fund Leadership Triangle Reserve Fund Learning Together Endowment Fund Love Trust Fund fbo Chapel Hill Public Library Foundation Tammy Lynn Memorial Foundation, Inc. Endowment Fund Funds Benefiting the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Eastern North Carolina: Tiffany M. Dockery Memorial Fund Make-A-Wish Foundation of Eastern North Carolina, Inc. Endowment

Susan Ribet Martin and Grace Ribet Memorial Scholarship Fund Ruby Ennis Maynard Scholarship Fund Meals on Wheels of Durham, Inc. Management Reserve Fund Richard K. Meyer Memorial Fund for ACRA Anne Nichols Moore Endowment for the Volunteer Center of Greater Durham George W. and Mary H. Newton Endowment North Carolina Amateur Sports Endowment Fund Funds Benefiting the North Carolina Museum of Life and Science: Nora K. Nicholson Scholarship Fund North Carolina Museum of Life and Science Endowment Fund Frank Smullin Art and Technology Fund

North Carolina School of the Arts Endowment Funds Benefiting the OPC Foundation for Mental Health: OPC Foundation for Mental Health Therapeutic Summer Camp Endowment William Hollister Endowment The late Alice Eure, Alice F. Eure Endowment Fund

Planned Parenthood of Orange and Durham Counties Endowment Fund Funds Benefiting the Alice Aycock Poe Center for Health Education: Laura Bailey and Claire Elisabeth Avery Fund for the Alice Aycock Poe Center for Health Education Building Healthy People Fund

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E. K. Powe Memorial Fund L. Richardson Preyer Endowment for the North Carolina Coastal Federation Puckett-Strickland Fund Rainbow Soccer Reserve Fund Betsy B. Rollins Fund for Hunger in Durham Richard S. and Sylvia G. Ruby Fund Ruffin/Edwards Academic Development Scholarship (READS) Fund St. Cecilia Fund St. George’s Episcopal Church Organ Endowment Fund Sales and Marketing Executives of Durham Youth Education Fund Sister Cities of Durham Endowment for International Understanding Judy and Johnnie Smith Endowment Fund William Taylor-Lillie Mae Jones Fund Funds Benefiting Threshold: Threshold Endowment Fund We Are Not Alone Fund

Tobaccoland Kiwanis Fund for the Lincoln Community Health Center Funds Benefiting Triangle Hospice: Triangle Hospice Endowment Fund Katie Wallace Reserve Fund for Hospice Home

Funds Benefiting the Triangle Land Conservancy: Herman Howe and Gladys Otten Fussler Endowment Fund Logan Irvin Stewardship Fund Montrose Preservation Fund Willis Alton and Margaret Baker Reid Stewardship Fund

Triangle United Way Community Investment Fund Wake County Bar Association Foundation Fund Wake County Public Library Fund LeRoy T. Walker Endowment for the John Avery Boys and Girls Club White Memorial Presbyterian Church Outreach Fund Richard E. Whitted Fund F. Carter Williams Architectural Endowment Women in Action Endowment Fund Women’s Center Endowment Fund Benjamin Watson Woodruff Fund


