Joy of Medina County Magazine November 2022

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SUCCESSFUL SUCCESSION PG. 17 Leaving a business legacy that will last

A QUICHE FOR THE HOLIDAYS PG. 20 Versatile enough to serve for any meal and dessert

WREATH CREATION PG. 21 Gather backyard finds for unique gifts.

ROYAL READS PG. 25 Secrets, grudges, romance, and murder!

He is the founder of an organization that brings music to children, but Thomas Sigel had quite the life before that. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

VOLUME 5 NUMBER 10 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

A Life Defined by Amy Barnes I am so tired of movies whose theme is that if women are controlled, the world would be perfect. The most recent such movie is “Don’t Worry Darling” (see review in this issue). Some of you know that I grew up on a farm with my mother, my aunt and my sister. The four of us did all of the chores, which included milking, gardening, chopping and hauling wood, chasing escaped livestock, killing venomous snakes, hauling several 50-pound bags of feed in a day, defending the farm animals against predators (owls, hawks, coyotes), staying up all night saving an animal’s life, and lots more. There were good times and sad times. Things needed repaired at times. What we could not fix with baling wire and duct tape or did not know how to fix, we hired someone to do it. Then we stood by, asked questions and learned more from whoever did the repair. We did not care their gender, race or marital status, we only cared if they could fix whatever was broken.

contribute, and all have the right to the pursuit of happiness and of a life well lived, defined and controlled by ourselves.

Not once, not one single time, was a job or a chore labeled gender specific nor were we told roles we had to fill because of our gender. The few toys my sister and I had covered everything from race cars to dolls to art supplies. Jobs were done by the one most suited for the task and who had proven it by trying a chore and doing the task well. The only thing that mattered was our brains and our abilities, and my sister and I were constantly challenged to stretch and grow both of those. We also were constantly reading, and the value

it makes no sense. For those who do that, we either remove them from our list entirely or put them back at the end of the list. Unfortunately, due to deadlines, if someone repeatedly does not show up for or cancels an interview, that means there is no time to line up and write about another group and “Gems” does not run. That is a lost opportunity for that nonprofit and for the one that could have benefited from the coverage instead. Lost is the free exposure to our readers and the free promotion we provide.

of education was always stressed. Part of that education was learning that no one is less than nor should be treated as less than because of anything. Each of us has value, has something unique to

If you know of a local nonprofit who would appreciate the coverage, please send an email to Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com We would love to hear about them, no matter how small!

══════⊹⊱≼≽⊰⊹══════ My apologies to our readers for the inconsistency this year of the appearance of our “Gems” column that focuses on local nonprofits. The column was designed to help educate the public, who is the source of donations, about the missions as well as the people behind the local nonprofits to help raise awareness of the mission and to perhaps cause an increase in donations. While some organizations have been wonderful in keeping interview appointments and providing information in a timely manner so columnist Kent Von Der Vellen can meet deadlines, there have been several who have repeatedly missed interview times or do not return calls or emails. That, of course, is the right of any organization. However, I find this very confusing. When someone asks the public for donations or patronage and then does not want free publicity,

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller IT SUPPORT Sara Barnes Tyler Hatfield PHOTOGRAPHERS Brooklyn Media FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Katrina Barnes Kel Bulkowski Tyler Hatfield Bryan Lefelhoc Mary Olson Chris Pickens Michelle Riley Rachel Shepard Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2022 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022 by Chris Pickens Versatile quiches fit multiple mealtimes.

BITE ME!

GLAZED SALMON WITH RICE AND EDAMAME by Kel Bulkowski

Honey, garlic and soy sauce combine sweet and savory.

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DIG IT!

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CREATE A WREATH FOR HOLIDAYS

FINDING HEARTLAND

by Michelle Riley

Get trimming done and make décor.

by Amy Barnes

Thomas Sigel has traveled the world and worked in international business, but it is his love of art and music that drives him.

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HEALTH

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OF MIND AND BODY

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THE READING NOOK

THE LONGING

by Angel J. Harrison

A poem by a local writer

THE LETTER by Kelly Bailey

Reflecting back can help find gratitude.

HEALTHY TRAILS

ENTERTAINING WINTER WORKOUTS by Robert Soroky

Motivation does not have to drop with the temperature.

BUSINESS

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

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THE NETWORKER

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by Bob Arnold

SERVING UP DICTATORSHIPS

AFFINITY IN ACTION

GETTING REEL

Talk about what is in front of you to find a common interest.

by Amy Barnes

DOING BUSINESS

Both movies focus on absolute power but from different viewpoints.

A calendar of area networking events

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ROYAL READS

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

FUN AND GAMES by Mary Olson

HUNGRY FOR CHIPS

A buffet of murder, romance, suspense, and royalty served up through three books.

While production levels continue to improve, the number of devices using them continues to grow.

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by Tyler Hatfield

THE IN BOX

SUCCESSFUL SUCCESSION PLANNING by Rachel Shepard

What will happen to your beloved business when you leave?

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RISE AND SHINE

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

WORLD OF THOMAS

Find key words in the life of ORMACO’s founder, Thomas Sigel.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

DISCOVERING A FORGOTTEN TARGET MARKET

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There is an audience craving attention that many businesses overlook.

Read the clue, collect the magnifying glass letters, and solve the puzzle!

by Bryan Lefelhoc

INVENTION CONVENTION

Patents recently granted to Medina County residents.

HOME AND GARDEN

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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OH, SNAP!

photos by Amy Barnes

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Brave souls determined to get fresh, local food through the end of October.

PICTURE THIS

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He did not realize his social media post would lead to blackmail.

Activities to keep you moving, as cold and snow creep closer.

WATCHDOG

by Amy Barnes

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VEGAN VITTLES

VEGAN VEGGIE QUICHE On the front and back covers: by Amy Barnes Thomas Sigel welcomes all to HeARTland.

LET’S DO IT!

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CELEBRATE!

A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

Part of the acreage of HeARTland

photos and story by Amy Barnes homas Sigel is not a man who considers or even sees obstacles. He is more likely to ask, “Oh, was there something in the way?” on his way to achieving his goals than to even waste a minute on hesitation. There are few willing to even try to stand in his way as he does not step down from a challenge or from achieving his goals. But let us start at the beginning of his story, because as much as Sigel is seen at various events and meetings throughout the county, he is a very private man, with few knowing much about his background or the adventures he has had that led him to founding Ohio Regional Music Arts and Cultural Outreach, more commonly known as ORMACO. So here we go, revealing some little-known facts about the man behind the music.

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He was born at Medina Hospital in 1965. Medina was still mostly farmland then. He grew up in Homerville, just around the corner from where he now lives. He was the middle child sandwiched between an older sister, Elizabeth, and a younger sister, Rozalind. His father, David, was in the livestock business and his mother, Marilyn, was a substitute schoolteacher. He says that, as a result, he was exposed to the best of both worlds. “We were taught to work hard, learn and to give back,” Sigel said. Every summer there was a family vacation with an educational component. The family would drive to places such as Gettysburg and explore and learn as much as they could, with a stop at the Hershey Chocolate Factory in Pennsylvania on the way back to Ohio.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

Another family trip Sigel fondly remembers is a trip to New Orleans. “We soaked in the history, culture and, of course, the amazing jazz,” Sigel recalled. He took music lessons at Oberlin College, and his parents took him and his sisters to concerts and museums. “I fondly remember when the Metropolitan Opera was on tour and stopped in Cleveland. My mother took me to some amazing performances with famous singers. I saw Beverly Sills in Massenet's "Thais" and again in Donizetti's "Don Pasquale,” he shared. Flash forward several years to 1986, when Sigel was accepted for an internship at the New York City Opera. Something few know about Sigel: He was an intern for Beverly Sills. “That was the summer of 1986. Beverly Sills at that time was the general director. I had the opportunity to work right in her office for the entire summer. That was an amazing experience,” Sigel remembered. He asked Sills why she chose him for the internship. She told him that he was the only applicant who was not an aspiring opera star and her husband had come from Ohio. It would be Sigel’s first dabbling in arts administration, laying the foundation for what was to come many years later. Even though Sigel was grateful to have been picked for the internship and was meeting a lot of famous people, the internship was unpaid and in New York. He had to find a way to pay his way. He got a job at a classical music radio station and was the gopher for the station, where he learned to be ready for anything, a lesson that would serve him well in the future. But we have jumped ahead of ourselves, back to where we were in Sigel’s story. While attending his last year at Black River High School, Sigel attended Oberlin College part time, taking classes in medieval history. Even though it is common today to attend college while finishing high school, back then, it was only a select few seniors who were allowed to do so and there were many requirements to be met. A restless impatience was growing in Sigel and going to college part time was not enough to quiet it.

