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Safety and Service PG. 24

A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 10 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

A Thanksgiving Lesson by Amy Barnes One Thanksgiving, when I was about 10 years old and my sister was 7, my aunt invited a friend to join us for dinner. Her name was Joanne. My family knew her because she was a goat farmer and we raised goats, too, but nowhere on the scale Joanne did. Joanne’s entire yard was a goat pen. Open the gate, and more than 30 goats would start scrambling, rising out of every cranny and crevice, like ghosts in a horror movie junkyard. While our farm was out in the country, Joanne’s was several towns away, behind a convenience store that had sprung up many years after she had started her farm. She was in constant battles with the town she lived in because of her rickety fences and outbuildings and haphazard way that everything seemed to be held together with pieces of baling wire. It did not help that the convenience store wanted her property. My sister and I thought she was very strange and did not like going to her farm. She lived alone with only her goats and cats and seemed very nervous and erratic. It was with great surprise and dismay that we greeted the news that my aunt had invited Joanne to Thanksgiving dinner. We whined, we complained. We could not understand why the invitation had been issued. We had not had anyone join us for Thanksgiving for many years, not since we had moved to Oklahoma, leaving family far behind in New Jersey. On Thanksgiving Day, the house was filled with the wonderful smells of dinner cooking. We were all driving my mother crazy sneaking into the kitchen for snatched nibbles of delicious food. Then Joanne arrived. My sister and I put on our best smiles and attitudes and greeted her. She looked odder than usual. My sister and I quickly ran off to play and thus avoid her. Dinner was soon served, and we all gathered around our small dinner table. It did not take long for the wonderful smells of dinner to be overwhelmed with the choking odor of something else. Something I could not quite place, but the longer we sat at the table, the worse it got. I noticed my sister was choking down her dinner as quickly as she could, as I now was. By that time, I had figured out the smell was Joanne, and I looked at my aunt, the one who had invited this guest, and she looked like she was becoming aware of the odor as well. My mother was being determinedly false bright, but I could tell she was struggling to pretend nothing was wrong. It was much later, after Joanne finally had left, that we all

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Robert Soroky MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

looked at each other and exhaled. My sister and I went on and on about how awful the day had been. My aunt agreed. But then she pointed out how much the invitation must have meant to Joanne because she had made a special effort to dress nicely for dinner out of what she had available to her, even wearing an illfitting wig that had been stored in the bottom of her closet. My mother added that it was hard to believe that Joanne was unaware that her cats had thoroughly soaked the wig with cat pee. It would be many years before I would appreciate why Joanne was invited to dinner. At the time, my sister and I were full of the arrogance of youth and we did not care nor truly understand the loneliness and pain for some who have no one for the holidays. By the next Thanksgiving, Joanne was in poor health. She was invited to her brother’s for dinner, but we heard that there was a big fight and she left early. I have a foggy memory of hearing that she died before the next Thanksgiving and sadly wondering JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is what happened to all of her goats and published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, cats. The convenience store finally got Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both her property and turned it into a editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com parking lot, or at least that is what I Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. was told. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from Eventually, as I became an adult, I the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, began to be glad we had shared our artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned. home with her, a gladness that has grown with every new Thanksgiving since. If you have a Joanne in your life, someone who is alone for Thanksgiving, pull another chair up to your table. Fill another plate. While you may never understand how much that dinner means to your guest, it will make a difference within you and be a lesson for any young ones at the table. Love and acceptance can stretch beyond family and circumstance.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

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THE IN BOX

TRAVELING MAN by Steve Rak Today’s technology has made it possible to work from almost anywhere.

THE NETWORKER

NETWORKING SABOTEURS by Bob Arnold Exploring why some people sabotage the networking efforts of others, and how to be a supportive and successful networker.

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SOPHIA’S SMILE

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RINGWORLD by Robert Soroky

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by Kelly Bailey

HEALTHY TRAILS

QUALITY RIDE by Robert Soroky

by Hunter Barnard

DIG IT!

