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IN THE FIRST PERSON PG. 18 Being a college student during a pandemic can make for a bumpy ride.

WHY A REBOOT WORKS PG. 28 Does your technology have a mind of its own? Time for a change in power.

WINTER GARDEN BEAUTIES PG. 30 Plants for an eye-catching wonderland

BLUECOAT RESCUE PG. 33 Help for first responders when tragedy strikes

Tired of politics? Escape into our pages of photos, stories and tips from local experts!

At 82 years old, an energetic Dick Indoe pours heart and soul into Richman Farms, his parents’ legacy and the land where he was born and raised. PG. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 10 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Behind the Tractor by Amy Barnes As I write this, it is a beautiful, warm fall day. Leaves are beginning to change and fall, and farmers are pushing each hour to its limit to get their harvest safely from the fields. I have a deep respect and love for farmers. No matter the weather, no matter the day, there is work that must be done, in mud, in snow, in record-breaking heat, in biting cold, and on days so beautiful they fill your soul. There is a deep honor and responsibility in the work of farming because, no matter what you may have done the night before, the 5 a.m. milking must be done. No matter the equipment failure or illness, the 5 p.m. milking is only 12 hours away and must be done. Miss a milking by even an hour and it can change the milk output. I grew up milking goats; gathering eggs; feeding pigs; searching for missing calves; chasing escaped critters of all types; celebrating beautiful sunrises and aweinspiring sunsets; and weeping on dark, cold nights when death took the youngest

and frailest. There is no lying on a farm. It is easy enough to verify if a chore has been done, if animals are in the pastures they are supposed to be in, if you are a person of your word. There is no skipping of chores. The animals do not care if you have a big math test the next day or if you are failing history, if you are so sick you can barely stand, or if you have a broken arm. All they know is that it is time, once again, for them to receive care and attention. In this month of celebrating plenty, of filling ovens, kitchens and tables with the bounty we enjoy because a farmer cared, please take a moment or two to be grateful for what others work so hard to provide. And the next time you are caught behind a slow tractor on the road, take a deep breath, let it out slowly, and be thankful for the moments you are being given to slow down, look around, and appreciate the beauty and heritage of a world that ensures you are fed.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Kariem Farrakhan II Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Amy Barnes MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

Tom Indoe of Richman Farms drives a tractor between fields. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

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HOME AND GARDEN

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BITE ME!

SWEET POTATO, CRANBERRY, APPLE CASSEROLE by Susan Russell Looking for something simple, but different? Give this recipe a try.

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DIG IT!

COLOR IN THE SNOW by Michelle Riley The snow might start falling, but that does not mean the beauty of a garden has to end.

HEALTH

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HEALTHY TRAILS

LAYERING FOR THE FALL by Robert Soroky Temperature swings and sweating make it challenging to dress for ride success.

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OF MIND AND BODY

HABITS TO CHANGE by Kelly Bailey Five habits that might have more influence than you realize.

THE THANKFUL MAN by Amy Barnes Dick Indoe does not hesitate to firmly say his roots are deeply planted in the soil of the greatest place on Earth.

COMMUNITY

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by Kent Von Der Vellen

COVID ROLLER COASTER

They answer the call when tragedy strikes first responders and now are expanding their focus to training and prevention.

by Katrina Barnes

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

OH, SNAP! photos by Amy Barnes, FlashBang Photography and Allison Waltz-Boebel You have to see this for yourself.

BUSINESS

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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ROLL ’EM!

THE IN BOX by Amy Barnes

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

WHY A REBOOT WORKS

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On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Dick Indoe, with his best friend, Calvin, at Richman Farms.

IN THE STUDIO

ACCELERATING OIL DRYING by Kariem Farrakhan II

Learn the trick to getting oil paint to dry quickly.

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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LET’S DO IT!

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CELEBRATE!

CRAVING THE REAL Online connections fall far short of the depth of inperson connecting.

by Hunter Barnard

by Jerry King

THE NETWORKER by Bob Arnold

RAINBOWS, MUSIC AND DISCORD

MIRTH AND JOY

by Austin Steger When technology starts acting confused or wonky, it may be there is too much on its “mind.”

Read the clue, then gather and unscramble the magnifying glass letters to solve the puzzle.

Our movie reviewer takes a musical journey with a movie about working together.

ATTACK OF THE BOTS Getting a sudden, overwhelming response to your online sign-up form? You might want to take a second look.

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GROUP SUPPORTS FIRST RESPONDERS

THE READING NOOK A first-person account of what it is like to be a college student during COVID-19.

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GEMS

ACRES OF LIFE Dick Indoe already has found the words that matter most to him, can you? Time for crunching through fall leaves and appreciating the events in Medina County. Our clickable directory of vetted businesses


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

by Amy Barnes

photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel

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would be the perfect farm manager, Indoe’s father, Kenneth Indoe. here are few vacation days, few times of rest. At the time that Kohn made his offer, Kenneth Indoe The work is hard, the elements unforgiving. was farming his own spread on land he was leasing Yet, there is a satisfaction in running a farm, a from his wife’s uncle, Frank Welton, about a mile and tangible connection to the past, a sense of the legacy a half from Granger High School. of many decades of farming, a love of land and Welton was a professor at the Ohio Agricultural outdoors that, once instilled, does not go away. Research Center in Wooster, had written several Richard “Dick” Indoe has a deep, quite pride in his agricultural books and was an agricultural scientist. farming heritage. Kenneth Indoe and Welton met because Indoe lived He was born on Richman Farms, the land he has 2 miles down the road from Welton’s niece, Hazel. been a steward and worker of for his entire 82 years Indoe attended Granger High School with Hazel on Earth, never once considering a different path to Welton and eventually married her. follow. A graduate of The Ohio State University’s While Indoe’s story began in 1938, the story of Department of Agriculture, Indoe was known as a Richman Farms began only one year earlier. hard worker, said Dick. It was 1937 and Richard Kohn had just acquired “Dad did well, no matter what he did,” he said. acreage that would become known as 7833 Richman It took some persuasion on Kohn’s part to get Indoe Road in Lodi, where he planned to start a farm as an to agree to leave his own spread and work for Kohn. income investment. To sweeten the deal, Kohn built a house from the Kohn already had his eye on the man he thought then-popular Better Homes and Garden house plans background photo by Jahoo Clouseau


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Richard “Dick” Indoe with his family’s crops on the land he loves.

