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TM

Official magazine of National Taxi Expo 2017 In support of

SOUTH AFRICA'S BEST SELLING TAXI OWNERS MAGAZINE

www.sataximagazine.co.za

Festive Season 2016 Edition #10

Retail Price R19, 99 VAT Included


TM

Official magazine of National Taxi Expo 2017 In support of

SOUTH AFRICA'S BEST SELLING TAXI OWNERS MAGAZINE

www.sataximagazine.co.za

Festive Season 2016 Edition #10

Retail Price R19, 99 VAT Included

FOREWARD Make sure that your Taxi is in a roadworthy condition before departure. All lights and indicators, windscreens, windscreen wipers, brakes, steering, shock absorbers, exhaust system and tyres should be carefully examined for faults.” Says Chief Superintendent Wayne Minnaar

TYRE TIPS TO KEEP YOUR TAXI SAFE THIS FESTIVE ENERGY DRINKS, TIREDNESS & SAFE TAXI DRIVING WHAT ARE YOU ALLOWED TO DO WHILE DRIVING? TIPS & ADVICE ON TAXI INSURANCE IN SOUTH AFRICA This festive road safety edition is proudly sponsored by

THE ‘WATER ANTHEM’ SONG HITS AIRWAVES ACROSS AFRICA THANKS TO MOBILITY TAXI INSURANCE’ FUNDING


CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT’S FOREWORD “TOWARDS GROWTH & ECONOMIC PROSPERITY IN THE SOUTH AFRICA TAXI INDUSTRY”

JMPD Gears up for Festive Road Safety Drive Johannesburg Metro Police Department (JMPD) officers will be out in full force during the Easter period to promote road safety and act decisively against road offenders. JMPD has warned that traffic officials will have a zerotolerance approach to lawlessness and to those who will be driving under the influence of alcohol or other substances. There will be roving roadblocks where officers will stop and check vehicles for roadworthy, driving licenses and professional driving permit for public vehicles including buses and taxis. Buses and taxis which are not roadworthy will be taken to the testing stations for full roadworthy test. There will be more than 22 point road blocks on all exit routes from the City on N1 and M2. Besides the road blocks, we will also have officers patrolling all the major highways. We are expecting the largest number of vehicles that will be leaving between the 15th and 24th December. There will be a highly visible presence of traffic officers on the roads, which will not only prevent motorists from

speeding, but they will also assist with traffic control. We are urging all road users including passengers and pedestrians to take personal care of themselves on the roads and obey the rules of the road as molao or the law dictates. We all need to remain conscious of the fact that safety is a collect responsibility and working together we can reduce the number of fatalities on our roads. The campaign will also focus on searching vehicles of drugs, illegal firearms, overloaded especially the vehicles leaving Johannesburg to other provinces and also ensuring that drivers are fit to drive. Enjoy the Festive Season and Arrive Alive! Regards, Wayne Minnaar Chief Superintendent JMPD


CHAIRMAN’S FOREWORD “TOWARDS GROWTH & ECONOMIC PROSPERITY IN THE SOUTH AFRICA TAXI INDUSTRY” safety is the responsibility of all of us, and not only the National Taxi Alliance. There is a growing focus on a system of public transport that is reliable, safe and comfortable, and which responds adequately to the demands of passengers. National Taxi Alliance has welcomed all of the voices within the public transport arena, and in particular, the growing confidence of commuters in the transformation of the taxi industry environment. Even though the old and non-roadworthy state of the taxi fleet is one of the major contributing factors to road accidents, the role of reckless drivers who do not respect the rules of the road and the rights of other road-users, should not be underestimated. It is necessary as well to focus on the role played by taxi drivers in taxi operations. Commuters have the right, at all times, to travel in safety and in comfort, with operators expected to deliver high levels and quality of services. It is the responsibility of Government and traffic authorities to keep operators on their toes and ensure that they respond adequately to passenger demands. Taxi magazine is such an initiative striving to enhance road safety. Objectives: Taxi magazine is placing special emphasis on further educating those drivers who are committed to providing quality service in roadworthy vehicles, while driving safely and with courtesy. Taxi magazine communicates the key message that road

Taxi magazine is also aimed at improving the image of the taxi industry by prioritizing the empowering of taxi bosses as well as customer care. Taxi drivers are motivated not only to respect their passengers, but respect the rights of pedestrians as well. Taxi magazine posed opportunity for partnerships between business and private sector to invest in the taxi industry "and help develop skills". The National Taxi Alliance believes this publication contribute immensely towards stemming the carnage in South Africa's roads. The National Taxi Alliance has emphasized that this publication continues to demonstrate its commitment to promoting safety driving and the social upliftment of both its members and their respective commuters. We continue to seek new partners who share our Alliance's vision and who will contribute to our continued growth and prosperity. Francis Masitsa Chairman


PUBLISHER’S FOREWORD There is a growing focus on a system of public transport that is reliable, safe and comfortable, and which responds adequately to the demands of passengers. Government has welcomed all of the voices within the public transport arena, and in particular, the growing confidence of commuters in the transformation of the public transport environment. The efforts to provide quality public transport are not only efforts undertaken by the Government, but also independent initiatives and partnerships by commuter organizations, community based organizations, business associations and public transport operators to complement the efforts of Government. Even though the old and non-roadworthy state of the taxi fleet is one of the major contributing factors to road accidents, the role of reckless drivers who do not respect the rules of the road and the rights of other road-users, should not be underestimated. It is necessary as well to focus on the role played by taxi drivers in taxi operations. Commuters have the right, at all times, to travel in safety and in comfort, with operators expected to deliver high levels and quality of services. It is the responsibility of Government and traffic authorities to keep operators on their toes and ensure that they respond adequately to passenger demands. By providing an incentive to safety conscious drivers we can enhance both the safety of minus commuters and other road users sharing the roads with minibus taxis. Taxi magazine is such an initiative striving to enhance road safety by addressing and rewarding road safety amongst our minibus taxi drivers!

