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OCTOBER 2019 VOLUME 2, NUMBER 9

A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.

$11.99


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 9 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

When the KKK Came Calling by Amy Barnes Late one night, the leader of the local Ku Klux Klan visited my mother when she was alone in the newspaper office. Our lives were about to change, and I was about to find my calling. He told her that if our family’s paper continued publishing and covering actions the city council and police department took, things would be very dangerous for our family. Since he also was the town’s chief of police at the time, the threat was particularly frightening. My mother and aunt asked my sister and me what we wanted them to do. Since we were included in the threat and were alone at the farmhouse when they were at the newspaper office, they thought we should decide. Without hesitation, my sister and I said to continue publishing. It became one of my life’s defining moments. Because we kept publishing, despite our fear, our town was changed and so were we. Council meetings changed from a group of old men gathered tightly around a small table muttering to each other to the council members following meeting laws. Secret votes and backdoor meetings ended. My half-deaf aunt, who was purposefully chosen to cover council meetings, made sure they spoke loud enough to be heard, and the public learned what elected officials were doing. Police actions and arrests were covered so the public became informed about how people were being treated. Changes were to come to the dog pound, too. Dogs at the pound were put to sleep by being closed in a 55-gallon steel drum that was connected by a hose to a truck’s exhaust pipe. As the men revved the truck’s engine, the dogs died. My family’s newspaper reported what was happening, and it was changed. Fewer dogs were put to sleep, and, when it had to be done, it was done by injection while the dogs were held. While in the last few decades, some newspapers and journalists have failed in their duty to remain objective and be thorough in their reporting, journalism as a whole has not lost its value as a gatekeeper and guardian of democracy. It means it is time to remind them of their duty, not time to abandon them. The Youngstown Vindicator newspaper’s closing on Aug. 31, 2019, should be a wake-up call to publishing companies that they need to change with the times and that the answer to saving publications lies not in bowing to advertisers but in listening to readers. It also should be a wake-up call to the public. Dedicated journalists know the threat to democracy and community that

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen INTERN Samantha Mickowski MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

the death of a newspaper signals, but does the public? Will it strike them when there is no local paper to cover their company’s event? Will it occur to them then that they should have advertised? When there is no paper to cover the story of their children’s sports teams winning championships, will it occur to them that they should have subscribed? Those who read their "news" for free from untrustworthy sources and advertise their businesses for free on social media are of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly forgetting the importance JOY by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and and value of the press. in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com When people turn to Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or publications for pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, donations, community manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned. involvement, or for someone who will investigate when they have been wronged, but those publications are no longer, will the far-away owners of social media platforms donate or care? What about those quiet little things that happen, that no one will know, because the newspaper no longer exists? Huntington House in Medina is being saved because Suzanne Sharpe read a newspaper article about its impending demolition. Recently, I was asked why I started a publication while others are failing. I answered, because I know the difference a publication can make. I did it because, many years ago, a little family in rural Oklahoma put their lives on the line, stood up to the KKK, and kept publishing. I did it because I believe in people, and from the comments I have been getting from the magazine’s readers, my belief is well placed.


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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

WITH A TWINKLE IN HIS EYE Jesse Smith can strum a song faster than you can find these words.

WISHING WELL WISHES FROM MEDINA FEST Our Wishing Well continues its travels, collecting wishes along the way. This time it was at Medina Fest.

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OF MIND AND BODY

FITNESS TRACKERS PROS AND CONS by Kelly Bailey Learning how to use tracking information in a positive way.

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HEALTHY TRAILS

CONSIDER RIDER TYPE AND GOALS IN BIKE CHOICE by Robert Soroky

GUITAR MAN

Learn about the different types of bicycles available and how to choose the best one for each kind of rider.

by Amy Barnes Meet the man whose love of music, learning, craftsmanship, and exotic woods keeps him building guitars and strumming his way into hearts and onto stages.

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THE READING NOOK

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by Robert Soroky

by Robert Soroky

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

OH, SNAP! photos by Amy Barnes and FlashBang Photography Medina County was hopping with a rope jumping team, a birthday for A.I. Root Candles, a food truck gathering, and more.

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KING LEONIDAS MEDITERRANEAN CHILI Hearty enough for warriors, this chili recipe has a strong Mediterranean influence.

RINGWORLD This month, an intriguing sci-fi short story begins.

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BITE ME!

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DOUBLE CHECK BEFORE APPLYING PADDLE by Paul McHam Here is what to do if condensation is found on the interior side of walls.

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX Can you solve the puzzle? Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

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DIG IT!

BOTANICAL FASHION SHOW BEGINS by Michelle Riley Best trees to plant for brilliant fall color.

THE IN BOX

STRUGGLING WITH IN OR ON by Steve Rak What is the difference between working in or on your business, and why is it important?

THE NETWORKER

KEYS TO NATURAL NETWORKING by Bob Arnold With these essential keys, it is easier to treat others as people instead of as businesses. On the Cover: photo by Samantha Mickowski Jesse Smith enjoys a rainy afternoon on his workshop porch. pumpkin photo by Steve Halama

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FALL FOLIAGE TOUR MAP

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GEMS

Time to enjoy fall and visit with pioneers, learn about a dairy farm and spinning wheels, try archery, and enjoy music, barns, antique cars, and alpacas.

BLINDNESS MADE THEM SEE by Kent Von Der Vellen When their daughter went blind, the Bonitz family saw a way to help others.

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LET’S DO IT! See how much you can do for free in Medina County!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Guitar Man by Amy Barnes photos by Samantha Mickowski

H

e eyes the row of old, worn guitars hanging in his workshop office. They each have a story, every scrape, every mark like scars on a body. Jesse Smith reaches out, takes one down, and tucks it into a natural embrace. In that simple movement, guitar and man become one. His eyes twinkle, and he starts strumming the strings and softly singing. It does not matter the song; he seems to know them all. He still has the guitar his father gave to him more than 30 years ago, although it was not his first guitar. Smith’s first guitar was a 1958 Gibson Melody Maker.

He sold it to a friend when he was 13 years old. The guitar changed hands many times and faded into the past. Then, one Christmas morning, 45 years later, there was a surprise waiting for him. It turned out that his wife, Cathy, had spent a lot of time tracking the guitar from owner to owner until she found it and bought it back so it could once again rest on Smith’s knee. Smith shakes his head in awe and appreciation for his wife’s tenacity and determination, smiling as he remembers that Christmas. The guitar his father gave him was from a trade. Henry Smith traded installing a carburetor in a car for the guitar that he gave his son.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Jesse Smith chuckles when he says that the guitar is hard to play, but he has kept it all of these years because of who gave it to him. “My dad had given it to me,” he says, simply, and that is enough. It was a gift from a father known for his hardness to a son who searched for love and acceptance. His father was a musician and mechanic from West Virginia. His mother, Kathrine, was from Hungary. He has one brother and three sisters. The family moved several times when Smith was in middle school, following employment opportunities for his father. When Smith was a senior in high school, his parents separated. Smith recalls a family story of him, at 4 years old, breaking the neck of his father’s prized mandolin. He was banned from touching any of his father’s instruments from then on, but that did not keep Smith from longing to play music. He started playing when he was 11 years old after hearing Chet Atkins playing guitar on the radio of his father’s 1949 Buick convertible. “At that moment, I knew I was going to be a guitar player,” Smith said. He would sneak his father’s Gibson guitar out from under his father’s bed, where his father had hidden it from him. Smith taught himself to play “Red River Valley” on one string. “I picked it up pretty easy,” Smith said. When he showed his father what he could play and some of the techniques he had figured out, his father was impressed. “It was the first time in my life that I thought my dad was trying to make me feel good,” Smith said. Unfortunately, the bond through music was limited by his father’s inability to admit his son could play better than he could. “He was kind of a proud person,” Smith said. It may have been the experience with his father’s pride that laid the groundwork for Smith’s careful consideration and deep respect for other players and their abilities, no matter the level of their expertise.