BULBS ARE BECKONING by Michelle Riley

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BACKING INTO A CLOUD by Austin Steger

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

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GEMS

BRIGHTENING THE HOLIDAYS by Kent Von Der Vellen When Pam Myers and Kim Blessing decided to change their lives 20 years ago, they changed the lives of thousands.

Before taking advantage of holiday bicycle sales, be sure to consider these factors. On the front and back covers: photo by Amy Barnes Suzanne and Jack Sharpe pose with one of their finds at Huntington House.

WHERE THE LIONS ROAR

Do you know how many ways data should be saved to be considered safe?

FINDING MINDFULNESS Learn what mindfulness is, tips on achieving it, and how it can bring numerous benefits to mind and body.

ROLL ‘EM!

Plan now for spring blooming abundance with these tips and a video guide to help.

LOOKING SHARPE

OF MIND AND BODY

by Paul McHam

Can you solve this month’s puzzle? Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH Finding the words while Jack and Suzanne Sharpe find a way to move Huntington House.

WHEN MOLD FINDS A HOME

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

OH, SNAP! Ice cream making and eating, squirt gun painting, bubblegum blowing contests, and a turkey shoot, who could ask for anything more?

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Our new movie reviewer starts his column by sharing his thoughts on the newest version of “The Lion King.”

THE READING NOOK

photos by FlashBang Photography

by Amy Barnes

If you suffer from these chronic illnesses, it may be time to examine your home for the cause.

While the few answers about The Event cause only more questions, a secret mission is being readied for launch.

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SPICY PUMPKIN BREAD A great Thanksgiving morning recipe to keep everyone at bay until the main meal is ready.

by Amy Barnes It seemed the legacy of an early Medina family was about to disappear with the demolition of their historic home, but then Suzanne Sharpe took notice.

BITE ME!

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LET’S DO IT! Celebrate thankfulness by enjoying activities and events as numerous as fall leaves!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

Sophia’s Smile story and photos by Amy Barnes

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arlier this year, there was outrage in the Sharpe household, located on West Washington Street in Medina. Suzanne Sharpe had just learned that the 183year-old Sophia Huntington Parker House was slated for demolition by the Medina City School District as part of a land swap with the City of Medina, and she was not about to stand by silently. Sharpe told her husband, Jack, that something had to be done to save the house. She started calling council members and asking questions about the land swap. The more she heard, the more outraged she became. The house and its property, located at 347 N. Huntington Street, Medina, originally were purchased by the Medina City Schools District to use in a land swap between the district and the City of Medina for the Bowman House. Bowman House, 625 Bowman Lane, Medina, is leased by the school district from the city for the district’s special needs program. The land swap would give ownership of Bowman House to the school district and ownership of the Huntington property and house to the city. Because the city wants to use the Huntington land to expand the parking lot at Ray Mellert Park, and does not want the house, the school district was going to tear down the house. Sharpe could not stand that Medina was about to lose yet another historic structure to demolition. After she saw that no one else was stepping up to save the house, she decided there was no choice but for her and her husband to take action. Some may remember Sharpe from 2018 when she ran unsuccessfully for the Ward 1 Medina City Council seat vacated by Laura Parnell Cavey. “I was really going after that (the council seat) because I wanted to make a real change,” Sharpe said. She is a force to be reckoned with, and when Sharpe sets her mind on accomplishing something, “no” is not an answer she readily accepts. While navigating months of negotiations with the City of Medina, the Sharpes established the nonprofit Building Blocks Preservation Group, Inc., with the goal of creating a community and learning center at Huntington House.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

