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SEPTEMBER 2019

$11.99

VOLUME 2, NUMBER 8

Paulette's Palette

While her brush strokes visited the 1800s, Paulette Grubb hid a few secrets in her part of the Wadsworth mural project. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 8

JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Out of the Darkness by Amy Barnes With all of the local coverage about the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning) ordinances that were passed by Medina City Council, there was something not covered that deserves notice. Attendees at the July council meeting did something that is almost unheard of in current times. Unlike so many other very volatile, controversial topics of the past few years across the country, people from both sides of the LGBTQ issue sat and stood, politely, side by side, and shared their views. They allowed space for each other to talk. They were courteous and polite to each other as they waited to speak, at times stepping back to let others speak ahead of them. Only once was there an outcry, and it was immediately shut down by Council President John Coyne, as it should have been, instead

of encouraged or allowed. Kudos to Coyne for reacting so quickly and appropriately. Once reminded, people quickly returned to being mannerly. It was enough to give one hope. To make one proud of this community. That night there were LGBTQ and ally teenagers standing up in a council meeting, asking to be heard and to have LGBTQ rights protected. They were backed by those who grew up in darker, less educated times when many times gays, lesbians, transgenders, bisexuals, and others were considered less than human by many. There are many things that can be criticized about any community, but that night, Medina had a shining moment showing how people can disagree civilly, and that should be celebrated. That was the part of the story that was not covered.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes PHOTOGRAPHERS Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes INTERN Samantha Mickowski MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an eedition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

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THE NETWORKER

NETWORKING’S BRIGHT LIGHT by Bob Arnold

Whether it is choosing dinner or people we bond with, quality is important.

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MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

VACUUM VERSUS FAN by Paul McHam

When removing hot, moist air from the bathroom, it is easy to create a vacuum and eliminate the fan’s effectiveness.

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THE ART OF HISTORY by Amy Barnes

Through her art, she has guided pilots, soothed sick children, decorated dollhouses, and helped celebrate a

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bicentennial. Now, her talent has become a part of the revitalization of downtown Wadsworth.

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Foxes, reading at a farmers market, and a picnic, sounds

The perfect timing of a helping hand in a local store.

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like the perfect end to summer!

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

Gather the clues and solve the puzzle! Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

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Wadsworth mural artist Paulette Grubb.

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PHOTO ALBUM

WISHING WELL WISHES FROM THE FAIR Wishing Well by Medina County Fair attendees and

If you love your cheesecake thick and heavy with a lemon twist, this is the recipe for you.

Featuring Letter Detectives winner Jessica Rapenchuk and

by Kelly Bailey

See the wide variety of wishes that were le in our

by Amy Barnes

BRUSH WITH WORDS

FOUR HIDDEN CAUSES OF WEIGHT GAIN

photos by Samantha Mickowski

NEW YORK-STYLE CHEESECAKE

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OF MIND AND BODY

There are more factors to weight management than just diet and exercise.

BITE ME!

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

Discover the cause of the black spots on your house and our gardening columnist’s secret love.

by Amy Barnes

by Christopher Barnes The final chapter.

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by Michelle Riley

CART CONUNDRUM

LITTLE TRUTHS

photos by Samantha Mickowski

FUNGUS CONFETTI AND A SECRET

IN DEED

THE READING NOOK

OH, SNAP!

DIG IT!

photos of butterflies, bees and dragonflies that visited the county.

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THE IN BOX

HEALTHY TRAILS

CYCLING LOVE AFFAIR by Robert Soroky

America’s love affair with bicycles and why the sport is growing.

REMOVING TOXIC CUSTOMERS

GEMS

To improve the overall health of a business, sometimes it is the customers who need to be fired.

by Kent Von Der Vellen

FLYING FREE

by Steve Rak

On the Cover: photo by Samantha Mickowski Paulette Grubb is the first of the artists participating in Main Street Wadsworth’s mural project.

Sometimes life’s path leads to helping others back into the sky.

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LET'S DO IT!

Take a break from work and school to enjoy great events and activities around Medina County!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

THE ART OF HISTORY

by Amy Barnes photos by Samantha Mickowski

The alleyway between The Sub Station and Bicksler’s Electric that is home to five murals by Paulette Grubb. She is planning to add a  sixth mural to the alleyway.

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ord spread quickly among airplane pilots in the Norton area: You can navigate your way by the giant Charlie the Tuna in the bottom of a local swimming pool. It would be several years a er painting it that the college student who was commissioned to reproduce StarKist’s bespectacled spokestuna would learn that her artwork had become a navigational tool. She laughs about it still. Paulette Grubb has completed a lot of pieces of art over the years, but she says that Charlie was one of her oddest projects. Her smallest project was painting tiny watercolors that would be hung in dollhouses created by a friend of hers. Her current project will not guide pilots, but it will help pilot Wadsworth visitors and residents down a

sun-dappled downtown alleyway to enjoy her historic outdoor murals. The murals are part of a projected 10-year mural project by various artists and spearheaded by Main Street Wadsworth to revitalize the Wadsworth downtown area. With all of the rain the area has had this year, Grubb was relieved that she could work on her murals indoors. “The weather this spring, it would have been awful (to try to paint the murals on-site),” Grubb said, adding, “size doesn’t bother me, but weather can cause problems.” Another challenge to painting on-site would have been the texture and unevenness of the brick wall of The Sub Station at 116 High Street. It would have been very difficult to paint a straight


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

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Two of the panels from the 2014 Wadsworth Bicentennial Gala. They are located within the main meeting room of the Wadsworth  Chamber of Commerce.

line at all because of all of the hills and valleys in the brick, Grubb said. She said that by doing the murals as smaller paintings first, she was able to add a lot more detail than if she had painted the murals full size. She started her murals with acrylic paints on quarter-inch thick boards, half of the final size of the finished murals, which vary from 4 feet by 6 feet to 5 feet by 8 feet. Grubb said she had photo corners

made from cardstock-weight paper so that, as Main Street Wadsworth photographer Tom Stugmyer took photos of the finished murals, the corners could be moved from one painting to the next to ensure each mural had uniform photo corners. Randy Todd, the mural project committee chair, arranged for her murals to be enlarged and turned into vinyl transfers from Stugmyer’s photos. The vinyl has adhesive on the back and is similar to the continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

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material used to create car wraps. Grubb said her murals were then applied to the outer wall of The Sub Station by one man using a blow torch for fourand-a-half hours. Grubb’s five murals are located in the alleyway between The Sub Station and W.S. Bicksler Electric, Inc., 114 High Street, across the street from Ann’s Pastry Shop, 121 High Street. Main Street Wadsworth is storing Grubb’s originals. Grubb said that If touchups are needed or the murals need to be re-made, then Main Street has the originals to refer to. Grubb said there also has been discussions about making postcards of the murals from the project. The mural subject matter and historical accuracy are due to the photo collection of Roger Havens, principal of Wadsworth’s Franklin Elementary School, said Grubb. There is a little secret in the murals that Grubb painted. Look closely at the people in the murals, and you might recognize Stugmyer and Adrianne Krauss, executive director of Main Street Wadsworth, in the middle of the one featuring the old interurban streetcar. The streetcar mural also features John D. Rockefeller and Laura Spelman Rockefeller, who were once Wadsworth residents, just in front of and to the right of Stugmyer and Krauss. Riding the streetcar, fourth window from the le , are Grubb’s daughter and grandsons, Courtney, Colton and Charlie Gile. In the Silver Creek Mine mural, the two miners sitting in the lower, right corner are Grubb’s son-inlaw, Trevor Gile, and her son, Johnathan Grubb. Grubb donated her artistry to the mural project because she loves Wadsworth and has found the community to be very supportive. “The community has been good to us, and we have so many good friends here,” she said. She has lived in Wadsworth with her husband, James, for almost 30 years. She is originally from the Norton area. The current-day Silver Creek Park is on part of her parents’ old property where she and her sister, Kathy, were raised by their parents, Katherine and Paul Petrich. Wadsworth residents who attended the Wadsworth Bicentennial Gala at the Galaxy Restaurant in 2014