george h.hitchings society THE TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION HAS ESTABLISHED THE GEORGE H. HITCHINGS SOCIETY IN HONOR OF ITS FOUNDER. THE SOCIETY RECOGNIZES INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE COMMITTED DEFERRED GIFTS (WILLS AND TRUSTS) TO CREATE CHARITABLE FUNDS IN THE FOUNDATION. THE SOCIETY REFLECTS DR. HITCHINGS’ PERSONAL PHILOSOPHY THAT “SERVICE TO MANKIND, BROADLY OR INDIVIDUALLY, IS THE ULTIMATE FULFILLMENT.” DEFERRED GIFTS TO CREATE A FUND IN THE TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ALLOW THE DONOR THE OPPORTUNITY TO PERPETUATE GOOD WORKS IN A LIVING MEMORIAL. COLLECTIVELY, THE MEMBERS OF THE HITCHINGS SOCIETY HAVE COMMITTED MORE THAN $92 MILLION IN FUTURE CHARITABLE GIFTS. THE FOUNDATION GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS WHOSE GENEROSITY WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIFE OF OUR COMMUNITIES FOR GENERATIONS TO COME. Charles and Barbara Andrews Grace Lynn Avery Tom Barber and Shannon E. St. John Clare and Walter Baum Helen Elizabeth Bell Robert H. and Carol W. Bilbro Donald L. and Maryann Bitzer Frank K. and Carolyn H. Borden John G.* and Dorothy R. Borden Henry Forest and Betty Jean R. Britt Chester W. Clark* Joseph H. and Barbara G. Collie William C. “Bud” Cowdery Edgar Foster Daniels Julia and Frank A. Daniels, Jr. Arthur S. and Martha D. DeBerry Christopher Kevin Delaney Mrs. Alberta B. Dolan John McNeely DuBose Amy F. and Monty Edge Thomas S. and Charlotte Ann Elleman Ronald A. and Elise A. Epner E. Spencer Everrett, Jr. J. Floyd Fletcher Muriel J. Fox Susan Frazier Eleanor A. George Mr. and Mrs.Benjamin K. Gibbs Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Gilles Elizabeth Wade Grant Roselyn Gurlitz Pamela Logan Harris Don and Marilyn Hartman Alycia Hassett Katherine Gordon Haworth (for the animals) Frances Wright Henderson Debbie Hill Mr. and Mrs. Watts Hill, Jr. William Hill Joel M. Hobby, Jr. Tom and Jean Hogen

Gray and Gail Hutchison Raymond Lewis Jeffries, Jr. Louise Johnson Elizabeth Dann Jones Eric E. Karnes Kelly S. King Susan B. King Randolph and Catherine Lambe Nancy W. Laszlo Anne Cone Liptzin Edwin H. and Ruth P. Mammen Jack and Mary McCall Peter and Prudence Meehan Marilyn Rand Miller-Fox (in memory of her son) Marv and Lesia Monfre Jean M. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Victor B. Moore John and Libby Morse Jan Muller Walter L. and Denise D. Newton Schooner and Julia Daniels Nowell Robert P. Nutter Erle Peacock Mimi Pearson Robert and Jean Phay Ethel Pratt Lee Nowell Radford and Garland Radford Jr. Mel and Zora Rashkis Elizabeth Marie Roberts Verne L. and Tanya Sue Roberts Carol T. Robbins Mozette R. Rollins Woodall and Margaret Rose Earl H.* and Margaret Ryan Virginia Safrit Dudley Hill Campbell Sargent Ann and Tom Schick John and Mary Louise Schwartz John Edward Segee Beverly Ann Segee Jean S. Sharp

Robert D. and Connie C. Shertz David and Barbara Shumannfang Glenn Simon Ruby Skipper Lynn Smiley and Peter Gilligan Judy and Johnnie* Smith Virginia Camp Smith Dorothy S. Stephens Gladys Ruddick Stidham Martha R. Stone Sara Brooks Strassle Lyle Strassle Ron Strom and Cathy Pascal Ron and Marilyn Toelle Jack and Carol Walker Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Ward Alice Poe and F. Carter* Williams Richard and Diane Williams Martha Hebbert Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Brooks Winborne William E.* and Joan M. Wollman Elizabeth Woodman Josef Woodman Robert M. and Patricia B. D. Woronoff Gilbert Yager And 45 anonymous donors *Deceased

If you have made a provision for the Foundation in your will or a deferred trust, please let us know so that we may include you in the Hitchings Society.

