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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


Why Districts, Schools and Classrooms Should Practice Service-Learning Service-Learning • leads to engagement and incorporates research on effective instruction. • helps academic improvement and higher order thinking skills. • fosters the development of important personal and social skills. • helps develop stronger ties to schools, communities and society. • promotes exploration of various career pathways. • is associated with positive school environments. • is associated with more community support for schools. Adapted from RMC Research Corporation. (2007). “Why districts, schools, and classrooms should practice service-learning”. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse.

“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” Benjamin Franklin, American statesman, scientist, philosopher, printer, writer and inventor. 1706-1790

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


August 18, 2010 Dear Friends, Moving public education forward in North Carolina requires collaboration, innovation and programs that prepare students with the knowledge and skills they need for the future. Learn and Serve America is a perfect example of this type of program as it uses service learning to bring the classroom to life and connect young people to the communities in which they live. The Learn and Serve America experience truly provides a win-win opportunity for everyone as local community groups gain valuable volunteers, students develop a lifelong habit of social responsibility and teachers see improved academic achievement and school attendance among participants. I am pleased that Communities In Schools of North Carolina has been chosen to manage North Carolina’s Learn and Serve America program. This program is a natural fit for Communities In Schools as this organization was built on the belief that every student needs and deserves an opportunity to give back to their community. CISNC staff work every day to make sure young people receive the academic and personal support they need to stay in school and graduate on time, and the organization is one of our most valuable partners in statewide dropout prevention efforts. By collaborating and investing in best practices and the learning strategies employed in programs such as Learn and Serve America, we will give our students the tools they need to stay in school and graduate well prepared for college, a career and life. Sincerely,

June St. Clair Atkinson JSA:SC:mw

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


Superintendent Atkinson and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction have been longtime supporters and partners of Communities In Schools of North Carolina. We look forward to leading the Learn and Serve America program, which encourages service-learning across the nation, enabling students to make meaningful contributions to their community while building their academic and civic skills. The mission of Communities In Schools of North Carolina is to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life. As part of the nation’s leading dropout prevention program, we believe that every child has the potential to graduate, and too many times they drop out because they lack the support they need. Service-learning is an innovative learning strategy that allows students to connect what they are learning in the classroom to a real world issue. They see how they can – and are – making a difference in the community that surrounds them. Every child needs and deserves a chance to give back to their peers and to their community. We look forward to giving students across the state that opportunity, and we thank you for your support.

Linda Harrill

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Thank you to the following individuals for their advice and important contributions to this compendium:

Jean Goodman

Beth Schierer

Adopt-A-Grandparent program,

E. A. Laney High School/CIS of New Hanover

Alamance County, N.C.

County, Growing Youth N.C.

Cathryn Berger Kaye

Joe Follman

CBK Associates and ABCD Books

Florida Learn and Serve

Therese Dally

Liberty Smith and Erin Lee

Cascade Educational Consultants, Madison, WI

Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse

Dave Cable Catawba Lands Conservancy

Marty Druckenfield National Dropout Prevention Center,

Cerise Collins

Clemson University

Communities In Schools of High Point, N.C. Marty Caryn Parnu, Libby Rau, Mike Judy Frick

Vankeulen, Maddy Wegner

Communities In Schools of Kansas

National Youth Leadership Council

Kathy Byron

Kara Brown, Lisa Keyne

Communities In Schools of Moore County, N.C.

North Carolina Campus Compact

Nevin Daryani, Maxine Elliott, Linda Harrill,

Pam Toole, Service-learning consultant

Erica Rafferty and Arlene Wouters Communities In Schools of North Carolina

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Pam Van Dyk, Educational consultant

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


CITATIONS

Portions of Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina were adapted from the following sources: The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., Š 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. Portions of the following sources were reprinted or adapted with the permission of: RMC Research Corporation. K-12 Service-Learning Toolkit. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2006/2009. (www.servicelearning.org/library/resource/8542.) Roehlkepartain, E.C. Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations: A Practical Guide to Starting and Sustaining High-Quality Programs. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2009. (www.servicelearning.org/library/resource/8543.) National Youth Leadership Council. (www.nylc.org) The Rubric for Continuous Improvement of the Service-Learning Experience. Teri Dary, Partner, Cascade Educational Consultants (teri.dary@cascadeeducationalconsultants.com) Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction: High Quality Instruction That Transforms - A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic Service-Learning. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, 2010. (www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/pdf high_quality_learning_web.pdf)(Wisconsin DPI, 2010) Special thanks to the following individuals for the compilation, editing and design of this guide. Cynthia Blythe Marshall (Service-learning consultant - Communities in Schools of N.C.) and Jacqueline Perry (Jacqueline Perry Designs)

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina is based upon work supported by the Corporation for National and Community Service under Learn and Serve America Grant Number 06KSSNC001. Opinions or points of view expressed and selected resources referenced in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the Corporation or the Learn and Serve America program. This material is published by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (www.ncpublicschools.org) and Communities In Schools of North Carolina (www.cisnc.org.) 6

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


TABLE OF CONTENTS

LETTERS/BACKGROUND............................................................................. 3 HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE . ....................................................................... 8 SERVICE-LEARNING AND DROPOUT PREVENTION ................................. 9 WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING?.................................................................... 12 Service-Learning Definition..................................................................... 12 Key Components and Learning Guide..................................................... 13 Service-Learning Planning Process........................................................... 14 The Cycle of Effective Service-Learning.................................................... 15 Establishing Curricular Connections........................................................ 21 Resources and Planning Tools for Aligning Effective Service-Learning with the Standard Course of Study................................ 23 THE K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE...... 25 SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES...................................................................... 37 PARENT INVOLVEMENT.............................................................................. 52 APPENDIX OF RESOURCES AND REFERENCES........................................... 53 Organizational Resources and Web Sites.................................. 54 Potential Partnering Agencies in North Carolina....................... 56 Notable State Resources/Awards/Funding Sources.................... 57 Additional Funding Sources for Service-Learning...................... 58 Service-Learning in North Carolina.......................................... 59 Educator and Student Worksheets............................................. 60 Institutions of Higher Education/N.C. Campus Compact........... 62

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina is intended primarily for North Carolina educators and their students in grades K-12 enrolled in public and private schools. Its purpose is to provide resources to transform community service activities into highly engaging, quality service-learning experiences that have sufficient duration and intensity to develop skills and knowledge, which will empower students to succeed academically, stay in school and achieve in life. This guide is designed as an electronic portal for other resources and organizations, as well as a source of suggested print media and examples related to various service-learning themes. As a compendium of resources from nationally recognized organizations and authors, it also includes some of the materials from professional development experts in the field of service-learning. Please utilize the resource section of each service-learning theme to discover potential community partners for your local efforts. Statewide resources/Web sites, as well as national organizations, are sources of research, statistics and partners for service-learning experiences in North Carolina. The United Way Volunteer Center found in many local communities can provide valuable information regarding community-based organizations and corporations that are interested in service-learning for students. Several states have contributed resources to this effort. There are sample thematic lesson plans from several school districts across the nation, all of which are available to download in electronic format. For example, Florida’s lesson plans are tied to the State’s Sunshine Standards, serving as a rich resource for North Carolina educators. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction’s guide also has provided an excellent rubric for service-learning standards. Other uses: In addition to using this guide to improve your own service-learning practices, consider the following options for expanding the service-learning network in your area of North Carolina: • Use this guide as a reference as you launch service-learning with your faculty. Plan and implement your service-learning efforts using the relevant worksheets during your planning meetings. Try focusing on one of the eight K-12 Service-Learning Standards in each session. • When you’re encountering challenges in your program, review the relevant section to see if it offers optional strategies to consider or use the Generator School Network to post your questions. This guide is a work in progress that may be updated as resources become available. As you use it, you will likely have new ideas, or you may have stories and examples of your efforts. Please share your insights and experiences with the Generator School Network (www.nylc.gsn.org), which is part of the Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse, or (www.gotoservicelearning.org), so others may benefit from your experience.

All Web site links in this guide are active. Please be sure to view this document in the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader, found free online at www.Adobe.com. Microsoft Word downloads of worksheets found in the Appendix of this guide are available at www.cisnc.org.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING AS A DROPOUT PREVENTION STRATEGY

What works in increasing the graduation rate? Over the past two decades, the National Dropout Prevention Center, based at Clemson University, has identified 15 research-based strategies effective in dropout prevention (Smink and Schargel, 2004). Such strategies stress that schools must have strong partners in the education of young people. Teachers, schools, parents and family members and community members, organizations and businesses all have a vested interest in students’ success; in addition, they each have important roles in that success and should be a part of the accountability process. Excerpted from “Measure What Matters, and No Child Will Be Left Behind” PDF. Marty Duckenfield, Sam Drew, National Dropout Prevention Center. Growing to Greatness, National Youth Leadership Council. 2006.

The 15 Effective Dropout Prevention Strategies School and Community Perspectives

1. Systemic Renewal

2. School-Community Collaboration

3. Safe Learning Environments

Early Interventions

4. Family Engagement Research

5. Early Childhood Education

6. Early Literacy Development

Basic Core Strategies

7. Mentoring/Tutoring,

8. Service-Learning. Service-learning connects meaningful community service experiences with academic learning. This teaching/learning method promotes personal and social growth, career development and civic responsibility and can be a powerful vehicle for effective school reform at all grade levels.

9. Alternative Schooling

“Service-learning is uniquely positioned to unify many of the proven dropout prevention strategies, as well as to provide the experiences needed to produce resilient young people.” Excerpted from “Measure What Matters, and No Child Will Be Left Behind” (PDF)

10. After-School Opportunities

Making the Most of Instruction

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11. Professional Development

12. Active Learning

13. Educational Technology

14. Individualized Instruction

15. Career and Technical Education Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING AS A DROPOUT PREVENTION STRATEGY

Engaged for Success

Service-Learning as a Tool for High School Dropout Prevention A Report by Civic Enterprises in association with Peter D. Hart Research Associates for the National Conference on Citizenship. 2008 John M. Bridgeland, John J. DiIulio, Jr. and Stuart C. Wulsin

Conclusion: Educators, researchers and students themselves have identified what it will take to keep students in school. Schools must make classes more relevant and engaging, and enhance the connection between school and the real world; schools must improve instruction and access to supports for struggling students; schools must build a school climate that fosters academics through better discipline; and schools must ensure that students have a strong relationship with at least one adult in the school. Service-learning can help schools advance each of these goals. While the teachers who participated in the focus groups said that they could not numerically show that service-learning had prevented students from dropping out of school, they did agree that it could have a positive effect on graduation rates. “I think you would end up with a higher graduation rate,” one teacher explained, “because if they’re more engaged in their classes, they’re going to come to school. It’s active, authentic learning and they’re getting more out of it.” Service-learning is not a silver bullet. Even if every student in the country engages in many high-quality service-learning classes, schools, states and communities still will need to implement comprehensive education reform aimed at ending the dropout crisis. The original and secondary research presented in this report, however, indicates that service-learning should be an essential tool in any dropout prevention strategy. (Excerpt from “Engaged for Success” (2008). • Read the Report (PDF, 1.4 Mb).

Additional information regarding service-learning and dropout prevention: Fact Sheet on Service-Learning with Disadvantaged Youth: (www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/fact_sheets/k-12_facts/disadvantaged_youth/) See the complete online fact sheet at Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse: (www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/fact_sheets/cb_facts/disadvantaged_youth/expanded.php) The toolbox developed by the National Youth Leadership Council includes links, resources and research on the ability to keep young people in school until graduation. (www.nylc.org/pages-resourcecenter-toolboxes-Dropout_Prevention?emoid=16:795&null=1276179655076)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


“We need students who graduate from high school prepared to succeed in today’s global economy. We also need students who understand the value of service and of helping others - whether in their own communities or across the world. This report shows that service learning programs can be the bridge between these two priorities, helping our students graduate prepared to succeed, but also prepared to use their skills to help others.� Senator Edward (Ted) Kennedy

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? Service-Learning Definition

Service-learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility and strengthen communities. www.servicelearning.org.

PRIMARY GOALS 1. 2. 3. 4.

Keeping students engaged in school and learning Developing involved citizens Honing skills such as critical thinking and problem-solving Improving job readiness

Service-learning is used to meet existing academic goals. Teachers who use this experiential method invite students to be creative and engaged in the direction of their learning and often collaborate with colleagues to combine several curriculum goals. They also use a multi-step process and include outside partners in the learning activity. Edited from Getting Started in Service-Learning. National Youth Leadership Council. 2010. Effective teachers integrate their state’s standard course of study in many aspects of the service-learning activity, while their students take the lead in directing the activity by conducting research, collecting data and reflecting upon their learning in different forms, such as writing, art, music and presentations.

THE FOUR TYPES OF SERVICE-LEARNING: 1. Direct Service - brings students face-to-face with those they are serving 2. Indirect Service - experiences offering resources and skills to people, animals or the environment 3. Advocacy - activism on behalf of a specific cause or social issue 4. Research - finding, compiling, and reporting on information which of interest to the general public “Learning In Deed” Article on history of service-learning and its growth [PDF] Service-Learning in K-12 Education

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? Key Components & Service-Learning Guide THE FIVE KEY COMPONENTS OF SUCCESSFUL SERVICE-LEARNING Investigation Preparation and Planning Action Reflection Demonstration and Celebration Cathryn Berger Kaye suggests that each stage or component of service-learning is part of the interdependent whole, offering a complete learning process for students and providing a depth of knowledge and skill development. (Kaye, 2010.) It is important to note that opportunities for reflection should be included and often at several points throughout the service-learning experience. Service-learning researcher and author Shelley Billig emphasizes that celebration is equally important to demonstration after the service-learning experience. (Billig, S. H. (2009, April). “It’s their serve: A primer with all the rules for the sport of student service”. Leadership for Student Activities, 37(8), 8-13.