may recognize Grubb’s artwork from the historic walkway that was installed in the restaurant, which had numerous hinged painted panels of historic storefronts from downtown Wadsworth. Two of the panels are on display in the main meeting area of the offices of the Wadsworth Chamber of Commerce. Six of the panels are displayed at the Wadsworth YMCA Community Center, 623 School Drive. Two are in storage near the Main Street Wadsworth office, 102 Main Street. Grubb’s murals also can be found in Akron Children’s Hospital. It was a way for her to relieve the heartache, fear and stress caused by her son’s first and second cancer diagnoses when he was in high school. He had just finished his chemo treatment in the fall at Akron Children’s and by the following January he was back with his second diagnosis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma. There is a little secret in the murals. During Jonathan Grubb’s stay in the hospital, which included 43 days in isolation, his parents were by his side. There, in the wee hours of the morning, when she would wake and be unable to sleep, Paulette Grubb would paint murals she designed to comfort the children receiving treatment at the hospital. She added murals to the Bear Cave, a playroom at the hospital, and to all of the walls in one of the treatment rooms that is part of the Showers Family Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Disorders. A little girl who was receiving treatment at the center loved fairies, so Grubb painted a fairy with the girl’s likeness on it and added a dragon and rainbow. Despite the stress and worry at the time, Grubb says, she wanted to help give the children having to be treated there something to focus on other than the treatments. She said painting the murals was a way to relieve stress. “It was therapy for me,” she said. The medical personnel were very supportive and even gave her the key to the rooms where she was painting the murals so she could work when there were no patients in them. “They were like family to us,” Grubb said. “They were amazing people there.” The nurses at the center took photos of Grubb’s


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The old interurban streetcar that traveled from Wadsworth to Barberton and then to Akron.

continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

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The Cracker Barrel Crowd, which was a group of Wadsworth politicians and business owners who met each morning in the alley by the  present­day Domino’s, 117 Main Street.

The entrance to the Silver Creek coal mine.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

murals and had a book made that they each signed to thank her for her artwork and caring. Jonathan Grubb is now 33 years old and works at an architectural firm in Columbus. He participates in bicycle rides that raise money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Paulette Grubb started painting in elementary school and in the ‘70s started dabbling in watercolor paints. She graduated with an art education degree from Kent State University and was an art teacher for the Norton schools for four years. Her husband’s job with Goodrich necessitated many moves as he was transferred, but she kept painting and became involved in the art community wherever they would live. One of Grubb’s mentors was Medina artist Fred Graff. She got great enjoyment from attending his workshops at the “old pickle farm” on East Smith Road in Medina that was owned by the Ted Chandler family. The pickle plant was known as Farm Packt Pickles. There, artists were treated to a wide variety of objects to hone their skills by creating paintings of things such as saddles, old cars and more. She learned to whiskey paint because Joe Grace sponsored her to join a local whiskey painting group where membership was by sponsorship from an existing member only. Grace was a cartoonist with the Akron Beacon Journal newspaper who enjoyed whiskey painting, which is when an artist uses whiskey, instead of water, to moisten watercolors. “You pick up different things from each artist,” Grubb said, reflecting back over her painting career. While she is delighted to have been chosen to participate in Wadsworth’s mural project, she also is excited at the opportunity it provides for other artists, as well, and is glad the murals will be on display in a way that is accessible to everyone. “Everybody can enjoy this,” she said. Grubb was told that the vinyls made of her murals will last approximately 10 years. She is comfortable with that, knowing that the originals are in safe hands and can be used to make reproductions again. photos continue, Page 10

Learn more about the Main Street Wadsworth mural project at https://bit.ly/31tGcsX . Donations can be made at https://bit.ly/2YZNOFW .

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Then, it was a shoe repair shop; now, Paulette Grubb said, it is Chuck’s Coin and Gold Exchange, 120 Main Street.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

The Co­Operative Store which carried boots, shoes and groceries.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine eedition! Go to JoyofMedinaCounty.com for links to past issues. This is the final installment of “Little Truths,” we hope you have enjoyed it. Our search for a new author continues!

CHAPTER 32   “I’m sorry. I’m so, so sorry.” My  mother is profusely apologizing to  Olivia, holding all three of us kids the  whole time. Finally, after the longest hug  of my life and endless apologies, we all  let go.    “Mom, I forgive you. Please, I just  want to be a whole family again,” Olivia  says, breathing heavily between words.     We’re all still regaining our  composure, and, as Olivia and my  mother start to talk, Devin grabs me by  the arm and pulls me slightly away.    “Cam, what’s going on? How are you  feeling?” He gently pushes back a loose  strand of hair, tucking it behind my ear.    For a moment, I have to stand here and  think about it, because I’m not sure what  I’m feeling. Anger at my mother for  putting me through all this? Resentment  that Olivia is able to seamlessly re­enter  the family that I was once a part of?  Happiness that we’re all together again?    “Um, well, I guess I’m…”    “Confused?” Marissa suggests. I nod,  looking down at my feet.    “I guess I have two choices, but I don’t  want to choose between you guys, and  them,” I admit.    This whole time, ever since my dad’s  passing, I’d been looking for a family to  consider myself a part of. While in  London, I found this family, not in Lea  and Lilith, as I was expecting, but in  Marissa and Devin. Now, I had my  blood family mere feet away from me,  and they were willing to work to repair  the damage that had been done ever  since my father took Olivia away.    “Cam, we’ve been through a lot. The  three of us have had an unforgettable  adventure, and we will always be close,  no matter what happens. But that right  there,” Marissa stops to point behind me  at Lea, Lilith and Olivia, “that is your  family. This is your last chance to have a  blood­related family now that your dad 

is gone, and I don’t think you should let  your grudge against your mother keep  you from that. She may have put you  through some tough times, but she’s  willing to apologize and make it right.  You can’t be mad at her forever, and you  have to forgive her at some point.”    “She’s right,” Olivia says, from behind  me.    I didn’t realize she had walked up  while Marissa was talking, and now was  standing right there.    “You can’t be angry forever.”    I want to be angry forever. I like  having my mom to blame for all the bad  that’s happened to me in my life, but at  the end of the day, she’s standing there,  ready to fix things, and if I deny that,  it’d be my fault that our family was still  broken.    Ever since my mom left, I’d felt like I  was part of a broken family.    Now, I have a chance to fix that, and  even though we are far from perfect,  making my family whole again isn’t  something I want, but something I need.    “Marissa, Devin,” I begin, turning  back toward them to give some sort of  speech about how we’ve been through a  lot and I greatly appreciated all they’ve  done for me and blah, blah, blah, but  then I think better of it. They know. I  don’t have to stand here and praise them  and thank them, I can say three simple  words, and that’ll be good enough.    “Yeah, Cam?” Devin asks.    “I love you,” I remind them, smiling.    “We know,” Marissa replies.    I feel tears welling up again, so I turn  around quickly and shake it off. I can’t  cry just yet. First, I need to go talk to my  mother.    Olivia and I walk back to Lilith and  Lea. I’m trying to breathe as deeply as I  can the whole time, preparing myself for  the words I’m about to say, though I  know nothing can prepare me for it.    Since the moment my dad told me she 