Dick Indoe keeps an eye on the cows and machines during a milking.

on the farm for the Indoes. farm on weekends to ride horses and look over his Finally convinced, Kenneth Indoe took over the investment. farm’s management in July 1937. By 1961, Kohn decided it was time to retire and to The next year, in that house’s upstairs, front get out of farming. bedroom, Dick Indoe was born. A lifetime bachelor, Kohn turned to Kenneth Indoe, continued, Page 6 Over the years, Kohn would bring friends to visit the


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his longtime farm manager, and offered to sell him the farm. Indoe accepted, and the Indoe family formed a family corporation, Richman Farms, Inc., to hold ownership of the farm. The name of the farm was chosen as a nod of respect to Kohn and his heritage.

Dick Indoe holds photos of the animals and house of his childhood.

Longhorn cattle on Richman Farms

Kohn was related, through his mother, to the Richman family that founded the Richman Brothers Company of Cleveland. Kohn also was vice president of the clothing company, whose slogan was: “The house that value built.� There is another tie between the farm and the


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Shannon Harbaugh and Dick Indoe working with the cows at a recent milking time.

Richman Brothers Company. Dick’s daughter-in-law Debbie’s mother, Lois (Bacha) Valentine, was a seamstress at Richman Brothers around 1947. Richman Brothers was known for calling employees the “Richman family” and having daily lunches at a very long table in a big dining hall that had a stage at one end of the room, said Dick. Each day, different employees would volunteer to perform for coworkers

during their lunch in a kind of informal talent show. Dick said he was treated to a couple of the lunches when he was 10 years old. Richman Brothers was known nationwide for the quality of its suits, Dick said. He has fond memories of being taken to the clothing company’s production facility when he was continued, Page 8


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A mother longhorn cow washes her offspring’s ear while another longhorn guards them. continued from Page 7

12 years old and seeing multiple layers of highquality cloth laid and smoothed out on large cutting tables. Layers would be added until a huge stack of cloth was formed. The cloth was then held in place with a press and cut with a saw. “The thing that really stuck in my mind was the stack of material,” Dick said. He was impressed with how tall the stack was. In 1969, The Richman Brothers Company was sold to F.W. Woolworth Company, which closed it in 1992.

When it closed, the Indoes were able to retrieve many pieces of Richman history and put them in a display case in a building on the farm. They even have one of the old sewing machines that was used in the clothing production. Throughout his life, Dick’s father, Kenneth, took on a variety of roles, including being a Medina County commissioner; a member of the board for Lodi State Bank, later known as Medina County Bank; and president of the Lodi school board. Dick said his father persuaded the school principal


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In 1938, Dick Indoe was born in this home (above), which was built for his parents in 1937 from a Better Homes and Garden plan. His son, Bill, now lives in the home.

to allow Dick to start school a year early. “I wish he wouldn’t have been (president of the school board),” said Dick Indoe. “I should have waited (to start school).” Dick said that while he was fairly decent in sports in school, he believes that if he had been allowed to mature more before starting school, he would have done better. He is the youngest of four children and has three

older sisters, Lois, Eva and Anita. Lois, 90, is a retired schoolteacher and Highland High School principal. She had four children and lives in Lodi. Eva, 88, had four daughters and lives in Wooster. Anita, who died four years ago at the age of 82, had three children. Dick had two children, Tom and Bill, and they work the farm with him. When Dick and his sisters were children, Medina

Tom Indoe raking hay, some of which will be ground to use as bedding for the cows.

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County had an annual health contest. Eva won and was named the healthiest girl in Medina County. Dick said Eva has never gotten a serious illness and added that she even still has all of her own teeth. To enter the contest, children had to be at least 16 years old. By the time Dick was 16, the contest was no longer being held. However, there would be plenty of other contests for Dick to enter in the years to come. Teaming up with his father, Dick would show draft horse teams and enter harness races. “That (horse competitions) was a lot of fun,” Dick said, with a large smile. There are 700 acres that make up Richman Farms, with another 450 acres rented from surrounding

property owners. Crops on the farm include soybeans, corn and hay. When Kenneth ran the farm, there were only Holstein cows on the farm. In an effort to raise the butterfat content in the milk and thus increase the milk’s value, Dick added Jersey and Brown Swiss cows to the herd. There currently are approximately 125 cows and nine calves of Jersey, Brown Swiss and Holstein breeds. Longhorn cattle also can be found on the farm. They are “an expensive hobby,” Dick said. He started with two and has grown the herd up to its current 24 head. Dick is on the National Holstein Board and, as such, has traveled the country, as well as the world to judge cow shows.