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Sigel found he was finished with high school before it was finished with him. He had Things to Do and had fulfilled all of the credit requirements in order to graduate, except for one pesky English class. He did not exactly let that stand in his way. He applied for a conditional acceptance to Oberlin College, which meant they would let him in without a high school diploma. They allowed it, with strict requirements attached, so in what would have been the January of his senior year, it was, instead, his first full-time semester at Oberlin College. His focus was on political science (called government back then) and comparative politics, with a focus on the Soviet Union and a minor in Russian. So, another piece of Sigel’s life few knew: Technically, he was a high school dropout. Following his first college semester, Sigel decided to grab a backpack and travel on his own through Europe for the summer. continued, Page 6


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The audience next door

He was 18 years old. His mother was less than thrilled. Keep in mind, this was before cell phones, the internet and home computers. Maintaining contact with someone backpacking across Europe is hard enough now with spotty cell coverage, back then it was close to impossible. A worried Marilyn Sigel wanted to know exactly where her son was going to be. As with any obstacle, Sigel found a way through it. “My mother wasn’t very happy,” said Sigel, “So I made up an itinerary to keep her happy.” In reality, Sigel had no idea where he was going to go or how long he was going to stay there. All he knew was that he was going to go and he was going to be somewhere. Then, off he went on his grand adventure, funded by money he had earned working. He was gone for nine weeks. After his trip, he was ready to settle down once again for college and returned to Oberlin for a year. The following summer Sigel attended an intensive summer Russian immersion language program at Indiana University. He followed that with participation in the Oberlin Junior Year Abroad program, where he was enrolled in the honors political science and Russian language programs at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Before returning to Oberlin for the 1985 fall semester, he studied Russian at the State Pedagogical Institute of Volgograd in Russia. After returning to the U.S., he continued his studies at Oberlin College to earn his bachelor’s in

The “neigh” bors

government with a Soviet studies minor in May 2006. Then it was off to the University of Michigan, where he earned his master’s in Russian and East European studies, with a focus on political and economic infrastructure. During summers, he worked for a company as a tour manager taking Americans to the Soviet Union. Another little-known fact: In two summers, he made 14 trips to the Soviet Union and Outer Mongolia. After earning his degree from Michigan, he applied for the Master of Business Administration program at the University of Manchester, England, one of the premier programs in Europe and one of the few that existed at that time, Sigel said. He won a spot in the program, but he was so busy at the time that he deferred the prestigious invitation for a year. Chuckling, Sigel said he ended up never attending the university because he was so busy working in the kind of positions he had been planning to obtain by having a degree from Manchester. Sigel has worked in an extensive range of positions that always relied on his knowledge of international business and his willingness to dive in, even if he lacked experience, such as when he accepted an international banking position with the Mid American National Bank in Toledo. Lack of knowledge is not an obstacle that Sigel has ever bowed to. While at the bank, he learned about international currencies; co-led credit seminars for major international clients; and founded and edited “International BankNotes,” a bank publication.


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The approach to HeARTland, the property Thomas Sigel bought to give ORMACO a performance venue and home.

His career also has included being an English and American history teacher at a youth cultural center in Leningrad, a business consultant, and an economic research analyst. He speaks Russian, Czech, German, and, of course, English. Other positions he has held include being a Soviet and Eastern European consultant negotiating joint ventures for North American businessmen with potential Polish partners and a translator for top Soviet delegates on US trade missions. Sigel worked on feasibility studies for North American companies wanting to create join ventures in the newly emerging countries following the collapse of the Soviet Union for such things as a cereal production plant and cosmetic plant in Poland and a tomato processing plant in Uzbekistan.

During his career, Sigel has worked in Ohio, Michigan and New Jersey and internationally in England, Poland and the Czech Republic. He worked for companies such as Pearson, SouthWestern College Publishing and Okno Consulting Group. As Sigel watched world events, however, he decided to focus more on Eastern Europe. “I became disillusioned because things were crumbling in Eastern Europe,” he said, and he wanted to get involved. Then Sigel saw an ad for someone with knowledge of Russian and banking. The job was working for the Open Media Research Institute which had evolved from the research/think tank of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, which were established to broadcast and publish news to continued, Page 8


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HeARTland is surrounded by rolling acres of farmland.

A local resident keeps an eye on things from the clouds.

communist countries and to places where a free press does not exist. Sigel took the position of being an economy policy analyst for Russia, working from Prague. He analyzed Russian media and wrote articles. “It was amazing,” Sigel said of his time with the organization. Another little-known piece of Sigel’s life: When off from work, Sigel played trombone in various music ensembles and pit orchestras, including a Czech brass band. Eventually, his career path turned toward publications. Remember that English credit he was shy of in order to graduate high school? Upon his return to the U.S., he became an editor and publisher.

For those arriving early for a performance at HeARTland, there is a pavilion where picnics are encouraged.

After writing so many articles for various economic publications and with his international business expertise, gaining a position as an economics and finance developmental editor with South-Western College Publishing in Cincinnati seemed the natural next step. He also decided to get a real estate license. A few years later, he was poached by Pearson Education in New Jersey, eventually putting his real estate license in escrow and moving to their branch in England. “It was an amazing experience,” Sigel said, adding, “I ran myself into the ground.” An epiphany came for Sigel when an author he was working with was diagnosed with cancer. The author did not want to spend the last of his life


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Thomas Sigel visiting Scogli dei Ciclopi, Sicily. photo provided

Thomas Sigel playing piano in his home.

Thomas Sigel visited Taos Pueblo, New Mexico, in 2019. photo provided

Thomas Sigel’s parents, Marilyn and David, enjoying the Ionian Sea, a bay of the Mediterranean Sea, in 2011. photo provided

In November 2019, Thomas Sigel visited Segovia in Spain. photo provided

Thomas Sigel at El Jem Colosseum in El Djem, Tunisia, in March 2014. photo provided continued, Page 10


