Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2022

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KILLER BUNNIES PG. 17 Just in time for Halloween!

NEW! RISE AND SHINE PG. 19 Motivation and inspiration for business owners

CALLED FAT PG. 22 What to do when words cripple instead of help.

She may look like a mild-mannered grandmother, but there are more surprises to Pauline Chapman than just her collectible cars. Pg. 4

TOO COLD FOR LEMONADE PG. 32 Some kid entrepreneurs will not be stopped.

A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

VOLUME 5 NUMBER 9 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Joyful Growth Spurt by Amy Barnes Wonderful changes have been happening at Joy of Medina County Magazine. Print issues of Joy now will be available through the library’s bookmobile way. They already were a part of every county library’s collection. ══════⊹⊱≼≽⊰⊹══════ Three more people have joined the staff. The first new member is Bryan Lefelhoc, he will be writing the new “Rise and Shine” column in the Business section. The column will focus on motivating and inspiring small business owners. Since he just quit his corporate job to start his own business, he is the perfect fit. His column premieres with this issue. Mary Olson also has joined the staff as the new writer for the “Fun and Games” column. This column is focused on reviews of books, games (video and board/card), and anything else fun. She is the readers’ advisory librarian at the Medina Library. The last staff addition is Katrina Barnes. Yes, she is related, she is my youngest daughter who is currently pursuing a degree in music therapy. She will be taking a great load off of me by compiling the monthly event calendar. If you have events for the calendar, please send them to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance.

══════⊹⊱≼≽⊰⊹══════ In case I have not said it lately, Thank you! Thank you to the readers who go out of their way to share what they love about the magazine and those who bug local librarians with requests for the next issue! Thank you, also, to the amazing advertisers in each issue who support the magazine so it can be offered as a digital issue for free to anyone who would like to sign up for it. Be sure to patronize our advertisers. Each of our advertisers represents the gold standard in their fields. I should know, I vet each company who wants in our pages and only ones that meet high standards in customer service, product quality, and professionalism are allowed in. I have turned away thousands of dollars in advertising in order to hold to our standards, but I would rather that than have a reader have a bad experience with a company we are promoting. ══════⊹⊱≼≽⊰⊹══════ Finally, be sure to check out the Fall Foliage Tour map and the great upcoming events being held at each stop. Be sure to also check out the advertisers who help support the publishing of the map and its details.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller IT SUPPORT Sara Barnes Tyler Hatfield PHOTOGRAPHERS Brooklyn Media FlashBang Photography Torre Design CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Katrina Barnes Kel Bulkowski Tyler Hatfield Bryan Lefelhoc Mary Olson Chris Pickens Michelle Riley Rachel Shepard Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2021 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022 While usually considered a breakfast food, waffles offer a versatile platform for experimenting. BITE ME!

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SPICY BLACK BEANS AND RICE by Kel Bulkowski A simple, tasty dish that packs spice and flavor into a meal.

HEALTH

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OF MIND AND BODY

A COBRA, A WOMAN AND A PICKUP LOAD OF FEISTY by Amy Barnes She may seem quiet and unassuming, but watch out, underestimating her would be your first mistake.

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ONE COMMENT by Kelly Bailey She thought they were in love, until he rejected her over 15 pounds. HEALTHY TRAILS

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COLOR ME RIDING by Robert Soroky What makes fall so perfect for a ride?

THE READING NOOK

COMMUNITY

WEATHER CHANGES AND BLEEDING HEARTS

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by Carmen-maria Mandley and Angel J. Harrison Poems submitted by local residents

BUSINESS

INDEED

WHAT HE GAVE

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Jaxon Bican is only 9, but he taught everyone a lesson in kindness.

SHAKERS AND FAKERS

Fall Foliage Tour Map

THE NETWORKER

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by Bob Arnold Learning the different types of characters can aid networking.

Time to enjoy all that fall in Medina County has to offer.

DOING BUSINESS A calendar of area networking events

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HURRICANE FORCES FAMILY TO EVALUATE LIVES

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT FUN AND GAMES

by Tyler Hatfield Just in time for Halloween, killer bunnies!

by Mary Olson The newest novel by Bruce Holsinger pits a family against a hurricane and the decisions they must make to survive. GETTING REEL

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WHEN WOMEN ROAR

DUST BUNNIES ARE STEALTHY KILLERS

THE IN BOX

ACCOUNTABILITY PARTNERS by Rachel Shepard They help achieve the goals and vision of any size company.

INVENTION CONVENTION

by Amy Barnes Add this movie to your must-see list, it is going to be sweeping the awards.

30 JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

Patents recently granted to Medina County residents.

PERFECTLY PAULINE

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Find the words that are part of her story.

WITHOUT TRYING, FAILURE IS GUARANTEED

by Jerry King

by Bryan Lefelhoc Ideas were meant to be shared and given a chance to grow.

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HOME AND GARDEN

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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Read the clue, collect the magnifying glass letters, and solve the puzzle!

SUCCESSFULLY SAVING CANNA

OH, SNAP!

RISE AND SHINE

DIG IT! by Michelle Riley Overwinter canna rhizomes by using these tips.

MIRTH AND JOY

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photos by Amy Barnes Entrepreneurial kids and an Oktoberfest to remember as St. Paul’s annual celebration returns.

WONDERFUL WAFFLES

LET’S DO IT!

VEGAN VITTLES by Chris Pickens On the front and back covers: by Amy Barnes Pauline Chapman poses beside her Cobra SVT Mystic Mustang, one of only 2,000 made.

38 Fall fun goes into full swing!

43 CELEBRATE! A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

The 1970 SS Chevelle, after Pauline and Charles Chapman restored it in the early 80s. From the smile on her face, it is easy to tell Pauline Chapman is ready to get behind the wheel. photo provided

hen first meeting Pauline Chapman, She does do that. she comes across as a That is, when she is not driving one of her prized grandmotherly, sweet lady with a cars or her large pickup truck or tackling political decided twinkle in her eye. The issues. kind of lady that one pictures happily baking treats Her favorite car is her Cobra STV Mystic Mustang. in her kitchen to share with those she cares about. One of only 2,000 produced, Chapman says she is

W


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

constantly getting offers from people wanting to buy it. She will not be selling it any time soon. “That’s my baby,” she says. For 17 years for her work commute to Cleveland, Chapman drove an Oldsmobile Toronado 307 with rolling rocking arms in the engine, which makes for a faster car because the friction in the motor is decreased, Chapman said. At least, that is what she drove until she made a barn discovery. Charles kept chickens in the back of their Medina home. One day, Pauline was picking up straw for the pen when she spotted a car in the farmer’s barn. It was the early 80s and Charles had just finished restoring a 1971 Pontiac. He was ready for a new project, so the Chapmans bought the farmer’s car to restore it. Once the car was restored, Chapman was driving it, a 1970 Chevelle Super Sport with a 396 motor that had a Muncie Rock Crusher transmission with a competition shifter. That translates to a car that could go very fast in the hands of a woman who liked to drive very fast. People kept telling her husband that he needed to take the car away from her for her own safety. When Charles sold the Chevelle, Chapman was furious with him. Being a smart man who wanted peace, Charles bought her the rare 1996 Mustang, brand new. In 2010, Charles died. He had health issues and Chapman took care of him and was by his side. She still lives in the house they bought together more than 40 years ago. “There is not a day goes by that I don’t think of

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him,” she says, with tears in her eyes. She continues to attend local car shows, something they enjoyed together, mostly at Laurel Square in Brunswick, sometimes alone and sometimes with her son, Alan. She enjoys seeing people’s reactions when they see her behind the wheel of her Mustang. Chapman also owns a 2007 Monte Carlo Super Sport and a 2018 GMC Sierra SLT truck, a truck so big that it makes Chapman look tiny in comparison. She laughs and says it is a step down from the big Denali she used to have. She also has her husband’s 1997 Heritage Springer Harley Davidson motorcycle. continued, Page 6


