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Jose Gerardo Ponte Neto Portfolio

M.S.Architecture and Urban Design Columbia University


JOSE GERARDO PONTE NETO jgp2135@columbia.edu 312.8879717 https://issuu.com/jponteneto

EDUCATION

207 W 80th Street, 10024. New York, New York.

Columbia University

Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design

Delft University of Technology (TU Delft)

Academic exchange student “Farm Blocks” Course supervision by Winy Maas | MVRDV

Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) B.Arch Graduated | May - 2016

University of Fortaleza B.Arch Incompleted Later transferred to IIT

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

Urban Urge Prize

The prize is a seed grant to fund a physical and/or programmatic intervention that grows out of work and research from the Fall Semester regional studio.

Dean’s List Student for Academic Excellence Nomination Louis Vuitton Spark Award

Farm Blocks Studio Project named by the professor to compete for the LV Spark Award. A partnership between Louis Vuitton and the city of Chicago deliver this award to an innovative architecture project done by students, based on the theme Metropolis.

New York - New York May 2017 - May 2018 Delft - Netherlands August 2014 - December 2014 Chicago - Illinois August 2012 - May 2016 Fortaleza - Brazil August 2008 - June 2012

Columbia University Fall 2017 Illinois Institute of Technology Fall 2015 and Spring 2016

Illinois Institute of Technology Fall 2014

International Scholarship IIT College of Architecture WORK EXPERIENCE

ReCS Architects

Architectural Designer and Draftsman Develop ideas and drawings for social smart city in Brazil. Drawings include concept hand drafts, floor plans and 3D images done in Revit.

Fortaleza - Brazil October 2016 - April 2017

Work on concept design phase for mixed-use building in China.

Nasser Hissa Associated Architects

Architectural Intern and Draftsman Work directly with Architect to develop construction drawings for a resort project. Use of AutoCad for the drawings.

Fortaleza - Brazil January 2012 - July 2012

DAA - Delberg Associated Architects Architectural Intern and Draftsman Assistant for concept design phase. Site visits and research.

LEADERSHIP

Fortaleza - Brazil July 2010 - December 2010

Teaching Assistant Urban Design Assistant

Organization, research, course preparation, archiving and other program-related work

PROFESSIONAL SKILLS

Sofware

Revit, AutoCad, Rhino, SketchUp, ArcMap, QGIS, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, MS Office, AfterEffects, Premiere, Hand Drawing.

Languages Fluent Portuguese, High Proficiency in English, Regular Proficiency in Spanish.

Columbia University Spring 2018


Content Urban Design Reclaiming the Gulf

Academic work - Columbia University | Pg.01

Energy Bank

Academic work - Columbia University | Pg.15

120th Street, an active corridor for students

Academic work - Columbia University | Pg.21

Food City for Low-income Residents

Academic work - Illinois Institute of Technology | Pg.25

Architecture Mixed-use Building Complex

Professional Work - ReCS Architects | Pg.29

Good Space Studio

Academic work - Illinois Institute of Technology | Pg.31

Renovation of Harold Washington Library

Academic Work - Illinois Institute of Technology | Pg.37


Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Reclaiming the Gulf Columbia University 2018 Spring Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Meng Li, Onejae Lee, Noor Malik

Aqaba is the only coastal city in Jordan with an outlet to the Red Sea. Under the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority (ASEZA), the city has adopted a model of gulf urbanism often described as “Dubaization” in hopes to emerge as a regionally as well as globally recognized city. With continuous privatization of the waterfront coast for luxury developments and reliance on foreign investment, Aqaba is at risk to develop into an unsustainable model of growth.

Our project envisions to reclaim its productive landscapes within the existing fabric of Aqaba city. By engaging once again, the fishing and farming economies in Old Town, this project envisions to re-establish the lost relationship of Aqaba’s local communities with its land and the Red Sea. With continuous privatization of the waterfront, local fishermen and farming communities have been marginalized and displaced for many decades.

Combined Proposed Framework Drawing

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

I Syria

Ferragina, Eugenia. "The Effect of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict on the Water Resources of the Jordan River Basin." Global Environment 2 (2008): 152–170.

Yarmouk River Unity Dam

Wadi Arab

I I

I I

I I I

Iraq

Dams

Irbid

Water Infrastructure Cities

Ziglab

Basins

Mafraq

King Abdullah Canal

Disi Aquifer Wellfield

Zarqa River

King Talal

Highlands Khirbet as-Samra Treatment Plant

Zarqa

Zai Water Treatment Plant Dabouq Holding Station

I I I

n si ty Ba ea r Tr ve e ri ac n Pe da or an II J rd lo Jo he t t Os le e en ur of 95 ra em ct l 19 Is re ru ro Ag St nt 94 n co n 19 lo io Os ok la at rt To Go 93 vi ve 19 de el ng di b ra yi to ra Is up A c r an i e ar oc r ie pl an th -w h Wa a asb arr s st ug y C mb Po ro da th H bo th xwi the ter d Si my Wa on nd e Ar 67 sp a nal th i 19 o re as n el i s ny ati ra N ie Ba ed Is , s tr e lt an 67 it un th su pl een 19 co of re es t on tw et ab s i st be Ar ter mpl d hn s an ons co 64 wa Jo on 19 he d, si e si el t se en th ten ra fu t s Is e t re of en lv 64 s n es so 19 of e wa io t pr re on th an ca es to ti t Pl ifi at e uc er 55 ns St iv tr iv t 19 te ns d ed na in co to it ar es e ” Un alt tri th ier 55 n un ns rr 19 a co gi Ca an as e be er ord th el at J ra w he Is nal f t 53 io o 19 Nat ers “ at w

No hypothesis for the allocation of the water of the Jordan basin can be put forward as long as water is used as a means to put pressure on rivals, and as long as deep inequalities in access to water continue to exist between Israel and the other countries of the basin. A new negotiation strategy employing impartial mediators is called for.