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Smith insists he is nothing special. This year’s Wayne Henderson Festival attendees might disagree with him. He won the nationally acclaimed guitar competition at the festival, held annually at Grayson Highlands Virginia State Park in Virginia. The top prize was a Henderson guitar. Henderson guitars are so highly coveted, there is a 10-year long waiting list for them, Smith said. The competition begins with 20 contestants chosen from online applications to perform. From there, the top five are chosen. The top five then perform again in the second level of the competition. Prizes are awarded near the end of the festival. Smith has been in the top five for the last four years, the three previous years he won fourth place each time. Wayne Henderson is an instrument maker and musician who has performed at Carnegie Hall, in three Masters of the Steel-String Guitar national tours, and in seven other countries. To Smith, music is all about sharing. He is always eager to play music with other musicians, from seasoned professionals to beginners and the students he tutors. He never fails to be open to learning from others and is tickled when he can share a trick from up his sleeve or when a player of any age can show him a trick he does not know. The electrical snap and pop in his mind are almost continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Jesse Smith displays the Henderson guitar he recently won.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

audible as he watches others perform to see what he can learn from them. Listening to Smith play, it is hard to imagine that there are musical tricks or techniques he does not know. “I get excited when I go out there (on stage) and see a young Keeping watch in the workshop. person (showing an interest in the music),” Smith said. “A lot of festivals I go to, I see all of the generations.” He said at one music festival in West Virginia, he saw five generations of a family performing. Smith is a popular performer at the Friday night bluegrass jams at Lafayette United Methodist Church. When he arrives to play, attendees excitedly pass the word. Continued from Page 5

His fellow musicians and music fans alike enjoy his performances because of his deep sense of humility, love of music and performing, and enjoyment of learning from others. In addition to guitar, other instruments Smith plays include mandolin and four- and five-string banjos. He plays fiddle, but finds it difficult because it lacks frets. He loves to hear others play the instrument, though. “I love waltzes on a fiddle,” he said. Playing guitar is Smith’s passion, but he never pushed it onto his children. He, instead, supported their passions. “It was always open if you wanted to learn it,” said Laurie Beal, Smith’s daughter. She smiled broadly while adding that her father has always been willing to help his children accomplish any goal they set, including moving half of a car into her dining room to create a unique bar. “He always supported anything we wanted to do,” Beal said. After he had purchased several guitars from a friend, the friend convinced Smith to start building guitars himself in 2009. Smith had experience with carpentry, so guitar building seemed a natural fit. For 22 years, Wadsworth-born Smith had taught carpentry at Wadsworth High School, himself a graduate of the school. The school would bus students out to job sites, and the senior project was continued, Page 10


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

for a guitar body, in a catalog, they looked at it, looked at each other, and decided they could make one themselves, so they did, using an ordinary lightbulb as the heat source. The wood dust created from building guitars aggravates Smith’s asthma, but it is work he loves. He accommodates his condition by wearing a mask and running air cleaning equipment. “When you put your heart and soul into an instrument and when you have someone who loves it and plays it, what could be better than that?” Smith asked. “Most of my guitars go to family and friends.” In addition to Beal, Smith and his wife have a son, Aaron Smith; seven grandchildren; and two greatgrandchildren. Beal is the director of The Garage in Wadsworth. The Garage is a ministry that was established to help at-risk youth through mentoring, club meetings and guidance. More information about The Garage is Even scarecrows love to play music with Jesse Smith. available at https://bit.ly/2lHOQVb Aaron Smith lives in Florida and is a curriculum continued from Page 8 building a house. designer for failing schools. Smith helped design the shop area of Wadsworth Every Wednesday is family dinner night at the High School before retiring in 2010. Smith home, and all available family members “It was the greatest job ever, other than being a attend. daddy,” Smith said, smiling. “It’s my favorite night of the week,” said Smith, his Some of his carpentry work can be seen at The Sub eyes soft and warm. His face glows as he looks Station in Wadsworth. He built the tables and booths lovingly at his daughter. for the restaurant. When there was a fire at the This is family. They celebrate each other’s talents original restaurant, the booths and tables were able and successes and they are supported by a father to be rescued and cleaned so they could be used who is there to help them reach for the stars, when The Sub Station reopened. whatever sky those stars are in. One guitar takes Smith 60 to 80 hours, with the neck being as much work on its own as the rest of the Listen to a small sample of Jesse Smith playing guitar. guitar at https://bit.ly/2ke5lIa and at He uses exotic woods for his art. Friends keep an https://bit.ly/2lQELVS Smith also can be caught at eye out for scrap wood from around the world that the Friday night bluegrass jam, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., he can turn into guitars. at Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette “Isn’t it crazy how you can take a little piece of junk Road, Medina, and at The Sub Station, 116 High (wood) and make it sound good?” asks Smith. Street, Wadsworth. Check the events on The Being a can-do kind of person, when Smith and a Sub Station’s Facebook page for when Smith will friend saw a bender, which is used to bend the wood perform at the restaurant.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

There is always a bluegrass jam at Jesse Smith's workshop.

From movie reels to guitar parts and pieces, it can all be found in Jesse Smith's workshop.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

