__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

WHY 5G IS IMPORTANT PG. 20 The changes and benefits it brings

CARING FOR YOUR MUM PG. 22 Expert tips on the best care for long life

OVERWHELMED? PG. 23 Steps to regaining control of your day

Tired of politics? Escape into our pages of photos, stories and tips from local experts!

SELF DEFINED Mark Bollinger never had any intention of letting the role of funeral director define him, and the variety of roles he has filled may be surprising, but what he wanted to be and why may be more so. PG. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


2

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 9 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Labels by Amy Barnes A very long time ago, when I was in first grade, I was labeled borderline mentally retarded. It was a term used back then to describe a child who had a greatly reduced learning capacity, who was struggling to keep up with classmates, and one who could never be expected to accomplish much more than basic daily tasks. My mother, who had tested with a high IQ and was convinced her children would be geniuses, could not accept this blow to her pride. She began pounding flashcards at me, hour after hour, night after night, demanding a perfect run through that never happened. She taught me to hate learning and anything to do with reading or math. Then we moved to Oklahoma, and it only got worse. I became very quiet because talking got me ridiculed for my Pennsylvania accent. My new classmates found my red hair and freckles worthy of further ridicule. There were no other redheads in school, so I was an oddity. Not a day went by that I did not hear, “I would rather be dead than red on the head.” The school principal would question me daily, asking if I had gotten my freckles by standing too close to the back of a cow as it relieved itself. He endlessly explained the joke to my classmates, and they would shrink from me as if it were true.

Each night, as I cried myself to sleep, I would beg God to change my hair color and erase my freckles. My learning issues increased but, back then, they were never recognized as a symptom of being bullied at school and abused at home. Even nowadays, the connection is often missed. I could not understand nor explain the wall I was fighting between my brain and what was being taught. Somehow, in spite of my reading problems, I discovered that through books I could enter worlds where I did not exist and I could be a bystander to a story. Books made it possible for me to disappear and not be noticed. I learned that if I was not noticed, I did not get hurt. By the end of third grade, I had won an award for reading 80 books, more books than anyone else in my grade. When it was announced, my mother almost fell out of her chair at the assembly. I went on to graduate in the top 10 percent of my graduating class and was the first one from my high school to ever win a journalism scholarship. I wish I had been able to recognize the limit to the bullies’ power back then and been able to say to them, “I cannot stop you, but you also cannot stop me.” But, perhaps, I did exactly that.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Kariem Farrakhan II Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Amy Barnes MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

3

HOME AND GARDEN

21

BITE ME!

SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS by Amy Barnes A low-effort recipe for a delicious meal that is perfect on a busy day.

22

DIG IT!

RETURN OF THE MUM by Michelle Riley Tips for keeping your mum happy and long lasting.

HEALTH

23

HEALTHY TRAILS

BIKE HUNTING by Robert Soroky Getting on a waiting list may be the only way to get a new bike any time soon.

OF MIND AND BODY

REGAIN CONTROL OF YOUR DAY

4 4 11

by Kelly Bailey Lost your routine and healthy eating resolve due to sudden changes in routine? We have five ways to successfully cope.

FILLING LIFE’S CANVAS by Amy Barnes When his father looked for an heir to the funeral business, Mark Bollinger stepped up, but it was not what he dreamed of doing.

COMMUNITY

25

THE READING NOOK by Amy Barnes

photos by Amy Barnes, FlashBang Photography and Allison Waltz-Boebel

BUSINESS

26

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

27

ROLL ’EM!

BREAKING DOWN THE WALL

28

by Kariem Farrakhan II JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

30

LET’S DO IT!

35

CELEBRATE!

TEXT TALK

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Mark Bollinger with his painting of his family’s Shih Tzu, Abby.

FALL TREE DAB

29

THE NETWORKER Help in avoiding the pitfalls of restricted communications.

IN THE STUDIO

Creating colorful fall artwork is only four steps away.

by Austin Steger

by Bob Arnold

by Hunter Barnard

by Jerry King

BENEFITS OF A 5G NETWORK The new 5G-capable network is being touted as the newest great thing, but what can it do for you?

MORE THAN SANDWICHES

MIRTH AND JOY

by Amy Barnes

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Read the clue, then gather and unscramble the magnifying glass letters to solve the puzzle.

Scooby-Doo and Shaggy prove they can be helpful, and our reviewer approves.

THE IN BOX Ready to make that dream come true and start a business, and that is when you hit The Wall.

20

by Kent Von Der Vellen

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

OH, SNAP! People were donning masks so they could connect and help each other through reptiles, tributes and a food bank.

19

MISSION OF RESCUE, EDUCATION Inspired by a rescued pit bull, a local pet charity does all it can to help find dogs of all shapes, sizes and breeds new homes with loving hearts.

TOBY’S STORY A story of loss, suicide and words unspoken.

14

GEMS

ADVENTURE OF LIVING Find the hidden words the same way Mark Bollinger has found a fulfilling life: by looking. The Fall Foliage Tour was cancelled, but trees are still dressing in their fall colors, and other events await you! A clickable guide of vetted companies who bring Joy to you.


4

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Mark Bollinger with his wife, Debbie, and their dog, Abby.

photos and story by Amy Barnes

Classmates at Fairview High School were well aware of what his family did, partly because of the annual tour that the school’s Contemporary Thought e would never be accused of fitting a class took through the funeral home each year to stereotype. Mark Bollinger’s interests and talents stretch into as learn about the care of the deceased. There also was no missing that Bollinger drove a many different directions as there are brush strokes converted hearse. He smiles when recounting how on a canvas. much his friends enjoyed cruising with him in it. His first job, at 15 years old, was the usual type of The funeral home was founded by Bollinger’s jobs one gets at that age: washing cars and doing grandfather in 1937 and was handed down to yard work. However, he worked at a less-thanBollinger’s father. When he decided it was time for common place, his family’s funeral home in the next generation to step up, most of Bollinger’s Cleveland.