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

wasn’t coming back, the only words  I’ve wanted to say to my mother were  nasty and venomous, and yet now that  I finally have the chance to do so.    “Hi, Cameron,” my mother replies,  just as quietly.    “I think I’ve made up my mind,” I  tell her.    “I would love to hear what you have  to say,” she responds.    Everything is quiet.    After all I’d been through, I never  would’ve guessed I was about to say  these words to her, but Olivia changed  everything.    “Although I haven’t forgiven you, I  want us to be a family. You, me, Lea,  and Olivia.”    And just like that, it’s out there in the  open. It was strange to say it aloud, but  it sounded right.    “I would like that,” my mom says.    “So, we’re a family again?” Lea  asks, hope in her eyes and love in her  heart.    “We’ve always been a family,” my  mom replies with a small smile.    “I’m not sure if that’s entirely true,”  I chuckle lightly, knowing how I’ve  felt about her this whole time.    “Cameron,” Marissa chimes in,  walking up and gently taking my hand  in hers, “I think there might be a little  truth in it.”    Her words make me think back to  that ladybug she showed me. She had  said at the time that ladybugs were a  sign of good luck, but I didn’t believe  it.    I’m generally a skeptical person, but  she told me that everything has a little  truth to it, and ever since then, I’d been  learning how true that statement was.    So, maybe that little ladybug did  bring me good luck. It just took a  while to reach me. EPILOGUE    “Her name is Spot,” Marissa says, 

handing me a tiny, see­through  container with a leaf inside.    “The leaf?” I ask, confused.    “No silly, turn it,” she replies,  helping me rotate the container to  reveal the tiny ladybug roaming  around the other side of the leaf.    As soon as I see it, I start to laugh.  She is so small, about half the size of  the fingernail on my pinky, cluelessly  walking around the leaf. She’s so cute  and innocent, I can’t help but chuckle  at her tiny little legs.    “You like her?”    “I love her,” I say, smiling wide. I  kiss Marissa’s cheek and then turn  around to bring her inside.    “Mom! We’re home!” I shout from  the foyer, even though this was the  first time we’d stepped foot into my  mom’s new place.    “Oh good! You’re just in time for  dinner,” she shouts back.    The smell of freshly cooked chicken  and dumplings wafts through the  house, and I breathe in deeply, letting  the breath out in a sigh.    The crisp fall wind sneaks through  the doorway as I pull the door shut.  Thanksgiving is just around the corner,  and we’re all coming together as a  family to celebrate.    Lea and Olivia, now in their  twenties, are already back home,  enjoying the warmth of the fireplace  while sharing a blanket and watching a  movie in the living room.    Devin is on his way with his  husband, as his parents had kicked him  out when he came out to them, but at  that point we were more of a family to  him anyway.    Marissa, my wife, never wants to see  her parents again after all they’ve done  to her.    After all was said and done, it left us  in a weird spot, but at the end of the  day, the six of us were family.

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  And yeah, we fought, and we  bickered, and we all had days where  we thought the others all hated us, but  that’s part of being a family.    It’s not just roses and sunshine, but  thistles and thunderstorms and even  natural disasters sometimes, but when  the storm calms, and the winds die  down, and you look around and see  that everyone is still there after all the  chaos you just endured together, you  understand that nothing can take them  away from you.    Because that is what makes a family.    “Cameron, look,” Marissa says,  pointing out the window with the  gleam in her eye that she gets when  she sees something truly magnificent. I  hadn’t checked out the windows to see  what the view was like in mom’s new  place yet, but she had clearly found  something beautiful.    I follow her over to the window and  peer out.    It’s such a picturesque view of Big  Ben that I almost don’t believe it.    My breath catches in my throat as I  gasp, and I wrap my arms around her.    We stand there motionless for a  minute, staring at this monument, until  there’s a knock at the door.    “Hey! It’s Devin and Michael! Open  up, we’re hungry!”    My amazement fades to a contented  smile.    I pick up Spot in her container and  watch her crawl along the leaf, looking  for something. Maybe she’s looking  for food.    Or maybe, just maybe, she’s looking  for her own little truth.

Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

BITE ME!

New York-Style Cheesecake

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recipe and photos by Amy Barnes To save time, I use two mixers for this recipe. I use a vintage electric mixer to beat the egg whites into stiff peaks because it does a better job than any modern mixer I have used. Meanwhile, I mix the rest of the ingredients with a modern mixer. •1 large graham cracker crust •1 tablespoon vanilla •1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice •2 8-ounce blocks of cream cheese •½ cup sugar •2 teaspoons freshly grated lemon peel (cut by half for less lemon taste) •2 separated eggs

The unbaked cheesecake filling has the consistency of pudding.

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Beat together vanilla, lemon juice, cream cheese, sugar, and lemon peel. When well combined and smooth, slowly add egg yolks. Beat egg whites in separate bowl until stiff peaks form. Using a spoon or rubber spatula, gently fold egg whites into cream cheese mixture, just until combined, do not over stir. Pour into graham cracker crust. Bake until slightly browned on top and cracks have started forming. It usually takes an hour and a half of baking time, but a er an hour of baking, keep a close eye on it. Cool. Store covered in refrigerator. Serve cold with fruit or fruit pie filling.

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A finished cheesecake, ready to eat!


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

17

Joyful Word Search BRUSH WITH WORDS

During the Medina County Fair, there is  always some confusion, but probably the  most confused was the woman who was in  the Commercial Building one morning, where  all of the commercial vendors are located.  She kept looking around inside the building  and finally asked, “Is this the horse barn?”

JESSICA RAPENCHUK

WADSWORTH ALLEY BRUSHES CANVAS VINYL WHISKEY CHARLIE THE TUNA SILVER CREEK

(Letter Detectives winner: Jessica Rapenchuk)

MURALS PAINTING HOSPITAL TALENT E

Answer Key for Last Month's Search

Time Traveling Skis

‘“When it’s a vegan chicken patty box,  nobody’s getting into it,” said a mom,  sharing her strategy for hiding Girl  Scout cookies in the freezer.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

THE IN BOX

THE NETWORKER

Removing Toxic Customers

Networking’s Bright Light

by Steve Rak

by Bob Arnold

About a year ago, I decided that it was time to make some changes to my business. One of the first things I decided to do was to evaluate everything and start removing the things that were toxic to my business. This included firing some customers and that was not easy. Firing customers is both terrifying and liberating. To make it easier, there are a few things to consider if you are planning on sending a pink slip to a few difficult clients. First of all, there is the 80/20 rule. This states that 80 percent of revenue comes from 20 percent of customers. It is time to make a list and see who your top 20-percent clients are. Next, determine if any of the customers you are considering letting go are in the top 20 percent. If so, that is all right, but obviously the pros and cons will have to be weighed a little more. Since you now know where they are in your revenue stream, you know what you are going to be giving up. If you have customers that need to be let go, I am sure you already know who they are. I probably do not have to give you the reasons they need to go, but here are a few to consider: they are not profitable, you cannot make them happy, they demand too much of your time, and you just do not like working with them. So finally, how do you let them go? I have sent both emails and actual letters to some of the clients that I let go. I made the verbiage as a final statement that we would be ending the relationship and it was non-negotiable. When you are letting a client go, it is best to make it final and move on. Like I said before, this is not an easy process, but sometimes it has to be done to improve your business.

