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Joy Qin’s Portfolio


CONTENT 1.0 Architecture 01 Hongdeng Primary School 13 Hung-up Living

2.0 Urban Design 17 Shiwei Tang Urban Renew 31 The Flux B

-- All for better life


Architecture


JOY’S PORTFOLIO

Hongdeng Primary School This is a charity project. The most challenging thing is we had to design and construct the building with limited budget and basic construction tools. The site was in a remote village of Guangxi, China. Due to poor conditions, we determined to use local material, bamboo and traditional construction method to build the school, with the villagers.

ARCHITECTURE

Context An overall view of the cultural heritage Hongdeng village, which belongs to one of the small minority “Hong lao” in China. The children were schooling under poor conditions: the existing school couldn’t provide enough space for students; the buildings were too old to be used.

Site

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Local Building Logic

ARCHITECTURE

Programs

> 4m setting out grid > Stone as foundation for wooden columns > Layers of pitch roofs > Clear zoning for functions

Technique Local Architecture Lanuage

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ARCHITECTURE

Design Concepts Urban concept The new school is a new agenda to the village. 1. It acts as the main gathering space of the village, which strives for day school, night gathering and other important events. 2. Culture and information exchange is facilitated.

Change of Underlayered space type

New type of space generated = Covered G/F Gathering Space = Centralized Gathering Space

Day and Night, Summer and Winter

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Idea sketches for construction pattern

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ARCHITECTURE

Structure Axon

Master Plan

Sections

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ARCHITECTURE

Forces Analysis

Elevations

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ARCHITECTURE

1. classrooms 2. outdoor playground 3. assembly courtyard 4. classroom 5. multi-function room/ library 6. teachers dormitories 7. public washrooms

Classroom Design 45 people (age 7-12)

32 people (age 6-10)

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20 people (age 6-10)

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ARCHITECTURE

Hung-up Living A conception design for Shinkenchiku Residential Design Competition 2010. Our idea was to challenge the lifestyle that Chinese big blocks brought us--we don’t know our neighbours because of the compartmented apartments. We hung up all of the functioning rooms to leave the ground floor empty for yards, which will increase the opportunity of meeting neighbors.

Concepts Iterations There are 4 iterations applied in communities: a)single unit, b)connected unit, c)related unit, d)shared unit

A conventional house occupies most land of a site.

A hung-up house vacates most land of a site for outdoor activities.

Privacy Hierarchy By determining the hierarchy of the privacy of the activities, we can decide what functioning rooms can be located on lower floors which will have less privacy.

Formation

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Urban Design


JOY’S PORTFOLIO

URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

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URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN

Principle II: Growth Projections

The Flux B Collaborators: Ivana Dancova, Rafael Parra Site: Melbourne

Introduction This studio aims to exploring a new version of urban design for Melbourne’s suburbs under the pressure of rapid population growth. Our team proposes a systematic design process created through understanding of the urban dynamics as an energetic interchange of fluxes. Flux is best described as a dynamic force applied to a certain area and quantified over time. In design terms, we interpret this definition to embody different fluxes: a collisional force of interactions caused by displacement -Commuting Flux (public transport, vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian), a physical force of the weather elements contacting the city surface - Environmental Flux - and the abstract forces of varying energy levels defined by the multiplicity of activities in the urban context -Action Flux. We believe that a city may be best evaluated through its level of success of capturing these three types of forces in its fundamental growing development.

Design Principles Principle I: Fluxes commuting fluxes, environmental fluxes, action fluxes

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Design Assumptions for the Case of Densification In order to fully comprehend the implications of high-density environments on the urban context, we need to understand its users. The population of Melbourne is projected to increase - but where in Melbourne? Will it spread over all areas equally over the coming years or will it be concentrated in specific centres? What exactly is driving people to choose certain living areas over others? We believe that ease of transport is a significant magnet for migration. With this theory in mind, we can then assume that the nodes of public transport around Melbourne will be subject to intense densification.

Our team committed to this design assumption and used it for projected growth calculations, which we then further used as explicit expressions of height and density. These expressions allowed us to study how the built environment directly transforms the quality of human interactions and the ambience between the neighbourhood boundaries. We looked at the spatial configurations (the relationship between the empty and the occupied space) as the determinant factor of defining quality of that space and ultimately the satisfaction level of its residents.

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JOY’S PORTFOLIO

URBAN DESIGN

Principle III: Spatial Design Elements 1. Ambiguous Edges

2. Openness of Space

Ambiguous edges blur the boundaries between the outside and the inside, encouraging people coming in, hence, the interplay between the outside and the inside becomes more frequent.

The meaning of differentiation in space typology is not only giving people different spatial perception, but also accommodating for a more intimate contact.

3. Variations in Economic Productivity

4. Water Design: Ground Level

The intention of mixed use is to get a place of different schedules in a day, so as to ensure the activity of the place as well as the safety of the place. The meaning of mixed use is to get residents having good accessibility to their daily needs.

Designing with water can be a challenge that involves a variety of factors. These include a specific reshape of the element of water which forces a complete understanding about its symbology, its sensory aspects and its technical challenges. Below are examples of creating environmental controls through stormwater mitigation tactics on ground level.

Eye level relation

The level of ambiguity

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Variation of

laneway space

^ Square Space

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Perimeter vegetation

Pocket Garden Space

Water flowing

Possible containers

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JOY’S PORTFOLIO

URBAN DESIGN

200

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ANGULAR NETWORK

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DIAGONAL NETWORK

ORTHOGONAL NETWORK

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THE BASE BLOCK The block of 200x100 is the main unit that define the Hoodle Grid

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Transformation I: Path Attraction Height Iterations /path as attractor 7

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In order to obtain a quality open space, paths will be attractors to control the scale of the open space. 3

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Building heights relate with the width of the paths, the closer the blocks to paths, the lower the heights are. As the paths become wider, blocks closer to the paths will be eliminated.

NETWORK

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URBAN DESIGN

Transformation II: Sun Attraction

Final Transformation: Combination

Height Iterations /sun as attractor

AVERAGE OF Height Iterations

Integrate the heights generated from solar analysis and that generated from open space scale control, using these two factors to generate blocks that

Solar analysis as a factor of change allows manipulation of the buildings’ proximities to avoid or minimize overshadowing. The density requirements and exposure of the facade allows to generate variations in height that diversify the block. The different orientations of the block allow to generate variations in the hierarchy of the buildings as well as different types of spaces. This puts in contradiction the principles of planning where it is raised homogeneity as the main code of planning, as well as uses.

have buildings without overshadowing and open spaces with moderate proportion of shadow and sunlight.

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Paths as attractor

Sun as attractor

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The final step of the design strategies to creating a block prototype.

Path as attractor

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URBAN DESIGN

Site

Action Evaluation

Collingwood Station

Public transport

Environmental Evaluation

Density Evaluation

stormwater fluxes

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Variation Integrating the design strategies we have developed earlier, lets us create visual matrices depicting the relationship between ground coverage and the average height of the block if wanting to achieve a desired FAR. Following Principle III of densifying around public transport nodes, means we are after high FAR blocks; high activation levels in those areas also mean lower ground

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URBAN DESIGN

coverage. The combination of this relationship responds with taller builidngs. As we move towards Yarra River, the activation levels drop, and so does the FAR as we are further away from public transport stations. Permeability for bicycle and pedestrian traďŹƒc becomes really important, but the ground coverage can decrease as the destinations become more selective. This relationship results in lower level buildings.

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URBAN DESIGN

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