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that part of the project. Burkhart expressed an interest in partnering with the Sharpes so they would not have to dispose of the dirt and the school district could use the dirt to fill in the house’s old foundation. Reusing the dirt from one end of the project to the other would save the Sharpes the cost of disposal and would save the school district the cost of buying dirt. As far as the parking lot expansion is concerned, there is no timeline in place for it. “None of that is going to happen until there is a funding mechanism for it,” said Jansen Wehrley, Medina City parks director. “There is no timeline right now,” he said. Because of the timing of the property being transferred to city ownership and other variables, the city lost out on applying for grants this year. They now The garage at Huntington House, with Jack Sharpe and Robert Arendash taking it carefully apart to try to preserve as much of the materials as possible. will have to wait until the grant cycle Originally, the Sharpes thought they could turn Huntington begins again in 2020, with grants from that cycle awarded in House into a community center that could be rented out for 2021, said Wehrley. events that would function well with the neighboring Ray Without the assistance of a grant, the chances of a parking lot Mellert Park. expansion are slim, Wehrley said. He said that open space The city, however, wanted the house completely removed funds, the general fund, and the parks carry forward fund could from the property in order to expand the park and increase the be used but funds already are stretched keeping up with the available parking. expense of maintaining the city’s parks. The end result of all of the discussions and negotiations was “Out of all of our parks, Ray Mellert is the park that would that the house was put up for bid with the stipulation that the benefit the most from improvements,” Wehrley said. house had to be moved by November 1, 2019, or be forfeited A fitness trail loop with fitness stations are planned for Ray back to the city, whereupon the city would remove the house in Mellert Park and are being paid for with a Community a manner of its choosing. A second stipulation was that the Development Block Grant that was awarded to the city for that winning bidder would be responsible for filling in the use. foundation once the house was moved. The parking lot expansion on the Huntington lot is not set in The stipulation regarding filling in the foundation was negated stone, Wehrley said. He said the park needs to be evaluated to because the school district said it would fill in the foundation determine what is the best course of action for the park. after the house was moved. “We need to look at the park as a whole and look at the needs “That was always the agreement with the city,” said Jon of the park,” Wehrley said. Burkhart, director of business affairs for the school district, in While moving the house destroys any chance of it gaining a explaining why the school district is taking responsibility for place on the National Register of Historic Places, said Sharpe, filling in the foundation. she added that at least the house would be saved for future Originally, the school district was going to demolish the house generations as an important part of Medina’s history. prior to transferring the property to the city, at a projected cost Since the house has to be moved, the mission for Building to the district of $30,000, Burkhart said. The Sharpes moving Blocks was reconsidered and it was changed from establishing the house saved the district those funds. a community center to one of saving historic homes and Burkhart said that the school would be able to fill in the working to restore them to be lived in. foundation any time of the year. He said the district could do Building Blocks’ new mission is based loosely on the Habitat some of the work itself and that the only challenge would be for Humanity model of having future homeowners help in the finding clean fill dirt. building of their homes. Building Blocks will have future Since a new foundation has to be dug for Huntington House at homeowners help in the restoration work of a historic home its new location, that means there will be fill dirt available from continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

continued from Page 5 before they purchase it. The house having to be moved forced the Sharpes to change their restoration plans to include finding a new location for the house. Before they even knew if they won the bid for Huntington House or even how many bids had been placed, they needed to obtain a property to relocate the house to and strengthen their chances of gaining ownership of the house and convince the city of their sincerity. By August 13, Building Blocks announced a land acquisition of 529 W. Friendship Street that could be the new home for Huntington House. On August 26, 2019, what turned out to be the only bid for Huntington House was opened by Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell. The board of control accepted the $5 bid from Building Blocks, and the Sharpes began the task of planning Medina’s first house move in 34 years. The last house moved in Medina was in 1985, and it was the Judge Albert Munson House, said Sharpe. It was moved from East Washington Street to Prospect Street. Huntington House’s move began with an intensive cleanup effort and dismantling of the garage. Jack and his friend Robert Arendash removed everything that could be salvaged out of the garage and then dismantled the garage as it was not a part of the original house and was not in moveable condition as a whole.