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grantmaking LAST YEAR WAS AN UNPRECEDENTED SHOW OF GENEROSITY FROM DONORS AT THE TRIANGLE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION, DESPITE THE CHALLENGES OF THE ECONOMY. OVER 2,010 GRANTS FROM DONOR-ADVISED, DESIGNATED, AND UNRESTRICTED FUNDS TOTALED $14,135,289, MORE THAN DOUBLING LAST YEAR’S RECORDSETTING $6.5 MILLION. MANY THANKS TO ALL WHO MADE SUCH A POWERFUL IMPACT ON THIS COMMUNITY AND BEYOND.

Based on the total number of grants made

Information for Community Organizations: Complete and updated information about receiving funding from the Triangle Community Foundation can be found online at www.trianglecf.org. For additional information, contact the Philanthropic Services Department at (919) 474-8370.

CONNECTING DONORS TO THEIR INTERESTS The Triangle Community Foundation’s goal is to enable donors to become more strategic and effective in their giving, to unleash their individual talents and passions for the benefit of the community. In 2000-2001, the Community Foundation worked one-on-one with several donors — exploring their interests and bringing them targeted grant opportunities that matched those interests. The stories behind these grants and the donors who supported them demonstrate the true impact that philanthropy can have on a community.

Participants in the cultural exchange trip to Mexico share their experiences with Triangle Community Foundation.

North Carolina Center for International Understanding – E. and E. Chanlett Fund and Emma’s Fund A common theme that the E. and E. Chanlett Fund and Emma’s Fund share is a desire to get to the root of problems and promote cultural understanding. When the Triangle Community Foundation shared a grant opportunity from the North Carolina Center for International Understanding, advisors to both of these funds leapt at the opportunity. The $20,000 grant paid for teachers and school administrators from the Triangle to take part in a cultural exchange to Mexico, where teachers would gain a greater understanding of the environment from which a growing number of their students came.

A postcard from a group of Chapel Hill teachers expressed the impact that these gifts were able to have on this group of educators and all of the children whose lives they will touch. “We are having an amazing experience here in Mexico. We have had many opportunities to get an inside perspective on the Mexican schools.

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grantmaking While at times we have been astounded by the lack of resources and the poverty level, other schools have impressed us with their creativity and the practical side to the their education. We have also had a chance to visit homes and talk with family members who have children in the U.S. From visiting schools and talking with teachers to seeing historical sights and staying with families, we have had an educational and cultural experience that we will never forget. We look forward to sharing what we have learned when we return to North Carolina.” North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences: Nature Fun Theater – Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund Knowing that advisors to the Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund look for unique writing and arts programs to benefit Wake County residents, staff at the Triangle Community Foundation brought an innovative grant proposal to their attention from the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The advisors to the Fund recommended a $9,000 grant to the museum to expand its Nature Fun Theater educational programming over the next year. In collaboration with Raleigh’s Flying Machine Theatre Company, the Museum will research, write, and develop six new scripts on natural sciences topics. The resulting plays will serve as pilots for more diverse and elaborate future productions in the Museum’s Nature Fun Theater performers entertain WRAL Digital Theater. This contribution from the Josephus Daniels the young audience at the North Carolina Fund allows the Museum to build on its successes in using theater as an Museum of Natural Sciences. interpretive medium for learning. “Some learn by seeing concepts, not by facts,” says Randy Bechtel, Nature Fun Theater manager. “These works — original plays written and performed by Nature Fun Theater — act as a bridge between the arts and the sciences.” Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center: Cancer Companions – Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill Endowment Fund In 1998 the Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill established a fund with the Triangle Community Foundation to utilize TCF’s expertise to accomplish their main goal: supporting programs that will greatly enhance health and health-related services for the citizens of the Triangle. One of the first grants that the Community Foundation shared with Cancer patient Linda Marwick alongside her Cancer advisors to the Home Health Endowment Fund was for the Cancer Companion, Harriet Whitehead, and a friend. Companions program at Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center. The program pairs volunteers with individuals suffering from cancer, providing weekly visits to their homes to relieve caregivers and offer outside companionship. Says one patient, “[Cancer Companions] has been an invaluable service. It has lessened my sense of isolation and provided me with much needed help — around the house and with life in general. It has certainly reduced that overwhelmed feeling a cancer patient can get trying to conduct her life and fight the disease at the same time.”