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ORMACO’s home base

had put it in escrow while working out of state and internationally. Yet, there was something missing and his energy was looking for an outlet. It would soon come to him. Having been so immersed in art, music and Thomas Sigel has collected various pieces of art on his culture all of his life, Sigel was dismayed to see that travels, these masks are a favorite of his. those were exactly the programs that were being trying to revise his book. Then another author cut and underfunded at schools. delayed revising her book because her sister had After determining no other programs were filling been diagnosed with terminal cancer. the gaps, Sigel decided to find a way to help give The company’s focus on profits instead of people area children the same access to the arts that he was upsetting, Sigel said, adding that it did not had enjoyed. seem like the company cared and only wanted the “I have a deep passion for music, arts and revisions (which were worth millions). culture,” Sigel said, “The impact of these programs Sigel was burned out and tired. on children...it’s not about me, it’s about the lasting He quit Pearson and left for a three-week long impact.” safari to explore South Africa and the Republic of Sigel had found his mission. Leaning on all of the Zambia, including canoeing the Zambezi River. expertise and knowledge he had gained throughout When he felt recharged and ready to face the his travels and jobs and the love of the arts instilled world again, he returned to London and started T. by his parents, he soon had created ORMACO. Sigel Consulting/Sigel Press. He immediately had To Sigel, it was the perfect answer. Through clients because of the strong international ORMACO, he could help artists and musicians connections he had forged over the years. present their work and be paid and at the same After having traveled so much of the world and time, he could bring the arts to underserved, gaining so much expertise and international disadvantaged and rural schoolchildren through connections, it was time for Sigel to return to Ohio. programs offered by ORMACO. Upon his return, he settled in Medina and Sigel also created a tagline for the organization to continued to build his company. He also returned to emphasize the importance of the arts: For without real estate. He had obtained his license in 1997 and culture, man has no soul.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

By the end of 2019, nine years after creating ORMACO, Sigel had taken it from a mere thought to an organization offering 75 outreach programs to schoolchildren in eight Ohio counties, He was to find, however, that as with most innovative ideas, few understood what he was trying to accomplish. Like every other obstacle he has faced, Sigel has never let this one slow him down either. His dedication to making the arts accessible to all has never wavered. ORMACO has continued to grow and expand the programs it offers, too many to list here, but the following are a sample. Jazz and Opera Under the Stars offers performances in Uptown Park in Medina’s Public Square during the summer with people from all over coming to enjoy the music, Sigel said. There are party buses to Cleveland’s Playhouse Square so adults can enjoy a lively trip to see a play with a box lunch, wine, and cookies to enjoy on the way. Medina’s Garfield School students are given the opportunity to participate in a song-writing program and attend musical performances. In addition, ORMACO brings in musicians from around the world for its annual World Tour of Music, with musicians staying with local residents. This makes for a unique cultural exchange with musicians from all around the world. “We embrace everybody,” Sigel said. Sigel has connected ORMACO to the Police Activities League (PALs), which offers after-school activities with police officers. Unfortunately, because Sigel tries to ensure programs are free for people to attend so as to include everyone, there is a misconception that the musicians are donating their time. “That’s the challenge of the organization,” Sigel said, adding there is not another organization around that does what ORMACO does.

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Some organizations, such as the Wadsworth Public Library, pay to have ORMACO’s programs presented there. All funds donated go to pay the musicians; cover general operating expenses, such as printed programs; graphic artists; technical support for the website; office supplies; and business expenses. With all funds going directly toward the outreach programs, that means the more funds raised, the more programs ORMACO can provide. Even if each attendee to each event donated $1 each, it would help ORMACO cover its expenses and even perhaps expand its offerings. COVID was another challenge to overcome, and Sigel pivoted ORMACO to offer online performances so even during seclusion, people still had access to the performances, It also helped musicians to earn continued, Page 12


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money during a time when their access to audiences was severely limited. As formal and private as Sigel may seem, he never hesitates to give with all of his heart and to hug those he calls friends. He is passionate in everything he pursues, from hiking, biking, canoeing, reading, listening to music, and traveling. In addition to the trombone, he also plays piano. While Sigel is a friend to many, he has never been married. His international career and frequent location changes allowed little time to cultivate a lasting relationship. He seems settled at last in Homerville and has even become a Homer Township trustee. Sigel has never married, although he was once engaged. “Sadly, I never married. I was always on the road. There have been other women, but alas, nothing that worked out,” Sigel shared. Sigel’s love of family is evident when he speaks of his parents. His father is now 90, and Sigel says he is still sharp. When Sigel’s mother died on May 27, 2020, his grief was very deep. As if to help draw him from his grief, a week after his mother’s passing, a 10-acre property in Homerville, close to his parent’s home, came on the market that was what Sigel had been seeking. With a large pond, weeping willows, a log cabin, and lots of space, Sigel saw a new home for

ORMACO that could grow into being an educational and cultural center. So was born HeARTland. Just as Sigel’s heart was breaking, it also began a sort of rebirth with a new path for his passion ORMACO, which his mother had helped plant the seeds for so long ago. He plans to have retreats, music master classes, corporate retreats, and music programs on the property, surrounded by woods and farms. Everything would be geared to ensuring the future of ORMACO long after he has died. Perpetuity is a word that he uses as he looks around the property and mulls the possibilities of what he can create there. Sigel plans to create walking trails in the woods, building individual art studios in the old barn, and placing sculptures around the property. He has a small art collection within the cabin that he gathered on his travels and which now give the rustic cabin an international flair that somehow melds perfectly to create an atmosphere of discovery. Sigel’s greatest dream is for ORMACO to continue on forever, to ensure that all be inspired to reach for a world they might have never known existed. If you would like to volunteer or donate, would like to learn more, or want to attend one of ORMACO’s events, go to https://ormaco.org/ or call 419-853-6016.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

THE READING NOOK

The Longing by Angel J. Harrison I sit in my office and feel the roar within me the disquiet grows and paces like a caged male lion who puts on a show without wanting to The fight against the constraints of expectations Of what a “good girl” should be I long to run barefoot through a meadow to visit the woods of my childhood to have the time to consider what a roly poly is thinking but I am trapped here tied to responsibilities chained to expectations How easy it would be to start driving and keep driving until the car’s tank is as dry and useless as I am it used to be easier to disappear

Angel J. Harrison is a Medina County resident who has written poetry and other creative writings since 8 years old. photo by Jean Wimmerlin

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

Have a fiction/non-fiction story (long or short) or poem you’d like published? Send it to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with some information about yourself: where you live, what you do for a living, anything you’d like to share about yourself. You retain all rights to your work, we only “borrow” it to run in the magazine and make you a published author! For more information and the submission form, please go to: https://bit.ly/2Xs2zSf

photo by Maxim Tajer


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Affinity in Action by Bob Arnold

I was at my grandson’s football game recently, standing at the end of the field watching the team practicing. A woman walked up to me and asked, “Is that the eighth-grade team out there?” Before I could respond, she added, “Because, if it is I don’t want my grandson out on that field, they are big!” I assured her it was the varsity team, and the eighth-grade team was beyond them. Then I asked her grandson’s name and number in case I wanted to keep my eye on him, adding, “My grandson is on the team, also!” She informed me that she was from the opposing team. We laughed. By that time, my wife had joined me. Of course, I had to explain the whole weird situation. The exchange reminded me that networking needs to have affinity mixed up in it or meeting people becomes very awkward. Affinity is simply having something in common with someone else. One of the best ways of finding common ground is to simply ask a question about something you are interested in. If you are at an event, like I was, and you are meeting someone about your age, like I was, simply throw out a question involving the major reason you are there, like this woman did at the football game. She focused on the team and her grandson because it was the most convenient thing at the moment. We had found something we both shared and cared about. For an added twist, once the game started, it became obvious that her grandson and my grandson were blocking each other at the line. Sometimes networking simply amazes me. We get so uptight about starting a conversation about the right thing when the topic is right in front of us the whole time. Grab the situation and have some fun meeting someone. By the way, affinity in action is how you met most of your best friends. It works! Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at theNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

Doing Business Local business networking events, not category restricted

Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, November 1 November Luncheon: Medina City School District Updates and Student Projects, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3UOGM0U Wednesday, November 16 Networking WOW! 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 5050 Eastpointe Drive, Medina. No walk-ins. Chamber membership requirement after two events, $12 member attendance charge, $15 non-member attendance charge. Register at https://bit.ly/3eOI9wj Thursday, November 17 Young Professionals Association: Engage Virtual Range Networking Event, 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Serenite, 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Get more information and register at https://medinachamber.com/events Thursday, November 18 Chamber Chat, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., location to be announced. Coffee and networking. https://bit.ly/3gpH8LX

Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Tuesday, November 4 Chamber Chomps, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Samosky’s, 6738 Center Road, Valley City. Wednesday, November 16 November Luncheon: Nonprofit Showcase, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., St. Ambrose Catholic Parish, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Chamber membership requirement after two events. Members $20, non-members $25. Register at https://bit.ly/3VAzgqZ

Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce Monday, November 7 Women in Leadership, noon to 1 p.m., Soprema Café, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Guest speaker Pat Bennett, founder of Pat’s Granola. Chamber membership requirement. Fee $15. Reservations to chamber office by the preceding Wednesday. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3FcWQ7x

Seville Area Chamber of Commerce Thursday, December 8 December Monthly Luncheon, 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawthorne Suites, 5025 Park Avenue West, Seville. $8 donation, pay at the door.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Hungry for Chips

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BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Successful Succession Planning

by Tyler Hatfield

by Rachel Shepard

The world has experienced many events in the past few years that few people could have predicted but affected the production of silicon chip production and the availability of smart devices. From COVID-19 bringing the planet to a halt and economic changes affecting millions of people, few could have been ready. As a cherry on top, the tech industry faced a new problem: silicon chip shortages. Silicon is a metalloid element, discovered in 1824, that is found in 27.7 percent of the Earth’s crust by mass and is behind only oxygen as the most abundant element available. It is used in nearly all electronics dependent on integrated circuits or microprocessors. As manufacturing fell to only a fraction of its expected production because of steps taken to protect workers from the spread of COVID, the demand for silicon chips grew. The supply chain simply could not keep up. In the last few years, there also has been an explosion in new smart home equipment and vehicles, “Internet of Things” devices, and enhanced computer hardware as the emphasis on artificial intelligence grows. The growing broad spectrum of technology has put a significant strain on the current production process for electronics. While the supply shortages are finally starting to be resolved, the smart and connected devices industry has seen a potentially bleak future if there is a repeat of the past few years. Worse bottlenecks or severe damage to infrastructure in the future could cause extensive breakdowns in telecommunications and cause entire industries to stand still, waiting on parts while demand continues to grow. Several tech giants, with this knowledge, are taking steps to prevent disruptions in the market as advancements continue. They want to protect the industries, as well as the people relying on their products, because delays can cause a ripple effect of issues for everyone involved. The chip shortage is ending and should be another piece of life returning to normal.

You have worked so hard to build a business and/or an organization and you want it to continue to have an impact long after you are gone. You may be young still, but it is never too early to start get a succession plan in place for the future. Succession planning is more than just the owners, it also is all of the key individuals that keep the operation running smoothly. What exactly is succession planning? Succession planning is the process of identifying key individuals and important positions within the organization and creating a pipeline of successors. A successor is an employee with the skills, abilities and knowledge to fill a vacant position. There are three major risks that arise from a lack of succession planning. The first is a significant loss of time spent getting a new employee up to speed; secondly are the potential disruptions to daily workflow; and finally, there can be a loss of critical knowledge that may never be recovered. To avoid those risks, there are five steps to take for successful succession planning. 1. Develop a plan. This plan will consider all the key roles in the company, including your role as an owner/leader. 2. Identify potential leaders. Who has the skills, abilities and knowledge to fill the vacant role? 3. Communicate with the potential successors. Let them know that they are valued and being considered for a leadership role in the future. Use professional and leadership development programs to prepare them. 4. Incorporate succession planning in recruiting and hiring efforts. This will help identify and fill talent gaps. 5. Determine your own succession plan. Some business owners hope their children will take over the business when they retire. In my line of work, I see that many times the children are not interested in taking over the business. This leaves the business owner with tough choices regarding when to exit and how the business will continue to thrive after their gone. Selling the business may be an option. Is there a valued employee willing to buy the business? In summary, succession planning is critical for the future survival of a business and will ensure that critical knowledge is passed down to future generations.

Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, https://www.hatsmediagroup.com/ , and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

Rachel Shepard is the founder of LonaRock, LLC, and a resident of Medina County. She specializes in helping businesses understand financials and access capital. Shepard can be reached by email at rshepard@lonarock.com.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

BUSINESS: RISE AND SHINE

Discovering a Forgotten Target Market by Bryan Lefelhoc One of the best ways for a small business to grow is to remain strong in the first place. The foundation that is built in the beginning will be what supports future growth. That is where happy customers come in. A small business survives on customer satisfaction for longterm stability, referral opportunities, and the customers’ smiles that exist because they are well served. If business owners were asked to reflect on what makes them the proudest, the first answer may well be their happy customers. It is a fact that the best customers are loyal, happy, satisfied, and stay with a company for the long haul. They also are a competition’s top prospect. Reflect on that for a moment. Imagine what is happening every day in your best customer’s world. It is not hard, because it happens to you, too. � They are getting sales calls from other vendors. � They are seeing marketing designed to create desire for the latest and greatest thing. Invention Convention Patents recently granted to Medina County residents. Only county residents are listed, although there may be additional people listed as patent grantees. Patent for: Handheld Vacuum Cleaner To: Joseph Saunders City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Isolator and Suspension Assembly for Riding Equipment To: MTD Products Inc. City of Residence: Valley City Patent for: Torque Converter With Internally Connected Studs To: Justin Persinger City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Banking System Using a Wearable Device for Simultaneously Visually Perceiving Physical Surrounding in a Field of View of a User and Visual Outputs on a Display of the Wearable Device To: Patricia A. Walker and Ralph E. Jocke City of Residence: Medina

� They are hearing stories from their friends of how another product or service is serving them well. � They are facing issues that did not exist before. Maybe they have to cut costs, maybe they get to launch a new line. At the same time, the competition is dropping off gifts in the hopes of having a conversation. They are asking questions related to your products and services, looking for ways that they could be improved. They are offering lower prices and better solutions and digging up opportunities. You may be doing the same thing in pursuit of another customer, or you may realize you are someone else’s top prospect, and you are having an “Aha!” moment. When an ad budget goes to lead generation and salespeople are making cold calls, what is being done to retain the best customers? Courtesy calls, VIP programs and helpful newsletters are all ways to stay in touch and top of mind with loyal customers. Are happy and satisfied customers treated at least as well as a top prospect? If not, then the good news is, it is not too late to start. Bryan Lefelhoc is founder and president of Bryan Media Strategies LLC, a boutique “company of one” marketing firm. Contact Lefelhoc by email at bryan@bryanmediastrategies.com

Patent for: Ingestion Resistance Through Delayed Dispenser Activation To: Shelby Jay Buell City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Refractory Lining Structure To: Daniel T. Schaner City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Devices for Reducing Tire Noise To: Robert W. Asper City of Residence: Wadsworth

Patent for: Silane Disulfide Vegetable Oils, Method of Making and Use in Rubber Compositions and Tires To: George Jim Papakonstantopoulos City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Functional Disulfide Vegetable Oils, Method of Making and Use in Rubber Compositions and Tires To: George Jim Papakonstantopoulos City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Flexible Polyvinyl Halide Used for Injection Over-Moulding To: Robert Schilling City of Residence: Medina

Patent for: Telephone System for the Hearing Impaired To: Michael J. Medley City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Polymeric Foam Comprising Low Levels of Brominated Flame Retardant and Method of Making Same To: Barbara A. Fabian City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Product Management Display System With Trackless Pusher Mechanism To: Stephen N. Hardy City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Tracking and Monitoring System To: Kevin Darrah City of Residence: Medina Patent for: Tire To: Lac An Nguyen City of Residence: Wadsworth Patent for: Coating Compositions Containing a Hydropyphenyl Functional Polymer and a Latex Polymer To: Alexander Polykarpov City of Residence: Brunswick


