Issuu on Google+

     

From Sentiment to Insight 

 

How Social Networking Can Support  Engaged, Customer‐Centric Retailing    A Prospective View    August 2009   

Sponsored by: 

    By:   Brian Kilcourse and Paula Rosenblum   Managing Partners   


Table of Contents  OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................................... 1  The Social Networking Phenomenon ........................................................................................................ 1  Communities of Interest Spring Up Overnight .......................................................................................... 1  Consumer Sentiment as the New Psychographic ...................................................................................... 2  Methodology ............................................................................................................................................. 2  BUSINESS CHALLENGES: Divining Demand ..................................................................................................... 3  Retailers Ask Themselves What Consumers Want To Buy ........................................................................ 3  Consumers Are Mostly Anonymous To Retailers ...................................................................................... 3  The Consumer Has All the Power .............................................................................................................. 4  Retailers Respond as Best They Can .......................................................................................................... 4  THE OPPORTUNITY:  Becoming an Engaged Customer‐centric Retailer ......................................................... 5  Social Media: A New Way to Engage ......................................................................................................... 5  Natural Language Processing Technologies ............................................................................................... 6  What Does the Engaged Customer‐Centric Retailer Look Like? ................................................................ 6  But How To Start? ...................................................................................................................................... 7  Getting Beyond The Squeaky Wheel Syndrome ........................................................................................ 7  Begin To Develop A Roadmap ................................................................................................................... 8  THE RISKS:  Don’t Start Unless You Plan to Follow Through ........................................................................... 9  Turning Sentiment Into Insight – Is Retail Ready? ..................................................................................... 9  The “Network Effect” As A Double‐Edged Sword ...................................................................................... 9  Avoid Killing the Goose that Lays the Golden Egg ................................................................................... 10  APPENDIX A: Relevant Reference Material ..................................................................................................... a  APPENDIX B: About Our Sponsor ................................................................................................................... b  APPENDIX C: About RSR................................................................................................................................... c 

 

  Figures  Figure 1: Difficult to Divine Consumer Demand ............................................................................................. 3  Figure 2: Continually Increasing in Importance .............................................................................................. 5  Figure 3: Social Media Feedback in Context ................................................................................................... 6 


OVERVIEW  THE SOCIAL NETWORKING PHENOMENON   In  the  late  20th  century,  quite  a  bit  was  written  about  the  isolation  inherent  in  modern  day  society.  Robert Putnam famously documented the decline of what he called “social capital” in  his  groundbreaking  book  Bowling  Alone1.  Putnam  observed  that  while  more  US  citizens  were  bowling  than  ever  before,  the  number  of  people  belonging  to  bowling  leagues  had  dropped  precipitously.  He  used  this  as  a  metaphor  for  the  decline  of  community  activities  and  connections in general (and supported his hypothesis with compelling statistics).   Putnam’s  view  may  have  been  US‐centric,  but  technology‐dominated,  isolated  societies  are  a  world‐wide phenomenon.   The only question outstanding was “Can humans sustain this kind of  isolation, or will they find new ways to connect?”  To use Putnam’s vernacular, “How could we  re‐build  the  social  capital  we’d  lost?”  The  answer  to  that  came  shortly  thereafter,  and  was  already nascent in community web sites like iVillage.com. Computers and technology, the very  things that had fostered isolation would bring people together in ways never imagined before.   The web birthed MySpace, Twitter, and Facebook and a new era was born – the age of Social  Networking.  The viral nature of social networks can enable a single person to trigger thousand  or even millions of impressions.  