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her ways. Born in Harts, West Virginia, to Virginia and Victor Adkins, Chapman learned at an early age to hold her own with three siblings. Her dad was a coal miner, and her mom was a homemaker. Eventually, her parents and siblings would move to Garden City, Michigan, because her father got a better paying job there as a tool and die maker. Chapman’s sister, Dora, died 41 years ago from Their son, Alan, would work on cars with his cancer. Her brother Carl passed this year, on August parents but their daughter, Jacqueline, did not. Her 5. Her brother Clyde resides in Michigan. hands were “too delicate,” said Chapman. When Carl died, he left behind a gift of love for his Nowadays, Chapman does not do much wife, Claudia. mechanical work on her cars, she leaves that up to It was a long to-do list of things they had been her son. planning to do together, as well as things he “My son does everything I have to have done,” wanted her to be sure to accomplish to make her Chapman said. life easier, even though he could no longer be with However, she still owns her own air compressor her. and will get it going to air up tires when needed. On the list were such things as trading in his truck When asked how fast she has driven one of her to get a new car that would be comfortable for her beloved vehicles, she chuckles as her cheeks and so she would not have to worry about repairs. pinken, and she says she had better not say. He wanted her to have another car they owned She says her family knows her for “driving wild” serviced and then given to one of their grandsons. but she shrugs as she says it and her chin lifts They had been planning for a long time to defiantly. At 77, she has no intention of changing redecorate a room of their house, he left instructions to get that project done. Claudia is working through her grief as she works through Carl’s list. Chapman said it was not a surprise to her that Carl made sure he could still take care of Claudia, even after death. “You never saw two people more in love,” Chapman said. Family is important to Chapman, and it was her brothers who sparked her love of cars when she was very young. At 8 years old, she never hesitated to crawl right under a car with her brothers to help by handing them tools as they worked on their cars.

Pauline Chapman is dwarfed by her truck.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

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Chapman says that the boys worked on their cars so much because they wanted to impress the girls in the area, but she loved helping them with the repairs. “My brothers were just my heroes,” she said. She happily spent hours detailing their cars for them, too. Eventually, when she could have her own car, she knew everything she needed to in order to keep it in tiptop shape. She said that if girls were mechanics back then, she would have been one but Cobra STV Mystic Mustang it just was not a job girls did. After she graduated from high school, she left West Virginia to go to Cleveland in search of employment. She got a job with Cleveland Trust on Lorain Avenue as a savings bookkeeper. She took advantage of the company’s offer to take classes with the American Institute of Banking. When a high school schoolmate also came to Cleveland in search of a job, it was the catalyst for the then Pauline Adkins to meet her future husband. The schoolmate just happened to know a fellow said that she had never thought about it because it named Charles Chapman who had dated the girl’s just was not a term that was applied to girls. next-door neighbor in West Virginia. Soon, her career came to a screeching halt. She Charles had come to Cleveland to work at Ford, was pregnant. Back then, women were not allowed eventually moving on to work for Foseco, which to be pregnant or have a baby and hold down a job. dealt in steel industry supplies. It was grounds for instant dismissal. He had grown up in Chapmanville, West Virginia, a It was 1964. town named after his family. “Back then, you could not have a baby or be It was not long before Pauline and Charles met pregnant and work,” Chapman said. and started dating, eventually marrying. Chapman was forced to take 8 months off from It just so happened that Charles also loved cars. work. On her return, she had to start all over, as if Pauline says he was a motorhead, as is their son. she had never worked for Cleveland Trust. When asked if the term applied to her, too, she This also was when women were not allowed to paused, considering the question. Laughing, she have a credit card or own property without their continued, Page 8


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husbands or fathers co-signing the paperwork. “I remember those days,” Chapman said, her jaw setting and anger filling her eyes. “And when they try to take freedom away now, do you wonder why I get pissed?” When she returned to work after the birth of her daughter, Jacqueline, Chapman got a position with the Cleveland Trust branch on St. Clair in Cleveland as the head bookkeeper. Her second pregnancy finished her career with Cleveland Trust and a year and a half after Alan was born, Pauline went to work for Schweizer Dipple, a power piping company. It was an all-union shop. It was at Schweizer Dipple that Pauline would learn all about construction from the blacksmiths, pipefitters and myriad others who worked there. “They were a bunch of good ole boys,” Chapman said. She remains in touch with some of them, even helping one buy a car and going on a test drive with him. Chapman liked learning from “the boys” and the

crew liked sharing aspects of their jobs with her, which is how she ended up learning so much about pipelines. Information that would be very useful to her in the future. To really see her fire, mention women’s rights, the Nexus pipeline, the Affordable Care Act, or any of the other causes near and dear to her heart and that twinkle turns into a fierce fire of determination and she is very likely to let loose with a wide variety of words and a very strong opinion of what needs fixing, where she can be found protesting next, and the importance of voting. She gestures at her front lawn where signs had started sprouting for the November election. “I get pissed at people for not trying to make things better,” she said. “Can’t you get involved in your community?!” In the summer of 2020, she stood on corners for six weeks, protesting in favor of the Affordable Care Act. When she joined the fight against the Nexus pipeline going through Medina and right past her property, suddenly the knowledge she had absorbed from those good ole boys at Schweizer Dipple became very useful The Nexus pipeline workers would soon learn just what a turbo engine they were poking when it came to Chapman. She spotted them approaching her neighbor’s property en masse one day and immediately called her neighbor’s family to sound the alarm. A member of the neighbor’s family showed up to stop the men from entering the property, Chapman said, but

There are seven different colors that make up the Mystic paint, Chapman said. Depending on how the light hits the paint, is what colors can be seen. photo provided


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

Charles and Pauline Chapman

photo provided

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A young Alan Chapman with his father’s 1997 Heritage Springer Harley Davidson. photo provided

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Baby

the Nexus employees said that only the actual property owner of record could deny them access and they entered anyway. Chapman hurried to the end of her driveway and started yelling at the Nexus employees that they had better not try to put as much as one toe on her property or they would find out exactly what she could dish out. When her neighbor went to court to fight the pipeline installation, Chapman went to court with them. As has been well documented, Nexus has continued to win court battles to enable it to proceed with the pipeline, and in Medina, the pipeline was finished being built by November 2018. Another place that Chapman’s construction knowledge became greatly valued was when she worked for 19 years for the Medina County District Library, with her final role being that of deputy fiscal officer. When the library went through its most recent renovation, Chapman was carefully watching every penny spent and single handedly ended up saving taxpayers $2.4 million according to a plaque she was awarded upon her retirement. After Chapman retired from the library, she was approached by local law firm Walker & Jocke Co.,

My Pretty Girl

LPA, Patent and Trademark Law, to take on their bookkeeping. She came out of retirement but is now planning her second retirement, and this time she means for it to stick. Her plan is to be fully retired by November, before the heavy snows come. She has a lot of projects and causes she wants to take on and also wants to spend more time with her son and her daughter, who lives in Australia. Chapman still mows her own large lawn and, prior to the COVID shutdown, went to the gym daily. When the shutdown occurred, she switched to walking around River Styx Park, which is how she ended up crossing paths with a stray cat. It took two months to finally catch her, Chapman said. Despite Chapman’s best efforts, including the use of tuna as bait, she could not catch her. Wooster Animal Rescue finally was able to catch the cat, and Chapman promptly adopted her. My Pretty Girl joined Baby, the cat who had been Chapman’s husband’s cat, in Chapman’s home. Would Charles be proud of her for the activist she has become? “Oh, my husband would be right out there in front of me,” Chapman responds, tears in her eyes, remembering what a fierce supporter the love of her life was of her. She adds that her kids are proud of her, too.