A BRIEF STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO SERVICE LEARNING (Kaye, 2010) Step One: Points of Entry

Select your method for getting started and making curricular connections, beginning with an existing program or activity, content and skills, a theme or unit of study, a student-identified need or a community-identified need.

Step Two: Review the K–12 Service Learning Standards for Quality Practice

Familiarize yourself with these eight recommended categories that support best practices for service learning. Referring to this list will give you reminders for what will provide the greatest impact for both learning and civic participation.

Step Three: Map Out Your Plans

Identify your curricular objectives. Write out your specific ideas for curricula, community contacts, literature and each stage (of the five stages) of service learning.

Step Four: Clarify Partnerships

Make contacts with any collaborators - teachers, parents, community members, agency representatives or others—who will participate. Discuss and clarify specific roles and responsibilities for all involved.

Step Five: Review Plans and Gather Resources

Review your plans. Gather needed resources, such as books, newspaper articles, web sites and reference materials from partner agencies. Schedule any visits, guest speakers or field trips. Note that these are good tasks for students to take on as they gain skills and experience.

Step Six: Begin the Process of Service Learning in Action

Initiate the process of investigation, preparation and planning, action, reflection and demonstration. Encourage youth voice and choice as you move through the service learning process. Be flexible! Service learning works best when students are able to see their own ideas in action. Continue to look for opportunities for reflection.

Step Seven: Assess the Service Learning Experience

Once the demonstration and the closing reflection have been completed, review and assess the learning accomplished, the impact of the service, the planning process, the reciprocal benefits for all involved, and ways to improve for next time. Debrief with all partners. From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permissions.cfm.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? Service-Learning Planning Process Found on later this guide, “Establishing Curricular Connections/Points of Entry” (Kaye, 2010), outlines the various ways in which a service-learning experience can begin. In general, beginning with a “project” that may have been a one-time event or an annual community service event that is not curriculum-linked, may be the easiest way to engage students initially. Investigative activities such as the neighborhood walkabout or conversational forums with local organizations and university staff are proven ways in which to engage students and provide visualization of the community need or issue. One example includes revisiting “old” or previously built Habitat for Humanity neighborhoods to assess current needs, such as landscaping, weatherization, or parks. The K-12 Standards for Service-Learning (NYLC, 2008) and the components of the process that follow, will be helpful in initiating service-learning or enhancing a current effort.

POINTERS FOR TEACHERS Find a Point of Entry Remember that service-learning must be an extension of curriculum “Start Small - Think Tall” Monitor progress frequently and look for ways to improve

Toolboxes from the National Youth Leadership Council. NYLC: Service-Learning Resource Library Getting Started Effective service-learning requires knowledgeable, trained practitioners and carefully designed programs. We’ve collected some useful articles and tools for beginning practitioners. We also recommend a short one- to two-day training for those new to service-learning. Making the Case Practitioners see the results of service-learning first hand, but that’s often not enough. Policy-makers, administrators and parents want and deserve proof that service-learning is an effective learning and community development model. Here, NYLC has gathered key resources to help you “make the case” for service-learning. Integrating Service-Learning into the Curriculum Effective service-learning always is tied to specific learning goals. This not only helps students meet genuine community needs through their service, but also improves student academic outcomes, and addresses state and federal education standards that schools are required to meet. The resources in this toolbox help teachers and other practitioners better integrate service-learning programs within curricula. For additional resources related to each of the core components or stages of the service-learning process, visit the K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit at the web site for Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/library/resource/8542). 14

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? The Cycle of Effective Service-Learning

In the pages that follow, each of the core components is described in terms of five steps or tasks. “Ready-to-Go” forms in Microsoft Word are available as aids in developing each component of the planning process. These forms were compiled from several organizations and individuals. Also provided are “Guiding Questions” from the toolkit Service Learning in Community Based Organizations: A Practical Guide to Starting and Sustaining High Quality Programs for communitybased organizations, developed by Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse to aid in each particular stage of service-learning.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


INVESTIGATION

For instructions on downloading worksheets related to Investigation, please visit the “Five Key Components” section of the Appendix.

Guiding Questions (Page 11, K-12 Toolkit) 1. What is the overall purpose of the service-learning project? What impacts do you hope the project will have on students and the community they serve? 2. How will you facilitate student choice of the “community” they want to serve? 3. What activities and resources will you provide to assist students in assessing community needs? 4. How will you use the criteria of relevance to academic learning; urgency and importance; student interest/ engagement; and efficacy to help students select the problem for the project? 5. What content standards and benchmarks will working on this problem allow students to meet? 6. What civic and other learning goals do you hope to meet within the project?

K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit Created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


PLANNING AND PREPARATION

For instructions on downloading worksheets related to Planning and Preparation, please visit the “Five Key Components” section of the Appendix.

Guiding Questions (Page 20, K-12 Toolkit) 1. Once you and the students identify a potential problem area, what questions about the problem and possible solutions should they try to answer through their library and Internet research? 2. What is the specific service to be provided? How does the service relate to the overall purpose of the service-learning activity? How does it address the areas of impact that you hope it will have on the students and the community? Will it successfully address the area that you measured to establish the baseline of the problem? 3. How will you facilitate student decision-making about the specific type of service to be provided and the division of labor that is needed to implement the project? 4. What content standards and benchmarks will be met as students plan and provide the service activities? 5. What civic goals will the project address? What civic knowledge, skills (e.g., informed decision making, listening, expressing opinions) and dispositions (e.g., tolerance, sense of responsibility for others, believing they can make a difference in the world) will be developed? 6. What other learning do you hope students will gain from the project (e.g., social skills, career exploration, learning to manage conflict, and/or learning about themselves)? 7. How can you ensure that community partners are part of the vision, planning, and preparation phases? 8. How will you assess students’ readiness for the project? What do your students need to understand about the social problem, the community and organizations with whom they will work, the recipients of service, and themselves? What skills do they need to have (e.g., communicating with others, conducting experiments, planning activities)? What attitudes and values should they have? What strategies will you use to ensure that students have the prerequisite knowledge, skills, attitudes and values? 9. How will you weave reflection activities into this component? 10. What types of assessment will you use to determine progress toward meeting specific service-learning project goals and learning objectives while they are working on this phase of the project? K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit Created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


ACTION

For instructions on downloading worksheets related to Action, please visit the “Five Key Components� section of the Appendix.

Guiding Questions (Page 31, K-12 Toolkit) 1. In direct service activities, students interact with recipients of service or the physical environment they have targeted for improvement. Given the service problem, what types of direct service activities could the youth perform? 2. In advocacy service activities, students try to address the underlying causes of a social problem by attempting to influence policymakers or elected officials. Could an advocacy component be added to the project to enhance learning and help students feel an even greater sense of efficacy? 3. How can you adopt, adapt or create a rubric for students to use that ensures the service activity they select demonstrates the standards and indicators of high quality service-learning? 4. How can you ensure that all students benefit from the service activities and that all students find them to be meaningful? 5. How can you ensure that students understand and find mutual benefit with service recipients? 6. How can you make sure that your community partners are playing a significant, positive role in the lives of the students? How can you maximize the potential for the partners to serve as role models? 7. How will you address diversity issues within the service project, both before, during and after service? 8. How can you keep students engaged in service over time? 9. How can you implement service-learning so that teachers and other adults also find the service to be fulfilling?

K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit Created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


REFLECTION

For instructions on downloading worksheets related to Reflection, please visit the “Five Key Components” section of the Appendix.

Guiding Questions (Page 37, K-12 Toolkit) 1. What reflection activities could you use to support the academic, civic and social-emotional learning goals of the service-learning project before, during and after completion? 2. If you plan to use discussion and journaling, are there forms of reflection you could use to encourage multiple modes of student response? For example, could your students write poetry or fiction about their projects, create paintings, sculpture or dramatic pieces? 3. What reflection prompts (questions) before, during and at the end of the project would encourage your students to go beyond simply describing or reporting their experiences? For example, what questions might push them to analyze the causes of social problems, to apply their academic learning to their service experience or to evaluate the effectiveness of social services? 4. How could you broaden the social context for authoring beyond the individual student to make reflection more collaborative? How could you expand the audience beyond you as teacher to make it more authentic?

K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit Created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


DEMONSTRATION AND CELEBRATION

For instructions on downloading worksheets related to Demonstration and Celebration, please visit the “Five Key Components” section of the Appendix.

Guiding Questions (Page 42, K-12 Toolkit) 1. Who should plan the demonstration and celebration, and what roles and responsibilities will each participant have? 2. What combination of demonstration and celebration activities would be the most meaningful for your students and community partners? 3. What plans for demonstration will best allow your students to meet the academic goals of the project? 4. In what ways could the demonstrations be used as summative assessments? If they are used this way, who will evaluate student performance and what criteria will they use? 5. Which options for planning would contribute most to your students’ civic and social-emotional learning? Which options would contribute most to the community? 6. How will you evaluate the success of the demonstration and celebration events, and engage in continuous improvement?

K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit Created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? Resources and Planning Tools Establishing Curricular Connections: Points of Entry 1. Identify An Existing Program or Activity To Transform Into Authentic Service Learning. • Select an activity or project already existing on campus. • Examine it for cross-curricular learning opportunities that meet or enhance academic standards. • Exchange resources and ideas with teachers, students, and community partners. Example: Canned Food Drive Before students brought in cans of food, classroom activities included studying nutrition, visiting the receiving agency to identify needed foods, and reading related literature. Students led peer discussions on social issues, replacing misconceptions with an understanding of hunger in their community. Graphs showing the food collected along with student-authored articles about the impact and continued need of this service were printed in school and community newspapers. Bookshelf suggestions: The Can-Do Thanksgiving, Soul Moon Soup, and Homeless Teens. 2. Begin with Standard Curriculum, Content, and Skills, And Find An Age-Appropriate Extension Into Service That Meets A Community Need Verified by the Students. • Identify the specific content and skill areas to be addressed. • Select an area of emphasis that supports or adds to classroom learning and addresses learning objectives or state standards. • Guide students as they investigate the related community need and create a plan for applying classroom content that improves a situation or benefits others. • Look for additional learning opportunities as the plan is transformed into action. Example: Learning History through Discussion with Elder Partners To be better informed about current events and to improve listening and communication skills, students met weekly with elders at a senior center. Shared experiences included studying news events, learning about aging, interviewing, collaborating on oral histories and photo essays, displaying results in the school and public library, and building a Web page to reach a broader audience. Bookshelf suggestions: Stranger in the Mirror, Growing Older, and We Were There, Too! Young People in U.S. History

From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permissions.cfm.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? Resources and Planning Tools Establishing Curricular Connections: Points of Entry, Continued 3. From a Theme or Unit of Study, Identify Content and Skill Connections. • Begin with a broad theme or topic, often with obvious service implications. • Identify specific standards-based content and skill areas to be developed. • Select a service application verified by students as an authentic need, including a baseline of the situation so they can monitor progress. Example: The Individual’s Role in Society During a lesson about the individual’s role in society, teachers encouraged students to consider options for civic participation. Curriculum included reading nonfiction stories of adults and young people contributing to their communities, researching local agency needs, providing regular assistance to an agency, and publishing an informative pamphlet for young people about the agency. Bookshelf suggestions: Sisters in Strength: American Women Who Make a Difference and Free the Children: A Young Man’s Personal Crusade Against Child Labor. 4. Start with a Student-Identified Need. • Identify student skills, talents, and interests. • Students define a problem, verify a need, and establish solutions, usually with community input. • Students lead implementation as teacher facilitates, adding interdisciplinary learning opportunities. Example: Transform an Empty Lot into a Community Garden A student initiated a conversation about starting a community garden in an empty lot near the school. With teacher guidance, academic standards were met as students communicated with a government agency regarding property use, conducted Internet research to find funding sources, partnered with special needs students to maintain the garden, and donated the harvest to a local shelter. Bookshelf suggestions: Seedfolks, Just Kids: Visiting a Class for Children with Special Needs, and A Kid’s Guide to Social Action 5. Start with A aommunity-Identified Need. • Community requests assistance, perhaps through an agency that has worked with the school before. • Teacher, students, and community partners identify learning opportunities. Example: Tutoring/Literacy A school received a request to participate in a citywide book collection to benefit local children. Teachers in several grades collaborated on cross-age projects, in which older students helped younger children write and illustrate bilingual books on mutually agreed-on themes. The books were donated to youth clubs, hospitals, and childcare facilities. Student representatives served on a city committee to plan future literacy activities. Bookshelf suggestions: La Mariposa, Just Juice, and Thank You, Mr. Falker From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permissions.cfm.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