THE READING NOOK

know?” “Sure, whatever,” she replied. Sally Cooper and Billy Maxwell had been friends for almost a year now. Living in the same neighborhood, they had become fast friends and, before long, were by Robert Soroky walking to school together every day, discussing Chapter 1: History things that could be considered important only to a couple of 12-year-old kids: movies, cartoons, he cartoon watch on his wrist, having reached homework, and friends. They enjoyed each other’s the 5 o’clock hour, chimed a playful tune as its owner, company immensely. Billy Maxwell, strolled home from school under the Today, however, Billy seemed a little more hot Ohio afternoon sun. preoccupied than usual. He had left school much later than usual today Maybe he’s just excited about Christmas, Sally thanks to the field trip his class had taken to the thought. science museum, but he didn’t really mind because it was, happily, the last day of school, at least for a little while. Maybe he’s just excited about Christmas vacation was finally here, and he could Christmas, Sally thought. hardly contain his excitement at the thought of decorating the family’s holiday tree. He also was When they arrived at the Maxwell house, Billy excited about tomorrow’s big reunion baseball game, started up his driveway and headed for the front played every year between the Maxwells and the porch. He sat down on the first step and invited Sally Peltons. It was, outside of Christmas day, one of the to do the same. They sat for a few moments in best family gatherings of the year. The weatherman silence as Billy continued to drift further into his own said sunny and 85 degrees would likely be the thoughts. forecast for the day. Perfect. “OK, I’ll bite,” said Sally, playfully, “What are you Of course, he really couldn’t remember the last time thinking about?” it wasn’t sunny and warm on game day, or on any day, “Does your family ever talk about The Event? You for that matter. Sure, it would rain sometimes, but know, like what happened and stuff?” asked Billy, most of the year it was just the same beautiful staring blankly down at the ground. weather everywhere you went, not like when Dad “Not really,” she replied. “Sometimes my dad talks was a kid, Billy thought. about it with other grown-ups, but not really with me. He remembered the stories Dad always told him ‘It happened a long time ago,’ he says, and just about the old days when he and his neighborhood leaves it at that. He said I would learn about it in buddies would spent most of the “winter” months school someday. And hey, what do you know, it just trapped in the house because there was so much of so happens that Mr. Barach is actually going to start that funny looking white stuff outside. What did he teaching us stuff about The Event when we get back call it again? Snow? Billy had heard that word for the from Christmas break. Is that what you’ve been first time when he was 10 years old. That was thinking about? The Event? For gosh sakes, Billy, it’s because, nowadays, no one had to deal with snow almost Christmas!” anymore, anywhere. “Yeah, I know, but ever since we got back from the Well, maybe way up north you might get a little, but museum today, it’s been on my mind. I mean, sure, it that was it. To be honest, Billy couldn’t even begin to did happen a long time ago, like 30 years or imagine his dad’s childhood and what it must have something, but I want to learn more and my dad is been like to actually be cold. the same way about it as yours. He just won’t talk It was different now, Billy knew. Of course, a lot of about it with me.” things were different now, ever since The Event. “Well, like I said,” Sally said, boldly, “we’re “Hey Billy, you gonna ignore me the whole way supposed to start learning more about The Event home, or what?” after vacation, but if it’s buggin’ you that much, why “Oh, sorry, Sally. I was just kinda thinking again, ya not just sit down with your dad and really make him

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

talk about it with you?” “Oh, I’ve wanted to, a bunch of times,” Billy responded, now looking more animated, “but every time I suggest it, he just makes some kind of excuse like he’s busy or something. Sometimes, when he’s in a bad mood, he’ll go around mumbling about The Event and act like it all just happened yesterday. He’ll start talking about how stuff used to be and how things are all different now. But he never really explains why. One time, I overheard him talking about The Event with Mom and, boy, did I hear some pretty crazy things!” “Crazy things? Like what?” “Well, stuff like when the Earth used to actually circle the sun!” “Huh?” “That’s what I thought, too, until today, when we were at the museum. I saw that full-motion scale model of the solar system over in the astronomy wing and, sure enough, it showed Earth and a bunch of other planets moving around the sun.” “Oh, our group missed the astronomy wing,” Sally admitted, rather embarrassed. “Jackie Francis got sick and we all had to wait out in the lobby until she was feeling better. She’s always getting sick! And we missed part of the museum because of it. I bet that solar system model was pretty neat. Did Ringworld look cool in the model, too?” “Well, that’s the other strange thing I learned.The model only showed what things were like before The Event. And guess what? There was no Ringworld back then!”

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“Well, isn’t your dad some kinda scientist or something? I thought he knew everything!” “No, Sally,” Billy said, angrily. “I told you, he’s an astronaut, remember?” “Well, why doesn’t he just hop in one of those space shuttles and go visit Ringworld then? Isn’t that what astronauts do?” “Don’t be silly,” Billy snapped, “Dad is retired. And even if he weren’t, the museum guy said that the shuttle fleet we have wouldn’t be able to go to Ringworld anyway. It’s too far away.” Sally came back over to the porch step and sat next to Billy. Both sat in silence, not sure what to say next. “Say, why don’t we just go talk to your dad, right now,” Sally finally contributed. “The both of us. He’s a pretty cool guy. I’m sure he would explain it all to us if we just ask him. We could tell him we’re getting ready to learn about it at school and even ask him about the model at the museum and stuff.” As if on cue, Billy’s father, Jonathan Maxwell, appeared at the porch door. “I thought I heard voices out here. Oh, hi, Sally.” “Hello, Mr. Maxwell. How are you?” “Very good, thank you. So, today was the last day of school, eh? I bet you guys are pretty excited!” Both Billy and Sally shook their heads in agreement as they stood up and gathered their school bags. “Well, Billy,” Mr. Maxwell continued, “I’ve got even more exciting news. Your mom and I have decided that we want to set up all the Christmas stuff, including the tree, tonight! Which means you’ll be able to decorate the tree after dinner!” And just like that, the world got a little brighter. “Awesome!!! Can Sally help, too?” Finally, her eyes locked on to what she had been looking for: Ringworld. “Absolutely,” said Mr. Maxwell. “As long as it’s okay with her parents.” “I’ll call them right now!” Sally exclaimed as both Sally, now totally amazed, sprang up from the porch 12-year-olds darted excitedly into the house. What a great vacation this was starting out to be, step and ran out onto the front lawn. She gazed Billy thought. First, we get to decorate the tree today upward and scanned the afternoon sky for several seconds. Finally, her eyes locked on to what she had and then, if we’re lucky, we can have a nice talk with Dad. A talk, once and for all, about The Event. been looking for: Ringworld. Our story continues next month! To the naked eye, it wasn’t much bigger than the size of a small pearl held out at arm’s length. However, for as tiny as it appeared, it was the second Robert Soroky writes the “Healthy Trails” column and is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long-distance charity brightest object in the sky, next to the sun. rides and is manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. “No kidding? Really?” Sally said, quizzically. “So, Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com. where did it come from if it wasn’t always up there?” “That’s just it. No one really knows! And I don’t Read past installments of “The Reading Nook” at even think Dad knows.” JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Six-week-old bulldog Chunkerbell is making it very clear to Sean Demlow and Wendi Farley she is entitled to a share of all food. He may just be a little more stubborn than she realizes!

While Emily Williams jumps rope, she moves behind one group of three at a time and adds them into her jump. Jumping along while waiting to join Williams in the jump rope are, from left, Kylie Campbell, Olivia Gray, Lauren Fowler, Caiden Bail, Clara Houck, and Ava Hitchings.

Jim Dull and Aggie Simmons get into the spirit of the Wadsworth Center for Older Adults Foundation's 25 Days of Christmas Raffle.

A crowd turned out to enjoy Food Truck Night and the late summer weather in Wadsworth. photos by FlashBang Photography

Jager the dog picks out a food truck to get food from with Michael Jordan.

Enjoying treats from the food trucks were, from left, Kristen and Brody Schaffer and Colin, Liam, and Kelly Campbell.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Root Candle employees and dignitaries or their representatives on the local, state, and national level sat together during the observance of Root Candle’s 150 years of business on August 23. Read more about the company and its history at http://rootcandles.com/company-history/ photos by Amy Barnes

Brad Root, the sixth president and fifth generation of the A.I. Root Candle family stands between a slideshow presentation about the company’s history and a photo of founder A. I . Root, while his uncle, Stuart Root, looks on.