H


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

5

paintings by Mark Bollinger

siblings, including Bollinger, wanted to pursue other careers. One of Bollinger’s older sisters wanted to take the reins, but their father told her, no. It was the 80s, but he did not feel it was proper for a woman to run a funeral home. With the remainder of his four siblings steadfastly refusing to take over the business, Bollinger said he stepped up because he felt the business should stay in the family. Bollinger was attending the University of Cincinnati and continuing his track career that he had started in high school. Pole vaulting was his specialty. The decision to take over the family business, however, meant he needed a degree in mortuary science, which was not offered by UC. After only a year at UC, he transferred to Xavier University and gave up track. He graduated from college in 1983. In 1988, Bollinger took over the family business. He was only 26 years old. “It’s never been what I wanted to do,” Bollinger said, matter-of-factly. His dream was to be an orthopedic surgeon. He theorizes that dream may have had something to do with the numerous broken bones he suffered as a much younger, scrawnier self. He often suffered broken bones from being involved in sports, such as football and pole vaulting, and from fighting. He recalls a time when he broke his

hand during a fight but declines to discuss the reasons for the fights. Following his college years, he stayed involved with sports by coaching pole vaulting, high jumping and long jumping at Highland, Fairview and North Olmsted high schools. He currently plays softball with a Medina 50-and-over league and with a traveling team that recently participated in a sevengame tournament. Bollinger’s attention turned to law school in 1993. He worked days, went to school at night, and with his wife, Debbie, was a parent to five children. Having always found school to be easy A’s without ever having to study, he was not prepared for the amount of reading and work he would have to do in law school. After a year, he decided law was not for him and that he had no great desire for a law degree. He shakes his head as he says how much respect he has for those who pursue a law degree and successfully become lawyers.

continued, Page 6


6

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

continued from Page 5

painting by Mark Bollinger

In the mid-1990s, Bollinger sold the Cleveland funeral home and worked instead for other funeral homes in the area. By then, he and Debbie had six children and it was not feasible for him to return to his dream of becoming an orthopedic surgeon. He was the general manager at Riverside Cemetery in Cleveland for three years after being an assistant manager for a year. While his focus in high school was far from painting or art, he found himself pulled toward creating and discovered he was very good at sketching reproductions of cartoon characters. “I drew a lot at first.” Then he decided to try painting what he was sketching. “I wanted to see if I could do it,” he said. He started with oil paints but did not like the long drying times. He said that an oil painting he painted in the late 90s or early 2000s is still tacky. It was his distaste for the way sketch lines would sometimes show through the paint, especially through yellow, that was the incentive to try a different approach. He wondered if he could skip the sketching and go straight for painting on the canvas. “If I could do it with a pencil, I could do it with a brush,” he says, with the same quiet confidence with which he approaches life. When the state went into shutdown in an attempt to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus, Bollinger took advantage of the time off from the office to turn his attention to painting and posting pictures of his finished works on social media. He says with a laugh that he calls the pictures he has painted during the shutdown his “Corona Period” paintings. One of them, a lion, he painted a second time for a


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

7

woman who wanted to purchase it. Bollinger does not come across as someone who pauses to consider, or even notice, any obstacles that may be in his path. He wants to try something, gain a new skill, expand his horizons, and he simply does it. Always looking for ways to increase his knowledge and skills, his venture into the world of cheesecakes started with his sweet tooth. One day, Bollinger wandered into the kitchen in search of something sweet to enjoy. When he did not find anything to his liking, he realized he really felt like having cheesecake. He started going through cookbooks, found a recipe for a marble cheesecake, and baked his first cheesecake. That first cheesecake was close to 30 years ago, and 37 different flavors of cheesecake were to follow. He says that his wife, Debbie, “can make them almost as good as I can.” He freely admits, however, that Debbie is the one who has the decorating skills that make their cheesecakes beautiful. Soon, they were selling Debbie Bollinger’s favorite of her husband’s paintings. cheesecakes to area restaurants between 2008 and 2013. Before even being asked, hours at his Wyers-Bollinger Funeral Chapel in Elyria, Bollinger will firmly say that his cheesecake recipes where the deceased are directly cared for and are not something he shares. embalmed. As well as sharing the kitchen, the Bollingers both Mark Bollinger also is involved with several area work in the family business. charitable organizations, such as the Free Masons, Debbie works at Bollinger Funeral Goods and the Brunswick Eagles and the Brunswick Lions. Services in Brunswick, which serves as a showroom and planning location. No decedents are ever at the Brunswick location. Mark spends most of his working continued, Page 8


8

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

continued from Page 7

is that members get to meet the children they are working to help. “It was just so rewarding (meeting the children),” Bollinger said. He is a member of the 22nd District Association of Free Masons, which covers Cuyahoga and Lorain Counties. Bollinger said that after World War II, it was much more common for people to join civic organizations. Now, those organizations struggle to recruit new members. “All of them struggle to get members,” he said. In the 1940s, the Free Masons had 200,000 members, now it has approximately 80,000 members. He said that one of the reasons the Masons in particular have trouble gaining members is because current members are not allowed to recruit or discuss the organization. “It’s not a secret organization, it’s an organization with secrets,” Bollinger said. There has been an increase in interest from younger people in recent years, and he theorizes that it is because so much information is now Debbie and Mark Bollinger in the kitchen where they have made so available on the internet that anyone interested many cheesecakes. in the organization can easily learn about it. He He joined the Free Masons when he was 23 years old. said he also thinks it is because more people are Bollinger said his father was a very active Free Mason, looking for in-person connections with others. rd achieving 33 degree status. “You can’t live with all of this electronic stuff,” “I followed in his footsteps,” Bollinger said, “I’ve taken Bollinger said, adding that people need to have what he did and taken it up to the next level.” contact with others. rd Bollinger also achieved 33 degree status through the Bollinger said that several organizations Scottish Rite and has been an officer for the Free Masons, contacted him recently, asking him to join or to as well as a district officer. take the lead, but, at age 58, he has been reHe said the Free Masons is the oldest and largest evaluating his life. fraternity in the world and it acts primarily as a charity “This whole COVID thing gave me a lot more with the motto of “making good men better.” He said the time,” he said, adding, “I think it’s time to slow name is a reference to stone masons and how a building down.” is constructed; the organization encourages members to During the months of the COVID-19 shutdown, build upon themselves. he said he has discovered that he does not Bollinger also has been a post potentate for the Al always have to be busy. He has learned the value Koran Shrine of the Shriners. Al Koran covers 16 counties. of enjoying quiet time at home. One of the things he enjoys the most about the Shriners


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

9

Mark Bollinger astride his Honda Shadow.