OBJECTIVES The aim is to impact on taxi driver behavior by reminding them of their responsibility to commuters and the larger community. The magazine is placing special emphasis on further educating those drivers who are committed to providing quality service in roadworthy vehicles, while driving safely and with courtesy. Taxi magazine communicates the key message that road safety is the responsibility of all of us, and not only the Government This magazine is also aimed at improving the image of the taxi industry by prioritizing the training of drivers in advanced driving skills as well as customer care. Taxi magazine initiative posed opportunity for partnerships between business and private sector to invest in the taxi industry "and help develop skills". I personally believes this publication will contribute immensely towards stemming the carnage in South Africa's roads.

TAXI DRIVER REACTION Readers of Taxi magazine have made important comments and even suggestions on how they have - and wish to continue to enhance road safety: “I believe it starts with oneself, when you treat people with respect and ubuntu, you will gain respect as well. Training alone will not make you a better person but you need to show willingness to work with people and learn from them...” “Set goals for yourself and have a vision, including being professional about your work as you want other people to take you and your work seriously. During Public Transport Month we need to ensure those few (people) who will be using our transport (taxis) are not tempted to going back to using their own cars but rather show what a convenient means of transport taxis can be…” “My wish is to see all taxi drivers including owners receiving training particularly with 2015 coming to have a positive mind and attitude….”

“Taxi organisations and taxi owners should encourage their drivers to do advance driving courses to improve their driving skills and prevent road accidents…” “I have learnt new things. For example I have learnt that when you drive on a rainy day, you should be very careful and try to ensure that there is a (proper) distance between your car and another one.” “It is critical that all drivers adhered to traffic rules because they are dealing with people's lives…” “Taxi drivers like to drive fast on the roads. I think they should be careful and ensure that commuters reach their destinations safely.” “I will do my best and try to be the best taxi driver on the road from now on. I have learnt so much and will carry on trying…” “I hope this competition will not stop here but continue to encourage all the taxi drivers out there…”

TAXI MAGAZINE ADVERTISER REACTION Sarah - TaxiStyling I would thoroughly recommend advertising in the Taxi magazine. As a small business, we were sceptical about the initial financial outlay but it has certainly been worth it. The phone hasn’t stopped ringing since! We are a small business and the fact that we advertise on a regular basis in this popular and established magazine gives our customers confidence that A Perfect Solution are here to stay. Loyiso and the team have been full of help and advice and have helped immensely with the initial design of our advert.

David – Taxi Parts Dealers Each time the Arrow Advertiser is posted out there is an immediate increase in the number of telephone enquiries which more than pay for the advertising. Also I find people have cut out my advertisement and it is pinned on a cork board when I visit. Good value advertising. Taxi magazine continues to demonstrate its commitment to promoting responsible consumption and the social upliftment of both taxi drivers and their respective commuters. Taxi magazine is the only publication in the country that features positive worthy news and articles about the South African taxi industry, our constant goal is to surpass the success edition of the previous quarter edition. Until next time, drive safe. Sincerely yours,

_____________________ (Uloyiso Ngavu)


TM

SOUTH AFRICA'S BEST SELLING TAXI OWNERS MAGAZINE Durban Adverting Executives Thabo Mdluli, Mark Harries and Khaya Maseko durban@jozimedia.com

Publisher Uloyiso Ngavu uloyiso@jozimedia.com Editor Justice Mashaba justice@jozimedia.com

National Journalists Themba Khoza Nonky Zulu Duma Majola Anthony Bekker Sipho Mfokate Steve Botha news@sataximagazine.co.za

Directors: Loyiso Ngavu, Chantal Kruger & Tony Ramaphosa Special thanks to: Minister of Transport Office: Ms. Elizabeth Dipuo Peters Contributors: National Taxi Alliance, SANews.gov.za, National Department of Transport, Arrive Alive, Babalwa Buthelezi, Nick Sally, Gordon Clive, Phinah Ramalepe, Sfiso Ndebele, Kobus Venter, Rob Dickson, and Vusi Khumalo.