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“I’ve never been any place in the world that I like better than right here,” Dick said. Dick’s parents, Kenneth Indoe, who died in 1996, and Hazel, who passed in 1975, were long gone when tragedy struck the farm on August 9, 2007. A tornado and hail hit the farm, damaging the main barn, destroying the tool shed, and collapsing a barn on some of the dairy cows and the team of draft horses. One of the horses ran from the barn and escaped harm, but draft horse Rex suffered a broken back and died. Also killed was a Holstein cow and North Lanes Banker Sarah, a Brown Swiss show cow who had been one of the top cows of her breed in 2006. The death of Sarah was a double loss because she was pregnant.

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That was when the Indoes learned how many friends they had. Volunteers rushed to the farm, slogging through the mud that the tornado and torrential rains had left behind and helping to pull wreckage off of the cows and doing everything they could to help the family. One of the things about a farm is that chores still must be done, no matter the tragedy. When it comes to milking, it has to be done every 12 hours or risk production decreasing or the development of mastitis, an inflammation of the udder that can quickly turn into a painful infection. Friends helped to milk the cows for the first couple of milkings following the tornado. Then the Jim Morlock family invited the Indoes to move their milking cows to the Morlock barns where continued, Page 12


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milking equipment still stood after being out of use for two years. Holding tanks for the milk were not immediately available, so hundreds of pounds of milk had to be poured down drains until holding tanks were in place. “I’ve always been indebted to that family for putting up with us,” Dick Indoe says softly, adding,

“They’re good people.” Despite the huge setback, the losses, and the long fight with their insurance company, Richman Farms bounced back and it was due to one thing, Dick says. “Determination.” A one-word answer that has so much behind it, so much courage and a refusal to lose a heritage he has guarded all of his life. If you look closely, you can see a muscle tighten in his cheek, his jaw set, as he says

Tom Indoe works on baling hay.

The hay baler releases a rolled hay bale.

Tom Indoe pauses to check a hay bale, which will be used to feed livestock through the coming winter.


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the word that sums up the farm’s survival. Farming will take its toll on a body and Dick is no different from any other farmer or rancher in that regard. He’s had both knees replaced, the second time around refusing physical therapy and proving he did

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not need it by doing a deep-knee bend while holding onto the edge of his kitchen sink shortly after the surgery. Years ago, while his sons were in school, a show bull who was known as being easygoing suddenly decided not to be.

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Anyone who has worked with animals will understand exactly what Dick means when he says

that he knew he was in trouble when he told the bull to move out of the barn and instead of doing so, the bull “got a look in his eye.�

Soybeans stand ready to harvest.

Cows are milked at 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. each day at Richman Farms. This trio looks experienced with having their photos taken.


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The bull swung toward Dick and pushed him up onto his head, then slammed him into a barn wall, stepped back, and then hit him again. Dick’s hand was across his stomach to protect against the blow, and all of his hand bones were broken. It was the quick action of their hired man that saved Dick. Dick shakes his head, remembering the pain of the blows. “That slowed me down a bit,” Dick says.

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Over the years there have been plenty of injuries, and just two months ago, Dick was run over by a cow. Yet, it is with a twinkle in his eye that Dick says, “We have a catastrophe every day. It makes it interesting.” Dick and his two sons, 62-year-old Tom and 59year-old Bill, run the farm together with Tom’s wife, Debbie, and help at milking time from 18-year-old Shannon Harbaugh. Debbie also has her own landscape maintenance continued, Page 16

Milking helper Shannon Harbaugh gets a hug from a cow at milking time.


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to check for mastitis and to stimulate a letdown of business, Second Nature. milk. Harbaugh was hired to help at the farm after she The mechanical milkers are then attached. The was out for a drive with her father and asked him to milkers have an important feature in that they have stop so she could see the cows. When Bill Indoe an automatic take off. This keeps the milker from spotted her, he offered her a job on the farm. She has being on the udder too long and avoids over milking, worked there for more than two years. which can irritate and damage the udder’s soft Milking time at the farm has a set procedure that tissue. must be followed exactly every time. Dick said that A milk tester comes once a month to test and weigh they are grateful for how hard Harbaugh works and the milk for butterfat content. The higher the how willing she has been to learn the proper milking nutrient and butterfat levels, the higher the price the procedure because they have had problems in the milk will bring. past with those who wanted to take shortcuts. The philosophy of Richman Farms is that the better The milking process begins by rounding up the the cows are cared for, the better the milk will be. So, cows and moving them into the holding area. From yes, happy cows do make better milk. there, they move into the milking parlor. The holding area for the cows is on a slope, so there Each teat is dipped in a teat dip that is left on for are heated rubber floors there so that ice and snow one minute to kill bacteria. The udder is then do not cause a cow to slip and be injured. Humans washed. One strip of milk is taken from each quarter get some consideration, too, with heated rubber Dick Indoe is happiest doing what he has done all of his life: farming the lands of Richman Farms.


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One of the main crops on the farm is soybeans.

floors in the milking barn where people stand. Dick said a cow with good physique and genetics will endure and last longer as a milk producer. A good producer gives 100 pounds of milk a day, Dick said, which is approximately 12 gallons daily. Richman Farms cows are never given hormones. Their milk output is a result of good care and good genetics, Dick said. The farm sells its milk to a cooperative which then distributes it to companies for processing for retail sale. When a cow is too old for milking, she is sent to the stockyards to be sold for beef. While Dick is glad to be working the farm with his sons, he has a lament about his sons that is common among many parents. “Those guys are always on the phone. I can’t get their attention,” he said. Dick and his father, Kenneth Indoe, both were nominated to The Ohio State University Dairy Science Hall of Fame. Dick also was nominated into the Ohio State Fair Hall of Fame. “I can work hard, but I wasn’t as smart as he was,” Dick said of his father. He said his father was very hard working and smart, and added that his sisters are smart. Dick, like his father, is a graduate of The Ohio State University, although Dick’s focus was the Dairy Science Program. He showed his first calf at 10 years old at the Medina County Fair. He was too young to be a member of 4-H yet, the youngest someone could be then to join was 12 years old.