This unusual moth looked like a piece of bark and had what looked like liquid gold on each side. Photo by Amy Barnes

With a face that looks like a wise old owl, this little moth visitor rests after being rescued from inside a home before taking off into the trees. Photo by Amy Barnes

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/ Mold Remediation

AirXperts

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/ Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

THE IN BOX

THE NETWORKER

Struggling With In or On

Keys to Natural Networking

by Steve Rak

by Bob Arnold

Did you ever hear the phrase, “You should be working on your business, not in it”? Sometimes, when I hear that phrase, I think they might as well be saying, “You should walk on the water, not in it.” It is akin to a minor miracle to be able to put the day-to-day business of running a business on hold so you can actually work on your business, say that 10 times fast! So, why work on your business instead of in it? And what does that mean anyway? I think it is best to look at it like this: Are you spending all of your time putting out fires, dealing with the day-to-day operations, doing the work, being an employee?

Heading to a networking event the other day, I reached into my right pants pocket for the car keys. They were not there. Calm, then frantic searching ensued. Seven pairs of pants and shorts and 14 pockets searched resulted in nothing. I even went out to the car to see if I had left them out there somewhere. Nope! As I was contemplating the situation, I unconsciously slipped my hand into my left pants pocket and there they were! I shook my head and laughed. It reminded me that the right key is required for the car to start, just as the right keys are needed to achieve networking success. I call them the Golden Keys and, without them, your networking will become marginal at best and frustration will become your nemesis. The key ring that holds the keys is ingenuousness. This ring holds the first key, which is freedom from reserve and restraint. Candidness and sincerity are critical keys also. These work with the final keys of naturalness and openness to set a correct environment. Networking is opened by these keys and becomes golden for you. Somewhere we formed the idea that we have to become someone we do not even know when we network. That is incorrect, these simple keys make up the key ring that establishes a natural networking style. I will paint better pictures for each of these keys in future columns. The Main Point is that for us to find success, we need to be natural. The keys of freedom, candidness, sincerity, and openness set the stage. With these keys, we are more likely to treat the other person like a person and to listen to them. Success is wrapped up in getting to know the other person well.

For example, say you own a landscape business. If you want the business to grow, you eventually have to get off the lawn mower. You have to move into a leadership role, start thinking about systems, training, sales, and what your vision is for the business. How big do you want it to be, how many employees will you need, what about a facility? You have to move from a doing-the-work role into a building-the-business role. Developing future leaders and managers, selling your employees the vision of the company, and setting goals are all part of the deal. Being a technician and doing the work is great, but if that is truly what you want to do, you might not want to be the owner, you might want to be an employee. There is nothing wrong with that. They are two different things, and eventually, if you want to grow your business, you have to get into the mindset of working on the business, not in it. This is much easier said than done, believe me, I struggle with it every day. Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Joyful Word Search With a Twinkle in His Eye

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Wishing Well Wishes Those attending Medina Fest on Medina Public Square were treated to a wide variety of vendors and enjoyed dropping their wishes into the Joy of Medina County Magazine Wishing Well!

“Cure for Fibro, CRPS, Lupus, RA, PCOS, HS.”

GUITAR TALENT MUSIC TWINKLE FATHER PERFORMANCE MANDOLIN

WORKSHOP FAMILY TUTOR COMMUNITY STAGE WOODS STRINGS

I

Wish for Luigi’s Mansion 3 to come out today.

I want to ride the Polar Ex�ress t�ain. Nathan Loyer, 4 years old

For my children to be happy.

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Brush With Words

I wish that I could win the lo�er� so I would have the ex��a money to help those in need!

I wish Silver Maple (Recov er�) accepts him.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTHY TRAILS

Fitness Tracker Pros and Cons

Consider Rider Type and Goals in Bike Choice

by Kelly Bailey Modern humans are like walking computers. Our devices track everything from steps and sleep to predicting what we want to buy. I am a fan of wearable fitness technology. On the pro side, my tracker influences my behavior, mostly in a positive way. I park farther away, walk faster and get up more often to move around during the day. Fitness trackers are motivational, help to set reasonable goals, track metrics, and create community. I cannot say enough about the motivational value of a step tracker. Research shows (https://bit.ly/2k0o8qi) a basic step tracker can increase activity up to 80 percent. That is huge! When I wear my tracker, I feel compelled to meet my daily step goal and beyond. No one goes from couch lounging to running a marathon overnight, but wearing a step tracker provides baseline data about movement and helps in setting reasonable goals. Depending on the tracker, data can include heart rate, sleep patterns, calories burned, and distance travelled which can be useful for monitoring health and fitness progress. Fitness tracker manufacturers have built entire communities where members can take on challenges, join groups, and even create a fitness-inspired group with coworkers or friends. However, trackers are not without pitfalls. Cons to fitness trackers include guilt, being less likely to exercise, and becoming obsessed with tracking. Step trackers can cause guilt when goals are not met. Negative feelings eventually can lead to demotivation. A CNN survey (https://cnn.it/2lClckk) showed that women who forgot to wear their fitness trackers were less likely to move because they felt the exercise did not count. I became obsessed with my tracker. I would get upset when I did not meet my daily step goal. The result was a depression-like funk that threatened to derail my fitness completely. We all know that inactivity and sitting is bad for us. Fitness trackers can be a valuable and motivating tool for anyone wishing to improve health and offer a real-time activity level check. I highly recommend trying one. Avoid the pitfalls by remembering it is just a device meant to assist a wellness journey, and it can be taken off at any time. Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

by Robert Soroky For some, buying a new bike can be quite intimidating. With so many styles to choose from, where does one begin? The answer lies in understanding the type of rider you are and defining your cycling goals. To help, here are the most common types of riders and the bike styles typically recommended for each. The recreational rider casually cruises the local bike path or pedals to a favorite ice cream hangout to enjoy the perfect summer afternoon. The comfort hybrid or cruiser style bike is the perfect fit. These bikes are designed with an extremely relaxed geometry that allow the rider to sit in a comfortable, upright position. With the added bonus of a big cushy seat and wide tires to provide grip and stability on both paved roads and light gravel trails, these are the lounge chair of bikes. The fitness rider is a more athletic type who wants to workout and tackle longer rides, a flat-bar road bike is the preferred choice. These lighter-weight bikes are easy to move, have thinner tires that roll smooth on mixed surface roads, come with flat handlebars for stability, and are designed with a semi-relaxed geometry. These bikes easily handle commuting to work, a 50-mile Metroparks ride, or enjoying a towpath trail. The competitive rider enjoys triathlons and long-distance charity rides and would do best with a drop-bar road bike. With super light-weight aluminum and carbon-fiber frames and thin, low-resistance tires, these bikes are fast and effortless, making steep rolling hills and 150-mile distances a whole lot easier to conquer. Some comfort is sacrificed due to the slightly more aggressive geometry, but the gains in riding efficiency are epic. Adventure riders find riding on paved roads or gravel paths boring. Those who would rather tackle the off-road excitement of dirt, tree roots, rock gardens, and crazy switchbacks, then mountain or gravel-grinder bikes are the ones to satisfy those adventurous riders. Ruggedly built, these bikes boast durable suspension systems, big knobby tires, all-purpose trail gearing, and powerful disc brakes to handle Mother Nature's most challenging terrain. Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

BITE ME!