Consumer Division Manager Nthabiseng Maphakela consumer@jozimedia.com Accounts and Finance Manager Selina Mogole Selina@jozimedia.com

Creative Director Nipun Garodia

Circulation and Subscriptions Officer Zukiswa Montashe subs@sataximagzine.co.za

Chief Operations Officer Misani Ngavu misani@jozimedia.com

Floor & Sales Manager Mpho Khutsoane mpho@jozimedia.com

Acting General Manager Happy Mokoena happy@jozimedia.com

Project Manager Vela Hlongwane vela@jozimedia.com

Cape Town Adverting Executives Thabisa Ngavu, Billy Noku and Derrick Taaibosch capetown@jozimedia.com

National Taxi Expo Manager Melusi Mtethwa melusi@jozimedia.com

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Publisher

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MED!A EMP!RE

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Tel: 011 036 2977 Fax: 0866106053 info@jozimedia.com www.sataximagazine.co.za

Office Manager Khensile Moriri khensile@jozimedia.com Administrative Support Akhona Mpisane akhona@jozimedia.com Office Maintainance and Security Joseph ‘Jack’ Liburu Office Cleaner Lesigo Cabage Printered by Banana Print www.bananaprint.co.za Distributed by: Allied Publishers Company Chaffeur

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TAXI MAGAZINE™ subscribes to the South African Press Code that prescribes news that is truthful, accurate, fair and balanced. If we don’t live up to the code, please contact the Press Ombudsman at 011 484 3612/8 or fax 011 484 36 19 or visit the website at www.presscouncil.org.za.

2016 © Jozi Media Empire (Pty) Limited TAXI MAGAZINE is copyright under Jozi Media Empire. In terms of copyright Act 98 of 1978 no part of this magazine may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Publisher.

DISCLAIMER This publication is compiled through the use of photographs and information provided by interested parties, providers and advertisers. The information is offered with the explicit condition and understanding that the accuracy of such information is not guaranteed in any way and that any decision based on the information provided should be confirmed at its source. The publisher, nor its employees, service providers accept any responsibility for any loss or damage caused in whichever was as result of incorrect information provided in this publication


CONTENTS 16 Road safety is everyone’s business – whether you are in the driving seat or just a passenger 22 Congratulations to the Taxi Magazine team for achieving this prestigious award in Africa

HIGHLIGHTS FROM TAXI EXPO 2016 18

26 What are you allowed to do while driving? 28 Road Safety for the festive season 32 Enjoy an injury-free festive season: Advice from Department of health 34 Energy Drinks, Driver Alertness/ Tiredness and Safe Driving 36 How to deal with Road Rage 40 Why many Taxi Drivers fill up at Total? 41 Tyre tips from REDISA 42 Taxi Insurance and Road Safety

ZERO TOLERANCE AGAINST DRINKING & DRIVING 24

44 The ‘Water Anthem’ song hits airwaves across Africa thanks to Mobility Taxi Insurance’ funding


LETTERS TO THE PUBLISHER The editorial team welcomes readers’ letters but reserves the right to edit them for publication. Please send your messages to: 011 036 2977 RESPECT

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"I believe it starts with oneself, when you treat people with respect and ubuntu, you will gain respect as well. Training alone will not make you a better person but you need to show willingness to work with people and learn from them..."

It is my pleasure to subscribe to such a wonderful magazine. It is so evident that this magazine is owned by and employs people of high morals and standards... this does not go unnoticed! Sfiso Zakhele – Cape Town

Gxabhashe (Soweto)

Loyiso, I want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for all of the hard work that you have put into this new venture of yours. It is so much a reflection of who I see you as. You have truly been blessed with talents that touch so many people in special ways. God bless you,

DRIVE SAFE "Taxi drivers like to drive fast on the roads. I think they should be careful and ensure that commuters reach their destinations safely." Jafta (KZN)

Mdu Masase - Pretoria

ON THE ROAD “I will do my best and try to be the best taxi driver on the road from now on. Taxi magazine taught me so much and will carry on trying…” Mshengu (Mamelodi)

UBUNTU "I believe it starts with oneself, when you treat people with respect and ubuntu, you will gain respect as well. Training alone will not make you a better person but you need to show willingness to work with people and learn from them..." Dukashe (Cape Town)

ACCIDENTS “Taxi organisations and taxi owners should encourage their drivers to do advance driving courses to improve their driving skills and prevent road accidents…” Lucky ( KwaMashu)

RAINY DAYS "Taxi magazine taught new things. For example I have learnt that when you drive on a rainy day, you should be very careful and try to ensure that there is a (proper) distance between your car and another one." Fostar (MTN Taxi Rank – JHB)

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ROAD SAFETY

Road safety is everyone’s business – whether you are in the driving seat or just a passenger

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This holiday season our country’s national roads will again be very busy as people are heading off on their annual December vacation. One of the roads that becomes extremely busy during the peak holiday season, is the N3, which links Gauteng, through parts of the Free State and Mpumalanga, all the way to KwaZulu-Natal. N3 Toll Concession (N3TC) manages the N3, from Heidelberg to Cedara, near Pietermaritzburg. This is known as the N3 Toll Route. The company has been playing a key role in improving road safety along this important transport corridor. “We have been responsible for managing this transport link for more than 13 years. During this time, we have learned much about road safety and what can be done to improve it,” says Con Roux, commercial manager of N3TC. “Safety is not only the responsibility of the company managing the road, or the driver of a vehicle. Everyone should play their part to help make our roads safer for all,” explains Roux. Thousands of commuters use the N3 Toll Route daily, and over holiday periods this number increases as long distance taxi operators do even more trips to help people get home to their families. “We have found that long distance taxi operators are often under much more stress during peak traffic seasons. They do more trips, more regularly; their shifts (or hours) on the road are longer; and they very often take fewer breaks or rest tops. Their passengers also place additional pressure on them as they are eager to get home as quickly as possible,” says Roux. “This pressure, however, places taxi drivers and their passengers at risk, as tiredness leads to a lack of concentration which may result in drivers making mistakes which may then be the cause of crashes. People under pressure may take unnecessary risks such as driving at high speed or overtaking vehicles when it is too dangerous to do so,” continues Roux.