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: WATCHDOG

Picture This by Amy Barnes

He was totally unprepared for the message he received. Someone had taken a photo of him that he had posted on social media and used deepfake software to make a (as he called it) lewd video portraying him doing things he had never done. They demanded payment to keep them from releasing the video. The most common tactic of these crooks is to not even actually have a video, just claim they do and work on the victim’s fears of a ruined reputation or job loss to get them to pay. At first, he paid but then decided to take another tactic. He let his employer, family and friends know of the situation and then he completely closed his social media accounts to avoid any further harassment or scamming. This is one of many scams and schemes that are rampant through social media, and it seems to have gotten much worse since the COVID shutdown and re-opening of businesses. According to the Federal Trade Commission, losses due to fraud totaled more than $5.8 billion in 2021, an increase of 70 percent as compared to 2020. Keep in mind that those losses are only counting those that were reported by the more than 2.8 million people who filed reports. The FTC reports that the two most common categories are online shopping scams and imposter scams, which are scams where someone claims to represent a company and tries to get the target to send money to them, usually through gift card codes or bitcoin. To file a report on scams, fraud or bad business practices, go to https://reportfraud.ftc.gov/ While the FTC does not intervene in individual cases, the agency does share the reports with approximately 2,800 other local, state, federal and international law enforcement agencies. Finally, keep in mind that just because ransom is paid does not mean you are safe or it is ended. In situations like the one at the beginning of this column, you are dealing with criminals. They lie. Paying a ransom is your choice, but keep in mind they will come back as many times as they can to continue to get more money.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES Chris Pickens is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic by Chris Pickens health coach. She has been a vegan since 2016. Pickens enjoys A quiche is described as a custard pie that is unsweetened and sharing her recipes, getting feedback (good or bad) on her recipes, getting requests for future recipes, and sharing will usually have a savory filling, such as ham, mushrooms information about veganism and why she became vegan. She can and/or spinach. be contacted by e-mailing her at momof4chris@gmail.com Though the history of quiche is assumed to be of French origin, it actually originated in Germany around 500 to 1500 AD. Please put “The Joy of Medina Attn: Chris” in the subject line. The word quiche comes from the German word “kuchen,” which means cake. HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME! This dish is very versatile because it can be made for Glazed Salmon With Rice breakfast, brunch or dinner. As far as German tradition goes, it also can be made into a dessert by simply adding or subtracting and Edamame a few simple ingredients from the filling. by Kel Bulkowski

Vegan Veggie Quiche

Crust: � 1 tablespoon flaxseed � 3 tablespoons water � 1 cup all-purpose flour � 1 cup almond flour � ½ teaspoon salt � 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil � 2 to 4 tablespoons water Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease a pie pan. Combine flaxseed and water, set aside. Add both flours and salt to a food processor, slowly drizzle in olive oil. Add flaxseed and water mixture to the food processor. Add additional water, as needed. Crumble dough into a pie pan, and press mixture into pan. Bake for 12 minutes. While the crust bakes, make the filling. When the crust is done baking, remove from the oven and set the oven to 375 degrees. Filling: � 2 garlic cloves, minced � 1 cup chopped mushrooms � ½ to 1 tablespoon olive oil � 1 cup chopped baby spinach � 14 ounces firm tofu, drained (no need to press out excess liquid) � 2 tablespoons almond milk � 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast � Salt to taste � ⅓ chopped cherry or grape tomatoes Saute garlic and mushrooms three to four minutes in olive oil. Add spinach and cook until the spinach shrinks up. Set aside. Mix together tofu, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pour filling into the crust. Add tomatoes. Bake for 35 minutes. Let cool for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing.

This recipe is flavorful and gourmet tasting with its sweet and savory flavors. This recipe makes a filling and healthy dinner for two. � � � � � � � � � � �

Cooking oil 3 tablespoons chopped garlic 1/3 cup red bell pepper, chopped 2 skinless salmon fillets Salt and pepper to taste 1/4 cup soy sauce 3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 boil-in-bag jasmine rice 1 steamable bag of edamame 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds

Start by heating cooking oil and garlic in a pan. Add chopped red bell peppers, cook until tender. Add salmon fillets and season with salt and pepper. While one side of salmon is cooking, whisk together soy, honey, more garlic, and lemon juice in a bowl. If too thick, add some warm water, and stir until well blended. Flip salmon and pour half the sauce onto the fillets, spooning it back on top as it cooks down and thickens. Cook until salmon flakes easily and is cooked throughout. Meanwhile, microwave jasmine rice and bag of edamame as directed. Split onto two plates, drizzle edamame with leftover sauce and top with black sesame seeds. Enjoy! Kel Bulkowski loves to create recipes influenced by dishes from around the world, with her favorites being Mediterranean and Asian. She also runs a small, local exotic animal rescue. She can be contacted at countingbluecars3@gmail.com or https://tinyurl.com/zwfzh3tr

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Create a Wreath for Holidays by Michelle Riley Feeling crafty? The most amazing crafts are usually the ones created from your own natural resources. Look no farther than your own outdoor green space for things such as grapevines, honeysuckle, English ivy, and wisteria. These four easy-to-find vines are the best for making the architecture of a wreath, swag, stem ball or any other woody décor imagined. Left-over remnants from a recent trim or trim stems needed at the time of creation. Soak the stems in a bucket of warm water for at least an hour. This removes any bugs that may be hiding out on the stems, as well as making the stems more pliable for easier implementation. Think about the size of wreath, ball or swag wanted and cut the stems accordingly. After soaking the stems, immediately begin forming them into the desired shape. Use floral wire to bind the stems together where necessary. Once the architecture of the piece has been created, allow it to dry for at least 24 hours before adding decorations. When creating a wreath or swag, use glue or floral wire to attach dried perennials such as lavender, hydrangea, yarrow, roses, goldenrod, and grasses as decorations. A dried bouquet delivered for a special occasion is never off of the menu, as well as winterberry holly stems or evergreen holly stems. Applying a UV-sunblock floral protectant spray will help maintain the vibrancy of the dried flowers. The arrangement being created can be as simple as two foot-long pieces of grapevine cinched in the center, with floral accents added to become a swag to hang over an entrance or doorway. Stems can be wrapped into a ball of any size, with sparkle lights worked throughout the ball. Let your imagination take off! Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com ; and https:// neohiogarden.com . She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

The Letter

Entertaining Winter Workouts

by Kelly Bailey

by Robert Soroky

Imagine being 87 years old. Laying in a bed, looking out the window, pondering life. You are nearing the end. Now write a letter from your 87-year-old self to your current self. What are you thinking about? Who do you want to be with? What would you say to your younger self about your current worries? What is 87-year-old you wishing you would have done while there was still time? Dear 42-year-old Self, Life has been good. You loved, lived, and laughed. You failed, flipped out, and forgave. You created a wonderful life for yourself, with very few regrets. All the same, this is a letter to you, not meant to be negative, but intended to wake you up. I wish I had just one more day to feel the breeze on my face. One more autumn to see the leaves fall. One more day of fishing. One last hike. When others judge you for taking time to enjoy life, just know that you will not regret all of the fun you had. I would give up all the cars, diamonds, and white picket fences in the world for just one more second with my husband. He was my absolute best friend in this world. My girl, the way you know how to choose your battles and value quality time with him, keep doing that. The two of you have a bond most will never know. Buy fewer of those fancy yoga leggings and bathing suits so you can afford to go on that bucket list trip to Africa. Turn off your phone when your teenage daughter is in the room. Give her your full attention. Force her to do the same sometimes. Let her know that time, connection, and attention are life’s most precious gifts. Call your parents. I know sometimes they seem distant and you do not see eye to eye, but they still want to hear from you. Let go of that terrible thing you did that almost wrecked your world. Everyone has skeletons in their closet. A bad decision does not make you a bad person. You reacted exactly as you needed to in those moments of crisis. Let it go and be proud of how you handled it. I am proud of you. Father time is undefeated. Those eye wrinkles mean you smiled a lot. That little extra pudge around your belly means you gave life, ate the cheese, drank the wine, and loved every second of it. Take it a little easier, both mentally and physically, on your body.