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Arab Gas Pipeline

Amman

Karama

New Abu Alanda Reservoir 150,000 m3

Shueib Kafrein

Turn out to Madaba

Palestine

Madaba

Existing Abu Alanda Reservoir 12,000 m3

Waleh

Mujib

Discharge Diffuser Turn out to Karak Karak

Israel

Tannour Hydropower Plant Turn out to Tafila

Tafila

325 km Pipeline 1 Billion investment operation and maintenance of facilities for 25 years

Desalination Plant Hydropower Plant

Desalination Plant

Dead Sea

Hydro Power Plant

Dead Sea

Reservoir

Ma’an

Disi Aquifer 55 wells

Wellfield Pump station and Collector reservoir

100 Million Cubic M of fossil Water (Non-Renewable)

Disi Aquifer Desalination Plant

I

Disi Wells - 600m-700m al-Mudawwara

Intake Pumping Station -430m

Sea Level

1000m

Aqaba

1050m 975m 900m 825m 750m 675m 600m 525m 450m 375m 300m 225m 150m 75m

Geopolitical Analysis of Jordan Water resources

I

Turn out to Ma’an

Regulation Tank

Red Sea

Pipeline

40% of water lost in leakege and informal tapping

Water Intake Pump

Red Sea

Chemical Process

High-sulfate concentration

Crystalization of Gypsum

High Soluble Gypsum concentration

Amman

Flow Control Station

I I

I I

II

Disi Wellfield Area

I

I I

Saudi Arabia

I

0m

-75m

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It is unlikely that the pumping race between Saudi Arabia and Jordan will ever lead to an open conflict. The two countries have only recently shown a will to collaborate in the management of their shared resource, however, they still do not publicly communicate or exchange


Work Sample Academic

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jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Shrinking of Local Fisherman Economy due to Privatization of Waterfront


Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Aqaba’s tourism is taking over Local economies

We propose a sustainable development for Aqaba supported by local activities

Aqaba flourished as a fishing village and was for a long time a gateway for pilgrims and travelers going to Saudi Arabia and vice versa. Since the establishment of the Special Economic Zone in 2001, Aqaba has experienced an influx of foreign direct investment, most visible in luxury housing developments, often only used as second or third homes. These developments have proven to be unsustainable in their economic value as they bypass the local economies. In addition, their existence have caused the displacement of entire neighborhoods and communities, most visible in Old Town.

Aqaba’s port and industrial activities along the shore has generated notable damage to the ecology of the Red Sea, mainly affecting the ecosystem of the coral reefs, upon which the fishing habitat and tourism relies heavily on. In order to visualize the current model of development, we have identified and mapped the vulnerabilities and dependencies of Aqaba in the diagram below

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

To test our framework, we selected Old Town as it offers opportunities to implement our design strategies. Old Town has an existing informal farming ground and a waterfront fishing boats marina. Further, Old Town has a water canal that runs off the rainwater from the hills to the sea. Furthermore, housing in this part of the city has been neglected and mostly abandoned which has caused houses to deteriorate over time.

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These houses are mostly used by the low income groups, consisting of locals and labour workers. Old Town is one of the last communities that will be displaced due to the new “Marsa Zayed” luxury development just south of the site and “Al-Hafayer Development” project slated to replace the farming and marina on the waterfront

What if, we could decentralize the water network to enhance the growth of farming and create new prospects for old town housing?

Existing economies and flow of goods in Old Town

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Drawing that represents water and land as one landscape with no boundaries


Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

Our design strategy starts by identifying key actors within the city of Aqaba namely, fishermen, farmer, the marine science station, the fishermen association as well as ASEZA. By creating complementary relationships between these actors, we aim to initiate a new pattern of growth that relies on Aqaba’s local resources rather than depending on global investment. As the fishermen and the farming community have strong ties to land and sea, we have identified them as the agents to trigger change. The production flow represents a unique opportunity to reimagine the local economies of Aqaba.

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The project is divided into three phases of implementation. Phase one begins with two major interventions; a. the construction of a new fishing pier at the waterfront and b. a new network of water channel and holding tanks, distributed within the farming and Old Town housing fabric. Phase two begins with integration of a new modular structural frame for infill housing and social programs, such as farmer’s market, boat repairs, research centers and storage facilities. Phase three represents growth of farming landscape and increased new and reclaimed housing. With implementation of design in these three phases this project aims to revive a new pattern of alternative development.

As part of phase one, the existing water canal will be redesigned in order to decentralize the water collection. The water that runs from the mountains will be redirected to Old Town catchment spots, benefitting the community’s local farmers.

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Work Sample Academic

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jgp2135@columbia.edu

3128879717

The floating Platforms provide a framework of resiliency to the fishing community. During different seasons of the year, the platforms work as fisheries to mitigate the impact of fish migration, but they also work as Research Center spaces, combining cultural and scientific knowledge to improve fishing economy.


Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

3128879717

At the waterfront, we propose the extension of the existing fishing pier, aiming to benefit local fisherman and to provide adequate space for economic growth. The pier will be the site to house the Fisherman Association and a new branch of the Marine Science Station. By providing the framework in which these two organizations can work together and share knowledge, we intent to make the fishing economy more resilient to oscillation during different seasons.

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

The existing pattern of farming located close to the waterfront of Old Town supports a productive landscape. The proposal aims to preserve the pattern allowing for flexibility and negotiation of land and crop production between farmers. Housing will be introduced as to densify the area and keep farmers close to their land. Within the housing fabric, modular anchors are introduced as community spaces. The configuration of these spaces are also flexible and will depend on the needs of the community.

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For instance, one anchor is devoted to research and sharing of knowledge, with a Marine Science Station branch, classrooms and accommodation for researchers. Other spaces include community kitchen, daycare and community meeting spaces. Water catchment is part of the anchor to be utilized as a decentralized community resource. In the farmland, the houses start to emerge first, and when the farmland appear, the farming arrangement will be flexible, so do the paths between them.