N3TC appeals to drivers and their passengers to put safety first Be prepared for your long journey, plan your trip well and know that you may be delayed when roads are very busy. Some drivers try to avoid traffic congestion by driving at night. Be aware that night time driving may be three times more dangerous than driving during the day because of additional risk factors such as poor visibility, drunken pedestrians, animals on the road, tiredness and a lack of concentration. Know the signs of driver fatigue and allow your driver to take regular, short rest breaks; at least after every 200km. “’Rather arrive a little late than not at all. In road crashes there are no winners,” says Roux. Encourage your taxi driver to slow down and keep a safe following distance between himself and the vehicle in front of him. This ‘safe space’ allows him to avoid a possible crash when something does go wrong. Also, remember that weather conditions can change quickly from being sunny with open skies, to dark and cloudy, with heavy rain. Driving in bad weather brings new challenges. “Rain and mist drastically decrease visibility which makes it very difficult to see what is going on around you. Your driver will have to slow

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down and be extra careful under these conditions. Passengers should remain calm and help their drivers to focus and stay alert. Don’t distract your driver or take his attention away from the road,” explains Roux. “If necessary, allow your driver to pull off at a safe place until travel conditions have improved.” 85 - 90% of all road crashes can be attributed to driver errors which may include errors in judgement, but also driver negligence and recklessness.

“Drivers and passengers should play their part protecting themselves and others on our roads. At times, the best way to defend ourselves and others is to avoid dangerous situations and knowing when not to travel; or when and how to adjust our driving to suit the conditions on the road and our vehicle’s capabilities and limitations,” advises Roux. Professional drivers understand their own physical strengths and weaknesses. They ensure that their vehicles are well maintained and roadworthy with properly inflated tyres, clean windshields and wipers, and reliable engines and suspensions. They do not overload their vehicles and they know how to correctly tow a trailer or overtake another vehicle. “Their passengers support and encourage drivers to keep doing the right thing,” says Roux. This holiday season, let us all get to our loved ones safely. Enjoy the journey,” ends Roux.

Help is available 24/7 on the N3 Toll Route Report problems or get assistance on the N3 Toll Route by contacting the 24-hour N3TC Route Control Centre on 0800 63 4357 (0800 N3 HELP) or by following the N3 Toll Route on Twitter: @N3Route.

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Taxi Expo® is the National Leader for the South African Taxi Industry Business, with events all over the country. Our flagship event, the Taxi National Convention, brings together taxi businesses of all sizes that work in the taxi industry. Taxi Expo® is leading the way in the Taxi Business, building a vast network of contacts and business associates the country over, providing the ultimate platform for business in taxi. Whether exhibiting or attending as a delegate, the experience and networking opportunities are endless, allowing for fast integration into a welcoming community in one of the country’s biggest industries. Exhibiting your company at Taxi Expo® events is not only a highly effective branding exercise, but also offers a great opportunity to become absorbed in the Taxi business. Our dedicated Account Managers are on hand to ensure that you are able to put your company in front of industry leaders, including taxi bosses,sponsors, governing bodies and other likeminded business people. For all presenters, attendance, exhibiting, and sponsorship enquiries, please contact Happy Mokoena on 011 036 2977 or email happy@jozi-media.co.za

www.santex.co.za TAXI MAGAZINE

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HALALA! HALALA! HALALA! HALALA!!!

Congratulations to the Taxi Magazine team for achieving this prestigious award in Africa. TAXI MAGAZINE

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DRINKING & DRIVING

Zero Tolerance Against Drinking & Driving

The South African Police Service, combined with other State and provincial authorities, are committed to reducing this crime, particularly over festive periods. No one is trying to stop you from having a good time - just be responsible about doing it! What is the limit? Your blood may not have an alcohol content of more than 0.05%. This means that even after what you may think is a "small drink", you could be over the limit. If you have more than 350ml of beer, OR if you have more than a single tot of brandy or other spirit, you may already be over the limit. Remember that these levels of alcohol will remain in your system for up to EIGHT hours after consumption! Do not take chances - rather stay where you are until you have sobered up, or arrange for alternative transport home from wherever you plan to drink, and make such plans in advance to ensure that you are not left stranded.

What will happen if you are caught over the limit? Members of the South African Police Service, the various Metropolitan Police Departments and other law-enforcement agencies are more frequently conducting road blocks and manning other checkpoints to discourage people from drinking and driving. If you are stopped at such a roadblock, and if it is determined that you have consumed more than the legal limit of alcohol that you may legally consume while driving, you will be arrested and charged with Driving Under the Influence of Liquor. You will be held in custody until you are able to post bail (in certain instances bail may be denied). Depending on prior convictions against you, as well as the circumstances surrounding your arrest, you face a minimum fine of R2 000 or a two-year prison sentence, or both. You may also lose your driver's licence, or have it suspended. And, of course, you will have a criminal record!