Do you like the sun shining on you? Of course, you do! It brings warmth. It brightens things up and brings the color out in things. It brings people together in happiness. It stimulates essential vitamins in your body to work their magic. It stimulates growth within you, physically and mentally. The sun constantly works all of this for us, and we tend to ignore it. There is a corresponding parallel in networking that helps to create an atmosphere where we can meet other people with ease and in healthy ways. Think about it for a minute. What helps you become acceptable to other people? What takes your defenses down and helps you relate to others? It is the bright light shining on your face when you smile! I am convinced that a smile is your key to success in networking. Think about it this way, how do you react with someone who smiles at you? Unless you are a real sourpuss, you smile back. When you do, there are a few reactions your face and body have that support that smile. A smile actually opens up a relationship through acceptance, curiosity, and openness. Acceptance of who the person is you are meeting, along with showing that you accept yourself as you are. Curiosity about who they are and what your conversation is going to include. Openness toward them and then toward you. Just like the sun, there can be too much smile going on. Do not overdo it. Let your face smile as you are talking, but let it also react with other emotions as the two of you talk. The Main Point here is to be aware of how much your smile connects you with your new friend.

Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an award-winning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, www.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

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Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

MIRTH AND JOY

Vacuum Versus Fan

by Jerry King

by Paul McHam We have covered pretty much everything that runs through your bathroom pipes in one fashion or another, but there is still one more source of water that can be seen in some bathrooms from time to time. Some family members like to take long and luxurious showers or baths. You can tell by the way the bathroom mirror fogs up and any metal items (towel racks, grab bars, etc.) have that wet feel of condensation on them. It is at that point that the hot and humid air is rising to the ceiling area and saturating it. Eventually, small mold spots begin to form as mold takes hold. Most folks have bathroom exhaust fans that could take the moisture out, if they are properly used. The bathroom exhaust fan should run for 40 minutes to ensure the moisture is cleared and some will install an exhaust timer with automatic shuto. There is a problem with that, however, in that most bathrooms are small and quickly form a vacuum when the door is closed. As the fan pulls air and negative pressure is formed, the exhaust fan can simply cavitate (continue to turn the fan blade without the ability to move additional wet air out due to back pressure). In other words, the removal of air will form a resistance to the ability of the fan to move air out or the ability of the fan to move air out gets overcome by the vacuum pressures built up in the room. What may be the best solution at that point is to leave the bathroom door open so more air can flow into the room. If you cannot always leave the door open, try installing louvres in the door to allow continuous air movement into the bathroom. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

DIG IT! Fungus Confetti and a Secret

A

by Michelle Riley Have you noticed tiny tarlike spots on the siding of your home

While I understand you do not want your prized hosta to

and car? They are more prevalent a er excessive rainfall, when

become a slug banquet, the answer is not always do or die.

the weather remains humid and hot. It may be your mulch that is packing artillery. No, your mulch

Did you know that the rotting dead slugs will attract more slugs because they are attracted to carrion and are great

has not weaponized, though it may be carrying a shotgun of the decomposers? If your garden is overrun with slugs, it is an fungus kind. Artillery fungus, shotgun fungus or Sphaerobolus spp. is a

indicator that the garden’s ecosystem is off balance. Create balance, and the slug population is decreased in the most

wood-decay fungus commonly found on wood or bark mulch

environmentally friendly way.

a er a hot rainy season. It loves the moist heat, and it flowers

If you want an overnight slug solution, apply a border of

atop the mulch with tiny pouches full of water and spores. The

vermiculite around your plants. The slugs will not cross it

water pressure in these tiny pouches increases to the point of

because it can cut their delicate bodies.

explosion, projecting tiny spores covered in a tarlike substance up to 20 feet away, and there is no easy way to remove them. Some experts recommend applying a fresh layer of mulch over the fungal bodies to combat the fungus. This only hides the problem and promotes more fungal growth beneath the new mulch. Fungus party, anyone? Regular cultivating of existing mulch prohibits fungal growth of many species, including shotgun fungus, and also prohibits fungal fruiting bodies and pests. It also creates better air and water flow to the root system. Speaking of pests, I have a secret. I always have been fond of slugs. As a child, I would spend hours gathering them, large and small, on a rotten piece of tree bark, only to be met with my sister’s squeals of glee as she ran a er us, armed with a salt

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

IN DEED Cart Conundrum by Amy Barnes Darryl Albright was waiting patiently for his turn at the grocery store checkout. He had started unloading his cart when he noticed the woman in line ahead of him was struggling. As so many of us do, the woman ahead had pulled her cart

shaker to assault my new friends and my sense of decent

down the checkout aisle behind her, so she could unload it

humanity.

easier. She was at the pay point when she realized she still

Age and wisdom have not changed my fondness for slugs. I cringe every time I see a product professing how it will “maim, kill and eradicate these pests.” Anti-slug product labels do not mention the anguish these

needed to unload the items in the underside of the opposite end of her cart onto the conveyor belt. As she started to struggle to get to the opposite end of her cart, Albright noticed and li ed all of her items up onto the

tiny souls endure to meet an untimely end simply because they conveyor belt, which inspired smiles all around. For noticing and caring that help was needed and for giving it were following nature’s direction. Labels also neglect to identify all of the other innocent souls who may be harmed or killed because the slug they had for breakfast was not wearing a warning indicating what harmful chemicals it had consumed.

quickly and without hesitation, Albright was awarded a $10 gi certificate for a local store by Joy of Medina County Magazine. Thank you for helping to make Medina County a great place to live!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

OF MIND AND BODY Four Hidden Causes of Weight Gain by Kelly Bailey Trying to lose weight? Most know the importance of diet and exercise, but many other factors influence the body’s ability to shed fat. These “xfactors” are becoming the critical missing link to health and weight loss. Blue light makes you fat. A recent landmark study revealed that women who sleep with the TV on at night gain 11 pounds every five years (1). Yikes! The reason? The blue light emitted from all electronic devices disrupts circadian rhythms and metabolism. Electronic devices, such as TVs, phones, tablets, and computers, emit blue light. The simple fix? Remove the TV from the bedroom, turn off all electronics at least an hour before bed, or use blue light-blocking glasses. Sleep loss causes fat gain. Have you noticed that, a er a night of terrible sleep, your cravings are out of control and you want to eat everything? Lack of quality sleep affects hormones that regulate hunger and satiety, making overeating more likely (2). Improve sleep quality by working on “sleep hygiene.” Establish a bedtime routine by putting away blue light-emitting devices, setting a bedtime, and sleeping in a very dark, cool room. Stress is a fat-maker. Stress is the underlying cause of more than 70 percent of all doctor’s visits (3). Chronic stress can cause frequent sickness, sleep loss, disrupted hormones, and slowed metabolism which can lead to fat gain, especially around the midsection. The simplest way to reduce stress is through deep breathing. Several times per day, take five deep breaths. Environmental toxins make you fat. The average American is exposed to more than 200 chemicals every day (4). Manmade chemicals are in water, food, air, and the products applied to skin. Many of these substances are known carcinogens and hormone disruptors. The lifetime cumulative effect of millions of exposures to these chemicals is health problems and fat gain. Reduce exposure to harmful toxins by filtering water (reverse osmosis is best), switching to cast iron or stainless steel cookware, avoid storing or heating food in plastic, eating organically raised food, and learning about products used on the body. Sources: 1. https://nbcnews.to/2XMmK9D B 2. https://bit.ly/2SzmQ2t 3. https://bit.ly/30RAUXZ 4. https://bit.ly/2q iOT Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach and owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and reach her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

PHOTO ALBUM

Wishing Well Wishes From the Fair photos by Samantha Mickowski

Medina County Fair attendees le an interesting variety of wishes in the Joy of Medina County Magazine’s Wishing Well. Here are some of them.