WHAT IS SERVICE-LEARNING? Planning Tools for Educators and Students Resources and Planning Tools for Aligning Effective Service-Learning with the Standard Course of Study Please see all Worksheets and Downloads in the Appendix of this guide. 1) Development of lesson plans Recognizing that each school system may have different protocols for developing lesson plans, several options are offered below: a) Establishing Curricular Connections (Kaye, 2004). b) Across the Curriculum Worksheet #4 (Kaye, 2010). c) Planning For Service Learning Worksheet #5 ( Kaye, 2010). d) Learn & Serve America’s National Clearinghouse toolkits 1) K-12 Toolkit (RMC) (www.servicelearning.org/library/resource/8542). 2) Service-Learning for Community-Based Organizations (Search Institute). (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf). e) Rubrics: (www.rubistar.org). Free online tool that teachers and students can use to make rubrics. f) Teacher planning guide. (www.gotoservicelearning.org). g) Guilford County Schools, NC- template for lesson plans. Worksheet #15. (www.gcs.nc.edu) h) Teacher Tools: (www.nylc.org). The Generator newsletters, 2008-2009. 2) Planning resources and tools National Learn and Serve America’s Clearinghouse: Service-Learning Ideas and Curricular Examples SLICE (www.servicelearning.org/slice). 3) Examples of alignment of standard course of study with service-learning Guilford County Schools, N.C. During the summer of 2010, Guilford County teachers created unit plans and lesson lesson plans for grades k-12, linking the N.C. Standard Course of Study to service-learning experiences while addressing the Five 2009 National Learn and Serve Challenge priorities: Community renewal, Education, Energy and the environment, Health and nutrition, and Safety and security. (www.gcsnc.com/charactered/resources.html). . Florida Learn and Serve “4 Practical Resources for Linking Service-Learning and the Florida State Standards” (www.fsu.edu/~flserve/sl/standards.html). In 2000, Florida Learn & Serve began compiling information showing linkages between service learning and the Sunshine State Standards. Local practitioners and trainers examined existing documents from Kentucky, Wisconsin, South Carolina and Vermont. Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction: High Quality Instruction That Transforms - A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic ServiceLearning. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, 2010. (www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/pdf high_quality_learning_web.pdf) (Wisconsin DPI, 2010)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


“We know the difference this kind of learning makes. We know that students become more engaged in what they’re learning and more aware of the world around them. We know that their writing and critical thinking skills improve and so do their grade point averages.� - Michelle Obama

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


THE K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE The development and implementation of service-learning activities are vital in attaining the potential academic, civic and social benefits for students. The following K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice were examined by panels of young people, teachers, school administrators, staff from communitybased organizations, policy-makers and community members convened by the National Youth Leadership Council (NYLC) in partnership with RMC Research Corporation. The process was similar to content-setting standards in other fields. Each panel considered the work of the two before them, revising the standards and indicators to ensure that they included the strongest aspects of quality, and to make the wording clearer, measurable and actionable. These standards were adopted in 2008 and are essential attributes of high quality service-learning. Although not every standard may be included at a high level in each servicelearning activity, it is important to understand these attributes and the research that substantiates their importance. (Edited from “K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice - An Annotated Bibliography”, 2008.

www.nylc.org.)

K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice Meaningful Service Link to Curriculum Reflection Diversity Youth Voice Partnerships Progress Monitoring Duration and Intensity

(Edited from Getting Started in Service-Learning. National Youth Leadership Council. 2008.)

Billig reported in 2009, “Research has verified that when all of these elements are present as the base criteria for service learning, the likelihood for significant impact on the students is greater.” S. H. Billig. “Does Quality Really Matter? Testing the New K-12 Service Learning Standards for Quality Practice.” In B.E. Moely, S. H. Billig, and B. A. Holland (Eds.) Advances in Service-Learning: Vol.9. Creating Our Identities in Service-Learning and Community Engagement. Charlotte, N.C., 2009.

Standards and Indicators are reprinted with permission of the National Youth Leadership Council. Copyright © 2008 National Youth Leadership Council, St. Paul, MN. www.nylc.org. All rights reserved. Comments in yellow boxes are written by Cathryn Berger Kaye. From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. Sample Supporting Research: RMC Research Corporation. Standards and Indicators for Effective Service-Learning Practice. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2008. www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/fact_sheets/k-12_facts/standards/

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K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Meaningful Service

Service-learning actively engages participants in meaningful and personally relevant service activities.

“Students identify, authenticate, and learn about a recognized community need. Student actions are reciprocal, valued by

INDICATORS OF MEANINGFUL SERVICE

the community, and have real

1. Experiences are appropriate to participant ages and developmental abilities.

consequences while offering opportunities to apply newly acquired academic skills and knowledge.” 

2. Addresses issues that are personally relevant to the participants. 3. Provides participants with interesting and engaging service activities.

(Kaye, 2010)

4. Encourages participants to understand their service experiences in the context of the underlying societal issues being addressed. 5. Leads to attainable and visible outcomes that are valued by those being served.  

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES Community resources mapping tools: Getting Started in Service-Learning - An Elementary Through High School Handbook. (NYLC, Revised and Updated, 2010.) Meaningful Service Standard segments on age appropriateness, project videos and more, go to www.gsn.nylc.org/topics/77/videos/242# and www.lift.nylc.org.

To view or download research supporting Meaningful Service in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 26

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K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Link to Curriculum

Service-learning is intentionally used as an instructional strategy to meet learning goals and/or content standards.

“The process includes deliberate cross-curricular connections whereby students learn skills and content through varied modalities

INDICATORS OF LINK TO CURRICULUM

that meet academic standards, and

1.Has clearly articulated learning goals.

enables the transference of skills and content to new applications. The content informs the service and the service informs the content.”  

(Kaye, 2010)

2. Is explicitly aligned with the academic and/or programmatic curriculum.

3. Helps participants learn how to transfer knowledge and skills from one setting to another. 4. Takes place in schools is formally recognized in school board policies and in student records.  

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES “Community Lessons: Promising Curriculum Practices”. Julie Bartsch and contributing teachers (Massachusetts Dept. of Education, et. al., 2001). (www.doe.mass.edu/csl/comlesson.pdf) “Enriching the Curriculum Through Service-Learning”. Carol Kinsley and Kate McPherson (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1995). Orders: (800) 933-2723 or www.ascd.org. “Growing Hope: A Sourcebook on Integrating Youth Service Into the School Curriculum”. James Kielsmeier and Rich Cairn (National Youth Leadership Council, 1991). Orders: (651) 631-3672 or www.nylc.org. “Learning From Experience: A Collection of Service-Learning Projects Linking Academic Standards to Curriculum”. (Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 2000). Orders: (800) 243-8782 or www.dpi.state.wi.us/pubsales. “Route to Reform: K-8 Service-Learning Curriculum Ideas”. (Video) M. Wegner, M. Anderson, and C. Stenborg (National Youth Leadership Council, 1994). Orders: (651) 631-3672 or www.nylc.org. “Spinning Interdisciplinary Service-Learning Webs: A Secondary Education Approach”. (Maryland Student Service Alliance, 1995). Online at www.mssa.sailorsite.net/sl_webs.pdf.

To view or download research supporting Link to Curriculum in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 27

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K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Reflection

Service-learning incorporates multiple challenging reflection activities that are ongoing and that prompt deep thinking and analysis about oneself and one’s relationship to society.

“Students participate in systemic varied processes that integrate empathetic response with cognitive thinking related to social

INDICATORS OF REFLECTION

issues and their lives. This affective

1. Includes a variety of verbal, written, artistic, and nonverbal activities to demonstrate understanding and changes in participants’ knowledge, skills, and/or attitudes.

and cognitive blend deepens the service learning as students apply and transfer new understandings of themselves, others, and the world around them.” 

(Kaye, 2010)

2. Occurs before, during, and after the service experience. 3. Prompts participants to think deeply about complex community problems and alternative solutions. 4. Encourages participants to examine their preconceptions and assumptions in order to explore and understand their roles and responsibilities as citizens. 5. Encourages participants to examine a variety of social and civic issues related to their service-learning experience to understand connections to public policy and civic life.  

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES “Assessment for Service-Learning, Part One and Part Two”. (Kaye, 2010). “Four Square Reflection Tool”. (Kaye, 2010). “Community Lessons: Promising Curriculum Practices”. Julie Bartsch and contributing teachers (Massachusetts Dept. of Education, et. al., 2001). (www.doe.mass.edu/csl/comlesson.pdf) “Reflection” (PDF, 75 KB) (NYCL, 2005). A basic overview of reflection, including an explanation of its importance, and ideas for reflection activities that address a range of learning styles. Reflection section of LIFT website. (www.lift.nylc.org) Video clips, interviews, articles, and classroom tools. Reflection Fact Sheet. (www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/fact_sheets/k-12_facts/reflection/) Reflection: “Your Role in the Community”. (Sample reflection questions) www.lift.nylc.org/pdf/R_StudentReflection.pdf To view or download research supporting Reflection in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 28

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K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Diversity

Service-learning promotes understanding of diversity and mutual respect among all participants.

“Student experience affords opportunities to form multidimensional understanding and varied points of view. This

INDICATORS OF DIVERSITY

astereotypes with accurate

1. Helps participants identify and analyze different points of view to gain understanding of multiple perspectives.

information.” 

(Kaye, 2010)

2. Helps participants develop interpersonal skills in conflict resolution and group decision-making. 3. Helps participants actively seek to understand and value the diverse backgrounds and perspectives of those offering and receiving service. 4. Encourages participants to recognize and overcome stereotypes.  

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES Diversity (PDF, 103 KB). Brief explanation of the importance of understanding diversity as part of effective servicelearning practice. Illustrates eight ways that service-learning promotes diversity. (NYLC, 2005) Toolbox includes project examples, articles, and links related to the challenges and opportunities regarding diversity, and approaches for improving diversity in service-learning programs. (www.nylc.org/toolboxes/diversity) “Reflection: Reflecting Using Multiple Intelligences”. (www.lift.nylc.org/pdf/R_MultipleIntelligences.pdf) “Pondering Learning: Connecting Multiple Intelligences and Service-Learning”. C. Klopp, P. Toole, and J. Toole. (National Dropout Prevention Center, 2001). (www.dropoutprevention.org)

To view or download research supporting Diversity in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 29

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K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice

K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Youth Voice Service-learning provides youth with a strong voice in planning, implementing, and evaluating service-learning experiences with guidance from adults.

“Students experience significant age-appropriate challenges involving tasks that require thinking, initiative, and problem

INDICATORS OF YOUTH VOICE

solving as they demonstrate

1. Engages youth in generating ideas during the planning, implementation, and evaluation processes.

responsibility and decision-making in an environment safe enough to allow them to make mistakes and

3. Involves youth and adults in creating an environment that supports trust and open expression of ideas.

to succeed.” 

2. Involves youth in the decision-making process throughout the service-learning experiences.

(Kaye, 2010)

4. Promotes acquisition of knowledge and skills to enhance youth leadership and decision-making. 5. Involves youth in evaluating the quality and effectiveness of the service-learning experience.  

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES “Getting Ready for Personal Inventory”. (Kaye, 2010). Personal Assets and Interest Inventory is available in the Appendix of this guide. “Making Youth Voice a Reality” (PDF, 644 KB) . Carole Klopp. 2004. Self-evaluation tool to help adults understand their attitudes toward youths and their willingness to let them lead. (The Generator, Spring 2004) National Youth Leadership Council. RandomKid engages youth in real-world problems by providing guidance to classrooms and youth groups around the world, teaching appropriate skills, and creating opportunities for them to connect to resources empowering them to inspire and mobilize others.  (www.RandomKid.org) ”Speaking Out: Empowering the Youth Voice”. (National Dropout Prevention Center, 2004). (www.dropoutprevention.org) “Youth Voice” (PDF, 112 KB). The basics of youth voice, including assessing adult readiness for facilitation of youth voice and leadership, training ideas and finding youth leaders. Includes youth-leadership and youth/adult-partnership resources. (NYLC. 2005) “Youth Voice Changing the World”. (The Generator, Spring 2004). (National Youth Leadership Council). www.nylc.org. To view or download research supporting Youth Voice in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 30

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K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Partnerships

Service-learning partnerships are collaborative, mutually beneficial, and address community needs.

“Students participate in the development of reciprocal partnerships and share responsibility with community members, parents, and other students, as well as with people from organizations, businesses, and government.” 

(Kaye, 2010)

INDICATORS OF PARTNERSHIPS 1. Involves a variety of partners, including youth, educators, families, community members, community-based organizations, and/or businesses. 2. Partnerships are characterized by frequent and regular communication to keep all partners well-informed about activities and progress. 3. Partners collaborate to establish a shared vision and set common goals to address community needs. 4. Partners collaboratively develop and implement action plans to meet specified goals. 5. Partners share knowledge and understanding of school and community assets and needs and view each other as valued resources. 

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES “Building Community Through Service-Learning: The Role of the Community Partner”. Susan A. Abravanel (Education Commission of the States, 2003). www.ecs.org. “Community Agency Support”. (PDF, 123 KB). NYLC. 2005. Tip Sheet provides educators with a basic understanding of community agency perspectives on service-learning and planning strategies for positive experiences for both groups. “Mapping Community Resources” and “Planning for Effective Partnerships” worksheets (NYLC, 2010.) In the Appendix. N.C. Campus Compact list of contacts and Communities In Schools of North Carolina list of local affiliates, in the Appendix. Resource for potential community partners: Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations (Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse, 2009). (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf) “Roles and Responsibilities for Service Projects” (DOC, 79 KB). (NYLC, 2005). Topics: Standards & Curriculum Integration, Best Practices, Youth Voice & Leadership. Basic chart to help teachers, students and community partners plan projects and delegate responsibilities. To view or download research supporting Partnerships in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 31

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K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice

K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Progress Monitoring Service-learning engages participants in an ongoing process to assess the quality of implementation and progress toward meeting specified goals, and uses results for improvement and sustainability.