community donors. community needs

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grantmaking photo courtesy of the News & Observer

This year the Triangle Community Foundation worked proactively with donors to identify 60 promising community projects:

Carter Community School ....$5,000 Carolyn Underwood Fund

Arts Center for Documentary Studies....................................$5,000 Elizabeth Wade Grant Endowment Fund and Claude and Adele Thomas Fund

Durham P.R.O.U.D. ..............$10,000 Anonymous

Chatham County Arts Council ..................................$1,500 Scott Family Endowment Fund

Kids Voting

GIVING

FREES US FROM

Durham Public Schools ........$2,500 Quintiles Gives Back Fund

THE FAMILIAR TERRITORY

Exploris................................$10,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund

OF OUR OWN NEEDS BY

Friends of the Durham Youth Orchestra................................$5,000 Charles Chase Pratt Memorial Fund and Kathryn “Kay” Segee Memorial Fund

OPENING OUR MINDS TO THE UNEXPLAINED WORLDS OCCUPIED BY

NC Writers’ Network ............$5,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund

THE NEEDS OF OTHERS.

Raleigh Civic Symphony and Chamber Orchestra................$2,000 Quintiles Gives Back Fund

 BARBARA BUSH

Triangle Opera ....................$20,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund photo courtesy of the Herald Sun

Good Work

United Arts Council of Raleigh and Wake County ........................$2,400 Katherine “Kay” Segee Memorial Fund Young People’s Performing Company ..............................$3,000 Barrie Wallace Fund for the Arts and Claude and Adele Thomas Fund Children AMW Foundation ................$10,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund and Jon K. and Jane C. Cook Fund Big Brothers Big Sisters of Durham & Orange Counties ....................$9,000 American Airlines Kids Are Something Special Fund

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Daniels Middle School PTA ......................................$40,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund

Exchange Club’s Child Abuse Prevention Center ..................$3,750 Elizabeth Wade Grant Endowment Fund and Proia Family Fund Friends of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences ....................$9,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund Sisterhood Agenda ................$3,000 Anonymous Gift The UNITY Project ................$2,000 Bell-Blackburn Deviants from the Norm Fund YWCA of Wake County ......$12,741 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund Community Relations Common Sense Foundation ....$5,000 Michael Warner and Elizabeth Craven Fund Hispanic Liaison of Chatham County ..................$8,000 Scott Family Endowment Fund and Quintiles Gives Back Fund NC Center for International Understanding ....................$20,000 E. and E. Chanlett Fund and Emma’s Fund Triangle Community Works ....................................$4,000 Bell-Blackburn Deviants from the Norm Fund Triangle Sponsoring Committee ..........................$12,500 Emma’s Fund and Lia Fund Wildacres Leadership Initiative ................................$5,000 Four Feathers Fund


grantmaking Economic Opportunties Good Work ..........................$10,000 E. and E. Chanlett Fund

North Carolina State University/ Engineering Foundation ........$1,200 Benezra Arts and Education Fund

Glory to Glory House of Refuge ..................................$10,000 Magnolia Fund

Habitat for Humanity of Orange County ................................$10,000 E. and E. Chanlett Fund and Phoenix Fund

PC Workshop ........................$5,000 American Airlines Kids Are Something Special Fund

A Helping Hand ....................$2,400 Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill Endowment Fund

R.N. Harris PTA ....................$3,000 Charles Chase Pratt Memorial Fund

Mental Health Association of North Carolina..................................$5,000 Quintiles Gives Back Fund and Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill Endowment Fund