“Everybody in our family is in 4-H,” he said. Richman Farms is known for its champion cows. They have produced the intermediate and senior champ in Jersey cows, the reserve grand champion in Brown Swiss cows, and six state grand champions in Holstein cows. Dick said that the first time they won, they got clapped on the back and congratulated. The second year, winning brought grudging congratulations from fellow farmers. Wins in following years caused goodnatured comments like, “you cheatin’ son of a gun!” He smiles and says, “We did good. Enough to make Jersey breeders mad at us. Swiss breeders got mad at us, too.” Richman Farms has been featured on the Medina County Fall Foliage Tour and hosts educational seminars and programs as well as this year’s Season’s Harvest dinner with proceeds benefiting Feeding Medina County. There is something about the smell of the soil, the connection with the land, the glow of green across a field full of sprouted seed that will make a farmer’s heart beat sure and steady with the pride of a job well done. The soil is a part of Dick Indoe, as much as his own sweat and blood are a part of the soil. “To me, this is the greatest place on Earth,” Dick said as he looked across the fields of Richman Farms, lost for a moment in his love of the land.


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THE READING NOOK

COVID ROLLER COASTER by Katrina Barnes

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he morning of October 15, I received news that would completely change my life for at least the next two weeks. I woke up around 4 a.m. and was unable to fall back to sleep. I checked my phone for new messages only to find a message informing me that my most recent COVID-19 test had come back positive. My automatic response was to panic and cry. It was now certain that the symptoms I was suffering only a couple of days before were not allergies. I couldn’t fall back asleep after that. I laid in bed, overcome with worry and fear. I knew that I had avoided parties and followed safety protocols, and I also knew that the positive test was likely a result of the boys my roommate had invited into our dorm room. As a student living on The College of Wooster campus, I feared what would happen since I had now tested positive. I was terrified of infecting other people more than I feared being infected myself. Eventually, daylight rolled around, and my roommate woke up and got out of bed. She checked her phone, and, sure enough, she had received a positive COVID-19 test result message, too. The college dean contacted my roommate and asked when he could call and talk to both of us about moving into isolation. His call came in around 8:45 am and we were told

we had to wait to move into isolation until he could find rooms for us. Oh, and we also were told to stay in our rooms and not to leave, not even to go to the bathroom or brush our teeth. Since The College of Wooster had been experiencing a spike in Corona cases, the rooms they had set aside for isolation had been filling up fairly quickly. Then, the waiting game began. The dean told us it would be about an hour before he could find us a room, but it took closer to three. Meanwhile, I started texting my family to let them know what was happening. What I didn’t know, and learned later, was that my mom’s phone wasn’t getting my texts, which explained why I wasn’t hearing back from her. Once rooms were finally found for us at the Wooster Inn, we had to wait for security to pick us up and take us there. We were told it would take only a few minutes for the security guard to arrive, but it took close to half an hour. The security guy showed up on a golf cart, so we had to strategically pack all of our luggage on the golf cart, leaving only the seats on the back of the golf cart for us. Originally, I wasn’t too worried about the ride because I assumed we would be going slowly since it was a golf cart. Oh boy, could I have not been more wrong! It felt like the golf cart was speeding faster than any of the cars on the road. When we were halfway there, a bag full of my belongings fell out of the cart. We had to turn around illustration (above) by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

to go back and get it. The entire ride felt like a roller coaster. Let’s just say I’m not a huge fan of roller coasters. The sharp turns left me feeling like I was about to fall off. My roommate, on the other hand, was loving every second of the ride. Once we arrived, I unpacked and got settled. That’s when the endless phone calls began. I was called by my caretaker who is responsible for making sure everything goes smoothly during my isolation, various members of my family, and a nurse who was trying to figure out everyone I could have infected in the past few days. I had to notify my professors about what was happening. Because of privacy issues, they had been told only that one of their students had COVID but not which one. So I had to e-mail them and let them know it was me, which meant there also were countless e-mails from my professors asking if there was anything they could do to help and offering me extensions on assignments. I was grateful that so many people cared about my well-being but was a little overwhelmed because everything happened so suddenly. After all of the phone calls and e-mails were taken care of, that’s when I really began to worry. I wasn’t worried my well-being, I was worried about my friends and classmates, whom I had possibly infected, and about my class assignments. I didn’t want to be the cause of someone else getting sick or dying because of me. When all is said and done, I don’t think this isolation will be too rough on me because I am an introvert and being away from people is my specialty.

Katrina Barnes is a 2020 graduate of Medina High School and is currently enrolled at The College of Wooster majoring in music therapy.

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Hello, Earthling! This 7-inch praying mantis was found a block from Medina Public Square, flying near birdfeeders. To learn more, although you might want to brace yourself for some gruesome facts, go to https://on.natgeo.com/3nMaseH photo by Amy Barnes

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From left, Grace Jackson, Brooklyn Heights, with her four children: Margot, 3; Vincent, 6; Sophia, 11; and Rose, 9.

Laura Godenswager, Brunswick, with daughter, Milly, 6, and son, Jason, 9.

Families enjoyed the chance to build their own scarecrows at Boyert’s Greenhouse in Medina. photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Kaleb Norris, 2, checks his boot for straw while his mother, Cassandra Norris, and brother, Nicholas Millsaps, 12, work on scarecrow construction.

Theresa Schmidt, Medina, and daughter Alexis Vassel, 8.