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Five things you need to know about drunk driving arrests 1. You will be arrested for being over the limit: Arrive Alive states that the legal alcohol limit of 0,05g/100ml is exceeded after just two standard beers. If you are suspected of driving over the limit, you will be Breathalysed. 2. Your blood will be taken: If the Breathalyser tests positive, you will be taken into custody and sent for further testing at an alcohol testing centre. A registered nurse will take a blood sample from you. The sample will be securely stored and transported by the police to a laboratory. 3. You will be detained: Once you have been arrested you will be taken to a police station, where you will be detained in the holding cells for at least four hours to sober up. The JMPD’s spokesman, Wayne Minnaar says that on busy nights, like on weekends, it could be longer before you are processed and released. A docket will be opened and you will be allocated an investigating officer who will follow up your blood test results. Now would be a good time to alert family or friends to your arrest, if you haven't done so already. If you do not have a phone, you will be permitted to use one at the station. 4. Bail: The bail amount for driving under the influence varies depending on the jurisdiction of the police station, says Mamonyane, but most require R500. 5. You car will not be impounded: If you have been arrested for drunk driving, you car will be taken to the police station. Your keys will be held and returned to you once you have been processed and paid bail.

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DO'S AND DON'TS

What are you allowed to do while driving?

A taxi driver should not do anything that could be interpreted as not being in complete control of the vehicle.

1) Activities While Driving With regard to other activities like eating, drinking, changing the radio or shouting passengers; there’s no specific indication in the National Road Traffic Act that expressly prohibits a taxi driver from performing these actions. However, according to Regulation 308, cited below, a driver may not occupy a position in a vehicle where he doesn’t have complete control of the vehicle. For example, a driver counting money in the traffic means he does not have his hands on the steering neither does he have an unobstructed view of the road. These are tantamount to distractions and can lead to dangerous consequences. Thus, even though the Act is silent on these particular actions, it is advisable that a taxi driver does not do anything that could be interpreted as not being in complete control of the vehicle. Please read Regulation 308 below which relates to the general duties of a driver / passenger on a public road: 1) No person driving or having a taxi on a public road shall—

is, it doesn’t matter whether you are on the phone or not! Regulation 308 A is a prohibition on the use of communication devices while driving. Please read Regulation 308 below: (1) No person shall drive a vehicle on a public road— a. while holding a cellular or mobile telephone or any other communication device in one or both hands or with any other part of the body; b. while using or operating a cellular or mobile telephone or other communication device unless such a cellular or mobile telephone or other communication device is affixed to the vehicle or is part of the fixture in the vehicle and remains so affixed while being used or operated, or is specially adapted or designed to be affixed to the person of the driver as headgear, and is so used, to enable such driver to use or operate such telephone or communication device without holding it in the manner contemplated in paragraph (a), and remains so affixed while being used or operated. (2) For the purposes of this regulation— a. the word “headgear” includes for the purposes of this regulation a device which specially designed or adapted to allow the driver to use a cellular or mobile telephone or other communication device in such a manner that he or she does not hold it in one or both hands or with any other part of the body, and which is connected to the cellular or mobile telephone or other communication device concerned, directly or indirectly, while being fitted to or attached to one or both ears of the driver; and

a. permit any person, animal or object to occupy any position in or on such vehicle which may prevent the driver thereof from exercising complete control over the movements of the vehicle or signalling his intention of stopping, slowing down or changing direction; b. when driving such taxi, occupy such position that he does not have complete control over the taxi or does not have a full view of the roadway and the traffic ahead of such vehicle.

b. the phrases “cellular or mobile telephone or any other communication device” and “cellular or mobile telephone or other communication device”, excludes land mobile radio transmission and reception equipment operating in the frequency band 2 megahertz to 500 megahertz that is affixed to the vehicle or is part of the fixture in the vehicle.

2) Use of a Cell Phone The National Road Traffic Act expressly prohibits the use of a mobile phone and further states that it is illegal to even hold a cellphone with your hand or any part of your body whilst you are driving. There is no exception in this matter, that

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HEALTHY, BODY & MIND

Energy Drinks, Driver Alertness/ Tiredness and Safe Driving

Too many accidents are caused by tired drivers falling asleep at the steering wheel. They either cause the accidents or are unable to avoid accidents which alert drivers would have been able to avoid. Tired driving is sometimes referred to as the silent assassin because sleepiness behind the wheel really kills! The topic of tired driving is often referred to in discussions on driver tiredness, drowsiness, driver fatigue etc. This has been recognized by road safety experts worldwide as a major threat to road safety – but too often is not given enough attention by drivers and fleet operators. Tired drivers cause thousands of deaths and serious injuries every year, yet even professional drivers (and their bosses) don’t always acknowledge the danger and pay enough attention to measures of avoidance. In this section we would like to consider safety advice and recommendations – and pay special attention to energy drinks as an aid to driver alertness. We will also reflect on caffeinated drinks which have been the topic of some criticism. Both tired driving and drunk driving are dangerous but in different ways. An important difference is however that there are severe penalties for driving with small amounts of alcohol in your bloodstream, but almost no penalties for driving while excessively tired. Perhaps it is time that road users and road safety authorities pay closer attention to driver fatigue as well!