North Carolina State University College of Humanities and Social Science ................................$15,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund Orange County Department of Social Services ..................................$5,000 Micah Fund Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers (TROSA) ..............................$27,000 Anonymous Gift and Emma’s Fund Education All Kinds of Minds ..............$10,000 Peter J. and Prudence F. Meehan Fund Church of the Holy Family ....$7,500 George and Isabel Fowler Fund, Claude and Adele Thomas Fund, and Willingham Family Fund Duke University Department of Biology ..............................$2,100 Rete Mirabile Fund Durham Public Education Network ................................$5,000 American Airlines Kids Are Something Special Fund Horton Middle School ..........$5,000 Quintiles Gives Back Fund Lincoln Heights Elementary School........................................$700 Program Director’s Fund Little River Community Complex ..............................$10,000 Quintiles Gives Back Fund and Proia Family Fund Loaves and Fishes Ministry......$5,000 Jon K. and Jane C. Cook Fund

Environment Haw River Assembly ..............$5,400 Scott Family Endowment Fund and Wiseacre Fund NC Division of Parks and Recreation/ Jordan Lake State Recreational Area ..................$4,800 Quintiles Gives Back Fund and Program Director’s Fund Health/Human Services Alliance of AIDS Services • Carolina ..............$10,000 Magnolia Fund Carolina Legal Assistance ......$2,257 Ron E. and Jeanette R. Doggett Endowment Fund Chatham County Council on Aging ................................$4,000 Horton-Carr Fund and Anonymous Fund #3 Chatham Social Health Council ..............................$10,000 Magnolia Fund

Methodist Home for Children ..............................$25,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund Project Compassion ............$10,000 Michael Warner and Elizabeth Craven Fund SAFEchild ..............................$6,995 Underwood Fund and Quintiles Gives Back Fund Threshold ..............................$6,000 Quintiles Gives Back Fund and Charles Chase Pratt Memorial Fund UNC School of Social Work / Family Advocacy Project $30,000 Phoenix Fund and Peter J. and Prudence F. Meehan Fund Urban Ministries of Raleigh ................................$10,000 Josephus Daniels Charitable Fund

Duke Cancer Patient Support ..................................$2,033 Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill Endowment Fund

Through the Foundation’s Strategic

Family Violence and Prevention Center (FVPC) of Orange County ..................................$3,000 Scott Family Endowment Fund and George and Isabel Fowler Fund

explore their passions and goals

Friends of the Chapel Hill Senior Center ..................................$5,500 Home Health Foundation of Chapel Hill Endowment Fund and Quintiles Gives Back Fund

become involved, call Beverley

Impact Grants, donors can work with staff members at TCF to and find community projects that can help make these dreams a reality. For more information or to Francis at (919) 474-8370 ext. 126 or email Beverley@trianglecf.org.

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scholarships ’00-’01 Alpha Delta Scholarship Fund ..............................$3,600 total Andrew Gunter, Scott Thorpe, Anastase Vonsiatsky Benezra Arts and Education Fund ..............................$5,000 total Lakeshia Pridgen, Nicholas Phillips The Bilbro Education Fund Teaching Excellence Award....................$3,500 William Morgan Robert Franklin Black Community Leadership Scholarship ..........$2,000 Jessica Faison, Ryan J. Towner Joseph H. and Barbara G. Collie Fund ......................................$2,000 Kathy Lynn Green Tommy Goldberg Memorial Scholarship ......$379 — one week of camp at Camp Kanata Mark Chasten Stacy Guess Outstanding Musician Scholarship ............................$1,000 Elise C. London E. deGrange H. Scholarship Fund ............................$11,200 total Amy Azzolino, Elizabeth Eubanks, Brandi Farrell, Nashateria (Nikki) Harris, Natalie Howard, Shauntell Kenion, Crystal McMillan, Veronica Salas Hillside Class of ‘66 Alumni Scholarship................................$500 Candice Monara Fuller Allison Elizabeth Hoof Memorial Scholarship ............................$2,000 Yoon Hie Kim The Linda A. Ironside Fund for the Arts ........................................$1,000 Sandra Jacobi Pat Kelley Achievement Award ..$775 to attend Green River Preserve Camp Rebecca Langstaff Kate Parks Kitchin Scholarship..............................$1,500 Claire Lise Herminjard Louis and Fay Maira Scholarship Fund ..............................$1,150 total Robert Perra, William Jordan, James Nordan, Kristy Ulrich Isaac Hall Manning, Jr. Award for Excellence in Patient Care Fund ............................ $2,000 total Direct Patient Care Award: Faye G. Trilling; Support Services Award: Jeffrey Jones Native American Health Education Fund ............................$11,500 total Shonna Dominguez, Aaron Begay, Cheryl Lynn Jones, Oleta Chavis