The 183-year-old Huntington House

The wing of the house that is being dismantled and re-assembled at Huntington House's future location at 529 W. Friendship Street.

Materials that were salvaged from the garage will be used to build a gardening shed in Sophia’s Garden, which is planned for the lot next to the house’s new location. Efforts then turned toward cleaning out decades of belongings from the house itself. While the cleanup work progressed, other key components in the move were being worked on, including finding a company to build a new foundation at the Friendship Street property; lining up a company to move the house; meetings with utility


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019 company representatives about moving lines that were in the path of the house move; obtaining architectural plans, permits, inspections, and plan approvals; approval of the clamps being used to attach the house to its new foundation; endless social media posts; and fundraising, always fundraising. “We will dismantle something in this house and get it moved over there (to the new lot on Friendship Street),” Suzanne said, in a particularly exasperated moment. She said that at every turn they seemed to be hitting roadblocks and higher-thanexpected costs. To cut costs, the Sharpes are dismantling the small wing to the house and rebuilding it at the new location. The main part of the house, which is 35-feet-by-24-feet, will be moved by professional house movers across the back of Ray Mellert Park to its new location. Throughout the highs and lows of the project, the Sharpes have never faltered in their firm belief that Sophia Huntington Parker would have wanted her family’s legacy saved and remembered. Suzanne sometimes pauses in her passionate pursuit of saving Huntington House, gets a faraway look in her eyes, and says she knows that “Sophia would have wanted this.” Posters on the Facebook page Preserve Medina History: Help Rescue the (183-yr.-old) Huntington House have joined Suzanne

in stating their belief that Sophia would be smiling if she could see all that is being done to save her legacy. Suzanne said that Huntington House was built in 1835 by Peter Huntington. He was from Norwich, Connecticut, and made numerous trips to Medina. On each visit in 1832, he worked on building a cabin of his own on 96 acres he had purchased and also would work for William Root, who had a store in Medina. He met and married Jane Simmons in 1834, Sharpe said, and the following year they built what is now known as Huntington House. Peter Huntington went on to become one of the richest men in Medina, second only to Hiram Bronson, said Sharpe. In 1840, Sophia was born in the house and married William Parker when she was 44 years old, according to the Medina County District Library Genealogy Blog, which added that apparently, Peter Huntington had some concerns about Parker’s intentions because his will firmly left everything to Sophia only. Sophia outlived her family members, including four siblings continued, Page 8

One of Suzanne Sharpe's finds at Huntington House was an antique glass fragment.

Jack found a friend with the same grin at Huntington House.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