Statistical Information on Driver Tiredness and Road Accidents Before focusing on the merits of energy drinks and road safety we need to consider a few international facts on driver tiredness. Information from various Sleep Institutes/ Sleep Centres nationally provides invaluable information on driver tiredness. In-depth research starting in the early 1990s has been correlated with police studies of motorway accidents. Various projects have focused on sleepiness and sleep patterns in factories and amongst ship and shift workers and more importantly on the driving ability of drivers. During some TAXI MAGAZINE

of this research drivers have been monitored by electrodes while they provided responses to how tired they are on a scale of one to 10. The Cape Sleep Research Centre has spent more than a decade investigating driver fatigue, analysing thousands of motorway accidents and demonstrating the true extent of the problem. Working with, among others, the government, police forces and companies in the transport industry, and running special training courses for drivers and their trainers, the centre uses sophisticated software and a driving simulator. This evaluates driving behaviour and the physiological state of tired drivers using an (electroencephalogram). These driver tiredness study results are now also used in court cases involving tired drivers in fatal accidents.

When are drivers most at risk of driver tiredness accidents? All drivers have their own natural/ biological body clocks. Everyone suffers a dip in the early hours and mid-afternoon. There are however common trends that needs to be given more attention: • Research reveals that crashes occur at peak times around 2 a.m., 5-7 a.m. and 4 p.m • Professional drivers in SA can drive legally for 4.5 hours at a time, but if that is in the early hours they have been found to be most vulnerable. • These vulnerable times should be avoided if possible. • Special concern has been raised with regards to older taxi drivers. • These drivers have been described as an ageing population because younger men are not keen on driving long distances in increasingly heavy traffic.

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• Many drivers are also overweight, which can contribute to daytime sleepiness by causing sleep apnoea.

• According to some researchers it is advised to drink two cans of a functional energy drink.

Warning Signs of Tired Driving

• Some driver training specialists have also promoted energy drinks as an aid to fighting fatigue among drivers.

When is the best time to have a rest stop and enjoy an energy drink? It is most important to remain vigilant behind the steering wheel at all times – and not to wait till you really can’t drive anymore. There are a few tell-tale signs that a driver is over –tired - and it is important to know these signs – both when driving or when you are a passenger in the car driven by such a driver: • eyes closing or going out of focus by themselves • trouble keeping one's head up • inability to stop yawning • having wandering and disconnected thoughts • inability to remember driving the last few miles • drifting between lanes • tailgating • missing traffic signs • jerking the car back into the lane, and/or drifting off the road Energy drinks might provide the boost needed to drive to the next safe rest stop for that much needed nap before continuing with the journey!!

Home Remedies and Quick Fix Solutions to Driver Tiredness Too many road users believe that they can through their own ingenuity manage to stay alert behind the wheel. They are in denial as to the signs their bodies offer with regards to tiredness – and disregard the need for some rest. In more than a decade of research and simulator tests on drivers, none of these strategies managed to cure or prevent sleepiness: • Opening windows

• Research by the Cape Sleep Research Centre shows that one can of functional energy drink is effective in reducing moderate levels of sleepiness. • The centre also found that consuming two cans would almost eliminate moderate levels of sleepiness and sleeprelated driving impairments for about 90 minutes after the drink had taken effect. • One study showed that a specific energy drink with 80 mg of caffeine per can, is as, if not more, effective as a cup of coffee, which varies from 20 – 120 mg of caffeine. • Some driving specialist have emphasized that drivers should keep a can in their car for use to enhance driver safety. Energy drinks should NOT be seen as a replacement to rest.

Safety Advice and Suggestions to improve driver alertness and avoid tired driving The Arrive Alive would like to advise owners to consider several measures to enhance driver alertness and avoid tired driving: • Plan ahead if you're going to be in a car for more than an hour at a stretch. • Plan journey breaks at safe stops, taking into account long stretches of monotonous road, such as motorways, and vulnerable times. • Consider stopping overnight on long-haul journeys • Share the driving with someone else – don’t do it all yourself if you don’t have to • Stop every two hours • If you start to feel tired while driving, don’t rely on air con or an open window: find a safe place to stop • Only get back behind the wheel when you are properly refreshed

• Turning up the radio • Chewing gum

• Avoid driving during the "red-eye hours" of midnight and 7 a.m.

• Taking a short walk • Willpower

• Follow your body clock: Most accidents happen at low points between 2-6 a.m. and 2-4 p.m.

• Eating Dr Brian Reyner, who has worked with the head of the Cape Sleep Research Centre, Professor Jim Horne, for more than 15 years, says they have proved categorically that no driver can fight sleep. The best advice to drivers is to avoid the situation.

Study on Energy Drinks It is most important to reflect on the research and study results about energy drinks and driver tiredness. There is much debate on the effectiveness of caffeine and energy drinks - and we would like to share some of these findings:

Caffeine • Drink two cups of coffee or a high-caffeine drink and have a rest for 10 to 15 minutes to allow time for the caffeine to kick in. • This does come with a warning - “A caffeine drink and a 20 minute nap is a short-term solution that will only allow you to keep driving for a short time.” • Research by the National University of Cape Town, suggested that caffeine has no stimulating effect on the brain and does not counteract sleepiness.

Energy drinks TAXI MAGAZINE

• Consider putting off your car trip until the morning, then get a good night's sleep in the meantime. • Avoid alcohol and medications that cause drowsiness. • Drink one to two cans of a high-caffeine energy drink or two cups of coffee, then nap for 20 minutes to allow the caffeine effect to kick in. • Energy drinks can be helpful for drivers as a quick fix to get them to a safe stopping place but should be consumed responsibly. • Remember, tiredness can be a killer as it affects reaction time and concentration.