Work Sample Academic

Flexibility of Farming Ground

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Work Sample Academic

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jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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In phase three, we use the same framework as introduced in phase two, but apply different organizational principals. The site of implementation is in the housing fabric of Old Town. Here we implement space for farming within the existing housing fabric. By activating these ‘in between’ spaces we envision to incentivize new growth in the food production economy. In addition, modular structures as anchors are introduced, as well as small-scale water catchment areas.

“By empowering the fishing and farming economies, Aqaba may once again reclaim its shorelines.”

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Infill of farming into the open spaces located in between the existing fabric of the city will activate local economy of food production

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Energy Bank Columbia University 2017 Fall Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Faisal Alzakari, Ruilan Jia and Xiaohan Wang

©Hudson Solar

Kingston

IN POUGHK VING EEP F LI SIE O T F S H O T L OD O A E H

11% 21%

19% ©Lighthouse Solar

HIDDEN COST OF HOUSING

S

TIE

ILI

UT

©BQ Energy

5%

1

REN

10%

Poughkeepsie

49%

CE AN N AN INT ATIO MA OPER &

75%T

SPORTATIO TRAN N

C

Energy Bank focuses on the affordability of living in the Hudson Valley and the city of Poughkeepsie, aiming to reduce the hidden costs of housing. Due to its convenient location to regional research networks, we believe Poughkeepsie should work as a continuous lab for technology innovation and simultaneously provide affordability and job opportunities to residents. Residents will have alternative choice to the monopoly of energy utility companies by developing a strong renewable energy infrastructure that will be collectively owned by the community.

Columbia University Solar Power Lab

H O U SIN G IBM Poughkeepsie

COMMUNICATION

WASTE

WATER

GAS

©Sol Providers ENERGY

©The Solar Program

Newburgh

©SOLARCITY

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Beacon


SPORTAT TRAN

Electricity, Heating, Cooling, Water, Garbage

$409/mo

19%

-INTERNET Academic Work Sample 60 Mbps or More, Unlimited Data, Cable/ADSL

49%

CE AN N AN INT ATIO MA OPER &

$70/mo

10%

2 beds 1 bath 1,000 sqft

ES

REN

75%T

$233/mo

HIDDEN LEGEND COST OF HOUSING Census Blocks

-BASIC

1

Electricity, Heating, Cooling, Water, Garbage

3128879717

5%

1

RENT

Faisal Alzakari|Ruilan Jia|Jose Ponte|Xiaohan Wang

ITI

IL UT

$1,350 /mo

ENERGY BANK 5

jgp2135@columbia.edu

H O U SIN G

Albany

Ward of

Central$163/mo Hudson is the majorInterest electricity and gas provider in -INTERNET and their scope Lots with Poughkeepsie includes a large part of the 60 Mbps or More, Vacancy Unlimited Data, Hudson Valley region. The monopoly of energy companies Cable/ADSL $70/mo like Central Hudson creates a predatory relationship towards low-income residents. The company will often shut off the ent is $800 a month power of some households,If mainly in the winter you’re sitting home, at when costs go got utilities of $300. any given moment, they higher, who have not paid monthly bill. A study by Center for can find cheaper could cut your lights off. e, but it’s awful. Financial Services Innovation indicates that utility bills are the number-one reason why people are forced to take short-term loans, creating a debt cycle and reflecting in their cost of living. So how can we find a solution? COMMUNICATION

WASTE

WATER

I work on two part-time jobs and that’s still not enough to pay my rent.

GAS

I’d love to get a job but the city definitely dosen’t have enough jobs.

Central Hudson Service Area

ENERGY

King

Poughkeepsie

FROM ENERGY MONOPOLY TO ENERGY DEMOCRACY? New York City TRANSMISSION NETWORK

ELECTRICITY SHUT-OFF THREATS

©Lighthouse Solar

NEW YORK’S AGING ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE

WHAT IS THE IMPACT OF ELECTRICITY RATES ON SOLAR SAVINGS?

NETWORK

APPROX COST OF ELECTRICITY

CITY

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY

$0.19/kWh

NEW YORK, NY

$0.18/kWh $0.12/kWh

PHOENIX, AZ

$0.11/kWh

SEATTLE, WA SOURCE: www.energysage.com SOURCE: www.pvwatts.nrel.gov

E

ar panel e

kWh/m2/Day

A 5KW SYSTEM (KWH)

4.0

5,854

ANNUAL Ressner SAVINGS Polytechnic Institute

$ 1,113

State University 4.2 of NY

6,078

5.84

7783

$ 930

6.57

8,180

$ 900

3.75 kWh/m2/Day

5,092

$ 458

3.7

Marist College

$9,663

6,766 kWh

10 Months

cents/kWh

Net cost of system

Annual power production

Average payback time

levilized cost of solar energy

(Cash - after 30% solar tax credit)

our solar e overall

84 M il

3.9

54%

kWh/m /Day

of its capacity most of the year Running at

100% capacity only a few days a year

IA

P

o

43

200 Mile Vassar College

Albany

80 Mil e

s School of Engineering

64.4% 98.9%

AVERAGE DAILY TOTAL SOLAR RESOURCE

2000 $240,300 2015

FUTURE

4.2

Newburgh

2015

CLEAN, LOCAL POWER

2000 $1,081

Median Gross Rent Median Home Price

76% 79%

Spend >30% in their income into Housing

-74 o

kWh/m2/Day 4.2 4.0 3.9

STORAGE

-72 o

3.7 3.6

SOLAR PV

2000 $165,800

LEGEND owner renter

University at Albany SUNY

Median Gross Rent Median Home Price

61%

EY

NEW JERS

41

2000 $1,082

kWh/m2/Day

AN YLV NS

2015 o

Spend >30% in their income into Housing

kWh/m2/Day

*Source: NYSERDA New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

$178,000

2015

Beacon

New York City 49%

4.0

In total, the various solar incentives available in New York State could reduce the cost of going solar by more than 50%