architect and owned a construction company. His specialty was continued from Page 7 and two nephews. She died in 1903, her husband preceded her ultra-modern homes. in death in 1899. She stipulated in her will that part of the Evelyn Hopp loved historic homes and dreamed of one day Huntington property was to be used to build a home for elderly owning a Victorian house. Every family vacation was spent women. looking at old homes, with her In 1914, the Order of the constantly pointing out to Pythian Sisters Home was built Suzanne the historic homes she on the remaining 86 acres of spotted. Trips to Chagrin Falls to Sophia’s family farm. The home admire old homes were common remained there for more than outings for the family. 100 years before being torn down “My mom was all about how a in 2017. The residents of the house absorbs the essence of the home had been able to be selfpeople who live there,” Suzanne sufficient through the cows they said. “She got me to love it.” tended and farming. Because her parents could The Pythian Sisters Home never settle the disagreement closed in 2002 and was between historic or ultrademolished in 2017. Huntington modern, they compromised by Square apartments for people staying in the house that Fred ages 55 and older were built on already had built. Suzanne Sharpe gets the receipt for the purchase of the north side of the property Suzanne is working on earning and the front part of the property Huntington House from Sherry Crow, the mayor's her certificate in historic administrative office manager. became home to The Echelon of preservation. For the last 21 Medina, a senior living facility that years, she has been employed at includes assisted living, independent Cleveland State University’s Maxine living and memory care. Goodman Levin College of Urban Now, only the house and a little Affairs. Levin also was a co-founder more than a half acre of land of the Cleveland Restoration Society remains of the legacy that Peter and restored the Sarah Benedict Huntington built. House at 3751 Prospect Avenue in As demolition plans for Huntington Cleveland to serve as the society’s House were being put into place, the headquarters. Suzanne said she feels Sharpes stepped into the picture. that Levin, who died in 2002, was a The Sharpes are working on kindred spirit. obtaining a loan to help fund the Jack was raised in Bainbridge with move. Suzanne points out, that with his three brothers by his parents, Jack now retired, they are a singleRichard and Margaret (Peggy) income couple, which is why they Sharpe. He says he is the middle founded Building Blocks as a bottom in birth order. His father was nonprofit, to encourage donations. the district manager of Brunswick Suzanne Sharpe admires the original foundation of However, any funds they personally Huntington House. Lanes bowling. The family opened put into the project are not a tax sub sandwich shops called 3S Subs, write-off because they founded the which became a local chain of nonprofit. sandwich shops known as Sharpy’s “When you found a nonprofit, you Subs. can’t donate to it and get a tax write“I came from a father who was hard off,” said Suzanne. working and entrepreneurial,” Jack It would seem that Jack and said. Suzanne’s paths were leading them to Suzanne cannot hold back at this Huntington House and to leading the point and interjects that Jack is effort to save it. absolutely the hardest working man Suzanne was raised in Fairview Park she has ever known. She said her father by her adoptive parents, Evelyn and was hard working, but Jack is even Fred Hopp. Fred was a woodworker and An octagonal window on the second floor of more so. built the family home. He also was an While much of the physical labor of Huntington House


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019 Jack and Suzanne met while on a group trail run in 2013. A week later, their first date was the Outrun 24 in Kirtland, where they ran 62 miles together. They agree that running that many miles together gave them a chance to get to know each other very well. In the six years they have been together, they have run a total of 34 races together, which included 50k’s (10), 26.2-mile marathons (11), a 50-mile race, a 6-hour race, 25k’s (four), 5k’s (two), half marathons (three), and Outrun 24 (2). They were soon married in the 1910 Burke Mansion, which is on the National Register of Historic Places and is part of The Music Settlement. Combined, they have five daughters and five grandchildren. It is fitting that it was when they were out running together that they fell in love with a home built in 1834 for sale on West Press plates that were used to print a newspaper found a new use Washington Street in Medina, which is their current home. as flashing for Huntington House. They were discovered during “We fell in love with that house, that was when I was preparation for the house's move. introduced to an older home,” Jack said. cleaning out Huntington House is being done by Jack and his The house was the answer to Suzanne’s dream of living in a friend Robert Arendash during the day when Suzanne is at historic home. work, he also volunteers by doing maintenance work at the Now, Jack and Suzanne share a dream of saving Sophia’s United Church of Christ, and he does not hesitate to pause his house. work to help out friends in need. The obstacles they have been battling since the beginning of He added that his mother and father always worked together, the project are going to force them to ask for an extension of although his father was “alpha dominant.” time from the city, Suzanne said at press time. With a wide grin, Jack recalls when his father bought his She is hoping that all of the work they have done so far will mother a new car, with no input from his mother. Richard convince the city to give them just a little more time to do the simply went to the car dealership, bought a new car and work that she believes would make Sophia smile. presented it to Peggy. She hated the car and longed for the old VW she had been driving as it was much easier for her to handle. Jack’s love of construction eventually led him to becoming the For updates on the progress of the moving and restoration of director of buildings and grounds at The Music Settlement in Cleveland’s University Circle. The Music Settlement offers music Huntington House, please go to https://bit.ly/35yvnZG . To make a donation, go to https://bit.ly/2ppIPOD. therapy, music instruction and early childhood education.