MIRTH AND JOY

King Leonidas Mediterranean Chili

by Jerry King

by Robert Soroky My Greek girlfriend, Maria Nassif, and I wanted to create a chili that not only captured the flavors commonly found in Mediterranean foods but also one hearty enough to satisfy the appetite of a Spartan warrior, such as King Leonidas. Leonidas was a Greek king who, with 300 warriors, fought to defend his homeland from the Persian army in 480 B.C., which was the subject of the movie “300” in 2007. We have received several positive comments over the years for our chili, so we wish you Kali orexi! (Enjoy!) • 3 pounds lean ground beef • 1 ½ cups chopped onions • 4 packets chili powder (one hot, one original, two mild) • 3 teaspoons cinnamon • 2 28-ounce and 1 14.5-ounce cans Italian-style diced tomatoes • dried oregano, to taste • garlic powder, to taste • 4 teaspoons honey • 2 tablespoons cocoa • 1 15-ounce can dark kidney beans • 1 15-ounce can garbanzo beans (chickpeas), drained • 1 cup elbow macaroni • 1 1/4 pounds French feta cheese • 1/4 pound diced, pitted Kalamata olives Sauté ground beef, onions and garlic powder in large pan until beef is browned. Put beef and onions into a slow cooker. Be aware that even though a slow cooker is being used, stirring will be necessary. Stir in remaining ingredients, except for feta cheese. Heat to boiling, stirring occasionally until elbow macaroni is fully cooked. Reduce heat to simmer, and add in crumbled feta cheese. Stir occasionally until cheese is melted. Serve to your hungry warriors! Robert Soroky writes the “Healthy Trails” column and is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com

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MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Double Check Before Applying Paddle by Paul McHam

“If I didn’t get up then, I still wouldn’t be up now.”

“I used to think that TV shows and movies were live footage and repeats were the events happening again.”

We have gone over those areas where you might easily imagine water running amok and creating an opportunity for mold growth. Now, let us take a quick look at those sneakier areas that always serve to surprise. When there is insufficient insulation in a perimeter wall, which usually happens at the top, that area gets colder in the winter and there can be condensation where the wall meets the ceiling. If the condensation appears to be more to the wall side, it may be that ice damming has caused the insulation in the wall to get wet and settle or it has settled by some other process, depending on what kind of insulation it is, or it may not have been insulated properly to begin with. If the condensation shows up a bit more on the ceiling side, some of the same reasons may apply. Cellulose insulation or fiberglass blown in or batt will get wet, settle and no longer possess the ability to insulate. It is the air gaps between the fibers that insulate, not the fibers themselves. Closed cell foam is a bit more expensive but will stand up to a little condensation. The first thing I would check would be the insulation in the attic. Is it missing, or did it get wet from a roof leak or ice damming? If there is no insulation at all, you are overpaying for heating and cooling. Many folks have insulation in the attic but not in the wall. This is usually found in older homes with plaster and lathe walls. Condensation can form on these walls and grow mold in just about any color of the rainbow. I once knew a homeowner that paddled his child for coloring on the wall. It turned out to be mold because he never had insulated his walls. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

DIG IT!

Botanical Fashion Show Begins by Michelle Riley Tis the season to leaf all of your woes behind. Do you fall hard for fall? The yearly botanical fashion show leaves me holding my breath, each tree variety providing its own brand of visual inspiration. A journey of a thousand trees begins with seeking out venues offering eye-popping vibrancy (check out the Fall Foliage Tour map in this issue!). You also can find some of the best fall color in your own backyard. If you would like to add additional color to your yard and bring the joy of leaves to your own property, the best time to plant a tree is now. Plan correctly and you can add beauty and grace to your landscape, as well as your life. There are many reasons to own trees, they keep your home cool in the summer and warm in the winter, as well as adding resale value. What tree brings you joy? Do you want a tall, majestic, deep crimson tree in the fall? Plant a pin oak (Quercus palustris), the squirrels will thank you. Maybe you are looking for something smaller in stature, yet big in seasonal bang? Plant a Florida dogwood (Cornus florida), which has an awesome spring blossom, red summer fruit the birds will love, and vibrant red fall foliage. Another choice tree for brilliant color would be the Red Sunset maple (Acer rubrum Red Sunset), one of the best red maples available on market. True to its name, the Red Sunset maple can wow with the hues of a sunset. Want to share in the harvest? Add a native favorite, the Autumn Brilliance Serviceberry (Amelanchier Autumn Brilliance). The serviceberry carries delicate white spring flowers, ripening into yummy edible berries by mid-June, and finally transforming its entire form with foliage of the warmest complexion. As with any good party, it is not all fall and games when we are left with the leaf aftermath. Some will say leave it be, while others will buy stock in rakes. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

GEMS

Blindness Made Them See by Kent Von Der Vellen At daughter Trinity’s eight-week doctor’s visit, the pediatrician and Rich and Stacy Bonitz had some concerns. Trinity was crossed-eyed and did not seem to make eye contact. Rich said he would hold his hands close to Trinity and clap, and the sound would startle her. The pediatrician suggested they have Trinity examined by a pediatric ophthalmologist who quickly noticed a problem and referred them to a retina specialist. From the specialist, the next step was a trip to Detroit to consult a surgeon. It was determined Trinity suffered from an autoimmune disease called familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. FEVR is a rare genetic defect that damages the retina. There are varying levels of severity, and many who have it experience little to no symptoms. Trinity had one of the more severe cases with bleeding in her eye and detached retinas, blinding her. In one week, things had gone from discussing concerns with a pediatrician to surgery to reattach 9-week-old Trinity’s retinas and stop the bleeding in her eye. While waiting to see the surgeon, the Bonitzes saw approximately 20 other families struggling with many of the same fears and anxieties about their children. The two decided to help. They created The Trinity Rose Foundation, named after Trinity, to fight childhood blindness and to support children and families struggling with serious eye conditions. They held their first golf fundraiser in the fall of that same year. This year, they held their 14th golf fundraiser. They hold smaller fundraisers throughout the year, as well, such as A Bid for the Booth Fundraiser on St. Patrick’s Day and Bowling for Blindness. The foundation has distributed more than $300,000 to help more than 20 families and to support research. Today, though blind in her right eye, Trinity has use of her left eye and is living the life of a normal teenage girl. Through testing, it was discovered Trinity’s older sister, Mackenzie, and their mother both have FEVR. All are being monitored regularly to keep the disease under control. To learn more about the Trinity Rose Foundation, go to http://trinityrose.org/ or to https://bit.ly/2kxUWHt on Facebook. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

October 2019 Non-Profit Calendar Tuesday, October 1 National Homemade Cookies Day https://bit.ly/2mdOpCj Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Gearheads: Coding With Scratch, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Four-week workshop. Learn to code own game using Scratch programming language. Must attend all four sessions. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2mgo2M4 Victoria C. Woodhull for President, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about Woodhull, the first woman to run for president. Portrayed by Kathy Kraus. Wednesday, October 2 National Kale Day (makes up for yesterday!) https://bit.ly/2kyThl9 Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Award-based hiking series. Learn mushrooms identification tips from a naturalist. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Peace Project, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create peace-themed crafts to give and cultivate friendship for International Day of Non-Violence. Grades 6 to 12. Cool Knights, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Touch armor pieces used by Medieval knights and Renaissance noblemen more than 400 years ago. Grades 2 and up. Healthy Dips and Dressings, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Joy of Medina County Magazine columnist Kelly Bailey shares healthy dips and dressing. Samples provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2lLfVH3 Family Fall Tree Luminaries, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make fall candle holder with family. Grades kindergarten to 5, with adult. Each can create own. Register at https://bit.ly/2lUSDyn Internet Scams and Prevention, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to tell fake from real. Pop-ups, phishing, links, fake e-mails, more will be covered. Bring own device for hands-on class. Register at https://bit.ly/2m8tHDI 200 Years of Herman Melville, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Celebrate Melville’s birthday.