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“When you show up with kindness, others can be more themselves.” ― Sue Fitzmaurice

photo by Pixabay

photo by Maxim Tajer


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

THE READING NOOK

Bleeding Hearts by Angel J. Harrison the bleeding heart waits anxiously for a call a message not understanding the silence and probing it like a tongue explores a painful tooth wanting some sign that someone cares pumping away hope as if it were Life’s blood acceptance sinks in like frozen lead and stills the beating as the last drops of hope drain away with a cry of anguish and another scar is born Angel J. Harrison is a Medina County resident who has written poetry and other creative writings since the age of 8.

photo by Alin Luna


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

THE READING NOOK

Weather Changes

by Carmen-maria Mandley Sometimes it’s the sound of it. The way it drags across skin, sand and other deterrents Sometimes it’s the perfect way it slides into spots, unaware Sometimes it’s the way it shoves down into the horizon, plowing day into inky black Sometimes it’s the way it slows me as a walk out Quail Ridge door in morning time I have six secrets One for each several lash that leapt from Brown speckled sleepless rain face One for candy girl One for firefly One for the wounded over there One for the ghost in my house One for charity And one for temple lights in far off lands hovering slowly over tired prayer. They pray all night some say, but always free the feet. Last night I dreamt of someone next to me In t-shirt sheets whispering instructions On how to get to Mexico. It wasn't so very far. Completely unlit we only shared space and breath Wilting blue covering head neck chin and so forth We leapt from the window with unseen wings and Landed in some desert place. I could see who it was then. I was surprised you followed me here. It was only yesterday I couldn't see you for tears. My compromise for Mexico was justified and the scorpion dancing the jig, told me I didn’t have far to go We picked a far off orange tree for rest And my palm was traced by forefinger unique He told me how many times I had tried But gave no indication on how many more were to come It was a subtle kiss when it landed. For thirty seconds or more We were less than an inch- lip to lip. Then the distance closed its self and proximity was everything He tasted of three things: ice, lime and sweet honey. He whispered a small prayer, there, over my eyes. (his hands rested in chastity on sunburned knees) I closed them in hope of blessing, the eyes (my hands, aching, do not rest, but remain good at heart). When the lids climbed back over my eyes, of course, he was gone. Gone to some other dream, I suppose. Sandman. And again I was in some foreign place filled with wet trees And fog like fingers. The sun was making his descent, and I heard some creature moan for moon Medina resident Carmen-maria Mandley is an educator, writer and painter. She has worked across the country in multiple Shakespeare theaters, but writing is her life’s love. photo by Eberhard Grossgasteiger

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Shakers and Fakers by Bob Arnold

I am reading a book about human nature that is really interesting. The author makes the case that we are all “characters.” Yep, it is true, each person has certain characteristics that develop due to the situations and environments experienced as a youngster, even before being very aware or can do anything about it. The author makes the case to avoid toxic types of characters such as the hyper perfectionist, the relentless rebel, the personalizer, the drama magnet, the big talker, the sexualizer, the pampered prince or princess, the pleaser, the savior, and the easy moralizer. The first thing I thought of was how I have come across each of these character types at networking events. We all find ourselves drawn to certain types. It takes a strong character to not get pulled into the web of a toxic type that can make life miserable. He then discusses the superior character. This is one that recognizes what was developed all those years ago and puts it all out front to deal with. We cannot shake all of it, nor should we; but we can seek some better ways of relating to people so that we can develop a superior character. Identifying our tendencies of acting or expecting certain outcomes may need adjusted so we can actually relate with each other. Thus the “Shakers and Fakers” title. Most of us wants to be a shaker, to have an impact on those we meet. However, this takes a bit of inward wisdom and determination to be inclusive and understanding of those we meet. The fakers? Well, they are the toxic ones trying to control others. See if your next networking event can be one where you really see how people operate and look for ways of becoming more of a shaker in the room. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at theNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

How can you tell if someone is truly sorry? If they change.

Doing Business Local business networking events, not category restricted

Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, October 4 October Luncheon: Medina County Health Department Overview, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3UOGM0U Wednesday, October 19 Networking WOW! 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 5050 Eastpointe Drive, Medina. No walk-ins. Chamber membership requirement after two events, $12 member attendance charge, $15 non-member attendance charge. Register at https://bit.ly/3BXRmdf Thursday, October 20 Young Professionals Association: Cooking Demo With Serenite, 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Serenite, 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3URUuQu Friday, October 21 Athena Leadership Awards, 8 a.m. to noon, Blair Conference Center, 9079 S. Leroy Road, Seville. Networking, breakfast, presentations. Chamber members, $60, nonmembers $80. Register at https://bit.ly/3fvSBsM Tuesday, October 25 Business After Business: Western Reserve Masonic Community, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3Ckz4Ew Friday, October 28 Chamber Chat, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., in person, location to be announcedl. Chamber membership requirement after two events, no admission charge. Receive link after registering. Register at https://bit.ly/3E5oJ0n

Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Tuesday, October 4 Chamber Chomps, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., 9’ers Diner, 63 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Network and support a local restaurant. All are welcome. Thursday, October 6 Annual Clambake, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Bunker Hill Golf Club, 3060 Pearl Road, Medina. Sold out. Wednesday, October 19 October Luncheon: Spotlight on Schools, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Center Café at Medina County Career Center, 1101 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Chamber membership requirement after two events. Members $20, non-members $25. Register at https://bit.ly/3SqE7Ji

Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce Thursday, October 6 Multi-Chamber Young Professionals Event, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Hop Tree Brewing, 1297 Hudson Gate Drive, Hudson. Wednesday, October 26 October Luncheon: Holiday Flavors of the Chamber, 11 :30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Galaxy Restaurant and Banquet Center, 201 Park Center Drive, Wadsworth. Reservations, $20. Register at https://bit.ly/3rj2eO1 Thursday, October 27 Mochas and Mentors, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., Soprema Café, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Guest speaker: Terri Greene, Leadership Medina County.

Seville Area Chamber of Commerce Thursday, October 13 October Monthly Luncheon, 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawthorne Suites, 5025 Park Avenue West, Seville. $8 donation, pay at the door.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Dust Bunnies are Stealthy Killers by Tyler Hatfield

When it comes to everyday devise such as phones, laptops, and computers, we often have a “set it and forget it” mentality to cleaning. Most clean their phone screens here and there and dust out their keyboards when necessary, but what about the inside? Devices like laptops, and especially computer towers, tend to collect dust and pet fur over time. While this usually does not directly affect everyday use, dust bunnies are stealthy killers in electronics. Over time, as dust and other debris build up, the efficiency of coolers within a computer decreases which forces the fans to run harder and the actual components to run hotter. This may present as a laptop’s fan being louder than it was when purchased or a desktop running noticeably harder as the fans try to keep up. Over the short term, this does not matter much and has little effect on you as the user. However, as fans have moving parts, they will wear out with time and the faster they run, the faster they fail. It is well established that components forced to run hotter tend to have shorter life spans as the silicon and other materials in electronics degrade. So, if your laptop that’s been around for a few years is running loud and hot, or if your desktop sounds like it is preparing to take off to the moon, it might be time to break out the duster. A can of compressed air can go a long way, but a professional that can open the device up and give it a true cleaning will always be the best option. Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, https://www.hatsmediagroup.com/ , and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

Please patronize our advertisers, when you see them in “Joy,” you know they believe in community!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Accountability Partners by Rachel Shepard Nonprofits and many large companies have a board of directors. Board members are expected to bring diverse perspectives and represent the interests of the stockholders and the stakeholders. The board of directors is there to hold the organization accountable, develop annual budgets, arrange compensation for the executive management team and set policies and procedures. They act as the accountability partners of the business. Just like nonprofits and publicly traded companies have a board to hold them accountable and carry out their mission, small businesses need accountability partners as well. Accountability looks different for every business, depending on the size and growth patterns of the organization. If an accountability partner is an accountant or bookkeeper, it is important to make sure they are not focusing on the past from a financial perspective. Staying on plan and reaching business goals requires looking

into the future and comparing past performance to the budget. Some business owners may join masterminds to hold them accountable and help with strategic planning. Masterminds can help, but they are unlikely to dive into the numbers and specifics of a company. Accountability partners are advisors and individuals with an interest in your success. They may be financial partners, business consultants or other business owners. They should help carry out the vision and mission of a company. They also can help establish business goals and budgets, as well as hold you accountable throughout the year. These individuals also may help with strategic planning and succession planning. Most business owners benefit from having an accountability partner as they play an essential role in the success of businesses and everyday lives. Rachel Shepard is the founder of LonaRock, LLC, and a resident of Medina County. She specializes in helping businesses understand financials and access capital. Shepard can be reached by email at rshepard@lonarock.com.