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Pendergraft, Krista Marie Wadley, Stormy L. Hulit, Edgar Villanueva, Rhiannon Clark, Nicolle Gonzales, Melanie J. Keams, Crystal von Hoskie, Racheal Lynn James, Yolanda Lynn Johnson, Florina Esplain, Georgia Lynn Tsingine, Samuel Daily, Darlene S. Vandever, Thalia James, Jennifer Jane Gilmore Needham Broughton High School Alumni Association Scholarship ..........................$2,000 Kaylor Russell George and Mary Newton Scholarship ............................$1,000 Erin Engler Nora K. Nicholson Scholarship Fund ................................$600 total one full week of camp and extended day care at the Museum of Life and Science Ben & Olivia Peters, Christopher Andrews Joseph S. Parker, Jr. Award ......$500 Khalilah Latrice Myers North Carolina Jaycee Foundation Scholarships ..........................$2,400 Staci Dawn Leonard, Aaron Joachim, Jessica Gray Eaton, David Kearns Susan Ribet Martin and Grace Ribet Memorial Scholarship ............$1,000 Kaitlin Anne Riemen The Rotary Club of Chapel Hill Advised Fund ................$4,000 total Jennifer and Karen Galassi, John Huang, Emily Kuty Shaver-Hitchings Scholarship....$1,500 Wendell John Charles Harrison Smith, III Scholarship ............................$5,000 Caroline C. Saxton Kathryn H. Wallace Endowment for Artists in Community Service Award ........................................$800 Marilyn Chappell, Holly Springs School of Dance Philip Watts Foundation Scholarship ............................$1,000 Caroline C. Saxton Richard E. Whitted Scholarship ..$500 Matthew V. Compton Mial Williamson Memorial Scholarship ............................$1,500 Michael Morell Benjamin Watson Woodruff Citizenship Award..................$1,000 Ashley Dutch

Marilyn Chappell of the Holly Springs School of Dance, recipient of the Kathryn H. Wallace Endowment for Artists in Community Service Award

Caroline Saxton, recipient of The Charles Harrison Smith III Scholarship, pictured with Sandra and Charles Smith, Jr.

The GlaxoSmithKline Opportunity Scholarships recognize Triangle-area residents who have overcome significant adversity in life and demonstrate a desire to improve their lives through education. From over 120 applicants, the following were chosen to receive scholarships in 2001: Denise Duncan received $9,000 to attend NCSU’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences; Lisa Norwood received $3,000 to attend the NCCU nursing program; Randolph Scott received $2,500 to attend UNC-CH in the Continuing Studies Program; Jodi Tompkins received $8,000 to attend NCSU to study horticultural science; Noralva Torres received $9,000 to attend the ECU nursing program; Abdi Warsame $4,200 to attend Wake Technical Community College; Shelia Webb received $13,000 to attend Shaw University.