Emily Myers, Medina, with son, Garrett Myers, 12.


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Adventuring they will go! Two-year-old Ben Warren and 1-year-old Nora Warren head off for adventure under the watchful gazes of parents Jon and Mary Warren, of Medina, and grandmother Tami Waldy, of Cincinnati, on Medina Public Square. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

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Gabriel Salmon, 2, Medina, hitches a ride on the hip of his grandmother Linda Perron, Medina, while his aunt Kim Pipoly, Medina, points out a decorated flowerpot on Medina Public Square. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Kirk Hiel, Medina, watches the activity on Medina Public Square while two unidentified women walk toward the Farmers Market in early fall. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

John Aird, Medina, and his son, Connor, 7, read on Medina Public Square while his wife shops. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Steve and Stephani Giuttari brought their children, 7week-old Maisy and Major, from Brookpark to enjoy the decorated flowerpots surrounding Medina Public Square. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Domonik Amegashie and her husband, Elom Amegashie, and their son, Israel, 7, shop at a recent farmers market on Medina Public Square. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

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Taking advantage of warm fall weather at Wolf Creek Environmental Center, Wadsworth, to earn their Medina County Park District hiking pins, were, from left, Mark McMillan, Shannon McMillan, Emily McMillan, Tara Bednarski, and Rick Reitzel. photo by FlashBang Photography

Mushrooms were sprouting at Wolf Creek Environmental Center in Wadsworth thanks to families who took the time to show off their creative flair for the outdoor display. photos by FlashBang Photography


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Attack of the Bots by Amy Barnes Suddenly, overnight there are a hundred or so sign-ups for the company’s customer newsletter. Following days net the same response rate, with no sign of slowing down as the days pass. The company owner thinks, wow, what did I do right that inspired such a sudden, overwhelming response? On a closer look, however, something is not right, and our hard-working business owner begins to wonder what exactly is happening. The online sign-up form is showing that with each new sign up, only the e-mail address box is appropriately filled. The fields for name, address and where-did-you-hear-about-us are a mishmash of nonsense letters. The business owner sends a couple of test e-mails to verify the e-mails are legitimate. No response comes, but the emails do not bounce back as having gone to fake addresses. What our business owner does not know is that if responses did come back, they likely would have phishing scam links or some other nefarious trap and the noresponse result is actually a fortunate one. Research of the sign-up sources by the company’s web site administrator quickly reveals that they are bots using a wide variety of constantly changing IP addresses, making it impossible to block them. The bots have saved the sign-up page URL and automatically contacts it hundreds of times every 24 hours, filling in the fields and providing fake or spoof e-mail addresses. Has something like this happened to you? Have you wondered what the goal is? The goal is the same as it is for scammer phone calls: getting your information to access bank accounts, create credit accounts, and more. Bots look for fill-in fields that are big enough to drop in a scam ad and an attempt to gather, or phish, for information. One of the most cost-effective ways to combat the bots is to change the URL of the sign-up page by deleting the original page and creating a new one. Have you discovered additional ways to combat bots? Share your strategies by e-mailing them to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com for possible inclusion in a future column.

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ArmstrongEXP.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Why a Reboot Works

Craving the Real

by Austin Steger

by Bob Arnold

There are a surprising number of issues in the tech world that are solved with a simple reboot of the device. A simple reset, turning a device off and then on again, often fixes frustrating issues. Why is that the case, though? What exactly is going on that makes this reset necessary in the first place? How does a restart fix the issue? There are two different types of resets when it comes to electronic devices, hard and soft, and they have different meanings depending on the situation. A soft reset is turning the device off and on again by choosing the restart option, using the power button or unplugging the machine. A hard reset is reinstalling the software back to its original factory state. Sometimes, a hard reset can also mean a forced soft reset, where the user holds down a button combination to force the device to restart. For example, holding down both the power and home (or volume buttons) will perform a forced soft reset on most phones. Many times, issues with electronic devices are caused by a buildup of information in the RAM or temporary memory, also referred to as the cache. Restarting a device wipes out all of the temporary data stored and starts everything over with a clean slate. This applies to devices such as computers, phones, smartwatches, GPS devices, and video cameras. Other devices like your smart TV, wireless router, gaming console, or DVD player run on software that can sometimes become corrupted. A program can get buggy if, for example, two conflicting commands are being issued at the same time. In these cases, a reboot sets the software back to its original state and stops the interference. It also is a good practice to wait a couple of minutes after unplugging a device for all of the power in the circuits to drain out. Capacitors can sometimes hold power for several minutes. A device will not fully reset until all of the power in it is depleted. Rebooting is something anyone can do and is likely the first thing an expert would try, as well.

This came from a prospector on a professional social media site: “Bob, I see we have some mutual connections…and I love to have conversations with likeminded people. So, let’s connect here and explore how we can help each other.” This has reached the point that it really bothers me! Especially since it is a recommended way of connecting with people online in a more personal way, rather than the boring, “Let’s connect.” It is not the message that bothers me, it is what comes afterward or what does not. Ninety-nine percent of these people have not even looked at my profile, first red flag. They know nothing about me, except that an algorithm has told them I would make a good connection for them. If I connect, 99 percent of the time, they never follow up with even a note thanking me for the connection, even if I send them a note first, second red flag. Some of them follow up with a preprogrammed advertisement trying to sell something, third red flag. Rarely, less than 5 percent of the time, am I able to get these connections into a meaningful dialogue that builds a real relationship. Just as we get close, they stop responding. What gives? Do not get me wrong, this does not mean online is a bad way of connecting; rather, it shows how challenged most people are at networking. This scenario flips when we meet face-to-face. We get to know each other personally and gain a real sense of connection, we search for ways of helping others in their businesses or personally, very little advertising goes on, and follow up is much easier and better. I encourage looking for ways to meet with others in person again and start building meaningful connections. Of course, be careful and follow current safety practices regarding the pandemic. There are hundreds of online connection platforms; however, I have not found any of them to work as effectively as face-to-face interactions.

Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330-952-1225.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https:// amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Sweet Potato, Cranberry, Apple Casserole recipe by Susan Russell photo by Joanna Kosinska Susan Russell is a local therapist, personal trainer, group fitness instructor, and partner with Juice Plus/Tower Garden. For more information, visit her website at http://www.russellstrong.com • • • • •

3 pounds sweet potatoes 3 pounds apples 1 bag cranberries butter ¼ cup brown sugar

Bake or boil the sweet potatoes. Cool, peel and slice them. Layer sweet potatoes, apples and cranberries in baking pan. Dot with butter and sprinkle with brown sugar. Bake in 350degree oven for 45 to 60 minutes or until apples are tender. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made it your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to anyone who would like to submit a recipe.

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Heptacodium, Temple of Bloom

Gaultheria procumbens, Winter Checkberry


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Group Supports First Responders by Kent Von der Vellen

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Editor’s note: Information is from the nonprofit’s most recent filings with the Ohio attorney general.

Bluecoats of Medina County, Inc.

Every first responder understands that placing one’s life in harm’s 3637 Medina Road Medina 44256 way is part of the job. Understanding the threat does not remove the stress or fear these 330-441-2475 https://bit.ly/33QPvHv individuals or their families live with during their careers. In 2002, Robert Cummings started the work of creating the Bluecoats of Medina County, Inc., to provide financial assistance to Date of formation: 07/04/2003 Organization type: 501(c)(3) families of police officers, paid and volunteer firefighters, and Description of Organization’s Purpose: Provide aid and emergency and medical personnel who die in the line of duty. The assist families of safety personnel working within Medina organization also serves as a liaison to other organizations and County, OH who lose their lives or who are permanently help for those families. and totally disabled in the line of duty. Medina County has more than 30 safety, police, corrections, fire, Is the organization's registration status current? Yes and emergency departments serving the county. Reporting Year: 2019 Cummings served as executive director until 2010 using Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2019 Bluecoats, Inc., in Cuyahoga County as a model. Though the two Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 groups share a similar name, each is a separate organization and Total Revenue: $55,353.00 there is no affiliation. Total Expenses: $20,029.00 Bluecoats of Medina County is a membership organization and Total Program Expenses: $0.00 raises most of its funds through member dues. Most members are Percent of Total Expenses: 0% Medina County residents or businesses. Total Assets: $504,798.00 Since its founding, Bluecoats has focused on being prepared for the potential of serious injury resulting in disability or death suffered by first responders. It has been more than 10 years since a Medina County first responder has died in the line of duty. In addition to holding funds for this potential threat each year, Bluecoats has donated funds to the Police Chief’s Association and the Fire Chief’s Association to help support the county’s safety professionals. Executive director, Christina Fozio, mentioned they are currently adjusting the organization to increase its focus on leadership training programs. Most of the county’s departments have limited funding and, by partnering with them, Bluecoats helps to fund training programs. Fozio said the hope is that funding the programs will prevent deaths and serious injuries on the job. Bluecoats holds fundraisers and an annual dinner to support the services they provide and to bring attention to the important jobs first responders do. For more information about the Bluecoats of Medina County or to make a donation, go to https://bit.ly/3nGPOws or to https://bit.ly/3lyiaXV Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

MIRTH AND JOY

Rainbows, Music and Discord

by Jerry King

by Hunter Barnard This review is about the movie “Trolls World Tour.� The movie is about trolls from all different sorts of music getting together to keep their strings from the Rock Troll tribe. All of the trolls love different kinds of music and each group has their own string that makes the music even better. Rock Trolls want to make everyone like their music, which I do not think is very nice. All of the trolls have to figure out how to work together if they want to keep their strings. There is a lot of nice music in this movie, like classical, rock, pop, and dance. Pop is my favorite because I like Queen Poppy and she is the main character and the only person really trying to fight back against the Rock Trolls. My favorite part of the movie was toward the end when there were lots of music and colors. I like rainbows, so it was cool to see a lot of them. I liked that when the trolls were working to keep their strings, they figured out their music was not that different and sometimes it sounded good together. It is nice to have friends from different places because they can teach each other new things. Trolls was a really good movie, even though it was not really like the first one at all. It had lots of good music, and it was nice to see everyone always working together. The movie had a happy ending, which is always the best. I think anyone who likes music would like this movie. I did not recognize a lot of songs that were in the movie, but that is OK because a lot of the movie was still really good, and I think everyone did a great job. I hope everyone likes the movie as much as I did! Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

photo by Isaac Quesada

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: IN THE STUDIO

Accelerating Oil Drying

“I don’t like color-bynumber because a bunch of teachers didn’t like me changing the color key.”

“It’s even worse than a dad joke.”

“Just ask Goldilocks, ‘OK’ and ‘just right’ are not the same thing!”

