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Julian Richardson Certificate in Landscape Design Portfolio

June 2012 julianrich@hotmail.com / julianrich.blogspot.co.uk / 07834 621676


Contents The following pages provide an overview of the work completed from October 2011 - May 2012, as part of the Certificate in Landscape Design at the University of Greenwich. Examples of work cover the following disciplines:

01 Site Design II 02 Planting Design 03 Design With Nature 04 Ecology & Conservation 05 Site Design I


01 Site Design II - Site Analysis: Portland Place


01 Site Design II - Concept Development: Portland Place


01 Site Design II - Concept Development: Portland Place


SECTION A-A @ 1:200

01 Site Design II - Concept Refinement


A group exercise leading from initial site investigation to the production of a research document -‘The Line’. The Line is the southerly walk from Primrose Hill to Horse Guards Parade and the document records the 4D experience. For my part, I investigated cross-section feel, spatial proportion and enclosure, focusing on expressing these landscape elements as a 4th dimensional experience.

01 Site Design II - Site Survey Document


X- Sectional Feel / Enclosure : Diminishing Skyline

Primrose Hill Horizontal Vista

Regents Park / Portland Place / Regents Street Formalised with vertical interventions

Oxford Circus / Carnaby Street / Piccadilly Circus / Regents St. Enclosed, multi-directional interventions (4D)

Horse Gurads Parade.... ‘natural conclusion’ Balanced, all landscape elements in the scene

The cross sectional feel along the line is dictated by the diminishing skyline. At Primrose Hill we are presented with a vista where London’s landmarks are sandwiched on the horizon by the sky and foreground - the sky is the dominant ‘horizontal’ landscape element. Walking south along the line, the sky is ‘edited out’ as vertical landscape elements create a more intense sensory,‘4D’ experince. In the West End, the build environment is upon us and we are no longer aware of the sky.

01 Site Design II - Site Survey Document


Spatial proportion : Enclosure

Primrose Hill - horizontal pressure + sky / - urban

Regents Park - vertical connections + planting / + built environment

Argyll Street - vertical enclosure + built environment / - sky

4D Pressure There are some fundamental proportional changes to understand - for example the change in ratio of avenue width verses building height must be appreciated at different points along the line. At Primrose Hill we percieve an open vista, an uninterrupted perhipheral view. From Regents Park to the West End vertaical forms intensify, our peripheral vision is narrowed leading to a truly 4th dimensional experience. 4D Pressure Primrose Hill - 4th diemnsional pressure + people, buldings, traffic / - sky

01 Site Design II - Site Survey Document


X- Sectional Feel / Enclosure : 4D textures

Piccadilly Circus in 4D

Primrose Hill - foreground and background pressure

Arriving in the West End, the transition from open vista to enclosed city scape is complete. The experience is textured in 4 dimensions and therefore multi-sensory

Piccadilly Circus - 4D pressure

01 Site Design II - Site Survey Document

Traffic

Noise

Smell

Touch

Buildings

People


The Big Idea: A New Urban Grid on Portland Place

Site surveyed

Analysis

Haring as the antithesis

Mega to Macro in 4D

Create asymmetry Dynamic, human, connected

Deconstruct existing urban grid Reconstruct a new urban grid

The site design is a landscape project that challenges the linear formality and conservatism of Portland Place - deconstructing the historic urban grid and revealing an new alternative urban grid and challenging the space. In Portland Place the buildings are dominant, landscape is secondary - the scheme fights back, liberating and reclaiming space and creating a new space called ‘Portland Space’. The scheme deconstructs the existing materiality and reapplies the material elements in a design that physically connects the void between the buildings and current public space, while creating a thought provoking landscape for the public to enjoy.

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation


Site Selection on the Portland Place Urban Grid

30_03_12

RIBA

The Green Carpet dictating the dynamic flow of vistors to the site and Planting intervention Portland Place model - site identified

‘Green Carpet’

‘Intervention’

‘Green Carpet’

04_05_12 The sequence of photographs illustrates the site developement after the Totem scheme was rejected. A more dymanmic, purposeful scheme that fills the space; interventions that connect voids and in particular the junction between Portland Place and Weymouth Street.

04_05_12

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation

Portland Space ‘Intervention’

Portland Space ‘Center Garden’


Deconstruction of the Urban Grid 15:00_ 24_04

Shadow Play: Amplification of the Intervention The sequence of photographs illustrates the site development looking specifically at how shadow serves to amplify the intervention at Portland Place. Shadow will be a vital tool in creating connections within the site between existing physical structures (shadow reaching across roads and buildings) and the people visiting (connecting stepping into the shadow ‘physically’ places the individual in the design).