As the crisp and colorful fall season transitions to the cold and snowy landscape of winter, opportunities for comfy outdoor riding become few and far between. So, if you are a person obsessed with bike riding but hate the frigid temperatures this time of year, how can the off-season cycling blues be avoided? Sometimes it might be just about staying active. Here are a few ideas to help ease those blues. Indoor riding. I can already see your eyes rolling at the thought of riding indoors. Boring, right? Not so fast. With the advent of smart trainers and associated riding software programs, riding your bike indoors has never been more entertaining. With dozens of virtual locations to ride and resistance tied directly to those locations, chances are that you will keep engaged without ever needing to grab a book or stream a TV show. I have completed 75-mile rides on my smart trainer and never once felt bored. Indoor trainers are more cost effective than those big, pricey exercise bikes, especially if you already own a bike. Bike shops often have interactive displays where indoor trainers can be sampled. The second suggestion is to rent a fat-tire bike. If you do not like riding in the cold, a fat-tire bike may change your mind. These bikes have huge tires that are tailor-made for floating over snowy trails, allowing folks to ride year-round. This time of year, some bike shops will rent fat-tire bikes specifically for enjoying winter’s wonderland of snow. The third suggestion is to hire a personal trainer. Maybe motivation is your handicap. If sitting on the couch with a peppermint mocha while binge watching every season of every Star Trek series was your winter game plan, perhaps a workout companion putting you through a rigorous fitness program is in order. Trust me, personal trainers have heard all the excuses you will drag out to shut down your fitness mindset this time of year, they know exactly what it takes to make getting off that couch worthwhile. One-on-one training can be quite effective as all of the attention is focused on you and your fitness needs. The key is to stay active and not lose all of the gains from spring and summer. For more information about indoor riding and smart trainers, send an email to the address below.

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022 I have seen other comments on this movie saying that it was ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL supposed to be women empowering. Wow. Really? Where? Serving up Dictatorships A final note: Yes, there should be a comma in the title: “Don’t By Amy Barnes Worry, Darling.” Movie: “Don’t Worry Darling” Seen: theater Rating (out of 5 possible): The movie opens in a 1950s setting with Alice (Florence Pugh) and Jack (Harry Styles) seemingly living an ideal existence as the newest couple to join the exclusive community of the isolated inhabitants of Victory, California, located in the middle of the desert. Victory is overseen and violently ruled behind a large plastic smile and the iron fist of Frank (Chris Pine) who is the creator of the community, the company and the top-secret project. Every morning, the men leave in perfectly timed and synchronized unison to go to their top-secret jobs. Wives are expected to express gratitude to their husbands for providing such an “ideal” life of housecleaning, TV, children, and making sure dinner is ready upon their husbands’ return. The one caveat to the couples remaining in Victory is for the women to never ask questions, to be obedient and to never go to headquarters. Any woman who dares to step out of the preset mold for her is subjected to being dragged off by men in jumpsuits and subjected to electric shock treatment. Welcome to the movie where the cars are the best part of the movie, and they are only the props. I kept being reminded of the “Stepford Wives,” with the common threads between the two being controlling women and taking away their free will and autonomy in order for the men to achieve a “perfect” world. This movie just did not flow, with even the actors seemingly confused as to what they were supposed to do next. In addition, there were scenes that would have worked better if placed in different spots within the movie. There also were scenes that seemed like they were accidentally left in. Such as the scene where Alice realizes the eggs in the egg carton are just empty shells. Yet, there are eggs in the frying pan every morning. Excuse me? The story overall does succeed in keeping the audience engaged, mostly out of confusion, and the answers at the end of the movie were disappointing, it felt a little too much like been there done that. While the focus and message of the movie seems to be all about how far some men will go to achieve an idyllic life with obedient, well-provided for wives, there is a secondary message. In spite of its flaws and erratic delivery, this movie brings into consideration the lack of selfhood that women had in the past and currently still struggle with as they find a way to define themselves that incorporates careers and home.

Movie: “Amsterdam” Seen: theater Rating (out of 5 possible): There has been a lot of buzz back and forth as to whether the movie is based on a true story. There is a supposed loose connection to a plot from the 1930s to overthrow the US government and install a dictator, using a retired major general to lead the charge (https://bit.ly/3eYPOZ9). Instead of leading them, the major general turned in the instigators. While no one was ever prosecuted, it was determined by the McCormack-Dickstein Committee that there had been discussion, planning and involvement by major financial backers. As far as the movie goes, there was absolutely nothing to like about this movie. Just when it seems there might be some saving grace, it takes a wild left turn of little sense and no value. At times, it was hard to tell if the script was just that bad or if it was the directing by David O. Russell. The flow had all the feeling of someone desperately running ahead of the movie, throwing new pieces of footage in as it rolled. There is absolutely no chemistry among those portraying the characters. They put me in mind of those holiday photographs where everyone is smiling but seconds before they were fighting tooth and nail. As bad as this movie is, what was the absolute, over the top, most terrible part was the portrayal by Christian Bale of the main character, Burt Berendsen. Bale’s choice to portray the character as a very poor and overplayed version of the old TV detective Columbo was horribly irritating and misplaced. The addition of having Berendsen also have a glass eye just as Columbo actor Peter Falk did in real life was unnecessary, including the repeated scenes that I can only assume were supposed to be humorous when the glass eye would fall out. No one was laughing in the theater. Columbo already was somewhat of a characterization, but Bale took it to a level of ridiculousness that was nails-onchalkboard excruciating. The rest of the cast was as if someone had walked into a bar and collected who might be sitting there or who had nothing else to do and wanted to pick up a few dollars. Any real talent is wasted here and almost impossible to find a glimmer of. Watching this movie had all the feeling of an awkward college party that no one really wanted to be at.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

ENTERTAINMENT: FUN AND GAMES

second in line to the British throne. Despite her reservations, Bex falls

Royal Reads

hard for Nick.

by Mary Olson

“Murder at Balmoral”

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Soon, the tabloids and the royal family insert themselves into this budding romance, forcing Bex to consider whether life with Nick is worth withstanding constant scrutiny.

Rating (out of 5 possible): “A Murder at Balmoral” by Chris McGeorge is a cozy, timely and twisty novel that will appeal to readers who enjoy a locked-room mystery. The setting is Christmas day at Balmoral Castle. The royal family has retired to the drawing room after a lavish holiday dinner when the king, Eric Windsor, collapses just before giving his traditional Christmas speech. With only the nuclear family present at the castle and a raging blizzard outside, help is nowhere to be found. Perhaps because of the wine and food, the family seems slow to

“The Gown” Rating (out of 5 possible): “The Gown” by Jennifer Robson focuses on a young Canadian woman who discovers priceless embroidered flowers in her grandmother’s personal items, leading her to believe her grandmother had some role in creating Princess Elizabeth’s gown for her 1947 nuptials to Phillip Mountbatten. Richly detailed, romantic, and suspenseful.

understand and respond to the crisis, so the chef, Jonathan Alleyne, steps in. Everyone is stunned when they realize the king is dead, apparently from one sip of poisoned whiskey. What follows is a Christmas like no other for the Windsors.