COMMUNITIES OF INTEREST SPRING UP OVERNIGHT   Social  networks  make  it  possible  for  people  to  communicate  in  a  new  way.  Social  media  networks such as Facebook hold a mind‐boggling amount of information about a shopper.  They  not only know that she has clicked on certain content (as search engines like Google and Yahoo  do), but also her name, where she lives, her age, specific areas of interest, and even what she  looks  like.    Such  identifying  information  makes  it  possible  for  those  with  common  areas  of  interest  to  find  each  other  easily  and  exchange  points  of  view.  It  helps  also  consumers  find  a  common voice.  For example, Canadian country music artist Dave Carroll posted a video on YouTube to complain  about United Airlines baggage handlers. That video was viewed over 4.5 million times within a  month  of  posting.    The  network  effect  of  social  media  can  cause  “word  of  mouth”  epidemics  unlike anything that retailers have ever seen before.  Initially thought to be the realm of Millennials, by 2009 Facebook reported a 276% growth in 35‐ 54 year old users.  This was double the growth rate in 20082. This demographic is important for                                                                    1

 Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, Robert D Putnam, Simon & Schuster, 2000  

2

http://www.istrategylabs.com/2009‐facebook‐demographics‐and‐statistics‐report‐276‐growth‐in‐35‐54‐year‐old‐ users/  


several reasons, but for our purposes, it matters because it represents the “biggest spenders,”  who are the primary target of world‐wide advertisers. In other words, even in a down economy,  there’s a lot of potential spending power in those social networks.  Along  with  the  potential  to  give  voice  to  millions  of  frustrated  travelers  (as  in  the  video  cited  above), mining the data available in Social Networks can also give retailers a look into the hot  buttons and trigger points of millions of potential shoppers.  It can also help us wrap our minds  around the sudden shifts in ideas, opinions and taste so prevalent in the 21st century.  

CONSUMER SENTIMENT AS THE NEW PSYCHOGRAPHIC  Ninety  percent  of  retailers  surveyed  by  RSR  in  July  2008  cited  psychographic  assortment  localization  as  a  key  to  their  merchandising  success.  Those  retailers  believe  that  along  with  tailoring  their  merchandise  mix  to  the  demographics  of  visitors  to  their  web  sites  and  stores,  and  the  geographies  within  which  they  reside,  understanding  their  inclinations  are  also  important. Are they empty‐nesters? Suburban? Conservative? Fast fashion adopters? Aspiring to  be and act like their parents?    Ironically,  with  all  the  science  at  their  disposal  and  with  ever  increasing  mass,  retailers  are  as  isolated as the consumers they serve. Even with focus groups, outside databases, and legions of  buyers, retailers remain baffled by the vagaries of demand.   Suddenly,  that  data  (and  a  lot  more)  is  available.    We  have  the  opportunity  to  find  out  how  consumers  feel.    The  challenge  of  course,  is  making  sense  of  piles  of  140  character  “tweets,”  emails to customer service, and Facebook status updates and wall posts. But even an industry  accustomed  to  drowning  in  data  has  been  forced  to  cry  “uncle”  in  the  face  of  this  pile  of  seemingly unstructured snippets.   The questions we attempt to answer in this brief report are straightforward:  • • •

Can structure be brought to these mountains of unstructured bits and bytes  Once structure is brought to it, can it be used?  And if it can be used, what are the best uses of it – even in a down economy? 

If  structure  can  be  brought,  and  the  data  can  be  used,  the  “sentiment  psychographic”  can  be  used  to  help  drive  a  new,  more  responsive  retail  enterprise.    RSR  calls  this  “The  Engaged,  Customer‐centric Retailer.” 

METHODOLOGY  In prospective reports like this one, RSR pulls together data points from a variety of different  sources and bring them together into a new whole.  A list of RSR reference documents is in  Appendix A.  We identify other sources in footnotes within the report itself.  We supplement  these data points with interviews to add color and substance to our conclusions.   

  2 


BUSINESS CHALLENGES: DIVINING DEMAND   RETAILERS ASK THEMSELVES WHAT CONSUMERS WANT TO BUY  Retailers  struggle  to  understand  the  dynamics  of  demand.  The  past  is  no  longer  prolog  to  the  future and retailers know it.  They fret over under‐ordering and more recently, with a scarcity of  working capital, they worry about making the right inventory investments (Figure 1). 