Conclusion All the statistics show that drivers who are over-tired are just as dangerous as those who have drunk too much alcohol. Yet drink-driving is condemned and reviled, while tired driving barely gets any attention. If you drive while tired you are a risk not only to yourself –but also to all the other road users!! It is important that we enhance awareness amongst all road users about the dangers of driver tiredness - and to advice drivers to drive when well rested and to remain vigilant at all times!

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ROAD RAGE

How to deal with Road Rage

Aggressive driving is a major concern and a real threat to the safety of all road users. Any unsafe driving behaviour, performed deliberately and with ill intention or disregard for safety, can constitute aggressive driving. In extreme cases, this may escalate to road rage, which is a violent criminal act involving the intention to cause physical harm. Here are a few tips on how to deal with aggressive drivers, plus helpful hints to reduce your own stress while driving:

Road Safety: Aggressive Driving Behaviour

Protect yourself: If you are dealing with an aggressive driver, make sure your car’s doors are locked. If you are stopped in the traffic, leave enough room to pull out from behind the car you are following. If an aggressive driver confronts you, call 10111 or drive to the nearest police station.

• Following too close to the vehicle in front.

Do not take it personally: Be polite and courteous, even if the other driver is not. Avoid any conflict, if possible. If another driver challenges you, take a deep breath and move out of the way. Never underestimate the other driver's capacity for causing harm. Reduce your own stress: Understand that you cannot control the traffic, only your reaction to it. In the end, you may find that personal frustration, anger and impatience are the real danger zones on the highway. Be a courteous driver: You can set a good example, which can help make our roads safer. • Control your anger. • Avoid making eye contact with an aggressive driver. • Do not make obscene gestures.

The followings aspects might trigger aggressive behaviour: • Passing vehicles on the left. • Cutting in and out of traffic and failing to signal while engaging in multiple lane changes. • Crossing safety markings while merging onto ramps. • Failing to yield at ramps and intersections. • Violating railroad crossings. • Displaying or using a weapon. • Displaying aggressive or obscene gestures. • Slow moving traffic in fast lanes, etc The following hints are applicable: • Do not react to provocation. • Stay away from erratic drivers. • Avoid eye contact with an aggressive driver. • Use your hooter sparingly. • Do not flash your headlights.

• Do not tailgate. • Use your horn sparingly — even a polite honk can be misinterpreted. • Do not block the passing

• Do not make obscene gestures. • Do not change lanes without using your indicator. • Do not drive too close to the vehicle in front of you. • Do not block lanes

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Why many Taxi Drivers fill up at Total? Your trust and satisfaction drive our actions: everyday Total is committed to deliver to its customers the highest service standards. Every year Total trains managers and pump attendants to welcome you, advise you and provide you with high quality services.

Welcoming our customers: it is our role to make a difference Expertise: Our teams are trained to welcome you in the best and most efficient way possible. Trust: You pay for the exact amount of product delivered, not more, not less. Each customer matters: We provide each customer with a personalized greeting and tailor our services to your needs. A complete range of products and services to make Total service stations a one stop shop Get free services from your pump attendant: under-bonnet checks, tire gauge, window cleaning. Save fuel by following our Ecoservices program: talk to our pump attendants to find out many tips on how to reduce your consumption!


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INSURANCE TIPS

Taxi Insurance and Road Safety Taxi insurance has been described as a necessary evil – even if you pay cash for a Taxi and you are the most cautious of driver, you are at great financial risk if you drive an uninsured vehicle. Having a good insurance policy puts your mind at ease as you drive and this in itself is one of the biggest vehicle insurance benefits – peace of mind that should you be in an accident or have your car stolen, you are covered! Taxi insurance has become an important business and people are getting more curious about how to safe guard their cars and other vehicles against vehicle accidents, damage and theft. Why do I need Taxi Insurance?

your policy document before you leave the daily grind to ensure that you’re covered outside SA. Also, make sure your taxi driver’s license is recognised. That way you won’t get stuck in a sticky situation.

The South African vehicle hijackings and road crash statistics provide more than enough evidence to the importance of vehicle insurance. Over the last couple of years the cost of repairs has increased dramatically and there has been a significant increase in the average cost of a claim. An increase in vehicle theft, accidents and rising repair costs force insurance companies to recalculate the risk and cost of insuring our vehicles.

If you’re renting any taxis or trailers, make sure they’re covered

With South Africa's high accident and car theft rate, you cannot afford to drive an uninsured vehicle. According to the South African Insurance Association (SAIA), about 65 percent of South African motorists are not insured. This has far-reaching implications for all road users, whether or not they are insured.

My car/ motor vehicle is insured - what now?

If you are an uninsured driver, you alone are responsible for covering the costs of repairing your car or even buying a new one if it is seriously damaged. You will also bear the legal costs of trying to claim damages from another uninsured driver without the assistance of an insurer.

Insurance Tips Ensure that your insurance policy is up-to-date ahead of the Festive Holiday Before you spend Festive with the family, make sure that your taxi and home insurance policies are valid and updated. This means that you won’t get a nasty surprise should something scary happen while on the road, at home or away having fun.