Invention Convention Patents recently granted to Medina County residents. Only county residents are listed, although there may be additional people listed as patent grantees.

Patent for: Three-Pass Torque Converter Having Multiple Flow Passages and Seal Plate Retention To: Kyle Nelson City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Furniture Pad To: Jason A. Sharratt City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Blind Bold and Tool Combination To: Bruce A. Carmichael City of Residence: Hinckley Patent for: Hydraulic Hybrid Swing Drive System for Excavators To: Jeff Cullman City of Residence: Wadsworth To: Bogdan Kozul City of Residence: Hinckley Patent for: Torque Converter With Flexible Clutch Plate To: Kyle Nelson City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Centering Pad and Removable Enclosure for a Blender To: Phonesacksith Guy Kettavong and Matthew John Dugan City of Residence: Medina To: David Kanning City of Residence: Valley City


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

BUSINESS: RISE AND SHINE

Without Trying, Failure is Guaranteed by Bryan Lefelhoc Thinking of starting a new business? It is important to know that 60 percent of new businesses will fail within 10 years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.That is two out of three. That is a staggering number. But what if that number were low? What if failure were not defined only as unsuccessful attempts but was broadened to include ideas never tried at all? If the number of failures includes businesses that never got past a scribbled-on napkin, then the true rate of failure is infinite. If you are brave enough to start a business of your own, congratulations! Just trying, in itself, is success. Win or lose. The real failures are the businesses that never see the light of day. The missed opportunities. The “if only” that gets uttered in the future. When someone wants to start a business, they have to put themselves out there, their ideas and abilities, reputation and worth. These are very personal things that are on display for the world to see. Small business owners take a risk that thousands will not take. That requires vulnerability and is one reason why so many put off their dreams and never take a shot. Taking the first step toward opening a business helps an entrepreneur gain knowledge, experience, hope, and a better understanding of the next step forward. Just by trying, they have impacted others and changed themselves. Whether the venture succeeds or not, a small business owner who throws caution to the wind will be that much further ahead to launch their next idea. Because no one knows how many businesses did not get past being only thoughts in another person’s head, the true failure rate will never be known. Those failures are not public nor are they ever seen on a profit-and-loss statement. Ideas are meant to be tried. Some will not make it, but that is OK. Just like a baseball player who grabs a bat, swinging and missing is far better than never stepping up to the plate. Starting a business can be scary and requires thought and courage. Most importantly, it requires action. The real failure is not trying at all. Bryan Lefelhoc is founder and president of Bryan Media Strategies LLC, a boutique “company of one” marketing firm. Contact Lefelhoc by email at bryan@bryanmediastrategies.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

photo by Michelle Riley

photo by Michelle Riley

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Successfully Saving Canna by Michelle Riley The canna is a rhizome, which is an underground stem that can send out roots and shoots from its nodes. With a few easy steps, canna plants can be saved for next season. Wait until after the first hard frost has killed the foliage, then dig up the existing canna. Dig farther out than the original planted size as it has grown over the season and has created new baby rhizomes. Cut the foliage back 2 to 3 inches, disposing of the foliage. Using your hands, start cleaning the soil off of the rhizomes. Once you can see some of the rhizomes clearly, begin to gently pry them away from the cluster. A dull implement may help if the clump seems too tight. Be cautious not to damage the rhizome or cause bruising as this can open the canna up for bacteria and disease. As the rhizomes are separated, dust them off gently, removing as much soil as possible without damaging the rhizome. Do not scrub the rhizome, as this may damage the canna and do not rinse them in water, as this will create too much moisture. Spread the separated rhizomes on newspaper or cardboard in a room 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. This is called curing. Let them dry out for three or four days. After the drying period, store the canna for winter. One option is to get a cardboard box, place a layer of newspaper in the

photo by Michelle Riley

bottom, then put a layer of canna rhizomes in the box, cover that layer with newspaper and start the next layer. Continue layering until all of the canna are packed away. Another method is to wrap the rhizomes individually in newspaper and place in a paper bag. You do not want to use anything plastic or material that might retain water as that will cause the canna to rot. Wrap them in something breathable. Place the box in a storage space that is cool, dry, ventilated, and safe from freezing temperatures. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com ; and https://neohiogarden.com . She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Wonderful Waffles

Spicy Black Beans and Rice

by Chris Pickens

by Kel Bulkowski

In the US, frozen waffles create an approximate $1.1 billion in sales annually. They are such a versatile food, even though they are typically known as a breakfast food. Once all of the options are considered, they can almost open a whole new world to food choices. Simple, yet delicious and considered a fun food, they can even be eaten with your hands. I dare you to get creative with waffles, maybe add some cut up fruit, chocolate chips, savory fruit sauce, or the typical maple syrup, too. This recipe is simple, yet very nutritious!

These spicy black beans and rice are so simple and easy to make, but they are packed with spice and flavor!

• • • • • •

2 cups flour 2 tablespoons baking powder 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt 4 tablespoons flaxseed 3 cups almond milk (or your favorite plant-based milk) 2 to 3 tablespoons melted vegan butter

Mix all ingredients together until smooth. If batter is too runny, add flour. If batter is too thick, add water until it is the desired consistency. If adding chocolate chips*, add these in at the end. Pre-heat waffle maker. Once heated, pour batter evenly over surface. Heat thoroughly. The last and most important step: ENJOY! *Most chocolate chips not vegan, although some semi-sweet chocolate chips are. Read the label to be sure. Chris Pickens is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic health coach. She has been a vegan since 2016. Pickens enjoys sharing her recipes, getting feedback (good or bad) on her recipes, getting requests for future recipes, and sharing information about veganism and why she became vegan. She can be contacted by e-mailing her at momof4chris@gmail.com Please put “The Joy of Medina Attn: Chris” in the subject line.

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• Cooking oil • 1/2 cup white onion • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic • 1 can black beans • 1 boil-in-a-bag white rice • cumin, cayenne pepper, chili powder, garlic salt, parsley, black pepper • butter of choice Saute’ chopped onion and garlic in oil until onion is translucent. Add black beans, do not drain. Season with spices to taste. I like mine spicy, so I add cayenne and chili powder. Prepare rice according to package directions. Drain rice, stir in butter (I use a vegan butter) and black pepper and set aside. Let the bean mixture simmer until most of the water is gone, it usually takes about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Plate, and enjoy! Kel Bulkowski loves to create recipes influenced by dishes from around the world, with her favorites being Mediterranean and Asian. She also runs a small, local exotic animal rescue. She can be contacted at countingbluecars3@gmail.com or https://tinyurl.com/zwfzh3tr

“Sometimes it takes only one act of kindness and caring to change a person’s life.” –Jackie Chan

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photo by Eberhard Grossgasteiger


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

One Comment

Color Me Riding

by Kelly Bailey

by Robert Soroky

I can take you back to the single moment that my thoughts about my body became negative. I was 20, a senior in college about to graduate with a Bachelor of Science. I had gained about 15 pounds. The man I was in love with and had been dating for four years told me I had gained too much weight and I was no longer attractive to him. That was the moment. It was the first time I can remember being truly uncomfortable in my own skin. It also was the first time I really understood that some people were judging my appearance, even people whom I believed loved me unconditionally. I left that man. But I struggled with disordered eating patterns and body dysmorphia for the next 20 years. Here is what you should say to a loved one if you want them to lose weight: Nothing. Read that again. Nothing. This is why: It only takes a single comment to cause years of dysfunction. No matter how well-intentioned your desire for your partner/child/friend, it almost always backfires. Resentment, loss of trust and rebellion usually ensue. The decision to lose weight is a very personal one. It must come from an inner desire to be better. I will go even further and say that the inner desire must come from a place of LOVE, not self-hate. I have never met anyone who hated themselves thin (at least not permanently). Not only does external pressure about a person’s body not help them lose weight, it may actually cause them to gain more weight in the long run because exercise and healthy eating become punishment. How to really help a loved one? Hold your tongue. Do not comment on their weight or how much they eat. It will only cause them to isolate from you. Set the example. Are you living the lifestyle you expect of them? Are you fit and healthy? Worry less about them and work on yourself. They will come to you if they want help, but only if they feel loved and comfortable with you. Let them know you love them, no matter what. And if your love for them is conditional based on their appearance, do them a favor by excusing yourself from their life.