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by Kariem Farrakhan II As an oil painter, I have been told many times that I must be very patient. Face it, oil paint straight out of the tube takes seemingly forever to dry, and many times we are ready to have a nice, dry painting, ready to hang. Oil painting does not always take patience. There are several ways to decrease drying time from days or weeks to hours. The answer is oil painting mediums. Mediums are liquids used to change the quality of paint. They are mixed into oil paint prior to painting. Some are used to make the paint thicker or thinner or to extend drying time. If in a hurry for a painting to dry, try mixing in a medium called drying linseed oil. It helps the paint dry much quicker and improves paint flow and gloss. Only a small amount of linseed oil is needed. Use the linseed oil in a way similar to how water would be used when painting with acrylics. Wet the brush with the medium and spread it onto the palette. Next, pick up some oil paint with the brush and mix it into the medium. Experiment with the mixing ratio until the perfect flow and drying time is reached. Be cautious with any of the media that contain petroleum distillates. They are highly flammable and release fumes, so they should be used only in a well-ventilated area. Thick gobs of oil paint can take weeks or even months to dry. Using an impasto medium thickens paint without thinning out the color. It also will help to find soft-bristle brushes made of mongoose, sable or synthetic hair. Softbristle brushes make it easier to add a smooth, thin layer of paint, which helps decrease drying time. Following these tips will cut the drying time of oil paintings significantly. It is a great way for acrylic painters to start experimenting with oil paint and broaden artistic horizons.

Kariem Farrakhan II is a Wadsworth artist who has experience creating art using a variety of media and enjoys sharing his knowledge, while continuing to learn. He is the art director for The Spirited Palette, https://thespiritedpalette.com/, and maintains his own solo platform at The Indigo Kid, https:// theindigokid.com/. He can be reached at kariem @thespiritedpalette.com or by calling 330-329-3930.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

Joyful Word Search Acres of Life

HERITAGE FARM COWS SOYBEANS CORN HAY FAMILY CALVIN

FRIENDS DETERMINATION LOVE RICHMAN AWARDS SMART TORNADO ROOTS

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Making His Mark

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

November 2020 Nonprofit Calendar Sunday, November 1 Zero Tasking Day https://bit.ly/2IpDfoZ Daylight Saving Time ends, move clocks back one hour. Please address all complaints to your congressman. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Camo on the Creek, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., last day, Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Signs along nature trail will help find camouflaged animals hiding in the fall foliage, with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owlthemed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot.

Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owlthemed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Chickadees, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about chickadees and how they survive winter. Limited to nine attendees. Register at https://bit.ly/2GWLSac Wednesday, November 4 Use Your Common Sense Day https://bit.ly/33VSb6E Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owlthemed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Magazine Art: Create!, 4 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., virtual, hosted by Wadsworth Library. Use old magazines to create collages with variety of techniques. Ages 12 to 18. View at https://bit.ly/3jYinDg

Monday, November 2 Look for Circles Day https://bit.ly/3nPjabU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owlthemed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Thursday, November 5 National Men Make Dinner Day https://bit.ly/34Zt8Po Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Tuesday, November 3 N Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig Election Day and Cliché Day https://bit.ly/3jXdYRa Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020 Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owlthemed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Friday, November 6 Marooned Without a Compass Day https://bit.ly/2H1by5z Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, through November 7, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owlthemed scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

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highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monday, November 9 Chaos Never Dies Day https://bit.ly/2SU2nX4 No kidding! Silhouette Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop in and find characters in Children’s Department and reveal hidden message. November 9 through 14. Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina Fire Station No. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. By appointment only, call 330723-9688 Art in the Afternoon: Turkey Collage, 4 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual, hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn about collage artists, make one from items around the house. View program at https://bit.ly/2FxXsrH Monday Night Intrigue: People Who Eat Darkness, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual, hosted by Wadsworth Library. Flex detective muscles on the case of Lucie Blackman. Register for secure virtual meeting invitation at https://bit.ly/3lQAefR

Tuesday, November 10 National Forget-Me-Not Day https://bit.ly/316xiny Silhouette Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop in and find characters in Children’s Department and reveal hidden message. November 9 through 14. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, November 7 Alphabet Adventure: U is for Universe, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual, Book Lovers Day https://bit.ly/3jYHS7F hosted by Wadsworth Library. Make a constellation, a galaxy pinwheel, Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal a space bracelet, and a torn paper planet. Pickup supplies bag with Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 8, Carolyn Ludwig registration at https://bit.ly/378KzQb View program at Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green https://bit.ly/3j2a4Fj Nature Trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Wednesday, November 11 Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU National Sundae Day https://bit.ly/2SUae6V Unbridled: Horses Empowering Women, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Forever Silhouette Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary, 1133 Granger Road, Medina. Subject: Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop in and find characters in Children’s Caring for Ourselves. Ages 21 and older. Seating limited to 10. $50. For Department and reveal hidden message. November 9 through 14. more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/2UlJ8XF American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Monthly Makers: Scare-owls! Walk, last day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view owl-themed Thursday, November 12 scarecrows created by local families. Get inspired and consider National Pizza With the Works Except Anchovies Day becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided https://bit.ly/315rzhV outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s Silhouette Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 theme. This month is owl-themed scarecrows. Portable restroom is Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop in and find characters in Children’s available in parking lot. Department and reveal hidden message. November 9 through 14. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Sunday, November 8 Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tongue Twister Day https://bit.ly/3j2prNU https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal 6th Annual Art With a Heart for Children, 4 p.m., through November 20, Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., today is last day, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage 7 p.m. via https://bit.ly/3kDvoC1 Art by local community artists and Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Signs along the Green Nature Trail artists in the Medina County Juvenile Detention Center will be for bid in