The New Grid Juxtaposing against the existing, regimented Portland Place urban grid. Reaching across and cutting through. The grid spans Weymouth Street concluding with a planting intervention at the junction of Portland Place, adjacent to RIBA.

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation


User Experience

View Key

3

1

1/2

4

The grand entrance - the easterly approach to Portland Place from Weymouth Street. The lush Fern Terrace provides a

N

dramatic vista, an antidote to the bland, monochromatic palette that is Portland Place. The user is guided through the garden via a matrix of mosses and grasses forming a ‘green carpet’. The layout of the green carpet is setout on a grid made up of red glass pavers - this can be illuminated at night to provide way finding and dramatic atmospheric colour.

3 Heading south past RIBA - the center garden provide a green link, while the interventions on the junction is a inconvenience. The awkwardness of the location is an anarchic response to the regimented order in Portland Place.

2

Planting Rationale

Planting rich, lush ferns, grasses and mosses to create a ‘green wedge’ at the junctions of Portland Place and Weymoth Street - truly an antidote to the restricted Portand Place palette. Equally, a mosiac of grass and mosses will be incorpoarted in to the Green Carpet. Suggested plants as follows: Ferns, Polypodium vulgare, Blechnum spicant, Sedums and Sphagnums. Hosta ‘Devon Green’

4 Sphagnum flexuosum

Sphagnum capillifolium

Sphagnum Moss

Soleirolia soleirolii

Metteuccia struthiopteris

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation

Blechnum spicant

View north westerly towards the Centre Garden.


Interactivity & Immersion

View Key

7

8

6

N

5

Interactivity & Immersion: Texture, shadow and reflection, provide a

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truly 4th dimensional intervention

E

View easterly towards the

A

Centre Garden, with the junction intervention hidden behind.

8 Walking between the terraces provides a truly 4D landscape experience. Reduced noise, physical texture and a micro-climate dictated by external weather conditions. The visitor is removed from Portland Place by the landscape elements for that moment in time.

Materiality as 4D Amplifier A - Tooled limestone: texture, colour stain over time B - Polished brass: reflection, patina C - Polished stone: Cold to the touch, smooth D - Limestone: texture, absorbency (sound, and colour)

6

7

Visitors interaction with the Fern Terrace - the awkwardnesses of the

The Centre Garden is a terraced garden and for special occasions

location forces the flow of people therefore forcing the interaction.

functions can be held in the roof top space. The surfaces of the structure

The first terrace is 2M in height, so human scale and accessible. The

mimic the material of Portland Place. Tooled limestone can be a

surface is heavily tooled limestone in homage to the current materiality

community art project. On the east and west face highly polished brass

in Portland Place. This will stain and weather as the garden moves

reflect the surrounding to bend and distort the ordered nature of the site.

with the seasons.

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation

E - Glass: reflection, absorbency (sound, and colour)

B

C

A

D

E


Exploded View

Illuminated glass block grid

Planting - Sphagnum moss, sedums Planting - mosses and grasses Planting - ferns and grasses

Planting - ferns and tall grasses

Marble planter Glass planter Polished brass planter Tooled limestone planter

Green carpet

Viewing platform for centre garden Green carpet grid - cut into road, denoted by red glass blocks (illuminated at night) Planting - ferns and grasses

Materiality Material elements for the scheme are taken from the actual materiality of the site. A response to the current austere, sombre Portland Place experience - materiality deconstructed and reconfigure to inspire a tactile, 4D experience. The grid is illuminated at night to provide different sensory experience and to amplify the planting scheme.

Tooled limestone panel Coloured glass panel

Tooled limestone panel Polished brass panel

Centre garden

Illuminated glass grid

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation


Fern terrace

Fern terrace

Fern terrace

66 Portland Pl.

Fern terrace

Center garden

47 Portland Place

SECTION A-A @ 1:200

Fern terrace/marble planter

49 Portland Pl.

Fern terrace/glass planter

Fern terrace/brass planter

SECTION B-B @ 1:100

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation

Centre garden - glass planter/limestone

47 Portland Place


Challenging the Urban Grid

DP

N TLA POR

A

B

E

LAC

RIBA

49 A

B

66 KEY T

REE

ST UTH

Planting - sphagnum moss, ferns

YMO

WE

Planting - grass carpet

47

Existing trees Centre garden Grid extending through the landscape Planting grid - lit at night

01 Site Design II - Final Presentation

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SITE PLAN @1:200 0M

10

20

30


02 Planting Design - Concept Development


02 Planting Design - Sketch Development


02 Planting Design - Planting Schematic


02 Planting Design - Planting Plan


C A

BEFORE

AFTER

C

B

B

A

03 Design with Nature - Chislehurst Common: Masterplan


BEFORE AFTER

2

Prick End Pond boardwalk, north-easterly access - Protected pond margins Illustrating the woven salix barrier and protected margin to the south west.