“I wish that I’ll own a dog  or t o when I’m older!  ” And that I’ll mar  Luke! “Go to Arizona.” ‐‐  Jonathan

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“I wish for no more bullying  in all schools in our  count .”—Diana Sailer  Blair “I wish that Eat’n Park  would come back.”


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

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“I wish to live in the  count  on a far .” "I wish Medina would get a  health food store, especially  one like Ear hfare of Nor h  Canton or Fresh Thy e.” –  Cher l Riegger‐Kr gh

“I wish kids of all colors were  t eated right. I wish that  disabled kids were undisabled so  they could know what it’s like to  be a person with nothing wrong.  I wish smoking wasn’t a thing. I  wish cancer wasn’t a thing. I wish  that all baby horses were bor   alive.” – Olivia B.

“I wish that world hunger  will stop!”

“I wish for Bobby to come  home…and for justice  against those hur ing/ har ing Bobby….” R


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

HEALTHY TRAILS

GEMS

Cycling Love Affair

Flying Free

by Robert Soroky

by Kent Von Der Vellen

“I want to ride my bicycle!” The late Freddie Mercury, legendary front man of the rock band Queen, crooned this line in “Bicycle Race,” a song inspired by the 1978 Tour de France. The song became a hit, and the cycling community gobbled it up. Of course, bicycles did not really need Queen's help as, incredibly, they have been spinning underneath us since 1817. Now, more than 200 years later, cycling continues to thrive thanks to advocacy groups, comprehensive cycling laws, an ever-growing number of bike paths and trails, and a continued emphasis on health and wellness. Why the love affair with our two-wheeled friends, and what are the benefits of riding them? Riding a bike is an easy, low-impact activity. As we age, our bodies get cranky and take profound glee in protesting the stress we subject them to. Many runners have begrudgingly visited a local bike shop confessing that their knees cannot take the strain anymore, yet they desperately want to stay active. As a low-impact, non-weight bearing activity, biking can provide an awesome workout, indoors or out, without the painful wear and tear on joints. Health.com ranks cycling as one of the best low-impact invigorating workouts for weight loss. For me, the best reason to ride a bike is that it is ageless. Many start riding bikes before they can even put sentences together, flying around the neighborhood on tricycles at the ripe, carefree age of 3. As we got older, the bikes got bigger, the rides got longer, and the falls, unfortunately, more dramatic. But even when we reach the geriatric period of our lives, we can still hop on that saddle (now the size of a small couch) and enjoy pedaling the great outdoors. Sure, the speeds are slower and the distances shorter, but our minds can still recapture the feeling of that adventurous, carefree 3-year-old. Come back next month to learn about the different bike types and which one best fits your needs.

Little did Laura Jordan realize when she moved to Medina County in the ‘80s that she would end up founding one of the few raptor recovery centers in Ohio. First, Jordan’s love of animals led her to be a founding member of the Medina County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Then she le the Medina SPCA in 1985 and changed her focus to helping sick and injured animals such as deer, raccoons and other common wildlife. Through her rescue work, Jordan discovered that injured raptors were not getting care. Since raptors are protected by federal law, anyone who treats or cares for them must have a permit. Jordan traveled to Lorain County and the University of Minnesota to complete the required training, then founded the Medina County Raptor Center in Spencer. The center treats 50 to 100 raptors yearly, plus more than double that in songbirds. The most common raptors the center aids are grey horned and screech owls, red tail and Cooper’s hawks, American kestrels, and turkey vultures. Some of the injuries the center sees are caused by cars, electrocution, poisoning, or shootings. In the spring, the center sees many young birds. Young raptors stay until fall and are released before winter to increase their survival rate. In the fall, the center finds birds suffering from the West Nile Virus, which is devastating to birds and has been a problem in Medina County for the last 20 years. The center also provides more than 90 outreach programs annually to educate people about bird behavior and to give them a chance to observe raptors up close. The Medina County Raptor Center is a 501c3 nonprofit organization staffed by volunteers, college interns, and local Boy Scout and Girl Scout troop members. Its funding comes from donations which pay for food, veterinarian visits, bandages, medicine, and equipment. It costs more than $25,000 a year just to feed the raptors. To learn more about the center or to make a donation, go to https://bit.ly/2MNwA8m or https://bit.ly/2M4TEjr .

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

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September 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Sunday, September 1

Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

admission $3, dinner is additional donation

No Rhyme or Reason Day

Grades 6 to 12. Paint year’s goals on canvas.

request. Bring favorite dessert to share.

https://bit.ly/2ufvUzt

Teen Eat Up and Meet Up, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30

Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

Monday, September 2

p.m., Sycamore Room North and South,

scheduled.

Bison-Tell-Yell Day https://bit.ly/2ufw7mf

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

First Friday: Sports Night, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.,

Tuesday, September 3

Brunswick. Grades 9 to 12. Hang out and eat

downtown Wadsworth. Wear sports team

Skyscraper Day https://bit.ly/2tJRg7r

pizza a er school to learn what the library has

apparel and have sports-themed fun and

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to

to offer.

attend football game. Trolley available

noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649

Thursday, September 5

Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

Be Late for Something Day

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

https://bit.ly/1KM6hIg

National Salami Day

Stroller Hike, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., River

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina

https://bit.ly/2NO5Thb and Neither Rain nor

Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth.

Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

Snow Day https://bit.ly/2LQt1Lr

Children can be in strollers, backpacks, or

Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer

A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9

toddle on own. Mid- to full-size or jogger-type

skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-

a.m., Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen

strollers recommended. Free.

0588.

Road, Medina. Monthly vigorous 3- to 5-mile

Perfect Day Collage: ZenTeen, 4 p.m. to 5

PJ Storytime, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Story Time

hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear

p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library,

Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10

132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make a collage

Street, Medina. Story time, wear pajamas if

to adult.

vision board about your perfect day. Register

you want to.

Kinship Appreciation Day, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,

at https://bit.ly/2ZXjzNg

The Decluttering Mindset, 7 p.m., to 9 p.m.,

Medina County Job and Family Services Foster

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132

Care and Adoption, 232 Northland Drive,

233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and

Broad Street, Wadsworth. Tips to getting on

Medina. Celebrating Kinship Care Month.

classic cars, free, public invited.

the right path to decluttering. No registration.