EN

Ressner Polytechnic Institute

S TT T C ICU A T S S EC 2000 MA ONN Spend >30% in their income C into Housing

Only operates at about 2

TODAY

2000 $1,027

Median Gross Rent Median Home Price

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100Mile

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off your

2015

2015

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School of Engineering

AL NTRSON EA CEU D R H ICE A V SER

74.5% 97.8%

2000 $171,500

CENTRALIZED POWER

Poughkeepsie

80 Mil e

$ 1,094

WHAT IS THE COST OF A 5 KW SOLAR SYSTEM IN POUGHKEEPSIE?

4 Years

Albany

Median Gross Rent Median Home Price

Spend >30% in their income into Housing

University at Albany SUNY

e

DIT

3.6

$0.09/kWh

(KWH/M2/DAY)

s

LOS ANGELES, CA

ESTIMATED ELECTRICITY FROM

AVG ANNUAL SOLAR RADIATION

($/KWH)

2000 $1,005

200 Mi55% le

o

43

Greater electricity costs mean greater savings, regardless of location

POWER PLANT

2015

Kingston DISTRIBUTION

-73 o

Newburgh

2015

©SOLARCITY

90%-100% 80%-90% 70%-80% 60%-70%

Poughkeepsie

-75 o o

42

100Mile

S ETT US-76 o UT H C TIC SSA NEC A N M CO

50%-60%

*Data Sources: Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress Regional Plan Association *Map Sources: The U.S. Census Bureau, American Fact Finder Social Explorer Website

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

3128879717

LEGEND Rent Stress Number of renters who pay more than 30% income toward housing

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME + RENT-BURDENED

Number of total renters

number of emplyees

Major Employers 1001 - 5900 501-1000 70-500

Median Household Income $ 15,000 - 31,000 $ 31,000 - 45,000 $ 45,000 - 56,000 $ 56,000 - 65,000 $ 65,000 - 82,000 $ 82,000 - 10,5000

In Poughkeepsie, 52% of the population spend more than 30% of their income towards rent or mortgage, making them rentburdened. However, we usually forget to talk about the high utilities costs of housing, which only expand the scope of the problem. The fact that low-income residents are driven to live in older housing with poor ventilation and inefficient heating and insulation systems, consequently having higher energy costs, represents how poverty and inequality plays a major role in this issue. 17 issuu.com/jponteneto


City of Poughkeepsie

Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

City of Poughkeepsie

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ADVANCED MID-LEVEL

4 Residential PV System

2 Electrical Inspector

3 Process Control

3 Utility Interconnection

Specialist

with Solar Expertise 3 Solar Marketing Specialist 4 Building Inspector with Solar Expertise

2 Advanced Engineer Manufacturing

Technician

Technician

4 Residential PV System

SYSTEM DESIGN

with Solar Expertise

1 Solar PV Installer

Expertise

Technician

ENTRY

MEDIAN PAY 1 $36,440/year $17.52/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

Manufacturing Technician

4 Electrician with

Solar Expertise

5 HVAC Technician

with Solar Expertise

2 Roofer with Solar

Expertise 1 Solar Site Assessor

1

3 Solar Service

Solar Assembler / Basic Installer

Technician

4 Electrician with

Solar Expertise 5 HVAC Technician with Solar Expertise PROJECT INSTALLATION & DEVELOPMENT OPERATIONS

1 Solar Site Assessor

2 Advanced

1

Solar Assembler / Basic Installer

MEDIAN PAY $60,050/year $28.87/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

provide parks, training and energy storage MANUFACTURING SYSTEM DESIGN PROJECT INSTALLATION & development DEVELOPMENT OPERATIONS Hybrid Structures to

MEDIAN PAY $28,640/year $13.77/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

ENTRY

MEDIAN PAY $60,050/year $28.87/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

MEDIAN PAY $28,640/year $13.77/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

Hybrid Structures to Interventions as produce energy Research on storage Civic Communication strategies: Nitrogen, City wide interventions which will heat, batteries showcase the technology to the Research on storage

Public spaces

1 Electrical Engineer

1 Software Engineer

2 Industrial Engineer

2 Solar Energy Systems

SOLAR ENERGY JOB OPPORTUNITIES

1 Solar Project

Developer

City wide interventionsLighting which and will showcase the technology to the transportation devices to the population and call attention city as a research lab. Designer

3 Environmental

4 Power Systems 1 Software Engineer

Engineer

3 Environmental

3

Engineer

1 Instrumentation and 4 Mechanical Engineer Electronics Technician

1 4

2 Quality Assurance

2

Specialist 3 Process Control Technician

Specialist

3 Process Control

Technician

1 Computer Numerical

Control (CNC) Operator

Designer Structural Engineer Engineering Technician Power Systems Engineer IT Specialist

3 Utility Interconnection

3 Solar Utility 1 Solar Project Procurement

Developer Specialist

Engineer 1 Engineering Technician 4 Residential PV System

2 Lawyer with

Solar Expertise

13 Solar Solar Sales Utility

Representative Procurement

2 Electrical SpecialistInspector 3

with Solar Expertise Solar Marketing Specialist Solar Sales Building Inspector Representative with Solar Expertise Electrical Inspector with Solar Expertise Solar Marketing Specialist Solar SiteInspector Assessor Building