Mary Olson is the readers' advisory librarian at the Medina County District Library.

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Alleyne is alone in his attempts to solve the murder. Long-held grudges and secrets surface as members of the royal family accuse each other, outline motives, and vacillate between appreciating and disdaining Alleyne’s questioning. Driven by a deep loyalty to the King, Alleyne fights not only the princesses, princes and their families, but his own rapidly declining health. He simply cannot rest until he finds justice for the King. A steadily accelerating plot, gradual reveals and some big twists toward the end make this a very enjoyable holiday mystery for Agatha Christie fans and royal watchers alike.

More Royal Reads “The Royal We” Rating (out of 5 possible): “The Royal We” by Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan is a modern romance examining timeless issues of celebrity. Rebecca (Bex) is an American student at Oxford University, where chance has given her a dorm room down the hall from Prince Nicholas,

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Joyful Word Search

Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

Joyful Search WorldWord of Thomas

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

WORLD OF THOMAS E A C C E S S I B L E K D T B

C J R Z T R O M B O N E D Y V

N R J E N B L L S T R A N N V

E L R C A Q T X X J R Q C R N

I D K H P I R N T L X U R P X

C K M R P U S T J L L E N N N

S B X E K S B S K T L Y N O Z

L B B P J B T L U L Y O I T M

A J V U Y R J R I R I T Y T N

ARTS CULTURE ARTS TROMBONE CULTURE TROMBONEHOMERVILLE HOMERVILLE RUSSIA RUSSIA ACCESSIBLE

C J Y B R B E V E S A T X X Q

I M D L G M R M S C H Q M X B

T Z D I K E T I I L N I Y M P

I N B C M B M D N Z D O N J Q

L L V O N Y E Z G T L R C G T

O R H G R D R J N L J V D N W

P B L G V M D X T X Q T Q G G

MISSION CZECH REPUBLIC MISSION CONCERTS CZECH REPUBLIC PUBLISHING CONCERTS POLITICAL SCIENCE PUBLISHING POLITICAL SCIENCE DEDICATION

ACCESSIBLE

DEDICATION

S

October 2022 Joyful Word Search Answer Key for Last Month’s Search Perfectly Pauline

Perfectly Pauline

S R O B H G I E N G N I R A C V R

C O L L E C T I B L E B M X Y B E

N G WW Y W K J J P V S P Y M C S N Z E T L L M T L C Z B T E B Y V

S Q B B J Q E L O R L E Z T K C R

M U J L B M R N G B V R I Q A Q Q

L S O N J T B Y I E R M A T K G Y

N L WO B W E P L G V L N N Y A L M M O M L A Y S B H Z G C T Y R J

M H Y G K A N E C Y Z A N R K N B

D S J N N D R L R Y M K O J B B W

R R P N R I A U M D N N D C D T J

L T V D A C Z Q B X W E L L N Z G T L N R K Y K N M Q Q V A G L O Q E R Z C R L L W L W N I Z Q WG H R X M G C GWM V W L Q Y M N K W

J C N J G Z Y N N L C M N T Z R G

“It’s not my fault you guys don’t know how to ‘Thanksgiving.’ “

“My apartment isn’t messy; it is ADHD organized.”


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

This month’s clue: A rare paint color Last month’s answer: Inventors, “Invention Convention,” Page 14, September 2022

a

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

It was a brisk October morning, but vendors at the Farmers Market of Medina County were ready for the hardy customers who visited. As the last farmers market still open for the season, their last outside market is the last Saturday in October. Vendors will be moving to Boyert’s Greenhouse, 7171 Wooster Pike, Medina, for the winter. photos by Amy Barnes

by Amy Barnes

From left, Chuck Garnes, Angie Laxganger and Peggy Garnes, the market’s organizer, discuss the benefits of Peggy’s honey products.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

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From left, Dave and Billiejean from Banzhaf Garten Organic Farm sell Janet Piombo some of their produce.

A cold breeze did not keep Kathy Reed from picking out a pie.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2022

continued from Page 29

From left, Dee Parsons, Gina Loy enjoy shopping the booth of Sherry K. Letzelter.

Barb Beres, right, picks out a dog bandanna made by Melanie Leonardi


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

Elaine Korud, left; Cody Grey and baby Summer Grey were some of the vendors braving the chill.

Kimberley Lee accepts payment from Barb Pavlick for her products while Ruth England waits.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

November 2022 Nonprofit Calendar T Tuesday, November 1 National Author’s Day Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Drum Group, 11 a.m. to noon, Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Celebrate community and life through interactive music. Register at https://bit.ly/3CqmWAD Create! Print Projects, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make prints with provided supplies and materials. Ages 12 to 17. Register at https://bit.ly/3D3toiC Haunted Escape Room, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3S3qPBC Sedona Wrap Bracelet, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. All materials provided to make a bracelet. Register at https://bit.ly/3EATdHX Ohio Heists: Local Author Jane Ann Turzillo, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

Wednesday, November 2 National Deviled Eggs Day Skittle Art, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. For students Grades 6 to 12. Mindful Parenting and Holidays, 6 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn four strategies to help minimize stress and maximize joy during the holidays. Register at https://bit.ly/3Exu6pw

Thursday, November 3 International Men Make Dinner Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., Saint Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Tween Thursday: Book Bingo, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Art History Craft Time, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Create a portrait inspired by Pablo Picasso. Register at https:// bit.ly/3yChCt4 Forest Therapy Walk, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina Marsh, 4266 Fenn Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3yIRDQq Corn Husk Dolls, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Create and learn about corn husk dolls. Register at https://bit.ly/3emcz9h Will it Waffle?, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3CjTpss Family Game Night, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworht.

Friday, November 4 National Common Sense Day

Saturday, November 5 National Donut Day A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Jingle and Mingle Craft Show, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Craft show. Rental spaces are available for $25, table and space available for $30. Contact Bonnie at bbabcock8858@outlook.com Weaving Guild Demo, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Mysterious World of Owls, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Discover the amazing adaptations of owls. 10th Annual Tony Imburgia Holdem Tourney, 4 p.m. to 10 p.m., Veterans Memorial Hall, 620 N Broadway Street, Medina. Doors open at 4 p.m., tournament starts at 5 p.m. Tickets are $55 buy-in and $25 re-buy. All proceeds go to the scholarship fund sponsored by the Knights of Columbus Council.

119th Annual Turkey Dinner, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Brunswick Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Adult meals, $12; children meals, $10.

Sunday, November 6 National Saxophone Day

Monday, November 7 National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day Do it Yourself Tote Bag, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3MF9DkR

Tuesday, November 8 National Tongue Twister Day Senior Strides, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. A hike for senior citizens. Library Art Store, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Shop the library art store with library bucks and practice money counting and creating art. This event is intended for Grades K-5. Register at https://bit.ly/3Vo3FZi Who Was at the First Thanksgiving?, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Who was at the first Thanksgiving and where were they hiding? Find out with Akron Zoo’s animal ambassadors. Register at https://bit.ly/3ROqbHP Afternoon Movie, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Movie title was not listed. Savor the Flavor of Autumn, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Discover new recipes that use fall veggies and learn seasoning pairings and cooking tips. Register at https:// bit.ly/3MpdBh0 Explorastory: Bear Says Thanks, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Pumpkin molding dough, crafts, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3gqgMJJ