“This has kind of taught me that it’s OK to sit back and relax,” Bollinger said. Besides painting and baking during the shutdown, the Bollingers have had time to pursue additional interests They both enjoy short rides on Mark’s Honda Shadow motorcycle, complete with handlebar fringe. Debbie enjoys assembling puzzles, Mark is captivated by Sudoku puzzles. Last February, just before the shutdown took place, they adopted Abby, a rescued Shih Tzu dog. Abby makes it clear how much she enjoys having her family home with her.

No one seems happier than Debbie, though, who expressed dismay over the numerous social media posts from women during the shutdown exclaiming aggravation at having their husbands home so much. Debbie gently kisses the top of Mark’s head as he lounges on the sofa and says how happy she is to have him home more, and she is enjoying sharing so much time with him. “I’m glad to have him home, I’ve enjoyed it,” she said with an unmistakable tenderness that leaves no doubt how much the two love each other, 26 years after the “I do’s.”


10

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

11

THE READING NOOK

Toby’s Story by Amy Barnes

Editor’s note: This month’s story includes a suicide and may be a difficult subject for some readers. It is hoped that it will open the door for a discussion of the finality of such a decision, how far its ripples extend, and of ways to get help. If you, or someone you know, is feeling suicidal or would just like someone to listen, please click here https://bit.ly/3mjo4NS for local options or call 211.

His smile was the kind that pulled you in and made you smile too, even when you were having a really horrible day. When no one else at school liked you, ’ve been thinking about him a lot lately. I’m not Toby liked you. He is one of the few people I have sure why. ever met who truly had a heart of gold. Perhaps because I know that if he were still alive, When I was a contestant for Hay Day Queen in a tiny he would care that I was alone. He would care that I little Oklahoma town, no one would agree to be my have children and I struggle against what seems escort. Toby did. impossible odds. Even though he did not have any faith that I would I know he would be a friend to me. Perhaps this was the time of year he died, although win, he agreed to be my escort because our families were friends. That is the only time I ever was I’m not really sure when he died. I was told of his death long after the fact. No one knew how deeply I disappointed in him. When I won and was crowned queen, I felt a certain would feel it. I know he didn’t have any idea that his triumph at the surprise on his face. We ended up death would affect me in the slightest. spending several platonic hours together that This is a lesson on speaking out to those you care about, even when it puts you at risk of being hurt or afternoon and evening. I didn’t know I was never to rejected. This is a lesson that every suicide has ripple see him again. My aunt had hoped that one day there would be a effects that no one can ever guess at. wedding. But it was not to be, I don’t even know why This is a lesson that bears learning, especially for she ever came up with the idea of us marrying. Toby those who are suicidal. That the pain they leave graduated from high school, I lost track of him, being behind, the pain they are not able to handle, does absorbed in my own future plans. I eventually left for not disappear with their deaths but instead grows college. and is spread in ripples throughout all who knew It was while I was at college that I got a phone call them, who care about them, who love them and it one night. never, ever goes away. Casual news from home. Toby was the kind of kid in school whom everyone And, oh, by the way, Toby is dead. loved. He was everyone’s friend. The shock was so intense, I could feel my heart stop He was a couple of years ahead of me, and I never as I tried to take a breath. I have no memory of saw anyone ever get mad at him or heard a single anything else from that evening except my voice word against him.

I


12

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

“If you are going to argue in front of me, at least make it interesting.”

“Are you ready to go to college?” “Yes! Independence, independence!!” “And then what are you going to do?” “Get scared, and call you when I go to do my first load of laundry!”

“You’ve got to understand that, from my point of view, everyone else is odd, not me.”

asking, “How?” and the casual voice on the other end of the phone explaining that he had taken a shotgun, put it in his mouth, and pulled the trigger. My aunt was one of the ones who responded to the call and saw what was left of Toby. She never did quite recover from it. I was told there was no note, that no one knew the why. They told me later that his older brother had a very rough time dealing with it. But that is all I was ever told, leaving me with so many unanswered questions. Now, all of these years later, I came across a picture of him in some old things of my aunt’s. A beautiful picture of Toby at his finest. In a suit and with his huge smile for his senior picture. It made me smile, partly because I had not realized how much I’d missed his smile and partly because it reminded me of a story he had once told me. One of Toby’s favorite things to do was to go to the malls in Tulsa with a friend. They would go to the fanciest men’s clothing stores and ask to try on suits. He liked to see how he would be treated. Most of the time he said he was not treated with much respect. But I remember him talking about one store where he was very well treated. He laughed about it because he was treated like he was royalty. But then he said in a quiet voice that if he ever had money, that was where he was going to shop. That was Toby, too, full of dreams and hope. I put the picture I found in a frame that has “Best Friends” on it, even though we were never really best friends. It is more about the friendship that could have been, that should have been, and what I never told him because I never took the chance. I never told him that if he ever needed help, if he ever needed someone to talk to, I would be there for him, that I was his friend. I wonder how many knew beyond any doubt they were considered friends by Toby, but how many did he know were friends for him? It is a part of Toby’s legacy that I learned to not hold back, to always take that chance and share my feelings, whether it is friendship or love or both. Sometimes it is that one moment, the chance that you take a deep breath and grab, that can mean the most.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Medina Fiber

Blazing fast internet! Our pure fiber to the home network delivers unparalleled performance, symmetrical download and upload speeds, and game changing low latency. Sign up for service or take our survey today by pointing your phone camera at the QR code in the corner of this ad.

13


14

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Emily Sheets, of Streetsboro, shows off her new tarantula to her boyfriend, Edgar Vargas, also of Streetsboro. photo by Allison WaltzBoebel

Community members were treated to the Cleveland Reptile Show, which moved its August show to the Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina, so there would be more space for social distancing, as per the governor’s mandate.