Public spaces interventions for civic and educational purposes

Electronics Technician

2 Quality Assurance

Solar Expertise

2 Solar Energy Systems

2 Industrial Engineer

1 Instrumentation and

2 Lawyer with

3 Structural Engineer

Engineer 4 Mechanical Engineer 1 Electrical Engineer

14

Designer 2 IT Specialist

2

3 Utility Interconnection

3

4 Residential PV System

41

Engineer

Designer

with Solar Expertise

1 Solar Instructor 2 Solar Fleet Manager 3 Solar Installation

Contractor

1 Solar Instructor 2 Solar Fleet Manager 3 Solar Installation 1 Contractor Solar PV Installer

2 Roofer with Solar

Expertise

3 Solar Service

Technician

with 41 Electrician Solar PV Installer Solar Expertise

with Solar HVAC Technician 25 Roofer

Expertise with Solar Expertise

3 Solar Service

Technician

Solar Assembler / 41 Electrician with Basic Expertise Installer Solar

5 HVAC Technician

with Solar Expertise

2 Advanced

Manufacturing Technician

Lighting and MANUFACTURING transportation SYSTEM DESIGN devices

1 Computer Numerical

Control (CNC) Operator

ENERGY BANK

ru yT

Specialist

4 Building Inspector

Interventions as interventions for civic Civic Communication and educational purposes

Net Metering Credit

st

with Solar Expertise

Representative

Control (CNC) Operator

SOLAR ENERGY JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Net Metering Credit

ENERGY BANK

3 Solar Service

Contractor Representative

population and call attention to the strategies: Nitrogen, city as a research lab. heat, batteries

ENTRY MID-LEVEL

E3

2 Roofer with Solar

3 Solar Marketing

2 IT Specialist 1 Computer Numerical

MEDIAN PAY 1 $36,440/year $17.52/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

ENTRY

AS

1 Solar PV Installer

2 Electrical Inspector

Engineer

2 Quality Assurance

2 Advanced

Manufacturing Technician

ENTRY

PH

3 Solar Installation

1 Solar Sales

3 Utility Interconnection Specialist

1 Solar Sales

MEDIAN PAY MANUFACTURING 1 $36,440/year $17.52/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

ENTRY

n

Contractor

2 Solar Fleet Manager

produce energy

3

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3 Solar Installation

Procurement Specialist

2 IT Specialist

1 Engineering Technician

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Acquiring and Occuping Vacancy The Energyand bank will occupy the vacancy in Acquiring Occuping the city by implementing flexible structures Vacancy that will expand energyinand The Energy bankthe willproduction occupy theof vacancy provide parks, training andflexible energystructures storage the city by implementing development that will expand the production of energy and

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Net Metering Credit

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Retrofitting Public Buildings

l s de ive nt s Mo e nc nes xI Ta Busi D R&

MEDIAN PAY 1 $36,440/year $17.52/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

SYSTEM DESIGN

1 Solar Site Assessor

1

Solar Assembler / Basic Installer

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

INSTALLATION & OPERATIONS

MEDIAN PAY PROJECT $60,050/year DEVELOPMENT $28.87/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

MEDIAN PAY & INSTALLATION $28,640/year OPERATIONS $13.77/hour

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MEDIAN PAY $60,050/year $28.87/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)

EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent) MEDIAN PAY $28,640/year $13.77/hour EDUCATION & TRAINING LEVEL High-School Diploma (or equivalent)


Installing solar canopies in parking lots which will host electric plug-in stations

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3128879717

LIGHT THE CREEK

Illuminating the creek through solar light devices, as a way to bring civic attention to renewable energy

MORSE MAGNET SCHOOL

Retrofitting the school building with solar system, hosting renewable exhibition facility

THE FAMILY PARTNERSHIP CENTER

Retrofitting the Family Partnership Center building with solar system, acting as a testing platform

OPEN SPACE

Illuminating the creek will make it a popular destination with open public space along the water

TECHNOLOGY LAB

The City of Poughkeepsie becomes a research lab for innovative technology products

VACANT LOTS

Installing flexible structures on vacant lots which will host energy storage, training & production facilities

GREEN ARTERIAL

Dedicating a specific lane in the arterial for low cost electric cars

CITY HALL Retrofitting the City Hall building with solar system, testing out new tecnologies

ENERGY BANK

Energy Bank takes the Civic Center vacant space as a base location

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Solar Place (Urban Urge Prize winner) Columbia University 2017 Fall Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Faisal Alzakari, Ruilan Jia and Xiaohan Wang The objective of the intervention is to shed light on renewable energy potential in the Hudson Valley, more specifically the potential of solar energy as a new model of efficiency & empowerment. One that stands up against the monopoly of utility companies and theirpower rate increases which overwhelm low-income households. A resilient energy infrastructure that speaks to REV (Reforming the Energy Vision) which is adopted by Governor Cuomo as a comprehensive energy strategy for all New Yorkers.

Solar energy, as a starting point, can be implemented in the City of Poughkeepsie to bring civic attention to the industry which would open the door for the city to becoming a continuous research lab for technology innovation and create job opportunities to residents. Residents will have alternative choice to energy by developing a strong renewable energy infrastructure.

SOLAR PLACE

SOLAR PLACE

URBAN FURNITURE POWERED BY RENEWABLE ENERGY

URBAN FURNITURE POWERED BY RENEWABLE ENERGY

SOLAR PLACE CONCEPT

Solar Panel

SOLAR PLACE CONCEPT

USB Charger

Electrical Outlets

WiFi Internet

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Work Sample Academic

jgp2135@columbia.edu

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120th Street Active Corridor Columbia University 2017 Summer Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Jack Bai, Deeksha Kalra During the Urban renewal period, a lot of construction was done in the neighborhood of East Harlem in Manhattan. Today, it has one of the highest populations living in Public Housing of New York City. One of the main issues faced by the neighborhood is children’s health. The area has one of the highest rates of Asthma in the city. Three main reasons contribute to the poor quality of life in this area.