“Once students identify and authenticate the need, they use varied methods to observe and track change and improvement as they carry out the service learning process. Advancement toward intended or developing outcomes is examined, along with effectiveness of applied procedures and recognized mutual benefits. Findings are shared with stakeholders.” 

(Kaye, 2010)

INDICATORS OF PROGRESS MONITORING 1. Participants collect evidence of progress toward meeting specific service goals and learning outcomes from multiple sources throughout the service-learning experience. 2. Participants collect evidence of the quality of service-learning implementation from multiple sources throughout the servicelearning experience. 3. Participants use evidence to improve service-learning experiences. 4. Participants communicate evidence of progress toward goals and outcomes with the broader community, including policymakers and education leaders, to deepen service-learning understanding and ensure that high quality practices are sustained. 

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES “Progress Monitoring”. (PDF, 70 KB). Maddy Wegner. (NYLC, 2008). A teacher tool on the steps of progress monitoring, as well as lists of questions to help students frame the process of a teaching project evaluation. (The Generator, Summer 2008). (National Youth Leadership Council). (www.nylc.org). “Progress Monitoring”. (PDF, 214 KB). Caryn Pernu, Jim Kielsmeier, Maddy Wegner, Thomas Leeper. Perspectives on how to integrate progress monitoring into any service-learning experience and also an example of youth-led project evaluation from the Eagle Rock School in Estes Park, Colorado. (The Generator, Summer 2008). (National Youth Leadership Council). (www.nylc.org). “Progress Monitoring” worksheet. ( Kaye, 2010). In the Appendix. “Rubric for Continuous Improvement of the Service-Learning Experience”. Teri Dary, 2010. Included later in this guide.

To view or download research supporting Progress Monitoring in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 32

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K-12 SERVICE-LEARNING STANDARDS FOR QUALITY PRACTICE

Duration and Intensity

Service-learning has sufficient duration and intensity to address community needs and meet specified outcomes.

“The length of the experience allows for a complete and thorough process as articulated in the Five Stages of Service

INDICATORS OF DURATION AND INTENSITY

Learning, with age-appropriate

1. Experiences include the processes of investigation of community needs, preparation for service, action, reflection, demonstration of learning and impacts, and celebration.

content, skill development, and depth of material covered.” 

(Kaye, 2010)

2. Is conducted during concentrated blocks of time across a period of several weeks or months. 3. Provides enough time to address identified community needs.  

(NYLC, 2008.)

RESOURCES Semester of Service. Connects prominent national service events, such as Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service and Global Youth Service Day, through an extended service-learning framework of at least 70 hours. Young people ages 5-25, spend the “semester” addressing a meaningful community need connected to intentional learning goals and/or academic standards. By providing grants, curriculum guides, training and technical assistance, Semester of Service helps educators to lead effective service-learning programs. See resources section of Youth Service America for materials for the all new 2010 Semester of Service guide. (www.ysa.org).

To view or download research supporting Duration and Intensity in the K-12 Service-Learning Standards - An Annotated Bibliography, go to K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice An Annotated Bibliography, (NYLC, 2008). 33

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


Reprinted with permission from Teri Dary, from High Quality Instruction That Transforms - A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic Service-Learning. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, 2010. www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/ pdf high_quality_learning_web.pdf 34

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


Reprinted with permission from Teri Dary, from High Quality Instruction That Transforms - A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic Service-Learning. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, 2010. www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/ pdf high_quality_learning_web.pdf 35

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


“Plant trees. They give us the two most powerful elements for our survival: oxygen and books.� A. W. Brown.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES

For illustrative purposes, we have chosen to categorize service-learning experiences according to 13 themes listed below. [Kaye, 2010.] • AIDS Education and Awareness • Animal Protection and Care • Elders • Emergency Readiness • The Environment • Gardening • Healthy Lives, Healthy Choices • Hunger, Homelessness and Poverty • Immigrants • Literacy • Safe and Strong Communities • Social Change: Issues and Action • Special Needs and Disabilities Other topics such as tutoring, music/art, public art, public policy and technology often are viewed as strategies for implementation or demonstration of one of the 13 themes, rather than a community need or issue. Additional in-depth information relating to these topics can be found at www.nylc.org. All of the themes relate to one or more of the five priority areas of the 2010 Learn & Serve Challenge. 1. Community renewal, including responding to the economic crisis 2. Education, including literacy and keeping kids in school 3. Energy and the environment 4. Health and nutrition 5. Safety and security (www.learnandservechallenge.org/) Resources, including examples of lesson plans, suggestions of partnering organizations and examples of the theme-related service-learning experiences are noted in the section that follows.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES AIDS Education and Awareness RESOURCES Downloads from the NYLC Web web site site (www.nylc.org) (www.nylc.org) include include the the following: following: Service-Learning and HIV/AIDS: Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. This basic guide includes to includes thethe components components of service-learning of service-learning andand their their connection connection to HIV/AIDS to HIV/AIDS education, education,and andtips tipsfor forreflection, reflection,action actionplanning planning,and andincorporating incorporatinglearning learningobjectives. objectives. HIV/AIDS Toolbox includes research of research articles, articles, project project ideas ideas, andand links. links. Service-learning mobilizes youth youthsasasaaforce forceininfighting fightingthe theHIV/AIDS HIV/AIDSpandemic, pandemic,and andresearch researchshows shows that youth youthsare aremore morereceptive receptivetotoHIV HIVprevention preventionmessages messagesthat thatcome comefrom fromtheir theirpeers. peers. Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for lesson Lesson plans Plans related related to to this this theme. theme.

Service-Learning Examples Adapted from www.nylc.org

Blankets, Babies, and HIV/AIDS Awareness. Grades: 3-8 After reading an article about babies born with AIDS, students decided to make baby blankets to publicize that AIDS affects everyone, even the youngest of children. Subjects: Health/Physical Ed., Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Music/Arts Changing Attitudes: HIV, AIDS, and Compassion. Grades: 6-12 One class realized that acceptance is key in the fight against HIV and AIDS after reading a book about pandemics and society’s negative views of the infected. The students worked to counteract harassment within their school. Subjects: Health/Physical Ed., Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Music/Arts Comic Books Against HIV/AIDS Prejudice. Grades: 3-12 After discussing the prejudice faced by people with AIDS, students created a comic book character to teach youth about acceptance and respect. Subjects: Health/Physical Ed., Language Arts/Communications, Music/Arts HIV/AIDS Theaterworks. Grades: 9-12 Theater is an excellent medium for young people fighting the AIDS pandemic. Students used theater to teach other youth how to deal with peer pressure and make positive decisions regarding their health. Subjects: Technology/Industrial Arts, Health/Physical Ed., Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Math, Music/Arts Youth Voice AgainsHIV/AIDS. Grades: 6-12 High school students living with HIV and AIDS collaborated with other students to teach younger students about the disease. Subjects: Health/Physical Ed., Language Arts/Communications

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Animal Protection and Care RESOURCES Downloads from the NYLC web site (www.nylc.org) include theAction! following: A Kids’ Guide to Protecting & Caring for Animals: How to Take by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Service-Learning and48 HIV/AIDS: Getting Spirit Publishing, 2008). pp., grades 6–12.Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS education, and reflection, and(ASPCA) incorporating learning objectives. American Society fortips thefor Prevention ofaction Crueltyplanning, to Animals Humane Education Department (www.aspcapro.org/service-learning.php). Teacher newsletter and service-learning examples. See links HIV/AIDS of research articles, project ideas, and links. excerpted fromToolbox this Webincludes site below: Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows that youths more receptive HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. Design ‘Adoptare Me’ Bandanas forto Shelter Dogs and Cats Design Holiday Cards GoHold to www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. a Fundraising Sale Hold a Wish List Drive How to Make a Catnip Toy and Bake Dog Biscuits Humane Society. www.local.com. Humane Teen. Listing of ideas related to 12 school subjects. www.humaneteen.org. Kids’ Planet. Compendium of animal protection and environmental Web sites for young people www.kidsplanet.org Roots & Shoots. www.rootsandshoots.org International environmental program founded by Jane Goodall to encourage young people to engage in service-learning to improve the conditions of people, the environment and animals. Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for lesson plans related to this theme.

Service-Learning Example Grade 6-8: Project Terrapin Excerpted from www.gotoservicelearning.org This project aligns with the life science curriculum. Instead of reading about scientific inquiry, environmental issues and animal adaptations, students were active learners in the process, traveling to the turtles’ nesting site two hours from the school. Global warming was an issue they could study with hands-on experience. . . For many of the students, they know they have made a difference in the environment through Project Terrapin. . . The community has benefited from knowledge gained through student presentation on the terrapins. For many adults this creates a greater connection to the environment.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Elders RESOURCES Go Downloads to www.servicelearning.org/slice from the NYLC web site (www.nylc.org) for Service-Learning include Ideas theand following: Curricular Examples (SLICE) Service-Learning and HIV/AIDS: Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. Go to This www.gotoservicelearning.org basic guide to includes the components for lesson plans of service-learning related to this theme. and their connection to HIV/AIDS education, and tips for reflection, action planning, and incorporating learning objectives. Grade level topics to increase student understanding of the aging process and societal implications of aging. www.servicelearning.org/index.php HIV/AIDS Toolbox includes of research articles, project ideas, and links. Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows Howthat to Convene youths area more Gathering receptive (PDF,to327 HIVKB) prevention messages that come from their peers. Eight-week guide outlined in four stages: planning, preparation and design, the service/gathering activity, and reflection and celebration. Includes brief description socialtomores from several cultures. 2005. Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans of related this theme. (Excerpted from www.nylc.org)

Service-Learning Examples Adapted from www.nylc.org

Adopt-A-Grandparent Program: Clover Garden School, Alamance County, North Carolina In 1984, the Adopt-A-Grandparent Program began in an effort to enhance the service-learning opportunities for students and to respond to the needs of a growing older adult population in the local community. Students in the sixth through twelth grades have participated in this service-learning program which has effectively met the real needs of senior adult residents at four local assisted living facilities, while providing a “learning by service immersion” for students. For approximately 100 students per year, the assisted living facilities become a laboratory for engaged learning that connects the classroom to reallife situations and problems of the elderly. The primary partner for this experience is the Hawfields Presbyterian Home in Alamance County. The Adopt-A-Grandparent Program is a multi-faceted approach, integrating aspects of gerontology, technology, the N.C. Standard Course of Study for language arts and social studies, and assessment and response to actual community needs. Students demonstrate improved academic performance, interpersonal skills and an enhanced appreciation of diversity. Older adults benefit from social interaction with the younger generation by sharing life experiences and knowledge to create common bonds. Intergenerational Celebration of Culture. Washington. Grades 5-8 When one teacher introduced a culture curriculum to her fourth grade students, she discovered that few knew much about their heritages. She and the students brainstormed a fun way to investigate their cultural backgrounds and in the process connected with some interesting community members. Subjects: Technology/Industrial Arts, Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Music/Arts, ESL History in Your Own Backyard. Pennsylvania. Grades 6-12 and Higher Education An intergenerational project helped history students discover interesting, but often overlooked, historical resources in their newfound friends from a local senior center. The youths met periodically with the seniors to document the elders’ life histories - a process that included formal, recorded interviews - and did additional research on the events that had shaped the seniors’ lives.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Emergency Readiness RESOURCES Downloads American Red from Cross the (www.redcross.org/disaster/masters). NYLC web site (www.nylc.org) include Web thesite following: includes a disaster education component withService-Learning tools for teachers, and including HIV/AIDS: a curriculum Getting Started that can (PDF, be52 downloaded. KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS Behind education, the Mountains and tipsbyforEdwidge reflection, Danticat. action planning, Scholasticand Inc.incorporating ORCHARD BOOKS, learning2002. objectives. Story of Haitian girl whose life and family is threatened in the polical uprisings of October 2000. (Book is out of print but check school HIV/AIDS library or Toolbox online includes for used of copies.) research articles, project ideas, and links. Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows Resources that youths for Recovery are more(PDF, receptive 304 KB) to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. Two leaders from the service-learning field traveled to the Gulf Coast soon after the devastation of the 2005 hurricane season to meet the educators and young leaders in the recovery process. This article Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans relatedinvolved to this theme. describes the various programs and initiatives that are being developed to engage genuine youth voices in rebuilding the region. (Growing to Greatness 2006) Teddy Gross, Jim Kielsmeier, NYLC Topics: Disaster Prevention and Recovery, Diversity, Research & Policy, Benefits of Service-Learning Save the Children (www.savethechildren.org/programs/emergencies). Web site features a global map and details about emergency situations and the needs of children living in disaster areas. Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for lesson plans related to this theme. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (www.ready.gov/kids/). Contains a guide for young people to create an emergency readiness kit and to make an emergency plan.