financials The Triangle Community Foundation’s primary financial goal is to develop and carefully manage permanent philanthropic endowment for the benefit of the communities of Wake, Durham, Orange, and Chatham counties in North Carolina. During the 19 years of its existence, the Foundation’s assets have grown from an initial contribution of $1,000 to over $85 million in 532 funds, over $56 million of which is permanent endowment. The remaining portion of the Foundation’s assets is held in non-endowed funds that can be par-

The careful stewardship of the Foundation’s funds is a critical responsibility of the Board of Directors. The Foundation’s Finance Committee, appointed by and reporting to the Board of Directors, has immediate oversight of all aspects of the Foundation’s financial management, including investment policy, guidance, and review. The committee is comprised of community leaders with specific experience and expertise in financial management and investments (please see listing on page 5). The Foundation’s goal is to earn a reasonable return on its investments while maintaining a diversified, high-quality portfolio with below-average risk of significant capital depreciation. Its investment policy, established and periodically reviewed by the Finance Committee, utilizes

two thousand & one

tially or fully expended.

prudent investment strategies tailored to the unique needs of its charitable funds. For nonendowed funds, this requires limiting the risk of capital depreciation and severe periodic volatility, primarily through the use of fixed-income investments. For endowment funds, the investment policy is designed to provide adequate current funds for charitable distribution as well as generate growth sufficient to maintain the real value of a fund’s principal balance and grantmaking capability over time. This is accomplished through a carefully balanced portfolio of both equity and fixed-income securities and through the Foundation’s total return spending policy. The Foundation currently follows a targeted endowment investment asset allocation of 65% in equity securities and 35% in fixed income securities. The Foundation employs professional investment management firms, which the Finance Committee selects and reviews regularly. The Foundation’s core endowment investments are currently managed by Independence Investment Associates, NewSouth Capital Management, The Vanguard Group, and The American Funds Group. In addition to these investment relationships, the Foundation also maintains financial partnership relationships with the following institutions: Bank of America Branch Banking & Trust Co. Central Carolina Bank Centura Bank First Union National Bank of North Carolina

Merrill Lynch Trust Company of North Carolina SalomonSmithBarney US Trust Company of North Carolina Wachovia Bank, N.A.

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Triangle Community Foundation, Inc. Statement of Financial Position as of June 30, 2001 Assets Cash and cash equivalents.................................................................... $619,388 Investments ......................................................................................$68,569,696 Real estate held for resale ......................................................................$640,160 Receivables........................................................................................$14,611,245 Land and building (net of depreciation) ..............................................$986,892 Office furniture and equipment (net of depreciation) ............................$64,634 Total Assets ......................................................................................$85,492,015 Liabilities and Net Assets Accrued expenses .................................................................................. $65,135 Grants payable ...................................................................................... $135,605 Assets held on behalf of other organizations .................................. $13,269,394 Net assets ........................................................................................ $72,021,881 Total Liabilities and Net Assets ...................................................... $85,492,015

Statement of Activities for the Year Ended June 30, 2001 Support and Revenues Contributions .................................................................................. $12,588,979 Interest, dividends and other income ................................................$2,710,829 Investment gains (losses)..................................................................$(3,083,553) Total Support and Revenues ............................................................ $12,216,255 Expenses Grants, philanthropic services and special projects ........................ $14,607,227 Supporting services: Fund management.......................................................................... $51,828 Administrative/indirect charges .................................................. $456,820 Development expenses ..................................................................$170,115 Total expenses ..................................................................................$15,285,990 Other loss ................................................................................................$61,187 Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle .................... $12,087,227 Support and Revenues in Excess of Expenses (after accounting change)* .......................................................... $(15,218,149) Net Assets, Beginning of Year ..........................................................$87,240,030 Net Assets, End of Year ................................................................$72,021,881 *Beginning in 2001, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 136 requires that funds held for the benefit of other charitable agencies be reflected as obligations of Triangle Community Foundation and as a reduction of net assets. For more information, you may request a copy of our 2000-01 audited financial statements by calling (919) 474-8370.

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2001 Annual Report