As temperatures cool down and leaves begin to flip colors, I am reminded of that one question endlessly asked when seasons change hands: What is your favorite season? Now, as a cyclist, the slam-dunk answer should be summer, right? But, believe it or not, there are many folks, especially the older generation, who dread the summer heat. Ohio’s notoriously humid conditions can make 90-degree days unbearable and heat stroke a real threat. For these folks especially, when is the best time to ride? Well, consider the fact that any time you exert yourself, whether it be biking, running, hiking or some other sport, your body requires oxygen to perform at peak efficiency. The problem is that on exceptionally hot days, it is much harder to breathe and, consequently, harder to perform. Why is this? I had a flight instructor who gave the best description of warm and cold air. He said to picture a big, open field with a herd of cows. On a 90-degree day, where are those cows? Well, much like humans, they would rather not be on top of each other in that kind of heat, so they scatter. The heard is thin. Conversely, on a 30-degree day, those same cows tend to huddle close together to try and stay warm. The herd is much thicker. Air molecules behave the same way when the temperature changes. On warm days, they are farther apart, making the air thinner and containing less oxygen. Conversely, on colder days, those air molecules are closer together, making the air thicker and oxygen rich. If you are adverse to the heat, the best time to ride would be during early morning or evening hours, when the air tends to be cooler. Not only will you avoid the blazing sun, but you will perform better because your body will take in more oxygen. Which is why fall is my favorite season. The cool, crisp air makes any time of day awesome for riding. Plus, with the trees showing off their vibrant new orange, yellow and red fall wardrobe, it is the perfect time to explore beautiful local bike paths like the Chippewa Rail and Inlet trails, the Cuyahoga Valley National Park towpath, and the Cleveland Metroparks.

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022 over his new friend, another family approached. The little one with them saw the toy Bican was holding and was What He Gave brokenhearted that it was taken. by Amy Barnes Without hesitating a moment and before his parents or During a time when acts of kindness sometimes seem as rare anyone else around him knew what he was doing, Bican as a unicorn sighting, 9-year-old Jaxon Bican showed such quietly handed the plush toy to the little one. overwhelming kindness to someone else that his mother and As the little one squealed over the toy, Bican just as quietly bystanders were left in tears. turned back to the box to pick out something else. It was very It was at Medina Fest on Public Square this summer. One of obvious how much he had wanted the first toy he had picked, the booths had a big box of stuffed plush toys from which yet he never said a word. children and adults were encouraged to pick a newly loved As a thank you to Bican for his overwhelming kindness and friend. the tears of pride and joy he brought to his mother’s eyes, he Bican quickly spotted a stuffed animal he very obviously fell received a gift card to a local business from this magazine. in love with instantly. In that same moment, as Bican was so filled with happiness N

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

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continued, Page 26


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

continued from Page 25 Tour Hosts 1

Geig’s Orchard

Stroll through the fruit tree groves, or take a hayride to the pick-your-own pumpkin patch. Get an inside look at how apples are sorted, graded, and packed, and the cider press in opera�on. Visit the farm market store for fresh local products.

2

Seville Library

Stop by the cozy Seville library for face pain�ng, cra�s, and music! Buy a book from our used book sale, get a library card, or make a bu�on!

3

Rupp-Dale Farm

Don’t miss this 5th genera�on family farm with an incredible dairy calf facility! See how the calves, ages 3 days to 3 weeks, are fed with automated milk feeders and learn about the many conserva�on prac�ces being used on the farm.

5

6

Trolley Line Park

The Wadsworth Historical Society will showcase historic displays inside the newly renovated Trolley Line House within the park. The park also holds the southern trailhead for the interurban trail that connects to downtown Wadsworth. Homemade ice cream will be served!

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7

Blooming Acres

This locally owned plant nursery and green house offers nursery-grown plants chosen for their aesthe�c quali�es, durability, vigor, and wildlife benefits. Tour the hoop houses, and get informa�on on winter garden prepara�on. Fall plants and decora�ons will be for sale.

Seville Historical Soc.

Tour this unique property which boasts a museum with Giants of Seville memorabilia, an 1823 schoolhouse, a jailhouse and a newly installed rain garden.

4

Points of Interest

Sky Park

Discover the unique history of this community airport. Learn how to become a pilot, try one of the civil air patrol’s hands-on simulators, or take to the sky on a scenic flight provided at $20 per seat/$60 per plane, weather permit�ng.

8

Oenslager Nature Ctr.

The land upon which the nature center sits was once a farm. Learn about the transforma�on from farm to wildlife sanctuary, and the connec�on to the Chatfield and Oenslager families. Nature ac�vi�es, hikes, games and cra�s will keep you entertained throughout the weekend.

9

Barn Talk Hops

This unique, family-owned hop farm and processing facility works with local cra� breweries to supply a fresh product. Visitors can see the hops growing fields and harves�ng equipment, which will be on display.

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Restrooms Available

Pass Bike Min 3 Ft Sign - DRIVE BY ONLY Sponsored by Bike Medina County to coincide with state law passed in 2017 to help ensure biker safety on roadways.

No Restrooms

B Mound Hill Cemetery - This is the final resting place of Captain Martin Van Buren and Anna Swan Bates - the Giants of Seville and their infant child.

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Leashed Pets Allowed No Pets Allowed Fee for Some Activi�es Food Available

Sign Our Streams - DRIVE BY ONLY - Adopt a stream or river crossing to encourage stewardship of our waterways. Call Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District to find out how.

D Sharon Center United Methodist Church – This church is one of the oldest con�nuously worshipping churches in Medina County. Since 1832, they have been an integral part of the Sharon Center community.

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Scan the code for accessibility information about each site.

River Styx Park - NO ORGANIZED ACTIVITIES The upland ravines of River Styx Park are a haven for a diverse array of flora and fauna. Stop to walk the ½ mile paved trail to enjoy a self-guided hike and beau�ful fall foliage.

THANK YOU to the wonderful sponsors who made the 2022 Medina County Fall Foliage Tour possible: GOLD LEVEL -- Medina Gazette, Joy Magazine

Copies of this map can be found at www.medinacountyparks.com

SILVER LEVEL -- Medina Conven�on & Visitor’s Bureau, Clement Construc�on BRONZE LEVEL -- Farmer’s Savings Bank, Spring Mist Farms, Maslyk Landscaping, Hirt’s Gardens, Michael Kovack, Richardson Farms, Pine Crest Farms, Northern Ohio Railway Museum


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

ENTERTAINMENT: FUN AND GAMES

Hurricane Forces Family to Evaluate Lives by Mary Olson Rating (out of 5 possible): “The Displacements,” a new novel by Bruce Holsinger, is compelling, thought-provoking, and somber with excellent character development and a beautiful narrative arc. Holsinger is also the author of “The Gifted School.” When the world's first Category 6 hurricane aims its wrath at south Florida, the Larsen-Halls family members are displaced from their lavish Miami home. The family includes Brantley, a successful physician; Daphne, a celebrated artist; and their two children and an adult son from Brantley’s prior marriage. While the rest evacuate, Brantley stays behind to evacuate a hospital, while Daphne and the children urgently evacuate. The chaos that follows is made worse by a cruel act that leaves Daphne completely cut off from finances and communication. At the mercy of strangers and government workers stretched to their limits, Daphne and the kids settle into a FEMA shelter in Oklahoma. Shock, grief and profound loss threaten to overwhelm the family as they come to terms with a new life in a country decimated by catastrophic weather and political infighting. The shelter houses much more than families dealing with trauma. There are chances to make money, to exploit, to evaluate life choices and values, to choose sides, to grow, and to face danger. This novel is both haunting and inspiring. It is haunting in its realism. The scenarios Holsinger writes so urgently and beautifully are completely possible in our time: whole cities wiped out by wind and flood; families separated and isolated when technology fails; people struggling to survive because of disbelief and lack of planning. Yet, it is an inspiring novel as well. Daphne, once she begins to recover from shock, draws upon a well of resilience she did not know she had. Her children adapt in positive and negative ways, deciding what kind of people they are going to be when all they have is their character. It has been a long time since I have read a book that made me question how I would cope with the same situation.