Wednesday, November 9 National Chaos Never Dies Day Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. An easy walk to explore and observe the unfolding of nature all year long. Naturebrary, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Explore, discover, and connect with indoor and outdoor activities. Register at https://bit.ly/3MryGHR Thanks a Lot!, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make a craft about what you are thankful for. This event is intended for Grades 6 to12. Antivirus Programs, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about antivirus programs. Register at https://bit.ly/3VepQ46 Wadsworth Area Historical Society: The Confederate Secret Service and the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Learn about the Confederate secret service and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Thursday, November 10 National Vanilla Cupcake Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Paint a Rock and Spread Some Love, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3CQdRT5 Tween Thursday: Wild, Wild West, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Get cowgirl or


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022 cowboy name, play games, make wanted poster, have balloon stampede. Register at https://bit.ly/3eMl79q Gluten Free Baking, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register at https://bit.ly/3rRe1Ue Ohio’s Hiking Grandma, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn the story of Ohio’s hiking grandma. Register at https://bit.ly/3fQi7sK Haunted Medina County, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., 6656 Center Road, Valley City. Learn about Medina County’s most haunted locations. Retirement: Make Your Money Last, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, Wadsworth. Learn how to reach your retirement goals and make your money last. Register at https://bit.ly/3ToaOai

Friday, November 11 National Origami Day Bluegrass Music, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. and closes at 7 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional $9. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, November 12 National Chicken Noodle Soup for the Soul Day Craft Fair, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Admission is free. Nature Art Fest, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. November 12 through November 13. 21st annual Nature Art Fest featuring unique items inspired by nature from professional artists. Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Therapy dogs visit the children’s area to be read to. Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. And November 13. Learn about wild turkeys through a variety of wild turkey activities. Tea Exchange, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3Thk3sY

Sunday, November 13 National Sadie Hawkins Day Nature Art Fest, noon to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. 21st annual Nature Art Fest featuring unique items inspired by nature from professional artists. Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about wild turkeys through a variety of wild turkey activities. Exhibits: Greeting Cards, Local History, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., 3314 Myers Road, Medina. An Evening at the Gingerbread House, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., The Gingerbread House, 3306 Old Weymouth Road, Medina. The Gingerbread House will offer house tours and a four-course dinner for 6. Raffle tickets are $10 by sending a check to Weymouth Preservation Society 3314 Myers Rd Medina, 44256. Include email or text. Drawing will be November 1. Winner may select an alternative date. All ticket sales benefit the Weymouth Preservation Society.

Monday, November 14 National Pickle Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Monday Movie Matinee: “Death on the Nile,” 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Craft a Guitar, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn the sound and science behind making a guitar and craft one out of tissue boxes and paper towel rolls. Register at https://bit.ly/3EGbRhT Mystery Art Bag Challenge, 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3EAZmnv Art in the Afternoon: Foil Embossing, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. For ages 5 to 12. Use foil and markers to make low-relief sculptures. Monday Night Intrigue: “The Case of the Murderous Dr. Cream,” 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Dr. Cream went on an international murder spree, with poison as his weapon of choice. Register at https://bit.ly/3MWSovh

Tuesday, November 15 National Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

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A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Pentimento Through November 6 Works in a variety of mediums by the PerSisters. B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Medina Weaving Guild Art Show Through November 30 All aspects of fiber arts Highland Library 4160 Ridge Road, Medina

Blake Student Art Show November 14 through December 10 B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina “Encanto” Fiesta, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Celebrate the movie "Encanto” with movie-inspired activities. Register at https://bit.ly/3yLxWI5

Wednesday, November 16 National Fast Food Day Dog Power!, 12:20 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about the process of training a therapy dog. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Show and Tell, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Adult show and tell. Register at https://bit.ly/3rQyjgA

Thursday, November 17 National Use Less Stuff Day VolunTeen: Butterfly Garden, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to earn service hours while becoming an expert on monarch butterflies. Register at https://bit.ly/3S2PRjZ Tween Thursday Summer Edition: Castle Creations, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make a no-sew pillow. Alphabet Adventure: I is for Igloo, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Through books and stations, kids will learn about igloos and become more familiar with “i” words. Register at https://bit.ly/3gcI1Y2 Pinterest Projects: Festive Jar Lids, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3ESH0hQ

Friday, November 18 National Princess Day Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Children will enjoy music, movement, and playing various musical instruments. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina.https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Saturday, November 19


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022 Indoor Recess at the Library, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Play active, classic games. Ages 4 to 7. Register at https://bit.ly/3CEqTSj American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Thursday, November 24 A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Thursday, November 24 Turkey Burner 5k and Kids Run, 7:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. run and walk begin, Hinckley Lake spillway, 1822 East Drive Hinckley. Benefits Running2bwell and people in need. For more information and registration, go to https://bit.ly/3CLzvH0 Turkey Chase 4 Miler, 8:30 a.m. 1-Mile Kid’s Run, 9 a.m. 4-mile race, Medina Public Square area. Benefits Shop With a Cop. For more information, race route and registration go to https://bit.ly/3yZzX3o.

Sunday, December 11 Christmas in the Valley 5k and 1-Mile Fun Run/Dog Walk, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Mill Stream Park, 1250 Maple Street, Valley City. For more information and registration, go to https://bit.ly/3MP9ATm

You might feel flushed! It is World Toilet Day K-9 Kapers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Holmesbrook Park, 660 College Street, Wadsworth. This hike offers an opportunity for dog owners to socialize their pets with other dogs. All dogs must be accompanied by an adult and 8-foot non-retractable leash. Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Also November 20. Learn about wild turkeys through a variety of wild turkey activities. It’s Time to Feed the Birds, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Learn about birds and types of bird feeders and seeds.

Thanksgiving Libraries are closed.

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Friday, November 25 National Buy Nothing Day I do not think this one will catch on! Highland Book Sale, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Mini Vendor Plant and Craft Sale, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., 9259 Zimmerman Road, Homerville.

Saturday, November 26 National Cake Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saint Mark Church, 1330 N Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Highland Book Sale, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. November 26 through November 27. Learn about wild turkeys through a variety of wild turkey activities.

Sunday, November 27 National Craft Jerky Day Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about wild turkeys through a variety of wild turkey activities.

Monday, November 28

National Red Planet Day Highland Book Sale, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W Main Street, Seville. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Mindful Mondays, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Experience Sunday, November 20 hands on therapeutic drumming. Register at https://bit.ly/3Vxtq9w National Peanut Butter Fudge Day One-on-One Tech Support, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Autumn Centerpiece, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Oenslager Nature Center, Street, Seville. Register for a 30-minute session to learn and review 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Using dried and fresh silk materials, computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3RYsiZO make a Thanksgiving centerpiece. Registration is $40 per person. Register Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity at https://bit.ly/3Mz4bQ9 Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Designed for Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 children on the autism spectrum or with sensory integration challenges and Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about wild turkeys through a variety their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/3TF1uyZ of wild turkey activities. ORMACO Live at the Library: Jeff Varga, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Tuesday, November 29 Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/3Ew0Mj3 Giving Tuesday Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Monday, November 21 Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. World Hello Day Making Warm Up Medina County donations One-on-One Tech Support, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center The Making of “A Christmas Story” Movie, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Street, Seville. Register for a 30-minute session to learn and review Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. computer basics. Register at https://bit.ly/3g3XdXb Let’s Explore: Sound, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wednesday, November 30 Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Explore how sound is made Computer Security Day and make a harmonica. Register at https://bit.ly/3D2hYeU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 W Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Tuesday, November 22 Chicken Nugget Tasting Tournament, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye National Go For a Ride Day Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. This event American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel is intended for Grades 6 to12. Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/ ORMACO Stephan Haluska, 6:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S Broadway 32i1sbg Street, Medina. Enjoy harp music. Tickets are free. Register at https://bit.ly/ Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 3ChsAVM S. Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome. Register at https://bit.ly/3gbG262

Wednesday, November 23 Go nuts! It’s National Cashew Day! Highland Book Sale, 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2022

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

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Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589