The first is the waterfront which is poorly connected to the public housing complex because of FDR drive, a major highway that crosses East Harlem. The second is the open spaces within the NYCHA housing complex, but its design mainly favors contemplation, instead of active spaces. This project is a manifesto for shared streets with active spaces in Manhattan. The site chosen was 120th street, where 8 educational buildings and institutions are located in East Harlem, middle and high schools being among them. The street is a path for a large numbers of students going from public housing to schools. By developing a shared street and giving preference to pedestrians over cars and trucks, the risk of children being hit by trucks is reduced. In addition, the creation of active programs along the street, complementing the programs of buildings next to it, will invite these students to be more active in the neighborhood. The 120th street will then be extended to reach Randalls Island, which already has the infrastructure of parks and active spaces. Right now, the relation of open space to residents is only 0,3 acres per 1000 residents in East Harlem, while the standard is 1 acre per 1000 residents. The goal of this project is to increase this number and consequently improving health conditions in the neighborhood.

The condition of the public housing is not ideal. Molds and leaks contribute to the lack of residents’ health quality, whom, in addition, cannot afford to live in other places. NYCHA tries to address the problem, but It also suffers from monetary issues. East Harlem’s streets are also part of most truck routs in the city. Being next to Triborough bridge, the movement of trucks becomes intense at certain times, contributing to the pollution of the air and presenting risks for children going or coming from schools. The lack of active open spaces is another major issue that contribute to poor health conditions. The residents have only two main areas for active open spaces.

4 5

6

P.S. 7 Samuel Stern John S Roberts Junior High School Harlem Art Park P.S. 79 Horan School

Multi-Service Center

Public School 206 River East Elementary School Ps 112 Manhattan

FDR Drive

Pleasant Ave

First Ave

2nd Ave

3rd Ave

Lexington Ave

Mount Carmel-Holy Rosary School

Public School 96

Global Technology Preparatory School

Park Ave

Madision Ave

Helene Fuld College of Nursing

Randalls Island

Marcus Garvey Park

125th Station

N Sacle 1:200 1:2000

Q 116th Station

120

BRIDGE STREET

Jackk Bai ai | Deeksha Kalra | Jose o e Neto Urban University an Design Studio Stud I Columbia Co u

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Master Plan for 120th Street in Manhattan


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East Harlem 0,3 Acre/1000 Residents

Standard 1 Acre/1000 Residents

Open and Green Spaces in East Harlem 22 issuu.com/jponteneto


jgp2135@columbia.edu

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Ra

nd

all sI sla nd

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120

BRIDGE STREET

Jack Bai | Deeksha Kalra | Jose Neto Urban Design Studio I Columbia University

John S Roberts Junior High School

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Top Image: Extension of 120th street into Randalls Island Bottom Image: Implementation of active spaces next to John S Roberts Junior High School


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O

DI

C ITE CH AR

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

RE

TU

U ST

I SHOULD GO OUT AND ENJOY STREET LIFE MORE...

STREET LIFE ZONE (MULTI-USE AREA)

STREET FARM MARKET

FLEXIBLE ACTIVITY SPACES 15’

SHARED LANE

Top Image: Section of 120th Shared Street Bottom Image: View of 120th Street Bridge

15’

FLEXIBLE ACTIVITY SPACES 30’

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3128879717

A Food City for Low-Income Residents Illinois Institute of Technology and Delft University of Technology 2014 Fall Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Kaitlin Beackham, Richard Hands and Noe Garcia

This project was developed in the Delft university of Technology by the supervision of Winy Maas from MVRDV office. The population of the world is growing in a fast rate and there is growing need to produce larger supplies of food. With limited amount of land to produce it, we should have problems related to the scarcity of food to feed every human being in the future.

This is a research project with the intention to analyze possibilities and design spaces to produce food within the urban context. Ways of producing and transporting food and water are studied in this project. The final result is a city that produces 100% of the food consumed with minimal losses.

City-wide Rendering 25 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Farm Cities

The research based design studio began by collecting data on crops and animals in addition to farming strategies both traditional and innovative.

Research is visualized through the creation of spatial schemes. This is achieved through scripting based upon the research.

Farm models transform from research informed schematic modules into design proposals, first for buildings, then for future cities.

Introduction

Farm Models

11.25.2014

Farm Strategies

Farm City

Farm City Structurejgp2135@columbia.edu

Work Sample Academic

Production

Distribution

Consumption

For that, the first step is studying and visiting current projects in the city of Chicago that focus on the production of food such as rooftop restaurants and aquaponics. The second phase is the study of farming methods, which gives us the possibilities to choose types and sizes of farming, as well as the quantity of resources we need in the city to produce the food based on different diet requirements. The example of the Pig farm is shown in this publication. The research of this type of farming is related to the food pigs eat, lifetime cycle, sizes and farming methods and types of outcomes we get in the end of the process. The research led us to different models and schemes based on Grasshopper models and diet requirements. From the calculation of incomes and outcomes of each farm, we could develop different designs for the food city.

Concept Diagram - Decentralization 26 issuu.com/jponteneto


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3128879717 WP5: Pig(s)

Pig(s)

91cm - 365cm deep 36” - 144” deep

6 in / 15 cm

3.3 f

t/1

sources

00 c

m

00 c

t/1

m

3.3 f

Input (per/m ) 1 kg of straw/pig. (440g/m2). 12 L of water/pig. (5.28L/m2). 1.5 Kg of fodder per pig/day.(0.66Kg/ m2), based on average consumption of 260 kg per pig in a lifetime. 2

Soil Type Slatted concrete floor. Pigs need around 1 kg of straw per day, and a space outside to stroll and sunbath. Companion Crops/Animals + Soy +Wheat +Barley + Rye +Corn +Pulses Crops/Animals to Avoid N/A

Pig(s) GENETIC CENTER AND PREGNANCY AREA

PIG FARM PROGRAM Biogas

Offals Blood, Casings, Chitlins, Stomach, Bladder, Balls, Lungs.