Herps Alive Foundation volunteer and outreach coordinator Brittany Reynolds, left, of Tallmadge, holds up a red tegu lizard for Tyler Keigans and his girlfriend, Rachel Skufca, both of Euclid. The foundation is a Sharah Mayle, of Goodyear Heights, and her children Soren (baseball nonprofit that rescues, rehabilitates and rehomes reptiles cap), 5, Skylarr (center), 9, and Royce (far right), 8, get a closer look at the and amphibians and offers education about reptiles. photo reptiles. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel by Allison Waltz-Boebel


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Twelve-year-old Abby Mock carefully holds a pied male snake as her 13-year-old brother, Dylan, and mother, Jennifer, watch. They came from North Ridgeville for the show. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

15

Carolyn Heller, lead coordinator for the Wadsworth Northside Christian Church drivethrough food pantry, checks in those waiting for food. Heller said food bank coordinators are trying to get the word out that they have food available for those in need. photo by FlashBang Photography

Brenda Marshall, left, and Janet Steffy fill bags for the drive-through Wadsworth Northside Christian Church food pantry that distributes food to those in need. photo by FlashBang Photography

While Logan Farr hauls boxes to the trash bin, carts of food are rolled out to waiting cars by, from left, Ernie Runyon, Craig Miller and Chuck Troutman. photo by FlashBang Photography

continued, Page 16


16

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

continued from Page 15

Tara Grill and her 6-year-old daughter, Brynn Grill, of Brunswick Hills, pick sunflowers in Lamphear’s Landscaping’s sunflower field at 3344 Pearl Road, Medina. It was Lamphear’s first year to plant the field. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Alan McClure shows off his smile while directing cars at Feeding Medina County’s drive-through food bank at the Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

17

Hope Recovery Community sponsored an observation of International Overdose Awareness Day in the parking lot of Cornerstone Chapel, 3939 Granger Road, Medina. Community members were invited to attend and to bring photos and other pieces of memorabilia to honor loved ones who died from drug overdoses.

Stacey Sims, right, of Chatham, is consoled by Denise Breucker of Chardon. Sims lost her son to a drug overdose. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Kristina Sims, right, Chatham, and her mother-in-law, Denise Breucker, attended in memory of Sims’ brother, Anthony Sims, who died of an overdose. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

John Nimmo, Medina, comforts his daughter, Tessa, during the candlelight vigil. They were honoring Sarah Hoisington and Gage Markley, both of whom died from drug overdoses. Nimmo credits the two with getting him into recovery. Also attending were, on the left, Tori Conrad, Medina; on the right, beside Tessa Nimmo, Kim Tatro and Michelle Earhart, Medina. Conrad and Earhart are residents of Cathy’s House, a sober living facility in Medina. Tatro is a recovery coach and a resident coordinator at Cathy’s House. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Sammie Wonkovich and her 5-year-old son, Jay Martin, attended to honor Martin’s father, Kyle Martin, who died from an overdose. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel


18

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Breaking Down The Wall by Amy Barnes You have done your homework. decided on the kind of business you want to open and where to open it (see last month’s column for guidance on those steps, https://bit.ly/ 330v5dt ), and now it is time to make that dream come true. This is when many first-time entrepreneurs hit The Wall. Where to start? How to start? Hire a lawyer? What in the world is an EIN? Do I have to register with the state? All common questions for those comprehending the mysterious world of everyone-seems-to-know-what-they-are-doingexcept-me entrepreneurship. Several years ago, it was not very clear or easy to know what steps to take to open a business in Ohio. Small business entrepreneurs were left to flop around like fish on dry land, a lot of effort, not much progress. Then, in late 2015, Ohio business registration dropped from $125 to $99, and it changed to same-day registration, which eliminated the need for the $225 expedited fee. Ohio also made available an online step-by-step guide to opening a business, which you can access at https://bit.ly/ 35abRog . It includes definitions of business structures, such as sole proprietors, partnerships and limited partnerships; information on vendor’s licenses and sales tax; a template for writing a business plan; and more. The best way to digest the information in the guide is to take it one small bite at a time rather than try to handle too much too fast and become overwhelmed and defeated. It is possible for you to set up a business on your own if you take the time to understand each step before proceeding to the next one. An EIN, by the way, is an Employer Identification Number. It is like a Social Security number for a business. While some will advise that if it is a single-proprietor business, it is acceptable to use your own Social Security number, it is not a good idea. Getting an EIN can be as simple as letting the bank get one for you when you open a business banking account or you can follow the steps outlined on the state’s website.

Interested in writing this column? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.

A Better EXPerience. Blending Armstrong’s Zoom internet and television services with interactive access to your home entertainment, EXPisyour all-in-one entertainment answer! NO MORE SWITCHING INPUTS OR JUGGLING REMOTES! Get apps like Netflix®, Prime® Video, YouTube®, TubiTV, CuriosityStream® and more, directly on the EXPplatform. Easilystream or transfer your favorite shows to watch on all your devices!

R 1.855.524.1193

ArmstrongEXP.com

19


20

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Benefits of a 5G Network

Text Talk

by Austin Steger

by Bob Arnold

Technology is always changing and innovating in exciting ways. One of the biggest changes is the release of the 5G network, the latest generation of wireless network technology. On the market since April 2019, it continues to be rolled out across the US and other countries. Despite being available to consumers for more than a year, many people do not know exactly what 5G is, how it works, what its benefits are, and what it means for cell phones. Like 4G LTE, 5G is based on the same mobile networking principles. However, 5G can further reduce interference. It also brings wider bandwidths, allowing more devices to be

A friend of mine expressed to me this week that she has people talking in “text” mode to her. This made me very curious, so I asked how she knows. “Well, they can’t look me in the eye while talking, they throw in phrases like ‘smiley con’ instead of smiling, they abbreviate some phrases to just letters, and they are in a hurry to finish up what ends up being a short conversation,” she said. This intrigued me, so I did a little watching myself. Most of my friends and acquaintances do not communicate in the way she was saying, however, I did run across a couple of people who could be classified as a text talk sort of person.

connected, and allows operating in both higher and lower bands and brings extreme capacity, high speeds, and low latency. Latency is the time it takes for a device to make a request and get a response from a server. Not only is 5G faster than 4G LTE, but it also can expand into new service areas, increasing cell services. The main advantage with 5G is the speed. It could deliver speeds up to 20 gigabits per second and average speeds of more than 100 megabits per second (https://bit.ly/2EtJTcm). A video or podcast could be downloaded in seconds. Along with the increased speed, 5G can support 100 times more traffic on the network. In order to take advantage of all the benefits that 5G has to offer, it means having a 5G-capable smartphone. All major Android phone manufacturers already are making 5Gcompatible phones. The good news is that 5G smartphones will be compatible with 4G LTE service, and 4G will not be going away anytime soon, so an upgrade is not immediately necessary. Before switching to a 5G smartphone, check with your service to ensure 5G service is available in your area. It is estimated that by 2035, 5G will support a wide range of industries and potentially enable up to $13.2 trillion worth of goods and services (https://bit.ly/2EtJTcm). This is significantly greater than previous network generations. It also is estimated that 5G alone could support up to 22.3 million jobs including equipment manufacturers, operators, content creators, and app developers.