Family-friendly vendors, community resources

Wednesday, September 4

Friday, September 6

and organizations, kid activities. Free, open to

Eat an Extra Dessert Day

Fight Procrastination Day

the public.

https://bit.ly/2uas7DV and Newspaper

https://bit.ly/2LKYceo and Read a Book Day

7th Annual British Car Day, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.,

Carrier Day https://bit.ly/2JWbnUM

https://bit.ly/2tfXGHE

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 6

Brunswick. British car show, People’s Choice

Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina.

p.m., Life Care Center of Medina, 2400

and door prize. Rain or shine. No registration

Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No

Columbia Road, Medina.

fee. Register car by calling 330-273-4150 or by

F

registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

between downtown and Art Wright Stadium. Saturday, September 7

e-mail or email, croghan@mcdl.info

for more details

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Book Brunch, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Lodi

Yoga for Preschoolers, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15

p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center,

Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Brunch

a.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473

855 Weymouth Road, Medina.

snacks, reading recommendations, then shop

Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Friends of the Library book sale.

nature through yoga poses, songs, and more.

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10

Orienteering at Allardale, 10:30 a.m.,

Bring own mat. Register at:

p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201

Allardale open air shelter, 401 Remsen Road,

https://bit.ly/2YyPnvl

Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

Medina. Map and compass navigation activity

Inspirational Art, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.,

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation

challenging ability to navigate a course of


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

varying land features. Four to six courses of

tsigel@ormaco.org

frame, 12 to 15 yards of 5- to 6-inch burlap

varying difficulty levels, from beginner to

Monday, September 9

fabric. Accessories provided.

expert. Bring manual compass and whistle.

Teddy Bear Day https://bit.ly/2ua1EGu

https://bit.ly/2KJswmN

Few compasses available to borrow. Whistles

Monday Movie Matinee, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

R is for Robot: Alphabet Adventure, 6:30

for sale, $1. Sturdy shoes and pants

Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library,

p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room,

suggested. No registration. Fee, at the door, is

132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. In partnership

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

$5 for NEOOC member, $10 for non-member.

with Soprema Senior Center. Reserve a space

Wadsworth. Learn about robots through

Monarch Tagging, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf

at 330-335-1513.

stories and cra s. Register at:

Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7

https://bit.ly/2YYATQR

Wadsworth. Help catch and tag Monarch

p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church,

Writing the Short Story, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

butterflies before they leave for Mexico. Nets

1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick.

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S.

available. Naturalist on hand. All ages. Free.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn basic

No registration.

Paper Vases: Art in the A ernoon, 4 p.m. to 5 elements of storytelling from author Shelley

Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County

p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth

Costa, includes hands-on writing time.

Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 5

Register at https://bit.ly/2YWWBbH

Association, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House

to 10. Make a paper vase with construction

Writing as a Cra : The Arts Series, 7 p.m. to

Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham

paper and fill it with paper flowers.

8:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth

Township. Use association telescopes to view

Cra ernoons, 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Story

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities

Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

Workshop series. Give your writing a boost

and displays in barn on cloudy nights.

Street, Medina. Ages 5 and up. Register at

with feedback, discussion, push to keep going

https://bit.ly/31xkIeO

with author of “If I Die in Ohio.” Bring writing,

Veterans Roundtable, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,

be ready to discuss. Register at

Sunday, September 8

Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B,

https://bit.ly/2YSOxZN

Grandparents Day https://bit.ly/1kYRNJY

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’

Wednesday, September 11

and National Pet Memorial Day

stories of survival. All ages. No registration.

911 Remembrance https://bit.ly/2Z46rbO

https://bit.ly/2Tqd96O

Tuesday, September 10

Medina County Auditor: Evaluate Your

Grandparents’ Day Family Fishing, 1 p.m. to

Swap Ideas Day https://bit.ly/2veeK2e

Home Value, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Meeting Room

4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100

Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers, 10

B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Staff and volunteers

a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., The Lodge

Wadsworth. First come, first serve.

available to help. Limited number of rods,

at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11:30 a.m.

reels, bait available. All ages. Free. REGISTER

Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes.

to 4 p.m., Western Reserve Masonic

BY SEPTEMBER 8 at https://bit.ly/2TqCBZS

All supplies provided, come dressed for mess.

Community, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina.

Medina County Park District: K-9 First Aid, 2

Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register for 10 a.m. at

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental

https://bit.ly/2TryaOk and for 1 p.m. at

Minute to Win It!, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.,

Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Red

https://bit.ly/31wAh6s

Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

Cross-based dog first-aid class on CPR,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6

Grades 6 to 12. Quick challenges to compete

resuscitation, and the basics on keeping a dog

p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605

against friends for prizes.

alive until getting to a veterinarian. Do NOT

Center Road, Hinckley.

Money Saving Apps, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville

bring dog to class, dog mannequins provided.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Tips to save

All ages. Free class, book with DVD available

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

without stress. Learn about Ebates, ibotta,

for $20. Register by September 6 at

233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and

more. Bring device or just attend. Register at

https://bit.ly/2N1N5Ob

classic cars, free, public invited.

https://bit.ly/2YZSZSu

ORMACO Max Byers: Maiden Voyage – Jazz

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 4:30 p.m.

History of Benjamin Franklin Highway:

Standards and Improvisation, 2 p.m.,

to 9 p.m., Fenn Elementary School, 320 Spring

Wadsworth Area Historical Society, 7:30

Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street,

Grove, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth

Wadsworth. Free but reservations

Fall Burlap Wreaths, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

recommended due to limited seating. For

Community Room, Buckeye Library, Medina.

Thursday, September 12

reservations, call 330-722-2541 or e-mail

Create wreath. Bring one 12-inch wire wreath

Chocolate Milkshake Day

Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served.

F


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

27

https://bit.ly/2t5d7Y7

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation

to 5.

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

admission $3, dinner is additional donation

Color Me Camouflaged, noon to 5 p.m.,

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

request. Bring favorite dessert to share.

Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

scheduled.

camouflage through cra s and activities.

330-725-0588.

Saturday, September 14

Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers, All

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 Hug Your Hound Day https://bit.ly/2ve05El

Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, 12:30 p.m. to

p.m. Summa Health Center at Wadsworth-

Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon, Wolf

4:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road,

Rittman, 195 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth.

Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge

Medina. All ages. Free. No registration.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All

Cleveland’s Burlesque History, 2 p.m. to 3:30

Prevail Through the Oregon Trail: Can You

ages. Learn about bird banding.

p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210

Escape?, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m.

S. Broadway Street, Medina. Includes vintage

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Community

photos, authors of “Rust Belt Burlesque,”

Wadsworth. Wagon team member has been

Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center

tidbits from Ohio’s burlesque scene past and

bitten by a snake and you must locate

Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

present.

antidote locked in a box in the room. Find

Grandparent’s Day Storytime, 10:30 a.m. to

Sunday, September 15

clues, solve the locks, help your team prevail.

11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library,

Make a Hat Day https://bit.ly/2sRp5R8

Ages 12 to 18. Register at:

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Focus on

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton

https://bit.ly/2yPTlAd

grandparents. All ages welcome. Register at

League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m.

Tween Scene: Bookmarks, Magnets and

https://bit.ly/2ZWTMEP

shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina.

Pencils, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity

Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s

All guns will be gauged for proper chokes,

Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad

decisions are final. For more information, call

Wadsworth. Make items needed for school.

Street, Wadsworth. Children read with

Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail

Register at https://bit.ly/2Me78JP

therapy dogs

bswartz@zoominternet.net

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

Live Action Mario Party, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,

Medina Cars and Coffee Cruise-In, 8 a.m. to

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

11 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Sponsored by

Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court

Ridge Road, Medina. Compete on team

Main Street Medina. Parking around the

volunteers help those not represented by a

playing mini-games on giant game board.

square and on Broadway Street will be

lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

Pizza will be served. Grades 3 to 6. Register at:

blocked for participants. Attendees can park

Nail It or Fail It, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

https://bit.ly/2TcIvOa

in the Medina County Courthouse parking and

Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster

Monarch Tagging, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf

in lots around the square.