Fattening

Noe, Jose Ponte

FARROWING AREA

Oddments Trotters, Caul fat, Leaf fat, Back fat, Heart, Liver, Tongue, Bones, Ears, Head, Brain, Cartilage, Skin.

Growing Schedule A pig lives 183 days. 35 days he is considered a piglet. For 120 days the pig is fattened, until slaughter. 140 days of a porker place to produce 1 pig, and 20 more days for service and sanitation.

Depth of Required Soil 25cm - 50cm

10.15.14

Other parts that can be used Tusks, Hooves, Manure, Compost, Bush hogging, Tilling, Nutrient recovery, Nutrient retrieval.

Waste/Excess Pig manure is a great source of nutrients for farm soil.

Noe, Jose Ponte

Low-on-the-hog Cuts from the pig that are most unknown for the consumers. Hocks, Jowl, Neck bones.

Oxygen/CO2 Requirements Natural Air.

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Middle-on-the-hog These cuts are the next in economic value and often need addictional work to get to final product. Come from the middle of the pig. Ham, Picnic shoulder, Belly, Ribs, Sausage and Ground.

Ph Requirements Drinking water 6.5 to 8.5 Dutch standard: 5 to 8. Risk: >9 and <4.

Animal Density Organic Farm - 2.3 m2 per pig.

WP5: Pig(s)

High-on-the-hog Cuts along the back of the pig. Sirloin, Tenderloin, Loin and Boston butt.

WP5: Pig(s)

PIGLET ZONE

MEAT PRODUCTION

Temperature Range 15.5° - 21° (C) 38.7° - 39.8° (C) - Body Temperature

Output (per/m2) One pig gives an average of 70 kg of meat. (30.8 Kg/m2). Ammonia emission is 0.01 kg per pig/day.

Pig City, 2000. “Km3 - Excursions on capacity, MVRDV, Actar publishers 2005.” City Pig, 2009. The Why Factory.

Pig(s)

Water Req. One pig consumes 200 m3 of water per year. Nursery pigs: 2.8 L/day. Growers: 8 L-12 L/day. Finishing pigs: 12 L-20 L/day. Non-Pregnant gilts: 12 L/day. Pregnant Sows: 12 L-25 L/day. Lactating Sows: 10 L-30 L/day.

Noe, Jose Ponte

55cm - 110cm tall 21” - 44” tall

44%

Light Requirements Pigs need 1h per day to sunbath and stroll outside.

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90cm - 180cm 35” - 71”

Animal Height/Size Size: 90cm - 180 cm Weight: 115 kg

PIG FARM

GROWING CYCLE JAN Pigle

30-35 d t ays

OCT

MAR Fattening

sources

Pig City, 2000. “Km3 - Excursions on capacity, MVRDV, Actar publishers 2005.” City Pig, 2009. The Why Factory. www.henkwildschut.com

Pig(s) FODDER Pigs are omnivores, so they can eat both plant and animals. In pig farms, they are mostly fed with grains like soybean, rye and corn. But pigs can also be fed with organic waste from crops and industrial by-products, it depends on which type of pig farm it is.

SEP

Y

tion nita Sa 20 days

JUN

AU

JUL

Soybean Meal

Corn

Barley

10 m

Symbiotic Scenario In a symbiotic scenario, the required ammount of grain to feed the pigs could be reduced. Pigs can be fed with waste from greenhouses and food-industries, as well as organic waste from supermarkets. Organic waste from households could also be used, but there has to be a controlled way of using it without contamination risk for the pigs.

ORGANIC FARM Organic Farm Area per pig is 2.3 m2. Fodder consumption is based on 20% organically produced grains, 30% green garbage and 50% industrial byproducts.

10 m

sources

Pig City, 2000. “Km3 - Excursions on capacity, MVRDV, Actar publishers 2005.” City Pig, 2009. The Why Factory. www.henkwildschut.com

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Lupine Grain

10 m

Ethic Aspect In the organic farm, the concern is to produce pigs respecting the welfare of the animals. Pigs are given more space and are able to go outside and socialize, they also spend more time with the sow before going to the fattening area.

Rye

sources

Wheat

Pulses

Pig City, 2000. “Km3 - Excursions on capacity, MVRDV, Actar publishers 2005.” http://www.raisingpigs.net/ http://orgprints.org/

Noe, Jose Ponte

Noe, Jose Ponte

Industrial Pig Farm In the industrial farm, pigs have a controlled diet, because the principal objective is to grow them healthy, with the right nutrients to be able to sell a high quality meat to the market. Industrial farms use commercial pig feeds and it already has the right mixture of nutrients depending on what stage of growing the pig is. The diet is mostly composed of grains like soybean meal, corn, wheat and corn. The food for the pigs often contain additives with vitamins, minerals, and sometimes medications if needed.

Organic Pig Farm Putting together a pig diet in organic farm may be very difficult, because the diet has to contaoin the same quantity of nutrients of a conventional feedstuff. In the organic far, all the grains have to be produced organically, without additives. Growers can introduce plants to the pigs diet. Oil cakes and lupines are good sources of proteins for the pigs. Lupine is good for organic farm because they can be cultivated without the risk of Anthracnosis.

10.15.14

10.15.14

Industrial Farm Area per pig is 1 m2. Fodder consumption is based on the production of grains.

WP5: Pig(s)

WP5: Pig(s)

METHODS OF FARMING

10 m

Piglet Area

ter gh au Sl

G

M A

Pig(s) INDUSTRIAL FARM

Insemination and Pregnancy

APR

Pig City, 2000. “Km3 - Excursions on capacity, MVRDV, Actar publishers 2005.” City Pig, 2009. The Why Factory. www.henkwildschut.com http://www.quora.com http://sugarmtnfarm.com/

Farrowing

120 days

175 DAYS

sources

Storage + Boar spaces

FE B

N O

DEC V


Work Sample Academic

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The concept presented is a horizontal city, based on decentralized production and distribution of food and low cost housing. The render shows a Central Hub for water and food. The farms produce the food which is sent through pipes to this central location, following that, the food is distributed to the residences which are located around this central core.