So, what is going on here? It seems that the orders we have been given of avoiding personal contact with people has had an unintended effect on our ability to communicate. Instead, we resorted to texting, group virtual calling, video calling, and more. Texting is, by far, the solution we have resorted to the most. Is it possible that when we text others so much that we can get caught up in text talk? While I have not found any real studies on this phenomenon yet, I do see that the texting mode could weave itself into our face-to-face relationships. Our minds adapt to the ways we communicate, and if we desire having good conversations with other people, we need to be cautious of letting our style of text messaging get in the way of talking with someone. Two things that will go a long way in keeping conversations real are maintaining eye contact and focusing on the person in front of you. Maintaining eye contact creates connections, and connections will create interest. Thus, when you are interested in something another person is saying, you will tend to be more real as you talk. Make sure you are focused on the person in front of you and not on the person you need to text a message to as soon as the person in front of you is finished. This distracts the brain and confuses your attention.

Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330-952-1225.

T

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https:// amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Sausage and Peppers photo and column by Amy Barnes Feeling like you missed out on summer fair food and still craving sloppy sausage sandwiches? This recipe is low on prep time and perfect to answer those insistent cravings. • • 1 28-ounce can chopped tomatoes, divided in half • 1 to 2 pounds smoked sausage • 2 large or 5 small onions, cut in eighths or quarters • 6 green peppers, seeded and quartered • garlic to taste Line slow cooker with slow-cooker bag for easy cleanup. Pour half of tomatoes into slow cooker. Place sausage, cut in approximately 5-inch long pieces, on top of tomatoes. Add onions and green peppers. Top with remainder of tomatoes. Add garlic according to taste. Cover and cook on low setting for approximately 4 to 6 hours. Serve on hoagie buns for sandwiches or great with rice for more of an all-in-a-bowl meal. Note: Fresh tomatoes can be substituted for canned. Use five medium to large tomatoes. Dip tomatoes in boiling water for approximately 1 minute, dip into ice water, and peel. Once peeled, quarter and follow recipe instructions for adding tomatoes. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made it your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to anyone who would like to submit a recipe.

21


22

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Return of the Mum

A

photos and column by Michelle Riley When you are in need of a showy fall perennial, the garden mum or hardy mum fits the bill. Not only do they attract butterflies and other great pollinators, they also are deer resistant. Keep in mind that deer resistant means the deer will more than likely not touch these perennials, though the chance still exists that they might. In the fall, mums are vibrantly displayed by vendors in an array of colors and sizes and sold as annuals for fall dĂŠcor. Would you like to plant them in your garden and have them return year after year? The trick is planting them in the spring. When a garden mum is purchased and planted in the fall, the mum does not have time to establish a strong enough root system to carry it through the winter into spring. They can be picky little plants as well. Garden mums love a well-drained soil and are not fond of clay. Being shallow rooted, the garden mum also needs consistent attention paid to its water needs as they can dry out very easily. Adding a good compost or soil conditioner to the soil when planting should aid in proper drainage. In addition to well-drained soil, the garden mum also will require six or more hours of sunlight to thrive. The more sun, the better, while keeping an eye on watering needs. Mulch using a 2-inch layer of straw or shredded bark mulch to help retain moisture. Feed in the spring using a water-soluble fertilizer, and repeat this process every four to six weeks through fall bloom. Clip the dead flowers back after the first hard frost and bury the plant in 3 to 4 inches of straw or shredded bark mulch for the winter. Uncover the plant in the spring, and trim back the dead stems. It is best to divide mums in early spring when just leafing out. The garden mum prefers its space and does not like to be in close proximity to other plants. If your mums have become floppy, you can shear them back through early July for a more compact plant.

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com; and NeOhioGarden.com. She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

Bike Hunting

N

23

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

Regain Control of Your Day

by Robert Soroky

by Kelly Bailey

By now, you probably have noticed that there are more people outdoors than ever before. Walkers, runners, hikers, kayakers, and bikers. The upside? People are exercising, experiencing nature and, hopefully, enjoying a new and healthy hobby they will continue well into the future. The downside? Try buying a bike right now. Or a kayak. Or a swimming pool. Or anything outdoorsy. No such luck, right? With most events shut down for the foreseeable future, it is no mystery that retailers of solo outdoor gear and equipment have seen record sales through the first half of

You just got on a healthy schedule of working out and eating better, and BAM! Schedule change! Maybe it is caused by a new job or by the kids sort of going back to school, but whatever the cause, a shake-up in routine has the potential of disrupting healthy habits. The old adage says that nothing in life is constant except for change, but humans are creatures of habit. We often struggle with transitioning from one schedule to another. Below are five ways to smooth the transition, decrease stress and increase the likelihood of success in maintaining a workout routine and eating better. 1. Sit down with a daily planner and create a flexible daily outline. What time will you get up? When will you plan and pack lunches? What time of day will you work out? What time will you go to bed? I cannot emphasize enough the importance of brainstorming a new routine. 2. Immediately get on a regular sleep schedule. Go to bed at the same time every night, and get up at the same time every morning. 3. Immediately get on a regular schedule of eating. Meals are often the first thing to go during hectic times. The result is a ravenous appetite later in the day. Couple that with the extra stress of a chaotic schedule, and poor food choices are bound to happen. Carve out at least 15 minutes for each meal and eat at the same times each day. 4. Plan meals ahead or have healthy options that are ready to grab and go. My work schedule has meant that I have been living out of my truck this summer. To keep myself well-fueled, I stock up on foods that are easy to throw into a cooler: hard boiled eggs, beef jerky, apples, oranges, carrot sticks, and single-serve packages of peanut butter, cottage cheese, yogurt, hummus, and string cheese. 5. Embrace the challenge. Recognize that change is hard. Give yourself a smidge of grace for a week or two while adjusting to a new schedule.