Ensure that your taxi driver’s license and insurance details are valid. If you’re driving long distance outside of the South African border, you need to make sure that your taxi insurance covers your driver wherever he is. Check the exclusions on

If you’re borrowing someone else’s ride or trailer, insurance is a great idea. You don’t want to spend a big chunk of your hard earned cash on fixing a taxi you’ve only driven for a weekend. Insuring your rentals will ensure no worries on your Festive weekend. It is important to see the purchase of an insurance police not as a once-off transaction! An important bit of advice is to make sure your insurance company monitors the insured value of your vehicle from year to year. Cars tend to lose value and the book value is what the insurance company will pay out in case of a claim, nothing more. If you pay premiums based on the initial purchasing price, but the second hand value is worth less, the discounted value will be paid out. There is therefore no reason why you should insure your car for more that this value. It is important to note that a comprehensive insurance premium is amongst others, made of an accident portion (major part) and a theft portion. Even though the car does depreciate it should be kept in mind that spare parts and labour generally get more expensive with the unfortunate effect that there might not be an automatic drop in premium year after year. Best advice is to contact your insurer or broker and consult with them on whether your premium might be adjusted. Continue to improve your driving ability and drive with caution. Even though your car insurance is in place – you would rather like to avoid vehicle and bodily damage!

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DJ FIZZ MUST FALL

The ‘Water Anthem’ song hits airwaves across Africa thanks to Mobility Taxi Insurance’ funding

J FIZZ MUST FALL

WATER awareness campaign songs written by DJ Fizz Must Fall, currently working to expand township developments in South Africa, have attracted much attention in Mzansi, a nation with a serious water problem. Even though it has not been released for sale, the Water Anthem song reached number one on SA’s music charts and is even nominated for a music award—a rareBleed achievement for a song about water. Trim Production and recording of the song was funded by the Mobility Taxi Insurance. South Africa has a fast-growing population where the 1. WATER ANTHEM demand of clean and sufficient water2. is everyday. MYincreasing FINAH 3. YINTON’ NA NOMARASHIYA People should use water sparingly at FT. all times to save the DEAR HEART (I KEEP ON FALLIN) basis of our living. Saving 4.water has become an essential 5. HELLO MY BABY FT. BRIAN practice for all areas around6. the country including areas KHAYELITSHA FUNK REMIX U & I Must Fall reports where water may be less of an issue. DJ7. Fizz AFRIKA UNITE that whenever he talked with high8.school students and other All songs and lyrics are written by DJ Fizz Must Fall young people about water saving he was astonished at their Recorded at Master Lugz Studios lack of knowledge on the subject. This by:led to his idea to Released & Marketed Jozi Records by: JMD increase water awareness throughDistributed music, since radio is the Cover designed by: Nipun most powerful form of entertainment in South Africa. Executive Producer: Uloyiso “DJ Fizz Must Fall” Ngavu & Mixed by: Lucky Shabangu After the song was completedMastered in October 2016, it was sent 2016 © network All rights of the record producer owner of the radio work to SA’s only television and allandofof theits FM reproduced reserved copying, public performance, broadcasting, and hiring out stations. The songs attracted aormajor response directly indirectly of this cd is prohibited.and were For the bookingradio. and interviews, send email to: bookings@jozirecords.com played repeatedly on DJplease Fizz Must Fall has high expectations for his work: Proudly Sponsored by

mory of “Seeing how the ‘Water Anthem’ song can Ichange n Loving Mepeople’s thoughts and actions, I hope this will act as a catalyst to ALOYISO make saving water as everyone’s responsibility, not just NGAVU Released & Marketed by the younger the government—especially among generation, (1982 - 2016) who are the future of South Africa.”

J FIZZ MUST FALL featuring the smashing hit

WATER

ANTHEM

JOZ RECORDS

DJ Fizz Must Fall owns the rights to the Water song MAY HISAnthem SOUL REST IN PEACE… www.jozirecords.com and is donating all proceeds to an NGO that works to raise awareness of saving water. When the song is played on radio in SA or other countries, music copyright management organizations transfer all royalties to the NGO in South Africa. However, DJ Fizz Must Fall explained, “This song was created through the efforts of volunteers in order to help prevent water scarcity, so I’d mostly like for people to listen to the song for free.” With that, here are 11 pieces of advice by DJ Fizz Must Fall; this is what can be done in your home to make it more waterefficient. • Take shorter showers. • Reduce your toilet flush volume. • Turn off the shower after soaping up, then turn it back on to rinse. • Install a system to pump grey water (from the washing machine, basins, shower and bath) to the garden, most households will eliminate the need for any additional garden watering. • Be alert of leaking taps and toilets. Find out how you can fix your leaking toilet. TAXI MAGAZINE

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• When washing dishes by hand, do not leave the water running for rinsing. • If you have a double-basin, fill one with soapy water and one with rinse water. • Use tap aerators to reduce the flow in kitchen taps. • Do not let the tap run while you clean vegetables. • Rinse them in a stoppered sink or a pan of clean water. • Water your lawn long enough for the moisture to soak down to the roots. A light sprinkling can evaporate quickly. “Saving water should come naturally as response to the challenges arising. Sign displays should not be ignored as they may help as reminders of water conservation. Parents should educate children about the simple water-saving methods around the home. Employees and co-workers should be made aware of water scarcity issues and the impact of water conservation practices, using water-saving features can reduce your in-home water use and save money too.” Says DJ Fizz Must Fall.

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Taxi Magazine: Festive Edition 2016  
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