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

this multi-media art auction. Preview is 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Blue Heron Introduction to Coded Language, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual, Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Tickets are $40 per hosted by Medina Public Library. No registration, limited to first 100 person. Registration required by November 6. people to join meeting. For phone numbers, meeting information, go to https://bit.ly/2SU4TfV Friday, November 13 World Kindness Day https://bit.ly/2SV0Zne Wednesday, November 18 Silhouette Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Push Button Phone Day https://bit.ly/2SSwXAa Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop in and find characters in Children’s Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys through November 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Department and reveal hidden message. November 9 through 14. Tuesday through Saturday, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Must register by November 12. Registered Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United according to that month’s theme. This month is hand turkeys made out Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. of whatever you have on hand. Portable restroom is available in parking https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3nP8XfG 6th Annual Art With a Heart for Children Art Preview and Dinner-to-Go, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Blue Heron Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medina. Preview and pre-order take-out dinner until November 11. For prices, menu, information, and reservations, go to Thursday, November 19 https://bit.ly/2FIlQXW Art auction is through November 20, 7 p.m. via Use Less Stuff Day https://bit.ly/2FtSWuh https://bit.ly/3kDvoC1 Art by local community artists and artists in the Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys through November 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Medina County Juvenile Detention Center will be for bid in this multi- Tuesday through Saturday, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 media art auction. Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Must register by November 12. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays Saturday, November 14 according to that month’s theme. This month is hand turkeys made out Pickle Day https://bit.ly/33Wq5In of whatever you have on hand. Portable restroom is available in parking Silhouette Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3nP8XfG Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drop in and find characters in Children’s Virtual Escape Room: Family Gathering, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., virtual, Department and reveal hidden message. Last day. hosted by Wadsworth Library. Register for link and instructions at Census Records for Family History, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., virtual, hosted by https://bit.ly/2HbT8Pb View tutorial at https://bit.ly/37c4Gx0 Medina County Library. Learn how to effectively use census and related Tween Scene: Magic Tricks to Astound Friends and Family! 4:20 p.m. records for research. Register at https://bit.ly/3j0dhVU to 4:40 p.m., virtual, hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn easy tricks with cards and more. View at https://bit.ly/2FykvCT Sunday, November 15 Explorastory: Yetis and Spaghetti, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual, hosted Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day https://bit.ly/3k0lsme by Wadsworth Library. Books, songs, crafts. Materials pickup available with registration at https://bit.ly/318WXMw View program at Monday, November 16 https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Button Day https://bit.ly/2FxyMzI American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Friday, November 20 Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. National Absurdity Day https://bit.ly/3iZBRG8 So fitting for this year! https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys through November 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Let’s Explore: The Science of Pumpkins, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual, Tuesday through Saturday, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn the parts of a pumpkin, dissect a Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Must register by November 12. Registered seed, learn how they grow, make pumpkin tower, dissolve candy households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays pumpkins. Materials available when register at https://bit.ly/3lRfUuZ according to that month’s theme. This month is hand turkeys made out View program at https://bit.ly/3k1LxkU of whatever you have on hand. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3nP8XfG Tuesday, November 17 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Church, Homemade Bread Day https://bit.ly/377FO9Q and Take a Hike Day 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp https://bit.ly/2Is82BD A perfect combo! Take a hike while waiting for the bread to rise! Saturday, November 21 Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys through November 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., World Hello Day https://bit.ly/34YfBrl Tuesday through Saturday, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Must register by November 12. Registered 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal according to that month’s theme. This month is hand turkeys made out points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural of whatever you have on hand. Portable restroom is available in parking Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3nP8XfG information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020 Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys last day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Must register by November 12. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is hand turkeys made out of whatever you have on hand. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3nP8XfG American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Department, 1616 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Sunday, November 22 Go for a Ride Day https://bit.ly/3dpN7L3 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU

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Materials pick up available with registration at https://bit.ly/3523TvN View program at https://bit.ly/2IuRusF Wednesday, November 25 National Jukebox Day https://bit.ly/2Iw8UFu Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through December 6, Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys Walk, through December 5, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view hand turkeys created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Monday, November 23 Fibonacci Day https://bit.ly/3nRXQCz Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., with Thursday, November 26 Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or National Anti-Obesity Day https://bit.ly/2SWwGwa Oh, c’mon! On sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. View at Thanksgiving!? https://bit.ly/2H62Naj Tuesday, November 24 Celebrate Your Unique Talent Day https://bit.ly/2SR1qil Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys Walk, through December 5, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view hand turkeys created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. To register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/2Iwiwjy Thanksgiving Fun, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual, hosted by Wadsworth Library. Write a Mad lib, play fact or fiction, launch a turkey, make crafts.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

Libraries closed for Thanksgiving. Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through December 6, Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys Walk, through December 5, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view hand turkeys created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot.

Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys Walk, through December 5, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view hand turkeys created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Sunday, November 29 Square Dance Day https://bit.ly/3nTml2j Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through December 6, Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal Friday, November 27 points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural National Day of Listening https://bit.ly/317Ps8j Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through December 6, Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal Monday, November 30 points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural National Mason Jar Day https://bit.ly/3dpGKaD Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through December 6, Allardale East, 141 Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to Remsen Road, Medina. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. Monthly Makers: Hand Turkeys Walk, through December 5, 9 a.m. to 5 https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view hand Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. turkeys created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Saturday, November 28 Make Your Own Head Day https://bit.ly/34UQc1W Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through December 6, Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., through November 29, Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Signs along the nature trail highlight seasonal points of interest with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2OaZxdU

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Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2020

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

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Dentist

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Landry Family Dentistry 5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

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North Shore Renovations Phone: 216-676-4700 Renovations and 24-hour emergency service Website: https://nsr911.com/

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio


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Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine November 2020  

One of the area’s oldest farm families shares its story, see who is in our 52 photos, learn why rebooting tech devices works, what happens w...

Joy of Medina County Magazine November 2020  

One of the area’s oldest farm families shares its story, see who is in our 52 photos, learn why rebooting tech devices works, what happens w...