2020. Now that we are entering the back half of the year, though, most of that product is, well, gone. The first thing to remember when you start shopping is to be patient. Yes, that is a tough ask as we are a “give it to me now� culture. But consider that the shortages happening in local stores also are happening worldwide. When it comes to bikes, the fact that everyone and their mother became a cyclist this year created such a gigantic leap in demand that it caught everyone off guard. In fact, most manufactures have now thrown in the towel on 2020 models. They know they will never catch up to demand. As a result, bike retailers currently are taking preorders for 2021 model bicycles. Even if pre-ordering, there is a good chance you will not have that bike until 2021. Of course, you can wait till closer to the holidays and hope to find a bike in stock, but since most bike shops are filling back-order lists now, the likelihood of any bikes making it to the showroom floor as stock is iffy at best. My recommendation? Get on a back-order list as it may be the only way you see a new bike anytime soon. Next, if you have an old bike, tune it up. At least then, you can ride through the rest of 2020 while waiting for your new bike to kick off 2021. Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

P


24

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Mission of Rescue, Education by Kent Von der Vellen

25

Editor’s note: Information is from the nonprofit’s most recent filings with the Ohio attorney general.

Buckeye’s Mission

4866 Center Road Brunswick 44212 Connie Richendollar has always been a dog lover. 440-344-2686 In high school, Richendollar helped save dogs by https://bit.ly/3jCe3sI volunteering to transport them from high-kill to low- or nokill facilities in Ohio and Pennsylvania. Date of formation: 01/22/2016 After college, she did fundraising and dog sitting. Organization type: 501(c)(3) Following the death of her golden retriever, Richendollar Description of Organization’s Purpose: to rescue homeless rescued a pit bull and named him Buckeye, and he quickly dogs from shelters from across the country, to rehabilitate and became a loving member of the family. Unfortunately, provide training for these dogs for the purpose of rehoming Buckeye soon died from cardiovascular disease. them. These dogs will be vaccinated, neutered/spayed and Buckeye became the motivation for Richendollar to start a microchipped prior to adoption dog rescue. Is the organization's registration status current? Yes In 2015, Richendollar bought a house with almost three acres of land to become Buckeye’s Missions and Sanctuary in Reporting Year: 2019 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2019 Brunswick. Dogs rescued are not specific breeds, cannot have a history Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 Total Revenue: $27,872.00 of biting, and should be comfortable around people and Total Expenses: $19,761.00 other dogs. Total Program Expenses: $19,761.00 Richendollar’s years of volunteering gave her contacts in Percent of Total Expenses: 100% animal shelters, who contact her when they have potential Total Assets: $23,213.00 rescues. To adopt a dog, an application must be completed, an inshelter visit with the dog and prospective adopter must happen, and Richendollar conducts a home visit to assess the environment, even talking with the potential adopter’s neighbors. Rescues are kept at Buckeye’s Missions or are placed with foster families, depending on each rescue’s needs. Dogs at the rescue are separated based on size, behavior and personality. A professional dog trainer visits weekly to assess the dogs, identify problems and teach handling techniques. Richendollar said the rescue had a shepherd that kept trying to herd the other dogs. The trainer pointed out this was stressing some of the dogs, while others were doing well. Learning different traits and behaviors helps the staff create a better environment for the dogs. Buckeye’s Missions visits schools and participates in community events to educate people on how to treat dogs and better understand their behavior. There are plans for summer camps for children to come play and learn how to care for dogs. Buckeye’s Missions Too was founded as the fundraising arm of the nonprofit and provides day care, boarding and grooming services. Proceeds fund Buckeye’s Missions and Sanctuary. Additional funding for the rescue comes from the community. For more information or to donate, go to https://bit.ly/3jCe3sI or https://bit.ly/3bgxi8t . Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.


26

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

MIRTH AND JOY

More Than Sandwiches

by Jerry King

by Hunter Barnard For this month’s review, I watched the newest Scooby-Doo movie “Scoob!” and I thought it was really exciting. I liked it a lot. I liked Scooby-Doo before this movie, and it was really cool to see him and his friends in a new adventure. The movie started when they were all kids and that was really cool because you got to see how they all became friends. Scooby and Shaggy were not even friends at the very beginning. My favorite character in the movie was Scooby-Doo. He is a good friend, and he was very funny. He talked in a silly way that I thought was pretty cool. The rest of the gang was really cool, too, because they were each good at something. Eventually, the gang gets separated and Scooby and Shaggy have a chance to show that they can be really helpful instead of just eating sandwiches. That was nice, but it was sad, too, because it meant they were on their own and not with their friends. Even though they were separated, they all still had to fight the same bad guy. Scooby and Shaggy fought the bad guy from a cool spaceship while the rest of the gang was trying to find them. The bad guy had a big spaceship, too, but he had lots of robots. He was a really bad guy, but the robots he had were kind of cute and some of them were nice, too. Scooby and Shaggy eventually got to be with their friends again. This adventure was a little different from their other adventures, but I still liked watching it. The ending was really good, and they got some cool new things. I hope there is another Scooby-Doo movie made so there will be more new Scooby-Doo stories like this movie.

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

E

27


28

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: IN THE STUDIO

Fall Tree Dab by Kariem Farrakhan II It is that time of year. The leaves are changing color and all skill levels of crafters and artists are getting in the mood for creating. By following these instructions, step-by-step with a group of friends, you can have a fall-themed painting party in the comfort of your own home or you can enjoy the solitude of creating it on your own and surprising someone with your newly created art. Materials needed for this project are a 16-inch-by 20-inch canvas; acrylic paint in red, orange, yellow, light green, sky blue, black, and white; paint brushes, a large flat, a medium flat, and a small round detail; a sponge; and a pencil. The first step, Photo 1, is to use the large paint brush to cover the canvas with a range of fall colors with yellow on the bottom and top. After that layer is dry, use black paint and a small paintbrush to paint in tree masses, Photo 2. It may help to use a pencil to draw in the shapes first, then paint them in, or use transfer paper to get the trees exactly how you want them. If you are not familiar with transfer paper and how to use it, you can find instructions on Page 28 of the September 2020 issue of this magazine or by using this link https:// bit.ly/3jgIrZM Next, use the sponge to dab yellow, green, orange, red, and black leaves all around the trees to create that deep, autumn forest effect, Photo 3. Finally, make sure the trees are dry and use a medium sized, flat paintbrush and horizontal brushstrokes to give color to the tree trunks, Photo 4. Use any combination of colors to your heart’s content. Use the same technique on the ground underneath the trees, and wrap up by using a sponge to dab white paint into the areas around the tree branches. Perfect this style of tree painting to add a fall flair to any room’s décor. Have fun! Kariem Farrakhan II is a Wadsworth artist who has experience creating art using a variety of media and enjoys sharing his knowledge, while continuing to learn. He is the art director for The Spirited Palette, https://thespiritedpalette.com/, and maintains his own solo platform at The Indigo Kid, https:// theindigokid.com/. He can be reached at kariem @thespiritedpalette.com or by calling 330-329-3930.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Joyful Word Search Making His Mark