Mary Olson is the readers' advisory librarian at the Medina County District Library.

ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL

When Women Roar By Amy Barnes Movie: “Woman King” Seen: theater Rating (out of 5 possible): If you are hesitating to see this movie because of the lack-of-detail trailers, ignore those and get to the theater. This is a beautiful, powerful movie you do not want to miss. If you are hesitating to see the movie because you have heard it is not historically accurate, it is important to realize that it is promoted as

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being based on the stories of the Agojie warriors and the Dahomey people and does not claim to be a historical work. It is not a documentary, but it does tell a powerful story. This movie explores the other side of the slavery story, why tribes sold each other into slavery, the economic benefits of those sales, the advantage of getting rid of enemies permanently, and how easy it is to not look at the whole picture of one’s actions. Set in early 1800s Africa, the story takes place at a time when the slave trade is booming, and tribes are gaining great treasuries from selling their captive enemies to the European slavers. The story is told from the viewpoint of the Dahomey tribe, which was infamous for its skilled women warriors called Agojie. Unlike many tribes and other societies, the Dahomey people believed that warriors, whether male or female, were equal. A belief that was based on the two sibling gods they worshipped. While major issues are addressed in the movie, it skillfully avoids coming across as preachy or pushy. The Agojie women are portrayed as powerful and having equal status with men. This is done without making the men seem less than but more along the lines that each person does what they are best at and where their skill sets lie. In an ironic twist, however, the women who are not Agojie are still subjected to being treated as little more than chattel. In one scene, a young girl is hit by a prospective “husband” who is considering buying her from her father to be his wife and to work his fields. If you do not come out of this movie wondering how women have ever allowed men to be completely in charge of their lives, then you need to rewatch the movie and as you watch, think about how in the 1960s and later, in this country, women were not allowed to have a bank account, a credit card or own land without a husband or father’s permission and co-signing. Men do not have to be less than, but neither do women. It is mentioned several times, although other critics claim it was not, that the Dahomey tribe was one of the biggest ones for selling their captives to the slavers. In this story, General Nanisca, powerfully portrayed by Viola Davis, argues with the king that by selling their captives to the slavers, they are weakening all of Africa and making it so soon there will be no one left to fight the Europeans, clearing the way for them to take over. When King Ghezo, portrayed by John Boyega, points out that their treasury has grown strong from the sale of captives, Nanisca proves they can make just as much from the sale of such products as palm oil and at the same time preserve the dignity and sovereignty of their people. This movie is overflowing with powerful performances, beauty, celebration, sorrow, and lessons that should not be ignored or silenced by critics. It is far past time for women to claim their power and their rightful place as valuable partners instead of being convinced they are less than. Trigger warning: There is a rape scene that is seen in flashbacks, but it is chaotic and avoids intense detail. There are battle scenes, blood and violence but it is not graphic.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

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M e d i n a Joyful C o u n t y Word M a g a z i Search ne | October 30 J o y o f 2022 October

Joyful Word Search Perfectly Pauline

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

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Searching Medina County

SEARCHING MEDINA COUNTY W B C E H D I L P R P B E N W L A Z L N A W K R E T HW Q Y

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“I still think cannibalism is more ethical than killing someone and just leaving them there, I mean, at least the body is used for something.” Your logic is frightening.

“In your world, you are right.”


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

This month’s clue: Who is the focus in the new business feature? Last month’s answer: Sooty mold, “Dig It!,” Page 19, August 2022

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

by Amy Barnes Maylee Meadows, in pink, picks what will be sold in the stand, with friends and family pitching in to help. Beside Maylee is Ever Meadows and mom Aubrey Meadows with cousin Odin DuBois in back.

A couple times a month and when there are games being played at the Claggett Middle School athletic fields, a little stand pops up at the corner of Union and North Jefferson where some local children work to raise money toward family trips and other

assorted goals. What is offered at the stand depends on the time of year and what Maylee Meadows chooses to sell, said mom Aubrey Meadows. She said it is lemonade during the summer, hot apple cider when the weather turns cooler, with flowers in between.


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Diane Ollom, Medina, stops by the stand to buy hot apple cider from Archer DuBois.

Archer DuBois is a mobile billboard as he rides a skateboard up and down the sidewalk wearing a sign on his back to gain business. In another business venture, Archer DuBois creates keychains and other items out of plastic waste, such as shopping bags, found around his home. Keychains sell for $5 plus shipping, with 9 percent of sales going to nonprofits that help injured sea life and clean up the ocean. To see a video of DuBois explaining his project and to purchase his products, go to https://bit.ly/3Uvzv5Y continued, Page 34


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Barb and Rex Demczyk

Following a hiatus due to COVID, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church’s Oktoberfest came roaring back on September 24 with a large daylong turnout of people ready to enjoy beer, sausages, live music, wild hats, lederhosen, kids activities, and door prizes with friends and family on the church grounds at 317 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Sporting their fashionable hats at Oktoberfest were Chris Fulton wearing a hot dog hat and Tami Keck.

T


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Jennifer and Todd Bracker sold an assortment of unusual hats.

The Rev. Kelly Aughenbaugh and The Rev. Barb Telfer, both of St. Paul’s, and The Rev. Albert Jennings of St. Timothy’s Church in Macedonia.

They thought he did not get in the picture, but Ben Dayton peeked out just in time! From left, back row: Joe Dayton, Tara Dayton, Kristin Zabrosky, Jared Zabrosky, and Ben Leightner. From left, front row: Jacob Dayton, Madelyn Zabrosky and Hannah Zabrosky.

Molly Stanko and Rob Nelson

V Volunteering at the Hope Recovery Community booth were Paul Davis and Mariya Silva.

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Members of the DSB band from Olmstead Falls who performed for the crowd, from left: Randy Bowman, John Yatson, Jackie Yatson, Jim Lenahan, Julie Williams, and Bob Elshaw.

From left, TJ Rohme, Dave Muffet, Amy Oklah, and Monique Cline


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

Megan Cook helped all day with children’s activities.

Longtime friends of at least 20 years, Valeri Rose and Rick Daso Petri and Sandi Gorfido.

Bob Bruno, Nancy Marquard and Debbie Bruno

Lifelong friends (so say their families!) Camden Middleton and Adelyn Curtsinger began playing pattycake as soon as they were put together until they were distracted by their photo being taken. Every photo, at least one was on the move and out of focus!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

October 2022 Nonprofit Calendar I Saturday, October 1

Saturday, October 15 Trunk or Treat, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Burnt Rubber Garage, 6112 Norwalk Road, Medina

Thursday, October 27 Trick or Treat at the Library, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. All ages trick or treating. Register at https:// bit.ly/3fwRIzZ

Saturday, October 29 Halloween Bash, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Enter a costume contest, create crafts, and trick or treat at the library.

Sunday, October 30 Trunk or Treat, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. 10th annual Trunk or Treat; kids enjoy trunk or treat, hot dogs, popcorn, hot chocolate, and crafts.