Service-Learning Examples The 2006 Gulf Coast WalkAbout (PDF, 180 KB). Tom Berkas, 2007. In the summer of 2006, NYLC’s WalkAbout program engaged youth from the hurricane-ravaged Gulf region to rebuild their communities. This article looks at the program’s history, details from WalkAbout service-learning projects, and civic and academic outcomes. From Growing to Greatness 2007 (PDF, 1 MB) Flood and Ice: Grades 9-12. Within a year, communities in northeastern Oklahoma faced unprecedented weather - two ice storms and a flood. Students wanted to tell their story. A journalism class created a newspaper devoted to students whose lives were affected by the disaster; history classes conducted surveys; English classes wrote poetry; art classes produced posters, and civic classes wrote essays. With community support and assistance from Cherokee Nation Learn and Serve, the collective result was a book of images, photos and writings that give voice to the community. (Excerpted from The Complete Guide to Service Learning). (Kaye, 2010).

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES

SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES The Environment RESOURCES Downloads theGuide NYLCtoweb site Our (www.nylc.org) include the&following: Going Blue: from A Teen Saving Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, Wetlands by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. HIV/AIDS: Getting (FreeService-Learning Spirit Publishing,and 2010). 160 pp., gradesStarted 6–12. (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS education, tips for reflection, action planning, andto incorporating objectives. A Kids’ Guide toand Climate Change & Global Warming: How Take Action!learning by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Publishing, 2009). 48 pp., grades 6–12. HIV/AIDS Toolbox includes of research articles, project ideas, and links. Service-learning mobilizes a force inengages fightingmiddle the HIV/AIDS and research shows EarthEcho International’s Wateryouths Planet as Challenge and highpandemic, school students to address thatchange youthsthrough are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that fromthe their peers. will provide global service-learning projects. When launched in come Fall 2010, challenge comprehensive science-based environmental educational materials, tools and resources to empower youth to Go toaction. www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. take (www.WaterPlanetChallenge.org). Project Learning Tree® (PLT) is a national environmental education program of the American Forest Foundation (www.forestfoundation.org/cel_environmental.html) that produces high quality curriculum materials for students in grades pre-K-12. PLT provides training and professional development and curriculum: PLT for pre-K-8 and PLT for grades 9-12. KnowH2O: Learning About Water Access While Strengthening Citizenship Skills. M. VanKeulen. NYLC, 2007. (www.nylc.org/resources). The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people. (www.nature.org/). Central Council of Governments: Overview of regional environmental organizations. (www.centralina.org). N.C. Cooperative Extension Service. (www.ces.ncsu.edu). N.C. Division of Forest Resources. (www.dfr.state.nc.us). U.S. Forest Service. (www.fs.fed.us). The North Carolina land trusts present, assist and promote our state’s local land trusts so they can protect more land. (www.ctnc.org). Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for lesson plans related to this theme.

Service-Learning Examples Grade 7-8: Harry Hurst Middle School Wetland Watchers, Louisiana Through education, service and awareness, Hurst Middle School students lead a community effort for wetland conservation. Students are engaged in activities that provide real-life connections and applications. Activities are 100% hands-on, integrated across the curriculum and with thorough reflection tying all of their experiences together with grade level expectations. View Lesson Plan from www.gotoservicelearning.org/. To see video of this example, go to www.lift.nylc.org. Grade 5: Hayes Bilingual Elementary School, Kinnickinnic River Investigation, Wisconsin Students partnered with various environmental and health agencies, and created a sculpture they used as a community awareness tool. Go to www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/pdf/high_quality_learning_web.pdf to read more in High Quality Instruction That Transforms, 2010.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Gardening RESOURCES Downloads from the NYLC web site (www.nylc.org) include the following: Service-Learning and HIV/AIDS: Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS education, and tips for reflection, action planning, and incorporating learning objectives. HIV/AIDS Toolbox includes of research articles, project ideas, and links. Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows that youths are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers.

RESOURCES

Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. Junior Master Gardeners (www.jmgkids.us) International youth gardening program Learn and Serve (www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/hot_topics/community_gardens). National Gardening Association websites: (www.assoc.garden.org/about) (www.kidsgardening.org/) North Carolina Food Network (www.ncfoodnet.com/). North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service (4-H) (www.ces.ncsu.edu). Agriculture & Food; Environment; Forest Resources; Health & Nutrition; Home & Family; Lawn & Garden. Project Learning Tree/activity guides aligned to course standards: (www.plt.org/cms/pages). The Center for Environmental Farming Systems (www.cefs.ncsu.edu). The National Wildlife Federation’s Garden for Wildlife (www.nwf.org/gardenforwildlife.cfm). Carolina Biological Supply......................... (800) 334-5551 Children’s Garden....................................... (415) 987-0097 Earth Day in Your School & Community...... (816) 756-5686 Green Teacher............................................ (416) 960-1244 National Garden Association...................... (800) 863-1308 “Tips for Starting a School Garden”, Randolph Middle School, Charlotte, N.C. Source: The Branch Newsletter: (www.plt.org/cms/pages/36_124_232.html) Go to (www.gotoservicelearning.org) for lesson plans related to this theme Grant resources for gardening: Project Learning Tree/American Forest Foundation: (www.plt.org/aboutplt/) (202)463-2585. Connect a Million Minds (CAMM), Time Warner Cable’s philanthropic commitment to connect youth to afterschool opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Eligible applicants include 501(c)(3) organizations and funding is available for transportation to programs related to STEM. (www.GrantRequest.com/SID_968) “Healthy, active, and well nourished children are more likely to attend school and are more prepared and motivated to learn.”  -Tufts University School of Nutrition 1994

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Gardening, Continued Service-Learning Examples Moore County, N.C.

Child health and wellness is a critical health issue for North Carolina, ranked the fifth worse state for childhood obesity. The Communities In Schools developed the FirstSchool Garden program to address this issue. With major funding from BlueCross and BlueShield of North Carolina Foundation and Moore Regional Hospital Auxiliary, as well as partnering with Moore County Schools, FirstHealth of theCarolinas, Moore County Cooperative Extension and the Master Gardener Volunteers, eight schools in Moore County now are increasing physical activity and providing healthy eating opportunities for school-aged children through the FirstSchool Garden Program. The gardens provide learning opportunities in all subject areas and are aligned with N.C state curriculum standards. FirstSchool Gardens have been awarded to eight elementary schools within the local school system, all supported by Communities In Schools of Moore County. The FirstSchool Garden Program supports students in developing lifelong nutrition and fitness behaviors by bringing diet, nutrition and food preparation directly to students in the garden. Through hands on experience, they discover what it takes to get the food they eat to their plate. When working in the garden, students have an opportunity to get fresh air, sunshine and exercise in an outdoor setting. Taking care of themselves and their environment go hand in hand in the garden. Sustainability concepts permit children to see their role in the overall earth ecology and the direct effect it has at a local level. They are exposed to a variety of recycling efforts including recycled plastics for rain barrels made from pickle barrels, and SmarTimberZ molded from plastic milk jugs. Water conservation and composting techniques are incorporated. (Communities In Schools of Moore County, N.C. (wwwfirstschoolgarden.org) Note: The grade levels project examples can be adapted to meet the needs of different ages and curricular goals.

Belfast, Maine: Troy Howard Middle School The Troy Howard Middle School Garden Project is an outdoor learning experience providing a school-wide garden and greenhouse project in which children can learn experientially through an integrated curriculum. It is viewed as both a regional and national model for school agricultural programs. This project has developed in three major phases: trail expansion, a pond and streams project, apple tree restoration and an heirloom seed garden. The garden provides nutritious, whole foods that are used district-wide in the school lunch program. In 2002, there were 4000 pounds of harvested food incorporated into school menus. Some of the harvest also was donated to local soup kitchens and food partners, teaching community responsibility and social awareness. The remaining produce was sold at the THMS Farmer’s Market to local families and the community (or given directly to students) and the local food co-op, thereby creating a small source of revenue to reinvest in the project. From 2003-2010, students grew 48,600 lbs. of food for distribution. A variety of herbs, vegetables and flowers are grown from seeds or starts. Fresh greens are sold to the district cafeteria program, local food co-op, through the school farm stand and to individual staff during the winter months. Two unheated hoop houses also are maintained to provide additional greens for the local soup kitchen and to hold a large underground worm bin for all of the school’s leftover food and paper waste. The hoop houses were designed and built by the gardening students and have become a place for student research. The Garden Project affords students the opportunity to work collaboratively, solve problems as a team and foster a strong sense of self-confidence while gaining an appreciation for the value of agriculture. Staff utilize the garden and greenhouse for student projects in the areas of art, plant experimentation, math, earth science, Maine history, writing and research, nutrition and economics. The curriculum attempts to integrate core, traditional subjects and state assessments through hands-on engagement. Adapted from: (www.schoolgardenproject.com/) 44

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Healthy Lives, Healthy Choices RESOURCES Downloads Note: Resources from the for the NYLC gardening web siteservice-learning (www.nylc.org)theme include often the following: are helpful for those developing a servicelearning Service-Learning experience in and theHIV/AIDS: area of Healthy Getting Lives, Started Healthy (PDF, Choices. 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS Drugeducation, and alcohol abuse prevention and service-learning: Selected resources. Retrieved from and tips for reflection, action planning, and incorporating learning objectives. www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/bibs/he_bibs/drug_alcohol/index.php. Click on links below. HIV/AIDS includes of research Building Toolbox a Healthy Community: Meth articles, Abuse project ideas, and links. Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows that youths Clearinghouse are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. National for Alcohol and Drug Information Institute on Drug Abuse Go to National www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. The Partnership for a Drug-Free American National Institute on Alcohol Awareness and Alcoholism Fact Sheets: Go to Public Health and Service-Learning Source: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, October 2008.This resource gives an overview of servicelearning and provides a list of resources and research on service-learning and public health. Go to www.go to servicelearning.org for lesson plans related to this theme.

Service-Learning Examples Sedgewick County, KS For several years, two elementary and two middle schools in Derby, KS, have partnered with Communities In Schools of Wichita to implement a health promotion project on improving nutrition and physical activity. As a result, the students are familiar with positive health messages and now have taken the project to the next level with a service learning component. The added focus is on further educating themselves, their peers and the community regarding the importance of Healthy Goals 2010 and meeting school district policies and student benchmarks in the area of health. In the process, they have educated their peers on the impact of media messages on their health and created a cookbook of healthy recipes and donated proceeds to the Derby Food Pantry. In addition, students have participated in the National Service Days of Martin Luther King Jr Day and Global Youth Service Days in conjunction with AmeriCorps members. The Derby schools, the Derby Rec Center, and the City of Derby partner with the students to help them deliver their messages through the city’s local television channel and through presentations to numerous school and community groups. Harborside Academy, Kenosha, WI Students participated in a project on the 1918 pandemic to the modern-day projected avian pandemic. Biology students were placed in stakeholder positions (school district, community government, state government, citizens) and asked to plan for a pandemic. After students considered questions from various perspectives, they discussed how to inform the community. The service became meaningful and personally relevant to the onset of the swine flu outbreak which occurred immediately after completion of the project. Students sent postcards in both Spanish and English to the community to reinforce the three main objectives of the health department: cover your cough, wash your hands and stay home if you’re sick. Students used pandemic preparedness survey information and class discussion to identify at-risk groups, such as school-age children and elderly living alone or in assisted living centers, as well as those who are not in touch with the media. The chosen groups became the focus of the “Get the Word Out” campaign and received simple readable information for prevention. (Wisconsin DPI, 2010 www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/pdf/sl-implementationguide.pdf) . Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer. Donations from lemonade stands to fund childhood cancer research. (www.AlexsLemonade.org).

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Hunger, Homelessness, Poverty RESOURCES Downloads from the NYLC web site (www.nylc.org) include the following: A Kids’ Guide to Hunger & Homelessness: How to Take Action! by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Service-Learning Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. Publishing, 2007). 48and pp.,HIV/AIDS: grades 6–12. This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS education, and tips for reflection,or action planning, and incorporatingfor learning objectives. Go to (www.gotoservicelearning.org) (www.servicelearning.org/slice) examples of lesson plans related to this theme. HIV/AIDS Toolbox includes of research articles, project ideas, and links. Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows Habitat for Humanity. (www.habitat.org/youthprograms.) that youths are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. North Carolina Coalition to End Homelessness (www.ncceh.org). Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. Share Our Strength. (www.strength.org)

Service-Learning Examples www.nylc.org

Feed Your Neighbors. Grades: preK-8 As part of a communications curriculum, kindergarten through sixth grade students invited a representative from a local food pantry to speak to them. The speaker explained that many people in the community were hungry, and the students were moved to organize a food drive. Subjects: Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Math, Sciences/Environmental Ed., Music/Arts Hunger, Homelessness, and Loneliness. Grades: 3-12 In a school focused on service, eighth and ninth graders shined in their work with their community’s hungry, homeless, orphans, and elderly-reaching out to a soup kitchen, and orphanage, and a nursing home. Subjects: Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Music/Arts One Less Empty Bowl. Grades: preK-12 When their school replaced the students’ holiday gift exchange with service projects, second grade students in Michigan decided to help the hungry. The project opened the students’ eyes and the community’s hearts. Subjects: Business, Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Math, Music/Arts Quilt-Makers Project. Grades: preK-2 It all began as an introduction to the letter “Q”: Quilt-related literature, both fiction and nonfiction, was read to kindergarten students to give them the historical and cultural backgrounds on the origins of quilts. The children then took their love of quilting one step further, creating a quilt to comfort a baby residing in a nearby shelter. Subjects: Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Math, Music/Arts, Family/Consumer Ed. 