MODEL PAINTER BAKER FUNERAL DIRECTOR POLE VAULT CLEVELAND SURGEON BRUNSWICK

LAW STUDENT COACH FAMILY CHEESECAKE FOOTBALL GENERATIONS FAIRVIEW LEGACY

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Tony Tall

29


30

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

October 2020 Nonprofit Calendar Thursday, October 1 National Homemade Cookies Day https://bit.ly/3k114RP Start your mixers and ovens! Virtual Music Therapy, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Required link will be emailed to registered participants by October 1. Learn about music therapy with adults. Register at https://bit.ly/3hrnCcx Friday, October 2 National Produce Misting Day https://bit.ly/3m3mBeu In 1979, an automatic misting system for produce was introduced, with the added bonus of unexpected showers for shoppers! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, October 3 National Techies Day https://bit.ly/2ZgRXV1 Celebrate those who are called at all hours of the day and night with: “Hellllppp! My computer is not working!! You have to fix this!” Into the Light: Human Trafficking Mythbuster Awareness Event, 9 .am. to 11:30 a.m., Heartland Community Church – Weymouth Campus, 3400 Weymouth Road, Medina. Drive-in style, socially distanced event. Not appropriate for children. Broadcast through FM transmitter, sit in car if bad weather, bring lawn chair and sit outside if good. Speakers will share human trafficking stores based on their work with survivors. Sunday, October 4 Taco Day https://bit.ly/3h5Cj4L Just making clear, in addition to, not replacing, Taco Tuesday. Monday, October 5 National Get Funky Day https://bit.ly/35bbWbz What more needs to be said? American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Sherlock Holmes Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Required link will be e-mailed on October 2. Have a pad of paper or whiteboard to show your answers. Register at https://bit.ly/3mjzlNT Tuesday, October 6 National Noodle Day https://bit.ly/3ib8z81 and Mad Hatter Day https://bit.ly/3jSpsos Celebrate by covering your noodle (head) with a hat! Or enjoy a noodle dish while wearing a hat. Wednesday, October 7

National Pumpkin Seed Day https://bit.ly/3bDuFNS Thoroughly wash all pulp from seeds, dry, and roast in 300-degree oven for about 45 minutes, stir a few times while cooking to evenly roast. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Create! Hack Your Games, 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Create new games using game board and pieces from other games. View at https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH Virtual ORMACO Samuel Salsbury: North Indian Sarangi, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Indian classical music concert and talk. A 125-year-old sarangi, a North India bowed string instrument, will be played. Link and passcode at https://bit.ly/2FjUnvu Thursday, October 8 American Touch Tag Day https://bit.ly/35d30lN Ever notice how every game of touch tag somehow ends up being tackle tag? American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Friday, October 9 R Moldy Cheese Day https://bit.ly/3jUTB6v Ewww. Saturday, October 10 National I Love Yarn Day https://bit.ly/333Ubs4 Especially when it is knitted into a nice, warm sweater or blanket! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Sunday, October 11 National Spread Joy Day https://bit.ly/35elLVX Of course, this would happen to be one of our favorite holidays, here at Joy of Medina County Magazine headquarters! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Old Fire Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual ORMACO John Doscher: The Mandolin and Bluegrass Music, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., live stream. Log in at https://bit.ly/3cAp1Mx The


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020 concert is free, but donations are needed. Donations can be made by calling 330-722-2541 or at https://bit.ly/3buoBWF Monday, October 12 Old Farmers Day https://bit.ly/2DBYGBd , Moment of Frustration Day https://bit.ly/33aHRX3 and Cookbook Launch Day https://bit.ly/3bA8tV3 Observe all three: Buy food from a local farmer, get frustrated because the recipe does not come out as expected, and launch the cookbook into the trash! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Art in the Afternoon: Art Weaving, 4 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Learn

31

A Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 14 through October 4, 2020 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV

Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 23 through September 26 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk

about abstract art, make two different art works that are then woven into new art piece. View at https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH Tuesday, October 13 International Skeptics Day https://bit.ly/35kLZq9 I doubt that! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Child and Infant CPR Non-Certified Training, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Covers how to respond to choking and other hazards. Free. Adults only. Registration required, 330-723-9688, Option 4. Virtual Alphabet Adventure: W is for Web, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Learn about the letter W and have web-weaving fun. Enjoy story about Walter the spider, sing songs, examine webs, make crafts, learn how to make a spider treat at home. Register to get craft materials packet to pick up at drive-up window or in Children’s Department. Register at https://bit.ly/3hvUj8T View program at https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH One Community, Many Stories: Virtual Visit With Margaret Peterson Haddix, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Meet author of “Remarkables,” “Into the Gauntlet,” the “Missing” series, and the “Children of Exile” series. Register to get required meeting link at https://bit.ly/3htSbhY Wednesday, October 14 National Fossil Day https://bit.ly/2R4SsNm and National Take Your Parents to Lunch Day https://bit.ly/3i8oFPR We are not saying one word about you could have fun mentioning how these two

Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Thursday, October 15 National Grouch Day https://bit.ly/328nxpH Enjoy a good grouch, a perfect activity for when you are alone. Use the link for some interesting grouch facts. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Virtual Tween Scene: That’s Gross! 4 p.m. to 4:20 p.m. Learn gross facts, make fake scabs and other creepy stuff. View at

observations could connect. Not…one…word. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on

https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH Friday, October 16 Dictionary Day https://bit.ly/33lZFi3 We have words for that! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road,

Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, June 6 through October 17 Medina Public Square Main Street Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 23 through October 31 Medina VFW Post 5137 3916 Pearl Road, Medina Parking next door: 3950 Pearl Road, Medina

Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 13 through September 26 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc


32

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Saturday, October 17 Wear Something Gaudy Day https://bit.ly/2R0OwgN Time to combine your favorite sparkly accessories with your most colorful clothes! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, through October 18, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Unbridled: Horses Empowering Women, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Forever Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary, 1133 Granger Road, Medina. Subject: Marriage and Relationships. Ages 21 and older. Seating limited to 10. $50. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/2UlJ8XF Sunday, October 18

Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mlWJdS Virtual Job Searching During a Pandemic, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Learn the ins and outs of job searching during the pandemic, how to research employers, complete applications, more. Register to get required meeting link at https://bit.ly/2FAIotb Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. To register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/3bWVexL Virtual Getting Started With Family Search, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Learn how to navigate free genealogy site. Register for required P meeting link at https://bit.ly/3iuvRFX Wednesday, October 21 Babbling Day https://bit.ly/3m05zOk and Count Your Buttons Day https://bit.ly/2FjwnYE If working from home, no one will care, but if

No Beard Day https://bit.ly/35bljbf perhaps because it also is National Chocolate Cupcake Day https://bit.ly/3h5Oqif Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, last day, Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. An easy walk to enjoy nature, signs along Lake Loop nature trail will mark points of interest, with one having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU ORMACO Open House, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., 8187 Camp Road, Homerville. Tour of the grounds, music by Homerville All Strings Band. Bring lawn chair, social distancing enforced. Free, donations encouraged. For more information, call 419-853-6016. For more information about ORMACO, go to https://bit.ly/3m1B625 Monday, October 19 National Clean Out Your Virtual Desktop Day https://bit.ly/2R01c7A Might as well clean off the actual desktop, too. That way you can spend all of the next day trying to find everything you cleaned out and off of both! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina Fire Station No. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. By appointment only, call 330723-9688 Virtual Let’s Explore: Spooky Science, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Read story and make erupting slime, a screaming balloon, a diving ghost, fluffy Halloween slime. Register to get craft materials packet to pick up at drive-up window or in Children’s Department. Register at

working in an office, we suggest perhaps not combining these two, or you might be thought to be celebrating the next day’s holiday early! Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! through October 24, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mlWJdS American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Thursday, October 22 National Nut Day https://bit.ly/3icharg Officially celebrating edible nuts, but it also is a great day to celebrate kooky, fun friends. Pecan pie recipe at https://bit.ly/3bN3z7r Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! through October 24, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mlWJdS Virtual Escape Room: It’s a Road Trip, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Do on your own or challenge a friend to beat your time. Register for link and instructions at https://bit.ly/32rscDi See tutorial here: https://bit.ly/ 3mhadYe Virtual Resumes During a Pandemic, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Learn about building a resume, common myths, different styles, key words and features, more. Register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/32v0Zjf Virtual Explorastory: Leaf Man, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Read Leaf Man story, play leaf-matching game, learn how to go on a leaf scavenger

https://bit.ly/2Fj6eKf View program at https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH Tuesday, October 20 International Sloth Day https://bit.ly/3h8VWZU Go ahead, take your time, and reward all of your hard work with an activity that is not work. Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! through October 24, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,

hunt and how to make a leaf person. Register to get craft materials packet to pick up at drive-up window or in Children’s Department. Register at https://bit.ly/2ZAQ6dH View program at https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH Friday, October 23


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

33

National Mole Day https://bit.ly/35gWvPc Starts at 6:02 a.m. and ends at 6:02 p.m. Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! through October 24, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mlWJdS American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina E Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, October 24 Make a Difference Day https://bit.ly/3h9USVs Celebrate by making a list of all the things others do that make a difference for you, then send them thank you notes. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek,

2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/ 2ybO4Rp Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., with Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. View at https://bit.ly/31UI67W Tuesday, October 27 Navy Day https://bit.ly/3bDkx7P Thank you for your service and for giving so much to this country. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will

6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! last day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mlWJdS One Community, Many Stories: Virtual Ask the MCDL Genealogy Team, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Team will answer family history questions, share tips. Register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/32rCgw8 ORMACO World Tour of Music: Alla Boara (Italian folk songs) with The Boardman High School Jazz Band, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Reservations recommended by calling 330-722-2541 or at https://bit.ly/2Z4XPzL Free. Sunday, October 25 National No Workplace Drama Day https://bit.ly/328QlhU Can your workplace meet the challenge? Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU

help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owl-themed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual: Monsters are Fun! 7 p.m. Listen to funny monster story, learn how to make cool monster crafts and monster sandwich. Register to get craft materials packet to pick up at drive-up window or in Children’s Department. Register at https://bit.ly/3ivqVkf View program at F https://bit.ly/2DXUJqH Wednesday, October 28 National Chocolate Day https://bit.ly/35esSxL Seems like this should be on Halloween, or it is a great excuse to eat chocolate twice! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign

Monday, October 26 Howl at the Moon Day and Night https://bit.ly/3hgOQTn Observe this one only if you really want your neighbors calling the police! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open,

having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center,


34

Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owl-themed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. S https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Thursday, October 29 Hermit Day https://bit.ly/35lTe0G You will have to celebrate on your own. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will

that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Virtual Interviewing During a Pandemic, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Presenter is Lisa Maida who has worked more than 25 years in various human resources departments and as an adjunct University of Akron professor. Register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/33uRyzo Writer Series: Virtual Brainstorming Story Ideas, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Bounce an idea off of other writers, get inspired for next story. Register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/3khtIOE Friday, October 30 National Candy Corn Day https://bit.ly/3iclE14 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU

help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owl-themed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to

Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owl-themed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Saturday, October 31 Halloween and National Doorbell Day https://bit.ly/3jYkbfk Well, that makes sense! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 1, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/ 2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owl-themed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2020

35

R

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Medical Massage

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

238 S. Elmwood Avenue, Medina (Inside GotMilt Health and Fitness) Phone: 330-461-0769 Website: www.KnotYourself.com

Dentist

Allison Waltz Photography

Armstrong

Knot Yourself

Photographer

Landry Family Dentistry 5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Phone: 567-203-2287 Website: https://www.allisonwaltz.com/

FlashBang Photography/ Videography Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

Renovations

North Shore Renovations Phone: 216-676-4700 Renovations and 24-hour emergency service Website: https://nsr911.com/

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio


Click on “follow” below so you don’t miss a single edition of Joy of Medina County Magazine! Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2020