Figure 1: Difficult to Divine Consumer Demand Top 3 Business Challenges 76%

Consumer demand is more unpredictable than ever

44%

Consumers demand more localized assortments

37%

Consumer demand has deteriorated significantly Cross‐channel consumer shopping behaviors create  new requirements for managing inventory

35%

Trading partners don't have the flexibility we need  in supply chain

33%

Credit markets have made it more difficult to  finance inventory purchases

22%

Overseas sourcing has exposed vulnerabilities in  our supply chain

22%

Quality of products has become more difficult to  manage eCommerce has gotten us into more slow moving  "long tail" items that are difficult to manage

20% 4%   Source:  RSR Research, August 2009 

Even as demand is less predictable consumer expectations remain high.  

CONSUMERS ARE MOSTLY ANONYMOUS TO RETAILERS  Most  retailers  only  know  consumers  through  the  lens  of  “the  market  basket”.    Even  retailers  with sophisticated customer‐oriented business intelligence capabilities joining customer profiles  with  detailed  transactional  data  to  determine  “propensity  to  buy”  only  really  know  their  customers  based  on  product  affinities.  Even  21st  Century  success  story  Amazom.com  takes  a  product‐centric  view  of  customers;  their  buy  recommendations  are  based  on  past  purchase  history  compared  to  the  purchase  histories  of  other  consumers  who  have  bought  the  same  item.   But  today’s  consumer  wants  more.      The  value  of  the  retailer’s  Brand  is  defined  by  how  well  products  are  delivered  at  the  right  price  with  the  right  quality,  wrapped  up  in  the  right  information and service, when and where the consumer needs them.  In short, consumers want  solutions to their lifestyle needs.  Today’s consumer routinely uses the Internet as a means to  3 


investigate the best value: quality, price, and availability. She is no longer un‐opinionated when  she walks into a store.  In fact, she’s loaded with facts. Demand is created outside of the store,  potentially outside of the retailer’s control.   Winning retailers have learned to use the Internet as a lead‐generation engine for their stores  by making content about their products and services available on the Internet, as well making it  possible  for  the  cross‐channel  shopper  to  begin  transacting  before  entering  the  store.  Retail  winners  know  that  their  multi‐channel  customers  are  more  profitable  than  single  channel  shoppers.  Savvy retailers have also learned to use internet search data to gain an understanding  of what consumers are looking for, and to work with Internet search engines to put messages in  front of the people most likely to see their value.    But in all of these methods, the data is about retailer actions.  A fundamental question remains:  what does the consumer have to say? As it turns out, plenty. 

THE CONSUMER HAS ALL THE POWER  The rate of technology change in the past fifteen years has shaken the fundamentals of retailing  to  its  core.    In  2007,  retailers  reported  their  biggest  business  challenge  to  be  “Consumer  complaints about their in‐store experience3.” We observed at that time how social networking  had  set  retailers  back  on  their  heels  and  retailers  were  creating  various  mechanisms  in  an  attempt to stanch the volume of complaints and criticisms.  These “squeaky wheels” have sent a message.  Retailers have now set about the work to provide  consistent convenience across all their selling channels.  

RETAILERS RESPOND AS BEST THEY CAN  Retailers  now  have  a  variety  of  mechanisms  available  to  sense  the  new  psychographic  of  consumer  sentiment.    They  have  Facebook  and  Twitter  pages,  feedback  forms  on  their  web  sites, outsourced help desks to speak with frustrated consumers and product review sections of  their web site.   This still leaves us with the same fundamental  question: how can retailers sift  through  these  volumes  of  unstructured  data  to  find  trends?    If  there  is  such  a  thing  as  “The  Wisdom  of  the  Crowd,”  is  it  found  in  the  loudest  voices,  or  behind  the  noise,  in  the  most  persistent sentiments? How can retailers blunt the network effect of negative opinion before it  becomes epidemic, and how can they use the network effect in a positive way to create a bias  for their products and services?    These are the challenges that winning retailers are trying to address through social media.   