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Immigrants RESOURCES “Engaging the Voices from the Rim” 400 KB) include the following: Downloads from the NYLC web site (PDF, (www.nylc.org) Summary of a presentation on refugees, immigrants, migrants and service-learning in urban communities. Service-Learning and HIV/AIDS: Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. Despite challenges of using service-learning these new students, benefits still cantobeHIV/AIDS plentiful. This the basic guide to includes the components with of service-learning and their connection Includes easy-to-read bulleted information and a case study. (www.nylc.org) (The Generator, education, and tips for reflection, action planning, and incorporating learning objectives.Winter 2004/2005) HIV/AIDS Toolbox includes of research articles, project ideas, and links. Everyday Democracymobilizes (www.everyday-democracy.org) has materials for middle and high levels, Service-learning youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, andschool research shows including a curriculum on immigration. that youths are moreunit receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (score.rims.k12.ca.us) Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. contains resources for connecting immigration issues to classroom curriculum. “Service-Learning and Multicultural/Multiethnic Perspectives” (PDF, 2 MB) In-depth study of missionary ideology, diversity and equity issues. Thoughtful vignettes illustrate the history of service in communities of color, including Native American, immigrant and refugee groups. Issues of diversity and understanding often turn into lessons about equity that can lead to social action and change. (Phi Delta Kappan, May 2000 adapted from www.nylc.org) The International Rescue Committee (www.theirc.org) provides assistance to refugees worldwide. Look for office in local communities. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (www.uscis.gov) includes the Guide to Naturalization. (Excerpted from Kaye, 2010).

Service-Learning Examples Adapted from www.nylc.org

Culture Bus. Washington. Grades 3-8. Bus shelters are some of the most visible items on roads. Second grade students decorated a shelter in an effort to spread their message of cultural appreciation. Armed with solid research and hands-on experience, the students were able to create insightful posters for the bus shelters. A local artist helped them depict graphically and symbolically many of the cultural details they learned, including countries’ modes of transportation, shelters, foods and basic language phrases. After their posters were installed as bus shelter panels, students encouraged family members to ride the bus more.  Because they had contributed to their community’s public transportation system, they were more comfortable riding the bus and more respectful of public property. Subjects: Foreign/Sign Language, Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Music/Arts Adapted from “Route to Reform: K-8 Service-Learning Curriculum Ideas,” © 1994-95 National Youth Leadership Council. (www.nylc.org). 

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Literacy RESOURCES A Kids’ Guidefrom to Helping Othersweb Read & Succeed: How to Take Action! Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Downloads the NYLC site (www.nylc.org) include theby following: Publishing, 2007). 48 pp., grades 6–12. Service-Learning and HIV/AIDS: Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005.

This basic guide to includes the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS

Volunteer USA Foundation is a new national foundation focused on mentoring and literacy. For more information on the education, and tips for reflection, action planning, and incorporating learning objectives. State Farm Youth Advisory Board and their support of service-learning nationally, visit (www.statefarmyab.com).

HIV/AIDS Toolbox ofLearning researchCurriculum articles, project ideas, and links. Strategies for Success with includes Literacy - A that Serves by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. Service-learning mobilizes as teacher a forceguide in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows (ABCD Books, 2009 revised edition)youths 253 pp., plus additional materials. Click here to find out more about that youths are more receptive prevention comeeducation from their peers. this innovative research-based approachtotoHIV engaging studentsmessages in literacy,that character and civic engagement through service learning. • summary of a study on this program conducted by RMC Research, here. GoFor to awww.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this click theme. • For a study conducted by the Los Angeles Unified School District, 2008 implementation, click here. Go to (www.gotoservicelearning.org) for lesson plans related to this theme.

Service-Learning Examples This is Your Life Grades: 3-5 To kindergarten children, older students can be intimidating and unapproachable. One fifth grade class in Michigan decided to change this perception by writing and presenting each younger student with a book. (www.nylc.org) Cross-Age Literacy: Grade 9 Because double-period English classes are designed for those students who are reading below grade level, the cross-age tutoring partnership was an excellent opportunity for students to improve their reading skills and to mentor younger children in their community. The first grade students also benefited from the relationship they developed with their “big buddies” as they began to realize that the high school students they encountered in their neighborhood were not to be feared; rather, they were to be trusted and admired. (www.gotoservicelearning.org)

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Safe and Strong Communities RESOURCES Downloads Go to (www.gotoservicelearning.org) from the NYLC web site (www.nylc.org) for lesson plansinclude related the to this following: theme. Service-Learning and HIV/AIDS: Getting Started (PDF, 52 KB). Tracy Reardon. 2005. Rhymes This Vs. basic Racism. guide to Florida. includes Allthe grade components levels. Students of service-learning used brown and and white their connection eggs and antoexpansion HIV/AIDSof the Humpty education, Dumpty and nursery tips for rhyme reflection, to illustrate actionhow planning, no oneand should incorporating be judgedlearning by theirobjectives. skin color. Subjects: Health/Physical Ed., Social Studies/History, Language Arts/Communications, Family/Consumer Ed. HIV/AIDS includes of research articles, project ideas, and links. (Excerpted fromToolbox www.nylc.org) Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows that are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. Some ofyouths the national organizations that address this theme are listed below: National Crime Prevention Council and Street Law. (Teens, Crime, and the Community). (www.ncpc.org) Go Educators to www.gotoservicelearning.org for(ESR) Lesson Plans related to this theme. for Social Responsibility (www.er/national.org) The National Association of S.A.V.E. (Students Against Violence Everywhere) (www.nationalsave.org) Neighborhood Safety Map. A group of Minnesota third grade students created a map of their neighborhood’s safety features and invited representatives from the police and fire departments and from the local utilities company to speak about safety on the street and around power lines. They studied community plans, seeing for the first time their neighborhood’s full design and practicing general map-reading skills. Walking in supervised small groups, they noted safety features such as street signs, traffic patterns, fire hydrants and telephones. They recorded the information on a map they drew and copied it for distribution to parents and community members at an open house. The students donated their large-scale original safety map to the public library as a neighborhood resource. (Adapted from “Route to Reform: K-8 service-learning Curriculum Ideas,” © 1994-95 National Youth Leadership Council, (www.nylc.org)

Service-Learning Examples Project Ignition, a partnership between State Farm Insurance and the National Youth Leadership Council, is a service-learning grant program focused on teen driver safety. Student campaign teams in many communities across the nation find their inspiration close to home, sometimes from personal tragedy, but their powerful messages reach across towns, counties and state lines. Students: • engage peers and other community members to consider their own roles in teen driver safety issues through school physics projects, interactive demonstrations at school lunch rooms and community fairs, writing music and poetry, producing public service announcements. • meet with city councils and local legislators to encourage stronger public policy surrounding teen driver safety. • build Web sites and memory walls. • galvanize schools and families and sometimes, around their efforts to keep teen drivers and passengers safe. (Adapted from www.sfprojectignition.com) Cathryn Berger Kaye, (2010, pp.201-203) describes numerous service-learning scenarios depicting several issues related to this theme, including bullying, teen violence, neighborhood speed limits, global conflict, community history, building friendships and tolerance. 49

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Social AIDSChange: Education Issues and and Awareness Action RESOURCES City Works: Exploring Your Community: A Workbook. Adria Steinberg, David Stephen (The New Press, 1999. A high school curriculum providing innovative way for young people to understand their community by investigating the neighborhoods in which they live. Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for lesson plans related to this theme. “Advocacy-Based Service-Learning for Social Justice and Civics-Based Service-Learning” (PDF). James Toole May 7, 2010.

Service-Learning Examples Malcolm Shabazz High School in Madison, Wisconsin. This project example documents collaborative work between schools in the Metropolitan School District in Madison, Wisconsin and the office of the Mayor. Students from Hamilton Middle and Malcolm Shabazz High Schools were asked to research ways to make a central city street more youth-friendly, while considering the concerns of merchants and property owners. Their report survey and reflection instruments illustrate how students might engage in service experiences that enter the realm of policy or advocacy work and result in attainable and visible outcomes. (www.lift.nylc.org/pdf/MS_ProjectExample.pdf) WHAT IS PEN OR PENCIL™? This initiative blends history, social studies, civic education, economic and service-learning standards into an experiential learning framework to inspire critical thinking, skills development and activism by youth to choose the road away from prison and jail, and toward a quality education. Through PEN OR PENCIL™, social action strategies evolve from the stories, courage and examples of little and well-known participants of the Underground Railroad and the modern day civil rights movements. This curriculum was designed by the National Alliance of Faith and Justice. Communities In Schools of High Point, N.C., has participated in this program for the last three years and engaged more than 150 young people at three High Point schools. Every student who has been involved has graduated from high school and many pursuing secondary degrees either at two-year or four-year institutions. Service projects have included leading school rallies against violence, participating in March on Washington to call attention to the need for mentors, adopting families for the holidays, peer mentoring, helping to build a Habitat for Humanity House and challenging schools to coordinate non-violence campaigns.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


SERVICE-LEARNING THEMES Special Needs and Disabilities RESOURCES Downloads “Getting Ready fromfor the Service-Learning NYLC web site Involving (www.nylc.org) Specialinclude Needsthe andfollowing: Disabilities” (PDF, 80 KB). Description of twoService-Learning classroom-oriented andactivities HIV/AIDS: appropriate Getting Started for preparing (PDF, 52 classes KB). Tracy to partner Reardon. with special 2005. needs or special education This basic students guidefor to aincludes service-learning the components project.of Brief service-learning but teacher-friendly and their resource. connection Cathryn to HIV/AIDS Berger Kaye, 2004. education, Topics: Diversity, and tips Best for reflection, Practices, action Benefits planning, of Service-Learning. and incorporating (Excerpted learning from objectives. www.nylc.org). Go to HIV/AIDS (www.gotoservicelearning.org) Toolbox includes of research for lesson articles, plansproject relatedideas, to thisand theme. links. Service-learning mobilizes youths as a force in fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and research shows Links that from youths www.servicelearning.org/topic/disabilities are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. Americans with Disabilities Act Go toEffective www.gotoservicelearning.org for Lesson Plans related to this theme. Practices: Disability Inclusion National Service Inclusion Project

Service-Learning Examples Disability Awareness/Health Fair. Grades: 6-8 Childhood diseases and disabilities impact many middle school students. Curriculum unit is designed to introduce sixth grade students to a variety of diseases and disabilities that children may suffer from or encounter in their school population. The unit incorporates research, compositions both written and visual, analysis of civic duty and culture and an analysis of computations and statistics - all designed to culminate in a student-run health fair. Syllabus/Curriculum: Disability_Awareness_Health_Fair.pdf. (Excerpted from description by Maryland State Department of Education/SLICE Ideas and Examples at www.servicelearning.org].  Cooking Club. Grades: Special Education, 3-8 Special-needs students in Minnesota chose non-disabled peer buddies to assist them in mastering the skills necessary to shop for groceries and prepare a nutritious meal. The special education students began by practicing how to read labels and recipes, along with the math skills necessary to make change for food purchases. As a group, they chose an ethnic theme, searched for appropriate recipes, and planned and prepared the meal for a multicultural celebration. Subjects: Health/Physical Ed., Language Arts/Communications, Math, Family/Consumer Ed.

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


PARENT INVOLVEMENT

Parents can play a key role in the success of service-learning:

RESOURCES

• Involvement in schools • Encouragement of their child’s involvement in service-learning • Participation in non-school settings Excerpted from “What is Service Learning? A Guide for Parents” (www.servicelearning.org/parents)

Teachers facilitate parent involvement by • Informing parents • Determining meaningful roles for parents • Workshops on service-learning • Establishing parent service liaisons for class or grade levels • Program design that includes opportunities for parents and students to work together • Involve in skill-building for students that teachers cannot provide 

(Kaye 2010)

RESOURCES “What Downloads is Service from Learning? the NYLC Aweb Guide site for (www.nylc.org) Parents”. Cathryn include Berger the following: Kaye. Six-page guide providing information on the Service-Learning definition and and benefits HIV/AIDS: of service-learning Getting Started and(PDF, practical 52 KB). stepsTracy for parents Reardon. to ensure 2005. service-learning is partThis of their basic child’s guideeducation. to includes(www.servicelearning.org). the components of service-learning and their connection to HIV/AIDS education, and tips for reflection, action planning, and incorporating learning objectives. “Service-Learning: A Context for Parent and Family Involvement”. (PDF, 108 KB). (Growing to Greatness, 2006.) HIV/AIDS Marybeth Toolbox Neal, Cathryn includesKaye. of research Commonalities articles, project of service-learning ideas, and links. and parent involvement are provided Service-learning with charts mobilizes and strategies youths for as collaboration a force in fighting amongthe parents, HIV/AIDS students pandemic, and educators. and research shows that youths are more receptive to HIV prevention messages that come from their peers. “Parental Involvement and Service-Learning” (PDF, 376 KB) (Growing to Greatness, 2010.) Hedy Lemar Walls advocates Go to www.gotoservicelearning.org for service-learning as a means for Lesson for schools Plans related to partner to this withtheme. parents. Schools help parents support learning at home and provide feedback on student progress, while parents can offer valuable volunteer resources to schools and service-learning projects. “Parent Involvement in Service Learning”. Cathryn Berger Kaye. (National Dropout Prevention Center, 1998). Resource emphasizes that the service habits start at home and provides specific examples of how parents’ interest can be fostered and activities in which they can participate. Family Engagement overview: www.dropoutprevention.org/effstrat/family_engagement/overview.htm Please note that in this context, “parent” is applicable to any relative, mentor or other adult who is significant to the student. 52

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


APPENDIX OF RESOURCES AND REFERENCES

APPENDIX

This Appendix is a toolkit compiled to provide easily accessible and effective resources for developing key components of the service-learning experience. The worksheets, which span the entire service-learning cycle, also are available online in Word ™ format to share information easily during the planning process. Additional references to electronic materials are provided to encourage identification of other planning tools, potential funding sources and partners, as well as opportunities for student recognition.