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The location of housing is chosen with the intention to diminish the energy used to distribute the food, making the city more sustainable.

Exterior View of Housing and Farm Spaces

Exterior View of Food and Water Hub 28 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Mixed-use Building Complex ReCS Architects Spring 2016 Jose Ponte and Marta Dituri (Technical Director) This project was developed in 2016 in colaboration with Marta Dituri, technical Director of ReCS Architects Brazil. The projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s site is located in China and as part of the comission, it was requested a preliminary concept for a mixed-use development.

The building was developed based on studies of pedestrian patterns in the site. The base of the building which includes the shopping mall was designed to be a cross path for pedestrians, as well as to create open public spaces in the corners.

The program of the building included a shopping mall, commercial offices, residentinal apartments and a private open space.

Higher floors contemplate commercial offices and apartments, each having private open spaces and green areas.

Exterior Rendering 29 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Study of Street Connections to the Building

Top view 30 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Good Space Studio Illinois Institute of Technology 2015 Fall Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Rong He, Yang Kang Good Space studio, led by Professor Steven Brubaker, looks into how architecture should respond to ever changing necessities of society. The concept of Good Space was defined by the students as a space that can be used for various purposes or programs, allowing the developer to expand its sales market. By extensively studying requirements of programs, it was defined by the studio specific dimensions of a space that could house Medical services, hospitality programs, office, commercial or residential spaces. This design decision is based on the idea that, in the future, buildings will have to be more flexible and adapt to different uses due to fast-changing technological development. The site of the project is located in the West Loop of Downtown Chicago, area of high influx of people due to the presence of Union Station, where people from the suburbs arrive to work in downtown. The site, being next to Willis Tower, has to contemplate the tourist movement in addition to the workers.

The project aims to create a building that dialogues with the street and its users, an extension of the sidewalk. The ground and first floor of the building base extend to the edges of the site and houses commercial activity. Above it, the creation of a public space is the connection to the subway station. Users circulate inside the building base to get to the station, activating the public space. The connection works not only through circulation, but also structurally, since the station is hung by the building. Consequently, it frees up space for pedestrians in the street, since no structural elements are needed anymore. To further develop the relation building-street, exterior spaces are added along the building. These exterior spaces allow for unconventional uses and complement the regular interior space, creating also a visual connection to the street. To reach this goal, we organize the building as sliding floor plates, based on direction of the sun during different seasons, allowing for more or less sunlight.

View of Exterior Space along the Building 31 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Model of the Building 32 issuu.com/jponteneto


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1 1 2

N

2 1 3

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1 3

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2 4 1 3 5

7

2 4 3 5

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Process Diagrams


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Jungle Gym

changable platforms necessity platforms

Circulation

platform horizontal circulation platform vertical circulation train station horizontal circulation train station vertical circulation

Diagrams above show the connection between the building and the subway station. In addition, as part of the public space, the implementation of platforms that can me movable according to event types and needs will drive circulation around the building.

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3128879717

Ground Floor Plan

1st floor plan

32

Plans

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Platform and Subway Station Floor Plans

3nd floor plan

32

Plans

33

Typical Floor Plan 35 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Model of the Building 36 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Renovation of Harold Washington Library Illinois Institute of Technology 2015 Fall Semester Group members: Jose Ponte, Laila Shanab, Shuni Wu and Dakota Bett The Harold Washington library is located in the south loop, downtown of Chicago. It is named after the first black mayor of the city. This project intends to redesign the Library in order to reflect its new context. The existing building was designed as part of a competition to thrive the development of the area. Its facades evoke the monumentality and grandiosity of traditional libraries design. As it was design in another time, the buildings does not represent the values of our epoch.

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The neighborhood nowadays is composed in large part of university students and young professionals who could potentially be everyday users. The library should be an asset for Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residents where people go for cultural and educational activities, but researches show a lack of usage of the building. The architecture and its high level of opacity do not invite or welcome people to be part of it.

North-South Section and Study Models


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As part of the design process, the first action is to substitute the facades of the building, which we believe are not successful. The new facade is done in terracotta which references to the color of the existing one.

Maintain structure

Removing the first lower three floors was done to create an organic enclosed public space that should be a cross path for people walking on the street. As a consequence, the columns become expose to create a contradiction between old and new, as well as to resemble the existing skeleton of the building. The other floor plates of the existing library are very extensive in length and short in height, giving an oppressive sensation to users. In response to that, the strategy of “carving out” the floor plates is implemented, bringing natural sunlight from the top and creating connection between different levels.

MAKE OPENINGS IN THE FLOORS

REMOVE FIRST TWO FLOORS

UNCONVENTIONAL LIBRARY CREATE PUBLIC SPACE AND CIRCULATION

CONVENTIONAL LIBRARY

CONNECTION TO THE PARK MAKE OPENINGS IN THE FACADES

Process Diagrams 38 issuu.com/jponteneto


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Ground Floor View

Interior View of Floor-to-Floor Connection

The new library is organized with the existing conventional and unconventional spaces added to the program. These unconventional uses are added in the lower and top levels of the building. As it was mentioned, a grand public space is created to substitute the lower three levels, with platforms that should be used for workshops, dancing classes and small commercial programs. In the top of the building, a public space is created, enclosed and open, to house coffee shop as well as private events in determined times. This should be a source of revenue to the Library.

Exploded view showing existing “conventional” programs and added “unconventional” spaces

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Exterior View - Connection to Subway Station

Ground Floor and Elevated Platforms

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Jose Gerardo Ponte Neto Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design Columbia University jgp2135@columbia.edu 312.887.9717

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