 

                                                                  3

  Technology‐enabled  Customer  Centricity  in  the  Store,  by  Paula  Rosenblum,  originally  published  by  RSAG, March 2007 


THE OPPORTUNITY:  BECOMING AN ENGAGED CUSTOMER‐CENTRIC RETAILER  SOCIAL MEDIA: A NEW WAY TO ENGAGE  With  traditional  media,  the  dialogue  is  one‐way  and  feedback  is  indirect.    Retailers  and  their  partners spend millions advertising their products and services, and feedback comes in the form  of  success  or  failure  at  the  checkout  counter.  “Web  1.0”  e‐retailing  is  fundamentally  no  different: marketing messages are delivered via the media, and consumers respond by searching  and purchasing. “Web 2.0” social media however is fundamentally different.  It’s direct and two‐ way;  in  a  word,  conversational.    It  has  the  potential  to  return  “social  capital”  to  the  fabric  of  retailing – much like conversations at the corner stores of the 19th and early 20th centuries, but  on a larger, more high‐tech scale.  Of course, as in real life, the best way to have a conversation is to start one.  In the past two  years retailers have begun awakening  to the opportunity inherent in engaging social media to  make their products and services known to members of those networks (Figure 2).   

Figure 2: Continually Increasing in Importance Perceived Opportunity from Social Networks or Other  Forms of Direct Customer Input 2008

2009 56%

46% 33%

31% 23% 11%

Little Opportunity

Some Opportunity

A lot of Opportunity   Source:  RSR Research, August 2009 

The question for retailers is, how engaged should they be and how do they collate and quantify  shopper sentiments?  First of all, messages from various social media, whether in the form of Facebook postings, email  messages,  blog  entries,  or  Twitter  “tweets”  are  not  data  –  they  are  sentiments  expressed  in  plain  language.    Short  of  having  an  army  of  call  center  analysts  manually  codifying  such  messages, retailers have no non‐technical way of turning that unstructured text into structured  data, so that it can in turn be transformed into true insights.   

  5 


NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGIES  The  good  news  is  that  technologies  do  indeed  exist  to  analyze  natural  language  and  contextualize unstructured data from social media allowing us to generally interpret a sentiment  as  either  positive  or  negative.  Pertinent  words  can  be  extracted  (for  example,  mention  of  a  product or a store).  These extracted and contextualized bits of information can be structured  into a data format that can be processed by the retailer’s internal business intelligence systems.  Formatted  data  could  be  matched  to  internal  databases  including  the  Customer  database  to  help prioritize sentiment from loyal customers vs. “noise” from an amorphous crowd.  Based on  the  nature  of  the  contextualized  sentiment,  an  appropriate  alert  can  be  triggered  to  the  appropriate customer service representative.  

WHAT DOES THE ENGAGED CUSTOMER‐CENTRIC RETAILER LOOK LIKE?  Retailers  capture  a  tremendous  amount  of  internally  generated  information  from  their  transactional  systems  (Figure  3).  Historically,  that  information  has  been  used  to  develop  forecasts and merchandising plans (product assortments, allocations, price, promotions) as well  as  marketing  strategies,  to  develop  operational  plans  (store  plans,  labor  plans),  and  to  track  performance  (financial  and  sales  information).  Retailers  also  brought  in  externally  generated  data to gain market and competitive intelligence, to help them focus their effort on increasing  market share and profitability of key categories of products.  