International Coffee Day Free Paper Shredding, 9 a.m. to noon, American Legion Post 2020, Medina County Veterans Memorial Hall, 620 N. Broadway, Medina. Donations gratefully accepted. Annual British Car Show, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Prizes. Kids’ Yoga in the Garden, 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Medina County Community Garden, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Parents required to remain. For children ages 5 and older. No charge, but donations gratefully accepted. To register, go to https://bit.ly/3OuxW54 Leaf Creatures, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.,Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Create an animal out of preserved leaves. Register at https://bit.ly/3r5uraX 2022 Bridal Ball Charity Event, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., Memory Lane Event Center, 456 College Street, Wadsworth. Benefits leukemia research through the Open Arms Foundation. Wedding-themed fundraiser, wear your old wedding dress, bridesmaid dresses, or favorite little black dress. Cash bar, dinner, prizes, raffles, dancing. This is a 21 and older event. For event updates, go to https://bit.ly/3z6pYtt Tickets are $35 to $45 at https:// bit.ly/3uOGhbS Gypsy, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building,114 N Broadway Street, Medina. “Gypsy” is a musical about the tale of a stage mother fighting for her daughter’s success while also yearning for her own. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/ 3TPYCQR

Sunday, October 2 National Name Your Car Day Gypsy, 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building,114 N Broadway Street, Medina. “Gypsy” is a musical about the tale of a stage mother fighting for her daughter’s success while also yearning for her own. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/ 3qqFpaE

Monday, October 31 Brunswick, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Monday, October 3

Seville, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the past, to be announced

National Boyfriend Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Pumpkin Decorating Contest, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Decorate a pumpkin and display it at the library where votes will be collected throughout the month and the winners will be announced during that last week of October. Pumpkins are provided. Register at https://bit.ly/3CaiQxS Beginning Sign Language, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Introductory sign language course. Register at https://bit.ly/3SvWYCb

Wadsworth, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Tuesday, October 4

Chippewa Lake, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Halloween Trick or Treat and Cider Tasting, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Hinckley, discouraged by township because of dark rural roads Medina, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022 National Taco Day Knitting and Crochet Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Scary Cute Crafts, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. A 4-week craft series with a new craft each week leading up to Halloween. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3BK7QWr Drum Group, 11 a.m. to noon, Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Celebrate community through an interactive drum circle. Register at https://bit.ly/3r8shHI

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Exploring Barns of Medina County September 5 through October 2 B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Wednesday, October 5 World Teacher’s Day Pumpkin Spice Party, 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Spice up a painting project with a seasonal favorite. Teen Taste Testers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Compete for teen tester champion. South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Wednesdays through October 12, 2022. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Discover Your Local Health Department, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3BKqTQn Life In The Blender, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about stepfamily life and how to handle its complexities. Register at https://bit.ly/3LoaipT

Thursday, October 6 National Mad Hatter Day One-on-One Tech Support, noon to 1 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register for a 30-minute session to review computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3BKfG2h American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Forest Therapy Walk, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Holmesbrook Park, 660 College Street, Wadsworth. Relaxed sensory experience forest therapy walk. Goal is to sense, embody, appreciate relationship with natural world. Led by Jason of Whisper Shifter. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3dWqJNV Ghosts of the Civil War, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Liverpool Township Community Center, 6801 School Street. This event features a mixture of haunting tales, literary selections, songs, and history.

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Antique Photography Exhibit October 1 through 31 Personal collection of antique cameras and photography equipment Lodi Library 635 Wooster Street, Lodi Medina Weaving Guild Art Show October 1 through November 30 All aspects of fiber arts Highland Library 4160 Ridge Road, Medina photo by Tejas Prajapati

Pentimento October 10 through November 6 Works in a variety of mediums by the PerSisters. B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

more! Check table of contents for map pages. Gypsy, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building,114 N Broadway Street, Medina. “Gypsy” is a musical about the tale of a stage mother fighting for her daughter’s success while also yearning for her own. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/ 3qokGo3

Sunday, October 9

Curious Events Day Rooted in Nature: Fall Foliage Tour Stop at Sharon Center UMC, noon to 5 p.m., Sharon Center UMC, 6407 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Decorated for the season and displaying historical documents. Check table of Friday, October 7 contents for map pages. World Smile Day Harvest Festival and Fall Foliage Tour, noon to 5 p.m., Seville Library, 45 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, Center Street, Seville. Celebrate fall with face painting, crafts, music, and 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg more! Check table of contents for map pages. Gypsy, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Concert in the Country: Jazz Bass and Beyond, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Administration Building,114 N Broadway Street, Medina. “Gypsy” is a HeARTland, 8187 Camp Road, Homerville. In the event of rain the musical about the tale of a stage mother fighting for her daughter’s program will take place at Homerville United Methodist Church, 8964 success while also yearning for her own. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/ Spencer Road, Homerville. Enjoy a jazz concert performed by bassist, Jeff 3eE3nfS Slater. Register at https://bit.ly/3RqosJo Exhibits: Greeting Cards, Local History, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m, 3314 Myers Saturday, October 8 Road, Medina. Enjoy exhibits on local greeting cards from the 19th and National Pierogi Day 20th centuries as well as photographs and artifacts from Weymouth and Rooted in Nature: Fall Foliage Tour Stop at Sharon Center UMC, noon Medina Township history. to 5 p.m., Sharon Center UMC, 6407 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Decorated Gypsy, 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County for the season and displaying historical documents. Check table of Administration Building,114 N Broadway Street, Medina. “Gypsy” is a contents for map pages. musical about the tale of a stage mother fighting for her daughter’s Harvest Festival and Fall Foliage Tour, noon to 5 p.m., Seville Library, 45 success while also yearning for her own. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/ Center Street, Seville. Celebrate fall with face painting, crafts, music, and 3TTY2kU


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022 cream, vote on best straw creation. Read to Brutus! A Bernese Mountain Dog, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Visit Brutus at the library and read him

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Sunday, September 11 through Sunday, October 16, 2022

Healthy Kids Running Series: Brunswick, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick. Each run has a variety of distances. For fees, registration and more information, go to https://bit.ly/3tWhiCi

Saturday, October 22

Paws for the Cause 5k and 1 mile, 7:30 a.m. registration, race starts 9 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Medina County Society for the Prevention of the Cruelty to Animals. https://tinyurl.com/26nu82bj

Saturday, October 29

The T-Strong Fall Dash 5k and 1 mile, 9 a.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Benefits children fighting cancer in Northeast Ohio. For more information and registration, go to https:// tinyurl.com/ybeed85t

Monday, October 10 National Handbag Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbgAlly Snack Break, 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., Media Center, Medina High School, 777 E Union Street, Medina. Support the Genders and Sexualities Alliance students and engage in conversation about building a safe and inclusive community for all citizens. Beginning Sign Language, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Introductory sign language course. Register at https://bit.ly/3r8t8Iq

Tuesday, October 11 National Sausage Pizza Day Scary Cute Crafts, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. A 4-week craft series with a new craft each week leading up to Halloween. Register at https://bit.ly/3RdD65X Afternoon Movie, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Enjoy watching a movie you may have missed. The Buckeye Bigfoot: Reality or Fantasy?, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Discover the complete history of Bigfoot incidents in Ohio. Beginner Birdwatching, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn how to get started bird watching including: where to go, best times of day, and bird identification.

Wednesday, October 12 National Savings Day Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. Ages 7 to adult. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3egtk1S American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Strawbees, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Build with straws, enjoy strawberry ice

a story. South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Last day for season. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Haunted Gingerbread Houses, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Celebrate the spooky season by creating a gingerbread house. Register at https://bit.ly/3dNP4pd Safety and Security Online, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street. Learn to determine fake from real. The event will cover pop-ups, phishing, fake emails, mysterious links, and more.

Thursday, October 13 National Train Your Brain Day One-on-One Tech Support, noon to 1 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Road, Seville. Register for a 30-minute session to review computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3SBGfNQ Drum Group, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Celebrate community through an interactive drum circle. Register at https://bit.ly/3r9kRE5 Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., Homerville Grace Brethren Church, 8992 Firestone Road, Homerville. Super Secret Slime Lab, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Road, Seville. Make a sensory slime test tube goo. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3BEp1Zu

Friday, October 14 National Dessert Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbgYarn Pumpkins, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create a pumpkin out of yarn. Materials are provided. Register at https://bit.ly/3xTF3xk After-Hours Hide and Seek 4th and 5th Graders, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Play hide and seek in the library after it is closed. Register at https://bit.ly/3xUDYFz After-Hours Hide and Seek 6th Grade to 12th Grade, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Play hide and seek in the library after it is closed. Register at https://bit.ly/3BQ0vEK Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: Halloween All Aboard!, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Ride miniature train around railroad and station house. Costumes encouraged, but avoid long, flowing garments. All ages. Free.