Skip Baran, Building Blocks board director and project manager, pays Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell the $5 for Huntington House. Jonathan Mendel, Medina community development director, takes notes in the background.

Treasure found in Huntington House.

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THE READING NOOK

by Robert Soroky

Chapter 2: Knowledge

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t was the bottom of the fifth inning and the Maxwell team was leading 8 to 4. Billy had actually scored a run for the Maxwells back in the fourth, and now it looked like his dad’s side of the family had the game in the bag. Sally, although not technically a part of the family, was such a familiar face around the house that Mr. Maxwell agreed to let her family play on their team. Unfortunately, Sally had just hit a high fly ball to the shortstop, registering the first out of the inning. She walked back down to the dugout and sat next to Billy, her high spirits unphased by her latest plate appearance. “You know, I really had a good time last night decorating your house and stuff. It was fun.” “Yeah, it was nice,” said Billy, his attention still riveted to the playing field. “Although,” Sally continued, “I’m still a little confused with all that talk about The Event. I mean, it was great that your dad told us everything and all, but he got so technical. Most of it went right over my head. And the stuff I did understand was, well, kinda scary! I mean, what if it comes back, you know?” “What are talking about?” asked Billy. “What if what comes back?” “You know,” Sally said, slapping him on the arm, “that thing your dad was talking about that blocked out the sun and made the whole world go dark. The same thing that made all the people fall asleep for a long time and when they woke up, everything was different. What if that comes back?” “I don’t think it will, Sally. It’s been so long,” Billy said confidently, in an effort to calm her down. “Dad said that people back then used to believe that ‘the thing’ might actually have been some kind of spaceship or something… .”

“But where would a ship have come from?” she cut in. “There’s nothing out there, remember?” Sally was right. There was nothing out there. No planets, no distant stars, no galaxies. Nothing. That was the universe Billy and Sally were growing up in. It was all they knew. But it wasn’t always like that, Billy’s dad had told them. Once, 30 years ago, the sky was filled with light. Stars as numerous as grains of sand on a beach, and the photos that Billy’s dad had shown everyone last night held all the proof. The pictures showed beautifully colored planets, many of which were blanketed by thick cloud cover, while others had bright stripes and rings. All of them, as Billy thought back to the model at the museum, had once been Earth’s companions in the solar system. Other photos depicted giant, deep space explosions, called nebulae, comprised of all kinds of strange materials and gases and named after earthly animals like the crab and the horse.

All these things were gone now. All these things were gone now. All because of The Event. That single, mysterious day when the Earth was forced asleep under an allencompassing shroud of alien darkness. She slept for a generation; her people completely unaware of time’s passage. On the day that she finally awoke, Earth found herself alone in the universe. Well, not completely alone. She still had her moon. And the sun. And Ringworld. That was new. Nobody on Earth could even fathom a guess as to what had really happened during The Event or where the rest of the night sky had gone, but not long after The Event was over, Ringworld suddenly appeared in the sky. It was a small, but immensely bright object, that roamed the heavens in a bizarre pattern for the first week of its arrival. Then, for no apparent reason, Ringworld stopped moving.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

It remained stationary for several days, but soon began its unusual trek across the sky once again. This time, however, it did so in a much more limited manner, back and forth, up and down, and always in the same part of the sky. Initially, astronomers thought that Ringworld might have been a leftover moon or small planet, something unaffected by The Event. But this was quickly ruled out due to its erratic movements and the fact that it was just too bright to be a legitimate planet. With further investigation by powerful Earthbound telescopes, “Ringworld” became the object’s official name after astronomers discovered a faint, blackish ring that surrounded its bright center. The common photo of Ringworld, seen in all of the astronomy magazines, looked not unlike one of those flying disc toys with the hole in the center, stood up on its end and held up in the air directly in front of the sun, the disc acting like a dark halo around the sunlight. That was Ringworld. Perhaps that is the place where all the answers can be found, Billy thought. At least, that’s what his father seemed to believe. Unfortunately, Ringworld was hundreds of billions of miles away and would take almost a decade to reach by conventional shuttle. But that wasn’t going to stop Jonathan Maxwell from trying.