Figure 3: Social Media Feedback in Context

  Source:  RSR Research, August 2009 


In  the  1990’s,  the  advent  of  loyalty  schemes  and  multi‐channel  retailing  enabled  retailers  to  identify  customers individually and engage with them in new  ways, focusing marketing  efforts  on those most likely to take advantage of offers in order to build loyalty, and  offer new ways to  deliver value to consumers. Some retailers have studied click‐track and search arguments from  their own websites and externally generated on commercial websites to better understand what  consumers are looking for.    But in a faster paced, more unpredictable world, getting closer to customer sentiments becomes  a vital tactic for proactively managing customer satisfaction. Measuring sentiment and marring  that new data to customer‐specific and market intelligence enables the retailer to quickly assess  the impact of its actions.  Plus, it creates a new one‐to‐one touch point  to the consumer.  No  longer  is  the  retailer  solely  dependent  on  the  store  clerk  to  create  that  “moment  of  truth”  impression on the consumer.  

BUT HOW TO START?   For  retailers  who  haven’t  begun  experimenting  with  the  two‐way  communications  capabilities  of social media networks, an obvious question is, “how do we begin?”  The question should be  answered as part of the retailer’s overall cross‐channel marketing strategy.  Issues that need to  be addressed include:   • •

• • • • •

One, a few, or many social media networks? Which ones?  What  are  the  intended  objectives  of  the  engagement?    Promote  the  Brand  (eg.  community  involvement)?  Product  promotions?  Special  one‐time  offers?  Employment  opportunities?    Employee  support?  Customer  support?  Special  services?  Corporate  communications?  Organizationally, who will “own” social media communication?  How will “success” be measured?  Will IT support be required?  Will  there  be  involvement  from  internal  support  organizations?  What  level  of  involvement?  How will we separate out the “noise”? 

GETTING BEYOND THE SQUEAKY WHEEL SYNDROME   A second important aspect of any good conversation is in listening.  Retailers need to decide up‐ front what they will do with the direct feedback that they get from social media.  Like any other  data, this new information must be processed.  For example, where do employee complaints go  to?  Customer complaints about products?  About services? Suggestions?  Corporate inquiries?  Just as in face‐to‐face communications, responses to social media can come in three flavors:   • •

Competitive  listening  (not  recommended):  where  the  listener  is  more  interesting  in  his/her own point of view than the other party’s;  Passive listening: where the listener absorbs but does not verify the message;  7 


Active  listening:  where  the  listener  engages,  feeds  back  and  verifies  the  message  and  commits to follow up. 

In the case of the business use of social media, retailers should develop use cases based on  the objectives that have been established for the two‐way communications.   

BEGIN TO DEVELOP A ROADMAP  As  experimentation  with  social  media  evolves,  retailers  need  to  begin  thinking  of  a  future  scenario where social media sentiment is interwoven into the business as customer insight. To  that  end,  the  long  term  impact  of  data  derived  from  social  media  on  people,  process,  and  technology need to be analyzed.  One way to approach developing a roadmap is to map these  data  to  the  internal  business  processes  that  are  impacted.  That  in  turn  exposes  the  impact  to  technologies that support the processes, and the people who execute those processes.       

 


THE RISKS:  DON’T START UNLESS YOU PLAN TO FOLLOW THROUGH  TURNING SENTIMENT INTO INSIGHT – IS RETAIL READY?  As retailers came to learn in the early part of this decade, one aspect of the Internet that can be  both  exhilarating  and  alarming  is  that  it  is  without  boundaries,  and  the  potential  for  rapid  scaling  is  real.  The  challenge  for  retailers  when  it  comes  to  any  technology‐enabled  consumer  capability  is  that  although  the  developmental  stages  of  the  new  capability  may  be  very  slow,  consumer  adoption  is  often  dramatic  and  very  rapid.  Those  retailers  that  choose  to  tap  into  consumer  sentiment  as  expressed  on  social  media  networks  could  find  themselves  overwhelmed  very  quickly  by  trying  to  respond  to  every  issue  raised.    Nor  should  they  be  tempted‐  not  everyone  who  may  comment  on  service  issues  or  product  quality  concerns  is  a  customer (or ever likely to be). An inherent problem with the “noise” from social networks, e‐ mails, and other forms of electronic sentiment is that there is no way to rank their importance,  and so they tend to be handled first‐in‐first‐out, if at all.  Technology should play an inevitable role in resolving the challenge of getting personal with the  right customers through the use of sophisticated technology to turn “unstructured” sentiment  into  usable  data  that  can  then  be  meshed  with  other  internal  information  to  create  insights.   However,  most  retailers  don’t  see  the  connection  between  the  challenge  of  consumer  unpredictability, the opportunity of creating a single Brand identity across all channels, the use  of social media to get direct consumer input – and technology.  In another study published by  RSR in May 2009, it was revealed that only 30% of retailers (and 32% of winners) rate “helping  the company win new customers and retain current customers” as a top expectation of the IT  function  within  their  companies.4    Clearly,  the  industry  needs  to  be  informed  as  to  the  new  possibilities.  But one thing should be clear: if retailers aren’t ready to fully engage and process  social media feedback that they themselves have triggered, they risk turning what was intended  to be a proactive outreach to new communities of consumers into a disincentive. 