Saturday, October 15 National Sweetest Day Feathers, Furs, Skin and Scales, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Explore a display of wildlife pelts and artifacts. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Old Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Certified CPR, AED and First Aid, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Interactive course, learn and certification in life-saving course. Some material may be sensitive to some participants. Per person: both sessions $100; one session $50. Evening session covers first aid. To register and pay: CPR and AED class: https:// cprenroll.me/VZf5BbvQU9 and for first aid go to https://cprenroll.me/ MvcLKS31Hp Bug Zoo, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Hands-on fun with six


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legged critters that rule the world. Register at https://bit.ly/3SqaMyr Masked Bandits, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy games, displays, activities. Genealogy Slam, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3SqbrQr Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: All Aboard!, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Ride miniature train around railroad and station house. All ages. Free. Starry, Starry Nights at Letha House, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., Letha House Lodge West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. View deep sky objects and planets up close using the Cuyahoga Astronomical Association’s telescopes. The observatory will be open for public viewing. All ages.

Sunday, October 16 National Dictionary Day Masked Bandits, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy games, displays, activities. ORMACO Live at the Library: Latin Jazz and World Fusion, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadwworth. Enjoy original music and covers performed by Victor Samalot. Register at https://bit.ly/3RTo7il K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Allardale Park, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages, children must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration.

Monday, October 17 National Wear Something Gaudy Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https:// rcblood.org/32i1sbg American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Beginning Sign Language, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Introductory sign language course. Register at https://bit.ly/3y1Hv54 Zombie Dolls, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Create your own zombie doll. Register at https://bit.ly/3CmGNCg

Tuesday, October 18 National Chocolate Cupcake Day Knitting and Crochet Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Scary Cute Crafts, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. A 4-week craft series with a new craft each week leading up to Halloween. Register at https://bit.ly/3SsxG8G American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Halloween Party, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Trick or treating, games, balloon animals. Register at https://bit.ly/3SmQF4v Exploring Alaska: The Last Frontier, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road. Register at https://bit.ly/3BUX2oy

Wednesday, October 19 National Medical Assistants Recognition Day Card Making, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road. Create 5 cards for $15. Bring your own scissors and adhesive. Register at https://bit.ly/3rjOX84 Monstercon, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street,

Brunswick 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sundays, June 12 through October 2 Produce, consumables and crafts July 24: Christmas in July September 11: Butterfly release October 2: Canine Costume Contest Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Call 330-441-0292 for more information. Medina 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 7 through October 29 Produce, consumables, crafts, knife sharpening Cornerstone Chapel 3939 Granger Road, Medina Enter lot from Weymouth Road Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3MQSaFJ 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 14 through October 15 Produce and consumables Medina Public Square Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3vLZY2W Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 28 through September 24 Produce, consumables and crafts Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3I5Az9l Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 11 through September 24 Produce, consumables and crafts Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r8trRd

Medina. A Halloween party including Monster Toy Lab, costume contest, and trivia murder party. History of Infectious Diseases, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about the history of infectious diseases and the evolution of treatment.

Thursday, October 20 International Sloth Day One-on-One Tech Support, noon to 1 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register for a 30-minute session to review computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3BUgz8G Forest Therapy Walk, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Relaxed sensory experience forest therapy walk. Goal is to sense, embody, appreciate relationship with natural world. Led by Jason of Whisper Shifter. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3RtSE5H Halloween Fashion Show, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Walk the red carpet, show off your costume, and get a special treat. All ages are welcome.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2022

Friday, October 21 National Apples Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg After-Hours Scary Stories, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Enjoy s’mores and spooky tales. Register at https://bit.ly/3RjfuN7

Saturday, October 22 National Make a Dog’s Day Basket Weaving 101: Autumn-Themed Basket, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Cost is $25.00 per basket. Registration is required. To register call Emily at (573) 694-4126 or email at basketmakingfriends@gmail.com Masked Bandits, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy games, displays, activities. Are You Afraid of the Dark?, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Prepare a scary story to share and enjoy a costume contest and s’mores pops. Permission slip is required. Register at https:// bit.ly/3LpOIS2 First Annual Soup Cook-Off, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Comfort Suites Hotel, 1464 Town Center Boulevard, Brunswick. All entrants to the contest receive free admission to the event. Prizes will be available for 1st, 1nd, and 3rd places. Admission for non-entrants is $10 with a live dessert auction after dinner. All proceeds go to Oaks Family Care Center. Register at https://bit.ly/3xAjf9X

Sunday, October 23 Mole Day Masked Bandits, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy games, displays, activities. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Foxes, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Hidden Hollow Camp – Day Use, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. Learn about foxes local to the area and how they survive. Ages 7 and up. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. Ages 7 to adult. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3egtk1S ORMACO Playhouse Square Bus Trip: “Les Miserables,” 5 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., Buehler’s, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. Meet at Buehler’s to board the bus to Playhouse Square and enjoy the performance of the musical “Les Miserables.” Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/3RFajb4

Monday, October 24 National Bologna Day Mindful Monday, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. A different calming activity each month. Register at https://bit.ly/3RtlpPH American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Meet the Ghosts of Ohio, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn about ghost hunting and try out ghost-hunting equipment.

Japanese culture, and do geek crafts. Cosplay welcome. Register at https:/ /bit.ly/3y34hJL Medina County Hauntings, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Listen to spooky hauntings in Medina County. Zoom option is available. Register at https://bit.ly/3BXSnSE Mobile Device Safety Online, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to stay safe from hackers.

Wednesday, October 26 National Pumpkin Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Break a World Record, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Attempt to break different world records. A Portrayal of Eleanor Roosevelt, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.

Thursday, October 27 National Black Cat Day One-on-One Tech Support, noon to 1 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register for a 30-minute session to review computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3ftOX2G American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Amityville Horror or Hoax, 6 p.m.. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street. Learn about the facts and fiction behind The Amityville Horror.

Friday, October 28 International Animation Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Saturday, October 29 National Internet Day World Tour of Music: A Taste of Tango, 7:30 p.m., Western Reserve Masonic Community Center, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina. Enjoy live tango and dance music. Purchase tickets at https://bit.ly/3BoGIgM

Sunday, October 30 National Candy Corn Day Creature Feature, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about spiders in inside presentation, then go for hike to find them. All ages.

Monday, October 31 Halloween

Tuesday, October 25 National Greasy Food Day Scary Cute Crafts, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. A 4-week craft series with a new craft each week leading up to Halloween. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3SktmYS Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. View and discuss anime, learn about

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Personal Trainer

Armstrong

My Personal Trainer

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

3733 Stonegate Drive, Medina Phone: 330-723-3009 20930 Drake Road, Strongsville Phone: 440-878-9000 104 High Street, Wadsworth Phone: 419-685-4917 Website: https:// www.ohiomypersonaltrainer.com/contact

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry 5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joesph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: https://landryfamilydentistry.com/

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Photographer

Brooklyn Media Phone: 440-382-6254 Website: http://www.brooklynmediallc.com/

FlashBang Photography/ Videography Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

Torre Design Insurance

Phone: 304-553-2893 Website: torredesigncontact@gmail.com

451 W. Liberty Street, Medina Contact: Thomas Muntean Phone: 330-721-7716 Website: https://bit.ly/39kwVN7

Simulated Shooting Range

Thomas Muntean Agency/ American Family Insurance

Engage Virtual Range

Locations in Medina and Avon Lake Visit EVR website for information and to book appointments. Website: https:// www.engagevirtualrange.com/r/b9aSrM

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio


Scan code for print and digital subscriptions!

Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589