3

View south across the common, towards Rush Pond - Traffic management

4

South-westerly corner of Rush Pond - ‘Deadwood sulpture park’ Taking advantage of the damp, shady conditions at Rush Pond

Planting of species rich hedgerow to act as traffic calming and natural barrier against traffic noise pollution. Also acts as important ecotone and

Mixed planting of Cornus/Salix spp.

habitat for fauna.

Provides community projects (weaving and coppicing), aswell as glorious winter colour. Deadwood sculpture as community/education pursuit, while providing habitat value for flora and fauna

03 Design with Nature - Chislehurst Common: Before and Afters


Revealed water Functioning borehole at Rush pond feeding underground stream, revealed at points on the common to reinforce genius loci.

Prick End Pond Reshaped to create sacrificial amenity zones and protected marginal shallows. Woven Salix barrier between zones.

Amenity grassland Planted with hedgerow as a barrier traffic and habitat.

Road

Coppiced woodland glade Cornus / Salix spp. winter garden (winter colour display).

Existing woodland

School/residential Anemity grassland.

Towards Cockpit Summer meadow.

SECTION A-A @ 1:1000

Woodland edge Insect hotels and deadwood.

Road

Woodland habitat creation Bat boxes and insect hotels, possible bee hives in secluded areas.

Rush Pond Cornus / Salix spp. winter garden (winter colour display).

Deadwood sculpture garden Extra Cornus and Salix spp. planted with deadwood as a community project.

Community garden Raised beds, soft fruit shrubs and orchards.

SECTION B-B @ 1:1000

Prick End Pond Sacrificial zone for duck feeding and public interaction.

Prick End Pond Boardwalk allowing interaction supervised with shallow margins for diverse habitat creation. Marginal planting.

Road (with hedge) Natural barrier against noise pollution.

New hedgerow Natural barrier and ecotone habitat link.

Fruit trees (community orchard) Educational zone for local school and amemity for local community.

SECTION C-C @ 1:500

03 Design with Nature - Chislehurst Common: Sections

Woodland glade Shaped and maintained shrub/tall herb margins revealing open meadow, graduating to closed canopy.


04 Ecology & Conservation - Railway Land, Lewis


‘Memorable Rhythms’- The Big Idea Site observed

Captured moments

Memory banks

Idea extracted

Memory pool

This project is inspired by memory. The installation is a ‘network’ that spans the site, linking the sea to the land. It is a disruptive influence with interventions (Memory Banks) that a serve to amplify the Greenhithe experience the visitors to the site. The project is about amplifying the sensory experience.

05 Site Design I - Greenhithe, Kent

Concept abstrated

Connections


‘Memorable Rhythms’ - Look and Feel

Ephemera

Time

Sensory

Rhythm

Memorable

‘Memorable Rhythms’ is arrangement in space - strongly affected by time and weather. This allows the installation to slowly detach itself from it’s intrinsic meaning and to let form, typography and composition take over. The landscape becomes malleable and memorable, thus creating a multitude of meanings for the observer. The installation aims to amplify the sights and sounds of Greenhithe providing a truly multi-sensory, and therefore memorable experience

05 Site Design I - Greenhithe, Kent


‘Memorable Rhythms’ - Concept Models

05 Site Design I - Greenhithe, Kent


‘Memorable Rhythms’ - User Experience Approaching the installation the Memory Banks link the land and estuary

4 3

5

67

1

1

2

3

Eye level approach illustrate the rhythm of the istallation in the landscape

4

The user can physically interact with the Memory Bank - the sensory experience in therefore amplified

6

8

2

Memory Banks intersect the landscape extending the panorama thus amplifying the site experience

Views

7

5

8

Memory Banks cutting through the pathway, intersecting the flood area ‘knitting’ the landscape together

Memory Banks provide the user with lines of sight relevant to the larger landscape

05 Site Design I - Greenhithe, Kent

On the walk home the Memory Banks form a dramatic, dynamic, panorama that truly reinforces the Memorable Rhythm experience


‘Memorable Rhythms’ - Context & Materiality Starting point. The first Memory Bank

Memory Banks provide the user with lines of sight relevant to the larger landscape

1

1 The first, third and fifth Memory Banks are illuminated at night as way finding. Orange coloured in sympathy with the Greenhithe palette

2

2 Artwork etched into concrete ‘takes’ copper verdigris colour over time 3 Heavily tooled concrete Memory Banks ‘take’ colour from the elements 4 Copper plinth, denote start/end point. Acts as furniture and metaphor Memory Banks provide the user with lines of sight relevant to the larger landscape

3

1

05 Site Design I - Greenhithe, Kent


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