Thursday, October 3 National Techies Day https://bit.ly/2vQdF5s Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Making Dough Fundraiser Event, noon to 8 p.m., Courthouse Pizzeria, 2 Public Square, Medina. Bring flyer or image on phone, inform guest ambassador that you are dining on fundraising event so 25 percent of pre-tax sales is donated to Children’s Center of Medina County. More information at https://bit.ly/2ka9PzD Tween Scene: TP Roll Sculpture, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 9 to 14. Artist Derek Hess and Mental Health, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Watch Hess movie, “Forced Perspective,” stay for book sales and signing. Hess creates sketches, mixed media. Register at https://bit.ly/2lTgTRs Writing Personal Essays and Memoirs, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn to harvest life experiences for stories. Come prepared to write. Registration at https://bit.ly/2m8tHDI Friday, October 4 World Smile Day https://bit.ly/2xaqaZf American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Made in Medina County, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 735 Lafayette Road, Medina. Breakfast, networking, keynote address by actor John Ratzenberger. Tickets for breakfast and keynote, $40. Expo Hall is open to the public for free, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. For tickets, go to https://bit.ly/2VqcT7M Snack Attack, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Enjoy walking tacos to celebrate Taco Day. Grades 1 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2kK0lvc Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, October 5 Do Something Nice Day https://bit.ly/1iZE1GT Seville-Guilford Fire Department 150th Anniversary, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., 100 W. Greenwich Road, Seville. Open house, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., fire and EMS equipment displays, tours, vendors, free doughnuts and cider. Comedy Night Fundraiser, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., with barbecue chicken, raffles, door prizes. Fundraiser tickets are $40 a person and


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019 are limited to 250 people. Tickets available at fire station or by calling 330-769-4112. Fall Fest and Horse Show, noon to 5 p.m., Medina Creative Therapy Ranch, 5200 Lake Road, Medina. Horse show, Halloween activities and contests, bake sale, clam bake. For more information, go to https://medinacreativehousing.com/ Sunday Cinema Club: “My Fair Lady,” 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Craft Beer Swap, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring favorite 6-pack of domestic/regional craft brew, leave with variety. Must be 21 or older to participate. Register at https://bit.ly/2lSBLIU Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served. Sunday, October 6 Mad Hatter Day https://bit.ly/2xRIYu2 Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail bswartz@zoominternet.net Color Float, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Enjoy fall colors with a naturalist, bring kayak, paddle, personal flotation device (must be worn for entire program). Free, no registration. Monday, October 7 Bald and Free Day https://bit.ly/2x9V2ZJ Monday Movie Matinee: “Dumbo,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Teen Meditation, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn meditation. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2lPCgmZ Navigating Medicare Maze, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Veterans Roundtable, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. All ages. No registration. Tuesday, October 8 American Touch Tag Day https://bit.ly/2gM3EvO Monster Toy Lab, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring old toy to dissect and use to make new creation. Grades 3 to 8. Teen Movie Night: “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Watch Mr. Rogers movie, discuss. Ages 13 to 18. Alphabet Adventure: J is for Jack-o-Lantern, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

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Wadsworth. Read about jack o’lanterns, then do activities, crafts, games. Register at https://bit.ly/2mgA2ND Make a Zine, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to make a small booklet with own drawings, writing, inspiration. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2lMwLFF The Arts Series: Writing as a Craft, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. First of trio of workshops. Get a boost in writing with feedback, discussion, push. Bring material. Register at https://bit.ly/2lV5iBp Wednesday, October 9 Curious Events Day https://bit.ly/2kJPZv8 Picture Wreath, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create wreath to display photos, mementos. Grades 6 to 12. No registration. Haunted Lodi, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Paranormal society shares findings in Lodi. Down Memory Lane: Part 2, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Thursday, October 10 Newspaper Carrier Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2JWbnUM Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241 Sunday, October 6 Susan G. Komen Rally for the Cure 1 p.m.to 8 p.m. Benefits: Susan G. Komen Foundation Bunker Hill Golf Course Saturday, October 19 Brew Crew Clambake 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Benefits: Brew Crew Softball team Bunker Hill Golf Course Sunday, October 27 UPPER 90 Futbol Club Golf Fundraiser 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Benefits UPPER 90 Futbol Club Bunker Hill Golf Course


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Sunday, October 6 Harvest Walk and 5k, 7:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Mapleside Farms, 294 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Benefits the Kidney Foundation of Ohio, Inc. For registration and pricing, go to https://bit.ly/2JmrvC0 Sunday, October 13 5th Annual Harry Potter Fun Run/Walk: Seek and Find the Snitch, 9 a.m. to noon, The Book Store and Handmade Marketplace, 109 W. Washington Street, Medina. Face painting, music, scavenger hunt. For prices and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2IrSThO

Saturday, October 19 Sanyuka Run to Educate, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., 7291 Stone Road, Medina. 5k run and 1mile run. Sanyuka Children’s Choir concert, noon to 2 p.m. Benefits Sanuyka Children’s Choir and children in Uganda. For prices and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2zEM3zU Saturday, November 9 The T-Strong Fall Dash, 8 a.m., Medina. Benefits children fighting cancer at Akron Children’s Hospital. Location was not available by press time. For prices and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2LpVCYX

Tween Scene: Chain Reaction, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Craft sticks will be used to set off a chain reaction. Creepy Campout: Can You Escape? 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Share spooky campfire stories. Ages 12 to 18. Registration at https://bit.ly/2lNzcru Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Speaker Series: Navigating Buying a Mortgage, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn what to expect when buying a home and navigating the mortgage options. Register at https://bit.ly/2kIKa1b Friday, October 11 National Spread Joy Day https://bit.ly/2WLlx5T Brunswick City Schools closed. Discover Rainbows, 11 a.m. to noon, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Explore rainbows and colors with prisms, test tubes, pipettes. Make UV bracelet. Ages 3 to 7. Register at https://bit.ly/2kAfhMv You Can Play the Ukelele, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring a uke or borrow one. Register at https://bit.ly/2kec30M Movie Matinee, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Popcorn and a movie about an elephant with large ears. All ages.