Organizational Resources and Web Sites.................................. 54 Potential Partnering Agencies in North Carolina....................... 56 Notable State Resources/Awards/Funding Sources.................... 57 Additional Funding Sources for Service-Learning...................... 58 Service-Learning in North Carolina.......................................... 59 Educator and Student Worksheets............................................. 60 Institutions of Higher Education/N.C. Campus Compact........... 62

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EDUCATOR AND STUDENT WORKSHEETS FOR EFFECTIVE SERVICE-LEARNING

APPENDIX

The following worksheets correspond to the Five Key Components of Effective Service-Learning. All worksheets are found in this Appendix and also in WordTM format at www.cisnc.org

Worksheets related to Investigation • Investigation/Establishing a Baseline Worksheet #1 • Sample Interview Questions for Key Community Leaders Worksheet #2 • Notes from Our Service-Learning Community Walk Worksheet #3 Worksheets related to Preparation & Planning • Getting Ready for Personal Inventory Worksheet #7 • Guide to completing the Mapping Community Partnerships Worksheet #8 • Mapping Community Partnerships Worksheet #9 • Planning for Effective Partnerships Worksheet #10 (2 pages) • Guilford County Lesson Plan Template Worksheet #15 (3 pages) • Across the Curriculum Worksheet #4** • Planning for Service Learning Worksheet #5 ** • Mapping out challenges/resources/strategies Worksheet #6** Worksheets related to Action • Checklist for Implementing the Action Plan Worksheet #11 Worksheets related to Reflection • Check-Up: Reflection Worksheet #13 p. 42 • Progress Monitoring Worksheet #12 • Reflection guide Worksheet #13 for teachers Worksheets related to Demonstration & Celebration • Demonstration and Celebration Worksheet #14

Citations found on the bottom of each worksheet.

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EDUCATOR AND STUDENT WORKSHEETS

Online Worksheets The following supplements are found on external Web sites and can be downloaded.

Downloads related to Investigation • Quality Check-Up: Investigate Worksheet #5, p. 22. Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations, 2009. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf) Downloads related to Preparation & Planning • Project Planning Checklist www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf • K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit, created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf • High Quality Instruction that Transforms: A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic Service-Learning Planning/Student Action Plan, p. 76 www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/pdf/sl-implementationguide.pdf. Downloads related to Action • Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations, 2009. Quality Check-Up: Action Worksheet #11, p. 37. www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf Downloads related to Reflection • Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations, 2009. www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf Downloads related to Demonstration & Celebration • Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations, 2009. Quality Check-Up: Demonstration and Celebration Worksheet #17, page 50. www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf • Teacher Options for Demonstration/Celebration Events, p. 66. High Quality Instruction that Transforms: A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic Service-Learning

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From the The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., Š 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permission.cfm.


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Worksheet 4

Across the Curriculum English/Language Arts

Social Studies/History

Math

Theater, Music, &Visual Arts

Physical Education

Languages

Computer

Science

From the The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A.,  © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district.  For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permission.cfm. 


Worksheet 5 (two pages)

Planning for Service Learning Grade level(s): _______________________________

Youth Voice and Choice:

Essential Purpose or Question:

Content—Learning About:

Service Need:

Service Idea:

Curricular Connections: English/Language Arts: Social Studies/History: Mathematics: Science:

Investigation of the Need:

Languages: Art and Music:

Preparation and Planning:

Technology: Other:

Action:

Reflection Methods:

Demonstration to Others:

Skills Being Developed:

Books and Other Media Used:

Community Partners:

From the The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., Š 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permission.cfm.


for Service Learning (continued)

Opportunities for Students to: •

Experience and explore diversity:

Participate in progress monitoring:

Learn about careers:

Strengthen social, emotional, and character traits:

Make global connections:

Develop leadership:

Duration of the Service Learning Experience (approximate timeframe):

Teacher Collaboration:

Public Awareness or Presentations Planned (including media, alerting public officials, recognition, and celebrations):

Tangible Product(s) from the Experience:

Additional Notes:


Worksheet 6 Administrative Tasks Making arrangements for students to carry out service-learning projects involves many administrative issues, such as scheduling (possibly getting permission for students to miss classes), gaining parent permission and involvement, and managing risk. What challenges do you anticipate related to each issue? What resources (people, financial, etc.) could help you and your students with these challenges? What are your final strategies for addressing each administrative issue?

Administrative Issue Challenges

Resources

Strategies

Scheduling the service experience

Gaining administrator permission and support

Gaining parent permission and support

Transportation

Materials and equipment needs

Potential risks

Reprinted from RMC Corporation, K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2006/2009. http://servicelearning.org/ llibrary/resource/8542. With Permission.


Worksheet 7

Getting Ready for Personal Inventory Every student brings interests, skills, and talents to the class. Your task is to discover what those are by doing a personal inventory. Using the Personal Inventory form, you will interview another student to discover abilities and interests that will be helpful to the group. Complete this form to prepare.

Coming to Terms What’s the difference between these three terms? Interest: Skill: Talent:

Active Listening List three signs that someone is being a good listener. 1. 2. 3. List three behaviors to avoid when listening: 1. 2. 3. Form groups of three. One person speaks about a subject for two minutes, one person listens, and one person observes the listener and notes the following: !" Examples of good listening:

!" Ideas for improvement:

Now, switch roles and repeat.

From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright Š 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permissions.cfm.


Worksheet 7 Getting Ready for Personal Inventory, continuedGetting Ready for Personal Inventory (continued)

Interviewing Questions for Getting Information Look at the Personal Inventory form. What questions will you ask to find out the person’s interests?

Encouraging Questions Sometimes, people need a little encouragement to answer a question. If the person you are interviewing says, “I don’t know,” be ready with a response like: 1. “Everyone has interests. For example, I’m interested in _______. So, what about you?”

2. Add another response:

3. Add another response:

Probing Questions A probing question goes deeper. For example, if you ask, “What are your interests?” and the person you are interviewing answers “Music,” what would you ask next? Hint: A person could listen to music and/or play a musical instrument, and there are many kinds of music. Write two sample probing questions: 1.

2.

Note Taking Tips !" Write legibly so you can read your writing later. !" Be on the lookout for key words. !" Do not use complete sentences. Notes are meant to be short phrases and words that capture key ideas. !" Add a tip of your own:

From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permissions.cfm.


Worksheet 11

ACTION:

Checklist for Implementing the Action Plan

o Students know what is expected of them and possess the necessary skills. o All students have meaningful roles to play. o Students know how to perform tasks well collaboratively. o The community partner is on board with all activities. o Students have engaged in troubleshooting conversations (what to do if . . .) o Transportation has been arranged as needed. o All safety and other risk protections are in place. o Any necessary parent permission forms have been collected. o Permission for picture and publications have been obtained. o The media have been informed and invited as appropriate. o Reection activities to take place during service have been planned. o Intentional links to curriculum have been made. o Administrators are aware of and support the Action Plan. Reprinted from RMC Research Corporation. K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2006/2009. http://www.servicelearning.org/library/resource/ 8542. With Permission.


Worksheet 12

Progress Monitoring What progress monitoring methods will you use? ! Observation ! Data Collection ! Interviews

Other Methods: ! __________________________ ! __________________________

! Surveys

Date __________ Step One: Establish your baseline—what is the need?

Date __________ Step Two: What noticeable changes have been made?

Date __________ Step Three: What other changes have taken place?

Date __________ Step Four: Describe evidence of your progress.

Date __________ Step Five: Provide a summary of your findings.

From The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright Š 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. This page may be reproduced for use within an individual school or district. For all other uses, contact www.freespirit.com/company/permissions.cfm.


Worksheet 13

PLANNING/REFLECTION Planning for Reflection Using the Options for Reflection chart in this guide, plan the reflection assignments you will use before, during, and at the conclusion of the service activity. Reection Assignment

Prompts

Mode of Responding

Length

Authors

Audiences

What goals will each reection activity allow you to meet?

Reprinted from RMC Corporation, K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2006/2009. http://servicelearning.org/llibrary/resource/8542. With Permission.


Worksheet 14

Demonstration and Celebration The purpose of this template is to help you plan a final event that honors students’ efforts, allows them to share what they have learned and the impact on the community, and build on their service-learning for the future. Title of the event Date and time Location Participants and their roles

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

How will you invite participants to the event? What are your specific activities for demonstration and celebration?

Attach an agenda How will you evaluate success?

How will you engage your students and others in reflection about the demonstration/ celebration?

Reprinted from RMC Research Corporation.  K­12 Service­Learning Project Planning Toolkit.  Scotts  Valley, CA:  National Service­Learning Clearinghouse, 2006/2009. http://servicelearning.org/resource/ 8542 With Permission.


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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Book and Print Resources

“It’s their serve: A primer with all the rules for the sport of student service”. Leadership for Student Activities by Shelly. H. Billig (2009, April) 37(8), 8-13. The Complete Guide to Service Learning: Proven, Practical Ways to Engage Students in Civic Responsibility, Academic Curriculum, & Social Action (Revised & Updated Second Edition) by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A., copyright © 2010. Free Spirit Publishing Inc., Minneapolis, MN; 800-735-7323; www.freespirit.com. Going Blue: A Teen Guide to Saving Our Oceans, Lakes, Rivers, & Wetlands by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Publishing, 2010). 160 pp., grades 6–12. A Kids’ Guide to Climate Change & Global Warming: How to Take Action! by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Publishing, 2009). 48 pp., grades 6–12. A Kids’ Guide to Helping Others Read & Succeed: How to Take Action! by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Publishing, 2007). 48 pp., grades 6–12. A Kids’ Guide to Hunger & Homelessness: How to Take Action! by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Publishing, 2007). 48 pp., grades 6–12. A Kids’ Guide to Protecting & Caring for Animals: How to Take Action! by Cathryn Berger Kaye, M.A. (Free Spirit Publishing, 2008). 48 pp., grades 6–12. National Youth Leadership Council Getting Started in Service-Learning. An Elementary Through High School Handbook. (Revised and Updated. 2010. $15.00). Worksheets: “Student Reflection Questions for Evaluation”, p. 54. “Organizing for Assessment and Evaluation”, p. 61. Growing to Greatness 2010 (PDF, 4 MB) The State of Service-Learning In 2010 authors focus on twin themes of teacher quality and breaking barriers to service-learning. Authors: Jim Kielsmeier, Susan Root, Caryn Pernu, Bjorn Lyngstad. Topics: Assessment & Evaluation, Best Practices, Research & Policy, Benefits of Service-Learning. The Path to Purpose: Helping Our Children Find Their Calling in Life. Dr. William Damon. 2009.

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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Organizational Resources Organizational Resources for Planning and Implementing Service Learning Experiences Communities In Schools of North Carolina.

Communities In Schools of North Carolina is part of the national CIS group, the nation’s leading dropout prevention organization, and the only one proven to both decrease dropout rates and increase on-time graduation. Last school year, the CIS network in North Carolina worked with more than 100,000 youth and their families across the state, empowering more than 96 percent of its high school students to remain in school. For more information, please visit www.cisnc.org or call 1-800-849-8881. (www.cisnc.org).

Do Something: Uses the power of online to get teens to do good stuff offline. (www.dosomething.org). Earth Force trains and supports educators as they implement six-step model for engaging young people in hands-on

learning activities to practice civic skills and become leaders in addressing environmental issues. (www.Earthforce.org).

Learn and Serve America’s National Service Learning Clearinghouse.

Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse (NSLC) supports the service-learning community in higher education, kindergarten through grade twelve, community-based organizations, tribal programs and all others interested in strengthening schools and communities using service-learning techniques and methodologies. (www.servicelearning.org). 1) Assessment, Evaluation, and Performance Measurement: Selected Resources. March 2008, 2) RMC Research Corporation. K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit. Scotts Valley, CA: National Service-Learning Clearinghouse, 2006/2009. (www.servicelearning.org/library/resource/8542) 3) Service-Learning in Community-Based Organizations: A Practical Guide to Starting and Sustaining High-Quality Programs. Copyright © 2009 by Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8543_CBO_Toolkit_2009.pdf) 4) Service-Learning Ideas and Curricular Examples (SLICE) (www.servicelearning.org/slice); or 866-245-7378 x 240 5) YouthSite. Youth engagement. Sharing Ideas and Tools for Engagement (Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse) (www.servicelearning.org/youthsite).

National Service-Learning Partnership. (NSLP) A national network of teachers, administrators, students and policy makers committed to advancing service-learning nationwide. Its website provides resources on planning, reflection, assessment, standards, student voice, funding and other topics of interest for teachers. (www..service-learningpartnership.org).