THE “NETWORK EFFECT” AS A DOUBLE‐EDGED SWORD   One of the benefits consumers experience from Social Networks is a sense of control. They can  speak to their peers. Those peers empathize. And the answers they receive to complaints and  concerns are unscripted, unlike those they receive from highly scripted help desk and customer  service personnel.  BUT…these same consumers perceive their networks as their own.   Social  Network  Facebook’s  attempt  to  change  its  privacy  rules  (and  declare  all  posts  –  past,  present and  future to  be  its property)  met with serious user revolt. Eventually the technology  provider relented, and softened its stance.  But as recently as June 2009, a message found its  way into thousands of users’ statuses, and even showed up in the New York Times.                                                                    4

 IT and Business Alignment in Retail Benchmark Study, May 2009, © 2009 RSR Research LLC 


IMPORTANT  ‐ To ALL FRIENDS. Facebook has agreed to let a third party advertiser use  your posted pictures without your permission. Click on SETTINGS up at the top where you  see  the  log  out  link.  Select  PRIVACY  ‐  MANAGE.  Select  NEWS  FEEDS  AND  WALL.  Select  the tab that reads FACE BOOK ADS. There is a drop down box, select NO ONE. Then SAVE  your changes. Please pass this around.)  On some level, it’s not clear that this was a new policy…but it went viral. Fast.  The rapidity with  which  the  Network  Effect  created  this  uproar  was  profound.    And  it’s  this  very  thing  retailers  have to watch out for. 

AVOID KILLING THE GOOSE THAT LAYS THE GOLDEN EGG  We’ve  demonstrated  in  this  report  that  retailers  have  a  profound  opportunity  to  mine  and  categorize  consumers’  interests  and  turn  that  data  into  dollars.  But  as  we  pointed  out  above,  consumer trust is tenuous at best. Any overt attempt to go beyond the consumer’s self‐defined  boundaries will result in an immediate stanching of the flow of information. Towards that end,  we see several imperatives:  1. Make  privacy  statements  explicit  and  clear:  Consumers  detest  surprises.    Make  sure  privacy policies are easy to read and understand, short, and succinct. While some may  say “Consumers don’t realize they are photographed at least 50 times a day…they have  no privacy,” one cannot presume on those consumers good will.   2. Always allow consumers to opt in:  When a consumer becomes a fan, or a follower, or a  member of a retailer’s own community, the retailer should always ask permission to use  the  information  it  gathers.    Most  of  the  time  the  consumer  will  agree  (after  all,  that’s  why  she’s  there,  after  all),  but  this  type  of  permission‐based  marketing  will  avoid  the  negative side of the Network Effect.  3.  If a consumer requests a specific response, be sure to answer it: Few things are more  frustrating  than  taking  the  time  to  fill  out  an  e‐mail  feedback  form  and  receiving  an  email auto‐reply saying “Thanks for your feedback.  We don’t have the time to answer  every request, but we’ll look into it.” The writer wonders, “Does this retailer really care  about my opinion?  Why did these people ask me for feedback when they really weren’t  going to do anything with it?  I’m going elsewhere.”   Even  as  we  focus  on  aggregating  the  data  we  get  on  consumer  sentiment,  we  also  must  remember that sentiment is real. And consumers still have many different choices of networks  to  join  and  retailers  to  buy  from.  Sometimes,  disaggregating  the  data  is  as  important  as  aggregating it.    The mistake of the early 21st century was presuming that self‐service is always an effective proxy  for  customer  service.  Retailers  now  recognize  that  self‐service  technologies  have  their  limits,5                                                                    5