Bingo, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Back to school Bingo, prizes. Grades kindergarten to 6. Wine and Canvas Night, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring wine, snacks, take home your painting. Bring cash or check made payable to Artists Uncork’d. Supply fee $15. Must be 21 or older. Register at https://bit.ly/2kIzijT Saturday, October 12 Old Farmers Day https://bit.ly/119miUM Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. Dogtoberfest, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina County Animal Shelter, 6334 Deerview Lane, Medina. Numerous shelters participating. Featuring adoptable dogs and cats from area rescues. Disc dog demos at 11 a.m. Costume contest registration starts at noon, contest at 1 p.m. Pet portraits, noon to 2 p.m. Dog guests must be up to date on vaccinations and on leash at all times. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2zH4zrd Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Admission to museum is free. Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children under 5. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ Fall Foliage Tour, noon to 5 p.m. Drive-it yourself tour of area of Chatham, Lafayette, Litchfield, Medina, and York featuring and focusing on rural living, agriculture, history. See map in this issue. 34th Annual Pioneers in the Park Festival, noon to 5 p.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Pioneer crafts and skills, re-enactors, encampments, live music, entertainment, food. Part of the Fall Foliage Tour. Warts, Webs and Wild Things, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about Halloween animals, from creepy and crawly to slithery and slimey. Crafts, activities, costumes welcome. Free, no registration. Sunday, October 13 International Skeptics Day https://bit.ly/2ktZpYq Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail bswartz@zoominternet.net Fall Foliage Tour, noon to 5 p.m. Drive-it yourself tour of area of Chatham, Lafayette, Litchfield, Medina, and York featuring and focusing on rural living, agriculture, history. See map in this issue. 34th Annual Pioneers in the Park Festival, noon to 5 p.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Pioneer crafts and skills, re-enactors, encampments, live music, entertainment, food. Part of the Fall Foliage Tour. Warts, Webs and Wild Things, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about Halloween animals, from creepy and crawly to slithery and slimey. Crafts, activities, costumes welcome. Free, no registration.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019 Samuel Salsbury: North Indian Sarangi, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Salsbury presents music from North India played on a sarangi. Monday, October 14 National Dessert Day https://bit.ly/2wLfOOH Teen Scavenger Hunt, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Participate in scavenger hunt, get free book. Through October 19. Grades 6 to 12. Art in the Afternoon: Leaf Prints, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use waxed paper, paint, real leaves to make prints. Ages 5 to 10. Cultivating Edible Mushrooms, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to grow, harvest own mushrooms. Register at https://bit.ly/2mgyfbm

Friday, October 18 Boo Bash 2019, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Camp Paradise, 4283 Paradise Road, Seville. Benefits SHC. Games, raffle, activities, prizes, DJ, trick or treat, haunted house. Costume contest at 8 p.m. Food available for purchase. Sunday, October 20 Trunk or Treat, Hickory Ridge Cinema, 1055 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Businesses participate in trunk costume contest, hand out candy. Saturday, October 26 Halloween Party, 11 a.m. to noon, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Walk the orange carpet in costume, treats. All afternoon Halloween movies, popcorn. Children of all ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2kfv3vR Monday, October 28 NEO Bubble Soccer’s Beggars Night, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Building 5, 1669 W. 130th Street, Hinckley. Indoor trick or treat. Candy, gifts, hot cider, from local businesses. Free.

Tuesday, October 29

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Mario Kart Tournament, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., R Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Take turns racing favorite character in double-elimination tournament. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2lNl5T2 Tuesday, October 15 White Cane Safety Day https://bit.ly/2j7CwvD Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Ohio Ghost Stories, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Stories of Ohio hauntings and ghosts.

Halloween Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Medina. Trick or treating, games, balloon creations, show off costume on runway. Register at https://bit.ly/2kjfpjh Trick or Treat at the Library, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Tricks, treats, fun. Candy donations requested. All ages with an adult. Register at https://bit.ly/2kz58zE Thursday, October 31 Trick or Treat: Chippewa Lake, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Brunswick, Medina, Wadsworth 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Seville Supernatural Trunk or Treat, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Cy Hewitt Park, intersection of Liberty Street and Spring Street, Seville. Free hot dogs, doughnuts, cider. Costume contest. Valley City Halloween Parade, 6:30 p.m., Depot Museum, 6615 Center Road, Valley City. Costume contest judging at Valley City Fire Department, 6700 Center Road, Valley City. Trick or Treating in the downtown area until 8:30 p.m. Monday, November 4 Halloween Candy Buy Back, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dr. Kathy Brisley-Sedon, 10 W. Main Street, Seville. Get $1 per pound of Halloween candy turned in. Candy is sent to military troops.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019 Author Visit: James Renner, the Amy Mihaljevic Story, Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Renner started looking for Mihaljevic’s killer when he was in middle school and as a reporter for Cleveland Scene, where he discovered new clues and suspects. Wednesday, October 16 Dictionary Day https://bit.ly/2D6qjRR American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5:30 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp FUSE: Special Edition Maker Project 1 of 2, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Design and create a time for the library’s New Year’s Party balloon drop using Raspberry Pi and basic Scratch coding commands. Register at https://bit.ly/2lPMKTn Music at The Lodge: Circle of Friends, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Rock/folk-inspired music. Free. Thursday, October 17 Wear Something Gaudy Day https://bit.ly/2xejkCW Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Tween Scene: Mini Pumpkin Fun, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Decorating mini pumpkins, supplies provided. Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/2lPC8Um Medina County Government Academy: Zoning, Taxes and Levies for Public Officials, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., University of Akron Medina County University Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ NuFit: Healthy Holiday Eating and the Benefits of Walking, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. A Healthy Wadsworth program. Explorastory: “Clifford’s Halloween,” 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, rhymes, crafts, games, puzzle. Make a Clifford hat and dog bone painting. Register at https://bit.ly/2kKcVKW Hanging Out With Lee Harvey Oswald, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Joseph Reardon shares insights into JFK assassination motivation and stories told to him by Lee Harvey Oswald of his time in the Soviet Union. They met in 1963, four months before the JFK assassination. Batty for Bats: Bats and Creatures of the Night Workshop, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., The Lodge at Allardale County Park, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Hosted by OSU Extension. Tickets, $10. Get tickets at https://bit.ly/2mfWdn8 Master Gardeners: Putting the Garden to Bed, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Friday, October 18 No Beard Day https://bit.ly/2QE7sAj Boo Bash 2019, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Camp Paradise, 4283 Paradise Road, Seville. Benefits SHC. Games, raffle, activities, prizes, DJ, trick or treat, haunted house. Costume contest at 8 p.m. Food available for purchase. Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: Halloween All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road,

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Medina. Wear costumes, avoid long flowing ones for safety. All ages. Free. No registration. Gates close at 8:30 p.m. or when parking lot is full. Saturday, October 19 Evaluate Your Life Day https://bit.ly/2ePjjgO It Happens Here Too: Anti-Human Trafficking Conference, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2JcyTi3 Basket Weaving 101: Fall Basket, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. All materials provided; no experience necessary. Cost: $17 per basket. Call Betty Rettig, 330-975-4251, to register. K-9 Kapers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash and be accompanied by an adult. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Sensory Storytime, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with autism, sensory integration challenges, or who have difficulty sitting still or focusing. All ages, but best for ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2mfzoQu Seville Library Harvest Festival, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Family Harvest Party, 11 a.m.; Outback Ray, noon; and Elie Magic Show, 1 p.m. Live music, crafts, food. Warts, Webs and Wild Things, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about Halloween animals, from creepy and crawly to slithery and slimey. Crafts, activities, costumes welcome. Free, no registration. Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: Halloween All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Wear costumes, avoid long flowing ones for safety. All ages. Free. No registration. Gates close at 4 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. or when parking lot is full. Sunday, October 20 National Brandied Fruit Day https://bit.ly/2lLxjvs Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail bswartz@zoominternet.net American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Jerusalem Evangelical Lutheran Church, 9282 Acme Road, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019

Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Chef will demonstrate how various types of sushi are made. Ghosts and Paranormal Occurrences, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Explore what is known and unknown and research of Scotland’s most haunted A list of art shows in Medina County. location with author Brandon Massullo. All ages. Register at To have a show listed, send the information to https://bit.ly/2mf8YOL joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. Author Visit: Mike Burg, Book Writing Dos and Don’ts, 7 p.m. to 9 There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Former police chief Mike Burg shares what he learned Issues of mental illness Common Threads explored through drawings September 30-October 27 from writing each book. Life explored through art by by Cleveland artist Hess Wednesday, October 23 the perSisters Painters and Highland Library National Mole Day https://bit.ly/2mauHas 4160 Ridge Road, Medina ceramic artist Bonnie Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North Gordon. and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent The Art of Erica Medina Library, B. Smith DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. Diffee Gallery (third floor) October 28-November 9, 210 S. Broadway, Medina American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 2019 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Ephemeral splendors of Lodi Library Sixth Blindfolded Taste Test, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 flowers captured in Annual Juried Art Wolff Road, Medina. Prizes. Grades 6 to 12. No registration. photographs Show Teen Art Night: Alcohol Ink Jewelry, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room Highland Library October 1-17, 2019 North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Reception October 2, 6 p.m. 4160 Ridge Road, Medina Apply ink to hardware to create jewelry. Register at Variety of works by adult Cliffside Artists and student artists https://bit.ly/2kLdPqn Collaborative: Karen Lodi Library ORMACO World Tour of Music Workshop: Shashmaqam, 7 p.m., Martin 635 Wooster Street, Lodi Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. New York-based October 1-31, 2019 ensemble recognized in its native Uzbekistan and Tadzhikistan for its Works in watercolors Derek Hess talent. Central Asia ethnic eclecticism: Uzbek, Tadjik, Afghan, Highland Library Gallery October 7-19, 2019 4160 Ridge Road, Medina Azerbaijani songs and melodies. Thursday, October 24 Warts, Webs and Wild Things, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature National Bologna Day https://bit.ly/2fNDVa7 Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about Halloween Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, animals, from creepy and crawly to slithery and slimey. Crafts, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. activities, costumes welcome. Free, no registration. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Creepy Crawlies, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., ORMACO World Tour of Music Workshop: Shashmaqam, 10 a.m., Chippewa Inlet Trail North, and State Route 42/Lafayette Road, Western Reserve Masonic Community, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina, Chippewa. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. and 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. New YorkFree. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. based ensemble recognized in its native Uzbekistan and Tadzhikistan Monday, October 21 for its talent. Central Asia ethnic eclecticism: Uzbek, Tadjik, Afghan, Count Your Buttons Day https://bit.ly/2eLgg5Y Azerbaijani songs and melodies. Free, public invited. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Cleveland Clinic, Writers Life: James Renner, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Weymouth 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Country Club, 3496 Weymouth Road, Medina. Akron resident Renner Easy Crochet Basket, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Hickory Room, Brunswick wrote “True Crime Addict,” “Amy: My Search for Her Killer,” more. Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginner to intermediate. Basic Ticket, $25, includes lunch. Register at https://bit.ly/2lNSahA crochet skills a must, but instructor will help. Crochet in the round. Tween Scene: Illuminated Letters, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Bring 1 skein super bulky yarn, 6 weight; Size K (6.5 mm) crochet hook; Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create stitch markers or safety pins. Register at https://bit.ly/2kz8hzs WAITING images with tooling foil and markers. LIST American Red Cross Blood Drive, 4:15 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Cloverleaf Drug-Free Wadsworth: What is a Drug Recognition Expert? 7 p.m. to Elementary School, 8337 Friendsville Road, Lodi. 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Wadsworth. Officer Daniel Shonk discusses drugged driving and law Fright Night, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 enforcement’s response. Wooster Street, Lodi. Creepy crafts, sinister snacks, costume contest, Tuesday, October 22 more. Grades 6 to 12. National Nut Day https://bit.ly/2e0Ypr9


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2019 Scare on the Square 2019: Pumpkin Decorating Contest, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Halloween Fashion Show, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Walk the red carpet in costume, practice trick-or-treat skills. Friday, October 25 Frankenstein Friday https://bit.ly/1NRdkQo American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Monstercon, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Spooky scavenger hunt, photo booth, sugar skull decorating, more. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2kyYPMw Saturday, October 26 Howl at the Moon Day and Night https://bit.ly/2wct5wj Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Storytime with Griffin, the therapy dog. Register at https://bit.ly/2kkDhTE Pumpkin Science, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. STEM projects. Grades kindergarten through 2. Register at https://bit.ly/2kIpUwD WAITING LIST Genealogy Slam, noon to 4 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. MCDL Genealogy Team explores court records. Register at https://bit.ly/2kLEBiz Warts, Webs and Wild Things, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about Halloween animals, from creepy and crawly to slithery and slimey. Crafts, activities, costumes welcome. Free, no registration. Mysterious World of Owls, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about the adaptations owls have made for survival. See live owls up close. Presented by the Medina County Raptor Center. Free. Cups Café Fall Reception, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, raffle baskets, magic show, information about Cups. Tickets are $25 per person, $50 a couple, $250 for a table sponsor (10 tickets). Purchase tickets at 330-241-5990. ORMACO Shashmaqam Concert, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., Highland High School auditorium, 4150 Ridge Road, Medina. Central Asian ensemble performs. Advance tickets, $12, at Medina and Wadsworth Buehler’s; at the door, $15, cash or check only. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2KTzatd Sunday, October 27 National Tell a Story Day https://bit.ly/2IhPJL3 Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8 a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail bswartz@zoominternet.net

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Warts, Webs and Wild Things, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about Halloween animals, from creepy and crawly to slithery and slimey. Crafts, activities, costumes welcome. Free, no registration. Monday, October 28 Plush Animal Lover’s Day https://bit.ly/2gLEi0W American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/2lVgiyH Tuesday, October 29 Internet Day https://bit.ly/2wMDGQv Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Memorial Elementary School, 3845 Magnolia, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Stranger Crafts, 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Crafts inspired by “Stranger Things” TV show. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2m9bW7h Wizard of Oz Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Experiment with a tornado in a bottle, decorate foil hearts, test courage and brain power with games, make a scarecrow craft, a hot air balloon craft, wands, green glasses, winged monkeys. Ages 3 to 10. Register at https://bit.ly/2kjOpA8 Wednesday, October 30 National Candy Corn Day https://bit.ly/1Gzd5ZI American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp CD Mosiac Tray, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Use old, broken CDs to create place for phone, drink or pens. Grades 6 to 12. No registration. Cemetery Gravestones, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn what headstone markings mean. Learn about US and European cemeteries. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2kIu1Zu Thursday, October 31 Magic Day https://bit.ly/2f7rxhl See special box with all of the trick and treating times. Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tween Scene: Everything Monster, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make sock monsters, bookmarks and play monster games. Ages 9 to 14.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2019  

A guide to the right bicycle, tips on using a fitness tracker, the local trick or treat schedule, and from pickin’ and grinnin’ to art shows...

Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2019  

A guide to the right bicycle, tips on using a fitness tracker, the local trick or treat schedule, and from pickin’ and grinnin’ to art shows...