National Youth Leadership Council. (www.nylc.org) 1) Evaluation/NYLC Signature Curriculum. Five pages regarding evaluation, including use of reflection throughout the service-learning process. )www.nylc.org/objects/Programs/GSN/GSN_curriculum.pdf). 2) Funding (PDF, 125 KB) A Service-Learning Tip Sheet 3) Generator School Network offers model service-learning practices and service-learning trainers to work with your school administration or district. GSN Homepage – Generator School Network.

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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Organizational Resources | Partnering Agencies in N.C. National Youth Leadership Council Continued 4) K-12 Service-Learning Project Planning Toolkit. Created by RMC Research Corporation for Learn and Serve America’s National Service-Learning Clearinghouse. (www.servicelearning.org/filemanager/download/8542_K-12_SL_Toolkit_UPDATED.pdf) 5) LIFT: Raising The Bar for Service-Learning Practice. Multimedia learning experience based on the K-12 Service-Learning Standards for Quality Practice; contains videos, articles, planning tools and checklists, model projects and research summaries. NYLC 6) “Program Evaluation” (PDF, 127 KB) Lists steps in the evaluation process, how program evaluation can provide data for key stakeholders and rationale for importance of program evaluation. (NYLC, 2005) 7) The NYLC Service-Learning Glossary (PDF, 53 KB) A sampling of terms and basic definitions related to service-learning. 8) “Tips For Teachers”. Go to www.gsn.nylc.org and search in the Resource Center for The Generator newsletter, issues 2008-2009. There is a teacher tip in each issue.

Operation Respect, founded by Peter Yarrow of the folk group Peter, Paul & Mary, is a non-profit organization working

to assure each child and youth a respectful, safe and compassionate climate of learning where their academic, social and emotional development can take place free of bullying, ridicule and violence. (www.operationrespect.org).

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), (www.nationalservice.gov) The agency responsible for federal initiatives related to service-learning and volunteerism; it administers Senior Corps, AmeriCorps and Learn and Serve America for K-12 schools and higher education institutions. Web site includes information concerning grants and a Resource Center with tools for designing service- learning and community service activities. Youth Service America. Grants and planning for Global Youth Service Day , MLK Day and Semester of Service. (www.YSA.org)

Potential Partnering Agencies in local N. C. Communities Communities In Schools of North Carolina. Listing of local Communities In Schools affiliates who may be potential partners for service-learning experiences in local counties. (www.cisnc.org) Food Banks in North Carolina. Organizations in seven N.C. communities strive eliminate hunger by the solicitation and distribution of food through education, advocacy and partnerships. (www.feedingamerica.org) Habitat for Humanity. (www.habitat.org) North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service gives N.C. residents easy access to the resources and expertise of N.C. State University and N.C. A&T State University. Through educational programs, publications and events, Cooperative Extension field faculty deliver unbiased, research-based information and answer questions on a wide array of topics. 4-H clubs are a part of this agency. (www.ces.ncsu.edu ) N.C. Mentoring Partnership: Learn more about mentoring resources and statewide mentoring efforts. The N.C. Commission on Voluntarism and Community Service encourages community service and volunteerism as a means of problem solving across thestate by administering federal funds to community service and volunteer programs such as CitizenCorps and AmeriCorps. (www..volunteernc.org/aboutUs/ )

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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Notable State Resources | Awards | Funding Sources Notable State Learning-Service Resources - Lesson Plans and Guide to Service-Learning Florida: Florida Learn and Serve: 4 Practical Resources for Linking Service-Learning and the Florida State Standards - illustrates links between service-learning activities and the Florida Sunshine State Standards and features discipline and age- specific lesson plans. Wisconsin: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction High Quality Instruction That Transforms: A Guide to Implementing Quality Academic Services. Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. (www.dpi.wi.gov/fscp/pdf/high_quality_learning_web.pdf)

Awards and Recognition (K-12) Barron Prize for Young Heroes - www.Barronprize.org Congressional Award - www.CongressionalAward.org President’s Student Service Awards - www.PresidentialServiceAwards.gov Prudential Spirit of Community Award - www.Prudential.com/community

Funding Sources For Service-Learning Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Foundation. (www.bcbsncfoundation.org). Connect a Million Minds (CAMM), Time Warner Cable’s philanthropic commitment to connect youth to after school opportunities in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Eligible applicants include 501(c)(3) organizations and funding is available for transportation to programs related to STEM. (www.GrantRequest.com/SID_968). Funding (PDF, 125 KB) A Service-Learning Tip Sheet Learn and Serve America Awards $9 Million in STEM Grants. Grants were awarded to 28 higher education institutions and nonprofits, focused in two main areas: training current and future teachers to use service-learning in the classroom and to bring service-learning to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) disciplines. (www.learnandserve.gov) Learn and Serve America’s National Clearinghouse: Subscribe to RSS feeds at www.servicelearning.org/connect-and-share. Funding information: www.servicelearning.org/topic/funding Ronald McDonald House Charities. www.rmhc.org (Grants to 501(c)(3) organizations.) Youth Service America. See Grants and Awards/STEMester of Service. (www.ysa.org) 59

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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Additional Funding Sources for Service-Learning To obtain more information regarding the programs below, please visit www.mncampuscompact.org Gibson Foundation Deadline: Open Walgreens Corporate Contribution Program Deadline: Open Allstate Foundation Education and Job Training Fund Small Grants to Assist Domestic Violence Survivors Applications accepted throughout year UMADD Mini-Grant Program Applications accepted throughout year JPMorgan Chase Grants Programs Deadline: Ongoing Nickelodeon The Big Green Grants Deadline: Rolling Coca-Cola Foundation Grants Deadline: Ongoing Starbucks Shared Planet Youth Action Grants Deadline: Open Kresge Foundation: Healthy Environments Program Deadline: Online letters of inquiry may be submitted at any time Walmart Foundation State Giving Program Deadline: August 20, 2010

State Farm Companies Grants Program Applications accepted January 2 through October 31, annually Cooperative Development Foundation: Mutual Service Cooperative Fund Deadline: August 6, 2010 Ashoka - Staples Youth Social Entrepreneurship Competition Deadline: September 20, 2010 Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy Deadline: September 10, 2010 US Dept. of Ed., Off-Campus Community Service Program Deadline: August 9, 2010 Sociological Initiatives Foundation Deadline: August 15, 2010 RGK Foundation Deadline: Ongoing Spectrum Trust Multicultural Endowment Challenge Deadline: August 31, 2010 Open Meadows Foundation Deadlines: February 15 or August 14 each year

Waste Management Charitable Giving Program Deadline: Ongoing

Freedom to Read Foundation Banned Books Week Grants Deadline: August 27, 2010

Qwest Foundation preK-12 educational grants Deadline: Ongoing

Community Tool Box Global Prize Contest Deadline: October 31, 2010

Fizwoz Campus Challenge Deadline: Ongoing

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REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Service-Learning in North Carolina 2009-2010 school-based organization grantees in North Carolina: Bertie County Schools (10 sub grants) Edenton/Chowan Schools Lenoir (Kinston Charter Academy) New Hanover (E. A. Langley High School) Wayne County (Wayne County Schools and Dillard Academy) Durham County (Hillside New Tech High School ) Halifax County (Roanoke Rapid Schools) Cumberland County Schools (Gallberry Farm Elementary) Alamance County (Clover Garden Charter School) Davidson County (Lexington City Schools) Forsythe County (Carter G. Woodsen School) Orange County (Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools) Lincoln County (Lincoln Charter School) Iredell County (Iredell/ Statesville Schools) Surry County (Elkin City Schools) Haywood County (Haywood Early College) Rutherford County (Rutherford County Schools) Swain County (Swain County Schools) Transylvania County (Davidson River School)   2009-2010 community-based organization grantees in North Carolina: (www.nationalservice.gov/state_profiles/pdf/NC_LS.pdf) Durham:The Historically Minority Colleges and Universities Consortium/North Carolina Central University Foundation; K-12 Community-Based Elizabeth City: River City Community Development Corporation. K-12 Community-Based; 15 participants. Hertford: Rhema Ministries Institute, Inc.; K-12 Community-Based. 19 participants

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Institutions of Higher Education Individual students or a group of students involved in the Campus Compact at a local college or university could represent an additional and important partnership for local service-learning activities at school sites. In addition, college faculty can provided much needed information and research about local issues and related public policies. As one example, Grand Valley State University’s College of Education is committed to the advancement of service-learning in Kent County, Michigan. The June 2010 issue of “Colleagues” magazine describes their efforts and environmental service-learning experiences. Articles by service-learning expert Cathryn Berger Kaye and noted researcher Dr. Shelley Billig are included:“Keep On Keeping On: What Can Happen Thorugh School/University Partnerships” explores the value of college interns in improving literacy skills. www.colleaguesplus.com/ North Carolina Resources The N.C. Campus Compact is a coalition of colleges and universities collaborating to increase campuswide participation in community and public service. Presidents commit their institutions to join with other schools in becoming “engaged campuses” that enhance students’ sense of responsibility, citizenship, leadership and awareness of community, while reinvigorating higher education’s concern for improving the quality of life in North Carolina.  N.C. Campus Compact is a member of National Campus Compact, which has nearly 1,200 presidential members and 35 state offices. (Excerpted from NCCC,) Campus Compact contacts on each campus can connect public schools to college undergraduates, as well as faculty who are working on similar community issues and needs. (Please see below and the following pages the complete listing of contact at each institution.)

Appalachian State University Shari Galiardi Coordinator of Service-Learning galiardisl@appstate.edu

Catawba Valley Community College Anne Williams Director of Resource Development awilliam@cvcc.edu

County Community College Lynne Watts Director of Student Activities lmwatts@davidsonccc.edu

Barton College George Solan Vice President of Student Affairs gsolan@barton.edu

Central Piedmont Community College Dena Shonts Director of Service-Learning dena.shonts@cpcc.edu

Duke University Domonique Redmond Assistant Director Domonique.redmond@duke.edu

Brevard College Michelle Harvey Assistant Dean for Community Development harveyml@brevard.edu Campbell University Faith Beam Campus Minister beam@campbell.edu 62

Davidson College Stacey Riemer Assistant Dean of Students for Community Service striemer@davidson.edu

East Carolina University Mike Loeffelman Volunteer Coordinator loeffelmanm@ecu.edu Elon University Mary Morrison Director of Kernodle Center for Service-Learning mmorrison4@elon.edu

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Institutions of Higher Education Fayetteville State University Melissa Barlow Director mbarlow@uncfsu.edu

Meredith College Tabitha Underwood Coordinator of Volunteer Services tabithau@meredith.edu

Gardner-Webb University Susan Manahan Coordinator of Service-Learning smanahan@gardner-webb.edu

North Carolina A&T University Lee Morgan Associate Director, Office of Student Development morganl@ncat.edu

Greensboro College Robert Brewer Campus Minister rbrewer@greensborocollege.edu Guilford College James Shields Director of Community Learning jshields@guilford.edu High Point University Kelly Norton Director of Experiential Education knorton@highpoint.edu Johnson C. Smith University Sherill Hampton Director of Center for Applied Leadership & Community Development shampton@jcsu.edu Lees-McRae College Selena Hilemon Director of Community Outreach hilemons@lmc.edu Lenoir-Rhyne University Charlotte Williams Associate Dean for Engaged and Global Learning williamsc@lr.edu Mars Hill College Lisa Wachtman Director of LifeWorks lwachtman@mhc.edu 63

North Carolina Central University Ruby Messick Assistant Director of Academic Community Service-Learning Program rmessick@nccu.edu North Carolina State University Tierza Watts Associate Director, Center for Student Leadership, Ethics, & Public Service tierza_watts@ncsu.edu North Carolina Wesleyan College Jessie Warren Director of Internships & Career Services jwarren@ncwc.edu Peace College Julie Lawson Director of Leadership & Service jlawson@peace.edu Pfeiffer University Jonathan Rowe Director of Francis Center for Servant Leadership jonathan.rowe@fsmail.pfeiffer.edu Queens University Benardo Dargan Director, Multicultural Affairs darganb@queens.edu

Stanly Community College Melody Sikes Coordinator of Cooperative Education & Service-Learning msikes5932@stanly.edu UNC Asheville Joseph Berryhill Director, Key Center for ServiceLearning jberryhi@unca.edu UNC Chapel Hill Jenny Huq Director, APPLES Service-Learning Program huq@email.unc.edu UNC Charlotte Cynthia Wolf Johnson Associate Provost for Academic Services cwolfjo@uncc.edu UNC Greensboro Joe Frey Assistant Director, Office of Leadership & Service-Learning jjfrey@uncg.edu UNC Pembroke Aubrey Swett Director for Leadership & Service aubrey.swett@uncp.edu UNC Wilmington Donna Chapa Crowe Director of Center for Leadership, Education, & Service crowed@uncw.edu Wake Forest University Kendra Paisley AmeriCorps VISTA paisleka@wfu.edu

Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


REFERENCES AND RESOURCES Institutions of Higher Education Wake Technical Community College Melody Wiggins Coordinator of Service mcwiggins1@waketech.edu Warren Wilson College Debra Kiliru Director of Community Leadership debrak@warren-wilson.edu Western Carolina University Jennifer Cooper Assistant Director, Center for Service-Learning jacooper@email.wcu.edu Western Piedmont Community College Tonya Waters Accounting Instructor twaters@wpcc.edu Wingate University Caroline Twiggs Director of Service c.twiggs@wingate.edu

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Advancing Service-Learning in North Carolina - A practical guide to designing and implementing quality service-learning experiences


Service Learning - CISNC  

Report design for CISNC

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