 The Customer Centric Store 2008, © 2008 RSR Research LLC 

10 


and  sometimes,  person‐to‐person  interaction  is  important.  If  retailers  are  to  avoid  “killing  the  goose  that  lays  the  golden  egg,”  we  must  remember  the  importance  of  the  human  touch.  At  worst,  it  will  put  an  end  to  a  viral  customer  complaint,  and  at  best,  it  will  turn  an  unhappy  customer back into an advocate.   

11 


APPENDIX A: RELEVANT REFERENCE MATERIAL   

We have used data (directly or indirectly) from the following benchmark reports as background  for this document.  All these reports are available for download from RSR’s web site.   

  Precision Inventory Management in the Age of Localization: Benchmark Report 2009, by Nikki Baird and  Brian Kilcourse, August 2009  Walking the Razor’s Edge: Managing the Store Experience in an Economic Singularity, by Brian Kilcourse  and Paula Rosenblum, June 2009  Customer‐Centric Merchandising: Driving Differentiation through Localization, Benchmark Report: 2008,  by Paula Rosenblum and Steve Rowen, June 2008  IT and Business Alignment in Retail, by Brian Kilcourse and Paula Rosenblum, May 2009  The  Customer  Centric  Store:  Benchmark  Report  2008,  by  Paula  Rosenblum,  Edited  by  Nikki  Baird,  June  2008   The Next Generation of Business Intelligence: Driving Customer Insights Across the Enterprise, by Brian  Kilcourse and Paula Rosenblum, August 2007  Technology Enabled Customer Centricity in the Store, by Paula Rosenblum. Originally Published by RSAG,  March 2007     

 


APPENDIX B: ABOUT OUR SPONSOR   

 

    SAP is the leading provider of application solutions for the retail industry. SAP helps retailers of  all sizes to understand, anticipate and inspire their shoppers by providing a compelling shopping  experience. The SAP® for Retail solution portfolio provides specific solutions for retail companies  in the food, fashion and hardlines businesses. The solution portfolio is built around understanding the  shoppers, or Shopper Insight, and consists of building blocks that cover the areas of Merchandise Lifecycle  (including planning, merchandise lifecycle pricing and promotion management); Supply Chain (forecast &  replenishment,  supply  chain  planning  and  execution);  Shopper  Experience  (workforce  management,  customer  loyalty  and  a  portfolio  of  POS  solutions);  and  Corporate  Operations  (finance  and  human  resources). 

Learn more about SAP at http://www.sap.com/retail/       


APPENDIX C: ABOUT RSR   

  Retail Systems Research (“RSR”) is the only research company run by retailers for the retail industry. RSR  provides insight into business and technology challenges facing the extended retail industry, and thought  leadership  and  advice  on  navigating  these  challenges  for  specific  companies  and  the  industry  at  large.  RSR’s  services  include  benchmark  reports  covering  the  state  of  retailer  technology  adoption  for  topics  ranging from merchandising and supply chain, store operations and workforce management, to customer‐ facing and multi‐channel technologies. Custom research reports provide more in‐depth views into topics  of  industry  interest,  and  advisory  services  help  retailers  and  technology  vendors  make  the  most  of  the  insights RSR provides. To learn more about RSR, visit www.rsrresearch.com. 

  Copyright© 2009 by Retail Systems Research LLC • All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the permission of the publisher. Contact research@rsrresearch.com for more information.

 


From Sentiment to Insight