Street, Lodi. Artistic food genius or not so

Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge

Color Me Camouflaged, noon to 5 p.m.,

much, find out through challenges. Grades 4

Road, Wadsworth. Help catch and tag

Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen

to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2MLzqL5

Monarch butterflies before they leave for

Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about

Friday, September 13

Mexico. Nets available. Naturalist on hand. All

camouflage through cra s and activities.

Defy Superstition Day https://bit.ly/2NMni9N

ages. Free. No registration.

8th Annual Rainbow Bridge Walk, 12:30 p.m.

and Fortune Cookie Day

Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar

sign-in, 1 p.m. program begins, Buckeye

Rides, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road,

Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina.

Seville. Admission to museum is free.

Free. Donations of cash and pet food

https://bit.ly/2ZXzDP4

E

Interesting combination!

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 4 Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children

accepted. For more information, e-mail

p.m., Orangetheory Fitness, 1120 N. Court

13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12;

Carthur1@zoominternet.net

Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

and no charge for children under 5.

K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Chippewa Inlet

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

http://www.trainweb.org/norm/

Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake

p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth

Mini Medieval Faire, noon to 3 p.m.,

Road. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must

Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster

be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10

Street, Lodi. Games, snacks, fun from 14th

towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog.

p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201

Century. Come in costume, costume contest

All ages. Free. No registration.

Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

and knighting ceremony. Grades kindergarten

Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series:


28

Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

Fungus Among Us, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Plum

experiments and cra s. Register at:

Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway,

https://bit.ly/2yPXwfE

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Brunswick Hills. Award-based hiking series.

Protect Your Family From the Flu, 6:30 p.m.

Mouse and Keyboard 101, 11 a.m. to noon,

Learn mushrooms identification tips from a

to 8 p.m., Community Room B, Medina

Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster

naturalist. Ages 7 and up. Free. No

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina.

Street, Lodi. Learn mouse skills and what all of

registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2OR9q3D for

Information and tips to avoid the flu. Register

the keyboard buttons are for. Adults. Register

more details.

at https://bit.ly/2MeQw4u

at https://bit.ly/2OPrxqt

Monday, September 16

Challenged, Banned or Burned: Reactions

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6

Collect Rocks Day https://bit.ly/2uQqgTT

to Controversial Books Then and Now, 7

p.m., Montville Township Police Department,

Baby Footprint Art, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.,

p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and

6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina.

Storytime Room, Brunswick Library, 3694

South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Center Road, Brunswick. Paint with babies.

Brunswick. Overview of censorship from

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Birth to 24 months. Register at:

antiquity to present day. Explores why

p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street,

https://bit.ly/2OLrhJk

materials were censored, how objectionable

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

texts and authors were dealt with throughout

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747

history, how reaction has evolved. Register at

233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and

Foote Road, Medina.

https://bit.ly/2yT3Dzx

classic cars, free, public invited.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Tuesday, September 17

Unicorn Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting

Science of Colors: Let’s Explore, 6:30 p.m. to

National Apple Dumpling Day

Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad

7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room,

https://bit.ly/1wDj0Gx

Street, Wadsworth. Make a unicorn, unicorn

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to

mask and horn, play unicorn games and make

Wadsworth. Learn all about colors through

noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649

a unicorn treat. Ages 3 to 10. Register at: https://bit.ly/2KI6Asy Overcoming the Fear of Public Speaking, 7

T

p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations.

To have your golf outing listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late.

Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships.

Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-4699241

Shale Creek Golf Course Weymouth Country Club 3946 Weymouth Road, 5420 Wolff Road, Medina Medina 330-723-8774 330-725-6297

Saturday, September 14

Fr. Krizner’s 4th Annual Golf Outing 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Benefits St. Colette Catholic Church Bunker Hill Golf Course 2019 Diamond Classic Friends of DBA Golf Tournament 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Benefits Friends of DBA (Diamond Blackfan Anemia) Shale Creek Golf Club

Monday, September 16

Trinity Rose 14th Annual Golf Event 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Benefits Trinity Rose Foundation Weymouth Country Club

Sunday, October 6

Susan G. Komen Rally for the Cure 1 p.m.to 8 p.m. Benefits: Susan G. Komen Foundation Bunker Hill Golf Course

Sunday, October 27

UPPER 90 Futbol Club Golf Fundraiser 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Benefits UPPER 90 Futbol Club Bunker Hill Golf Course

Brunswick. Learn how to write an effective speech, overcome jitters. Led by Annette Palmer, Toastmasters Club. Register at https://bit.ly/2MUWKWG You Can Play the Ukulele, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Try out the ukulele, can borrow or bring one. Grades 3 and up. Adults welcome to register with their children to play along. Register at: https://bit.ly/2YyNvCz Wednesday, September 18 National Cheeseburger Day https://bit.ly/2LtiA48 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Kindness Rock Project, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. A er school create a kindness rock. Grades 6 to 12. Cubeecra s: FUSE, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019

29

Wadsworth. Make Cubeecra s papercra toys

experts.

smueller@alz.org or call 234-284-2752.

using math and art, pick from variety of

Problem Solving, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

https://bit.ly/2VQW72K

projects. Ages 12 to 18. Register at:

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S.

47th Annual Weymouth Day Lawn Sale, 9

https://bit.ly/2M9TRlt

Broadway Street, Medina. Interactive

a.m. to 2 p.m., historic Weymouth School,

Ancient Egypt with Cleveland Museum of

presentation on nature and process of solving

3314 Myers Road, Medina. Music, food

Art, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room,

difficult problems.

vendors, fresh fruits and vegetables.

Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

Friday, September 20

See real artifacts and the story behind them,

Punch Day (the drink!)

Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road,

discuss pharaoh, gods. Register at:

https://bit.ly/2weTLRD

Medina. Physician talk and 1- to 3-mile walk.

https://bit.ly/2Th1mYp

Community Response to Child Abuse

Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration.

Read S’more Books Storytime, 6:30 p.m. to

Symposium, 8 a.m. to noon, Cleveland Clinic

Keep on Truckin’, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Buckeye

7:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick

Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street,

Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Parking lot

Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Stories,

Medina. For more information, go to

full of work vehicles of all types, from tractors

games and s’mores. Register at:

https://bit.ly/2JcyTi3

to concrete mixers and fire trucks. Children

https://bit.ly/2YRUXEr

Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.,

can climb aboard. Rain or shine. Photo

Music at The Lodge: Steve Madewell, 7 p.m.

Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132

opportunities.

to 8 p.m., Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen

Broad Street, Wadsworth. Hear stories, then

Color Me Camouflaged, noon to 5 p.m.,

Road, Medina. Variety of music. Free.

dance and sing.

Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen

What is the Cloud? 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5

Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S.

p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street,

camouflage through cra s and activities.

Broadway Street, Medina. Discover the cloud,

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Sunday, September 22

how it works, how to use it. Bring device,

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10

Hobbit Day https://bit.ly/2LUJxtX

hands-on class. https://bit.ly/2yYEmUA

p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton

Thursday, September 19

Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m.

International Talk Like a Pirate Day

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation

shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina.

https://bit.ly/2Lqu74p

admission $3, dinner is additional donation

All guns will be gauged for proper chokes,

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

request. Bring favorite dessert to share.

decisions are final. For more information, call

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

scheduled.

bswartz@zoominternet.net

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

First Annual Area 51 5k Fun Run, 6 p.m. to

Color Me Camouflaged, noon to 5 p.m.,

330-725-0588.

7:30 p.m., Spokes Café, 406 S. Broadway

Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6

Street, Medina. Costumes encouraged. Prizes

Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about

p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road,

for best costume. Spokes will remain open

camouflage through cra s and activities.

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

late to serve coffee, cold drinks, ice cream,

Monarch Tagging, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf Creek

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

bakery items. Tickets at https://bit.ly/2Oz1YtR

Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road,

p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi.

Saturday, September 21

Wadsworth. Help catch and tag Monarch

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Miniature Golf Day

Medina County Government Academy:

https://bit.ly/

Sunshine Ethics, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

1MlYXSv

University of Akron, Medina County University

Medina County Walk

Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina.

to End Alzheimer’s,

Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8

8:30 a.m. to 11:30

p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at

a.m., Community

https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ

Recreation Center,

Nufit: Virtual Grocery Store, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

855 Weymouth Road,

Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132

Medina. For more

Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Learn new

information, contact

recipes, dispel myths and get tips from

Stephanie Mueller,

H

Healthy Strides, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Carolyn


30

Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019 butterflies before they leave for Mexico. Nets

Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster

available. Naturalist on hand. All ages. Free.

Street, Lodi. Cra s, stamping, tasting, more all

No registration.

about apples. Ages 5 and up.

Monday, September 23

Rainforest in a Bottle, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Checkers Day and Dogs in Politics Day

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

https://bit.ly/2cIEHhO

Ridge Road, Medina. Create ecosystem in a jar.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to

Register at: https://bit.ly/2KoTtgU

7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74

Wednesday, September 25

W. Main Street, Seville.

Comic Book Day https://bit.ly/2weM3ac

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

A ernoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.,

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 9 through October 13 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV

The Browns Blues with Terry Pluto, 6:30

Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick

p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North

Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent

and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center

DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for

Road, Brunswick. Discussion of Browns

titles, 330-273-4150.

football team’s headaches and heartaches

Banned Books, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.,

of last 20 years, behind-the-scenes look.

Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 4 through October 12 Medina Public Square

Register at https://bit.ly/2TquMU5

Celebrate freedom to read and why popular

Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7

books have been banned. Grades 6 to 12.

p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth

The Art of Tattoos, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Story

Activity Room, Seville Library, 45 Center

time and more for children on the autism

Street, Seville. Learn about ancient art of

spectrum and those with sensory

tattooing. Teens will create and receive

integration challenges and their families and

temporary henna tattoo that lasts two to four

caregivers. Register at

weeks. Grades 4 to 12. Register at

3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, June 18 through August 20 Medina County Center for Older Adults 246 Northland Drive, Medina No new vendors are being accepted. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2DC3Vxs Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 25 through September 28 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 15 through September 14 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc 4 p.m to 7 p.m. Wednesdays: June 26, July 24, August 21 Village of St. Edward, 880 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

https://bit.ly/2ORh2mJ Tuesday, September 24

E

https://bit.ly/2YJZFYT Thursday, September 26

Punctuation Day https://bit.ly/2wf5xLD

Love Note Day https://bit.ly/2vHJFqG

Health Screenings, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.,

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

Brunswick. Blood pressure, glucose

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

screening.

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

Senior Financial Issues and Legal Matters,

330-725-0588.

11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi

Therapy Dog Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,

Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Sponsored

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street,

by Cooperative Community Services. Free.

Medina. Visit, pet, read to therapy dogs. All

For more information or to reserve a spot,

ages.

call Karen, 330-802-1407.

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8

Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville.

p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic

Domestic Relations Court volunteers help

tunes and classic cars, free, public invited.

those not represented by a lawyer in family

Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen

court. First come, first served.

Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

1000 Books Party, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Children’s

Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Watch anime,

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad

cosplay, learn about Japanese culture,

Street, Wadsworth. Children who completed

more. Chef will demonstrate how various

the 1000 Books Before Kindergarten program

types of sushi are made. Register at

can drop in and explore learning stations,

https://bit.ly/2Z0ngAD

socialize, have fun.

Everything Apples, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Master Gardeners: Seed Saving and


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2019 Planting Spring Bulbs, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

31

Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

R

Author Visit: Lauren Burnett, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Campfire Cushions, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Use coffee bean bags to create cushions for next campout. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2YK5Ywm Friday, September 27 Crush a Can Day https://bit.ly/2uPl4iY American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Saturday, September 7 Un Run: 0.5 mile Run/Walk, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. start times, start at either Sully’s Irish Pub, 117 W. Liberty Street, Medina, or Lager Heads Brewing Company and Tap Room, 325 W. Smith Road, Medina. Crazy costumes and teams encouraged. Benefits Summer Reading Game, youth literacy program. Fee of $40 includes one beer, carb station, T-shirt, race swag and medals. Adults only. Register or sponsor at https://bit.ly/2ZdFNtK

scheduled. Wine and Canvas Night, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Bring wine and snacks, go home with own original painting. Bring cash or check made payable to Artists Uncork’d. Supply fee $15. Ages 21 and older. Register at https://bit.ly/2yKf8cE Saturday, September 28 Good Neighbor Day https://bit.ly/2uN15DO Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Story time featuring therapy dog, Griffin. Register at: https://bit.ly/2ZJk8Kj Britt Fit Family Fitness Event, 11 a.m. to noon, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Combine exercise and literacy. Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Admission to museum is free.

Sunday, September 8 2019 Tunnel to Towers 5k Run and Walk, 8 a.m. to noon, Public Square, Medina. Benefits Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation. Honors first responders and military in memory of 9/11. For registration and pricing, go to https://bit.ly/2KCMDoD Sunday, September 15 Medina Runs Down Cancer Series: Race With Grace 5k, 9 a.m., Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. For registration and pricing, go to https://bit.ly/2KEHMoy

Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children

Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create

13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12;

art from pages of discarded books. Grades 6 to

and no charge for children under 5.

12. Register at https://bit.ly/2H5aSJc

http://www.trainweb.org/norm/

Intuitive Eating, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

Sunday, September 29

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S.

Confucius Day https://bit.ly/2vHChf2

Broadway Street, Medina. Non-diet approach

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton

to relationship with food. Learn eight

League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m.

principles of eating, relearn hunger and

shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina.

fullness. Led by Joy of Medina County

All guns will be gauged for proper chokes,

Magazine columnist, Kelly Bailey. Register at

decisions are final. For more information, call

https://bit.ly/33nbDH8

Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail

Create Vision Board, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

bswartz@zoominternet.net

Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library,

Monday, September 30

3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Put dreams on

National Mud Pack Day

O

paper, create vision board using images and

https://bit.ly/2mNGzfI

words. Art supplies, magazines provided.

Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.,

Register at https://bit.ly/2Z0sHzx

Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Teen Art Night: Book Page Art, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room South, Brunswick

Submitting Calendar Events Events listed in the calendar must be a festival or fair or hosted by or bene a non-profit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Event information is not accepted by phone. The calendar is also available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional event information.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine September 2019  

Historical art, cheesecake, puzzles, bicycling, wishes, comics, rescuing raptors, and a bright light! That and more are all in this month’s...

Joy of Medina County Magazine September 2019  

Historical art, cheesecake, puzzles, bicycling, wishes, comics, rescuing raptors, and a bright light! That and more are all in this month’s...