“No wonder he never talked to me about this stuff before.”--Billy “Maybe that’s why Dad decided to come out of retirement and fly next month’s space shuttle mission to Ringworld,” stated Billy proudly. “No wonder he never talked to me about this stuff before. He was getting ready for a big secret mission and no one could know about it, not even me.” “Yeah, that was a big surprise, huh?” Sally said, wide eyed. “He seems pretty excited about it, though, but I don’t know…your mom didn’t look too happy. And I don’t blame her. I’d be kinda

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scared to go up there all alone. Wouldn’t you? And besides, I thought you said that Ringworld was too far away and that they couldn’t get there by shuttle.” “Weren’t you paying attention at all last night? Dad said NASA had been making secret changes to the shuttle’s engines so it would be able to make the journey in a shorter time. And he’s not going alone, silly. There’s a whole bunch of other scientists going, too. I think it would be fun to go up there and explore.” “Yeah, but what if there are a bunch of bad people on Ringworld and they…” “Whoa, slow down,” Billy interjected, “remember, scientists don’t think it’s a planet. It’s too bright or something and moves all funny, not very planet-like.” Sally looked even more confused than last night. Maybe it was time to talk about something else. Luckily, Billy’s cousin Joey solved the problem. Joey was the Pelton’s shortstop and was yelling at Billy, trying to get his attention. “Hey, Billy,” Sally said, “I think you’re up again.” Billy scrambled from the dugout and grabbed his favorite aluminum bat. All this talk about The Event had taken his mind off the game. Sally sure had a lot of questions, he thought, as he made his way to the batter’s box. Oh, well. Maybe next month, everybody’s questions would start to be answered. Billy walked up to the plate and waited for the first pitch, hoping it was one he could crack over Joey’s head. Our story continues next month! Robert Soroky writes the “Healthy Trails” column and is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long-distance charity rides and is manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com.

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy of Medina County Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

Squirt gun painting, bubble gum blowing contests, lawn games, ice cream, and lots more were all part of the Wadsworth Area Historical Society’s Fourth Annual Ice Cream Social at the Johnson House Museum, 161 High Street, Wadsworth.

Getting dishes of ice cream are, from left, Jason Shultz, Emerson Phillips, Ily Shultz, Zakhary Bartko, and Connor Shultz.

Adults competing in the bubblegum blowing contest are, from left, Dave Ault and Ann and Josh Weinberger. The children in front are Alexander and Olivia Weinberger.

Emerson Phillips takes a picture while Olivia Weinberger and Jayden Halloway create a squirt gun painting. In the background, Erica Phillips reaches for art supplies.

Annabelle Gaudet is served ice cream by historical society volunteers Ily Shultz Jeanne and Beau Dsuz.

In the background, Shane Dean, left, and Lisa Halloway watch Olivia Weinberger, who is behind the easel; Zakhary Bartko, with the green squirt gun; Brooklyn Halloway; Connor Shultz; and Madilynn Phillips, with her back to the camera, create art with the help of Cheri Smith, the owner of Brush Tips in Wadsworth.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

Chloe Ault was the winner of the children’s division of the bubblegum blowing contest.

Ricky Gaudet and his 3-year-old daughter, Molly, play a lawn game.

Roger Havens, left, and Anthony Bennett run the ice cream machine.

It is Turkey Shoot time at the Izaak Walton League, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina! Every Sunday through November 24, 2019, competitors shoot paper targets for prizes. Cost is $3 per shoot, with shell provided.

At a recent shoot, Pat Benson, left, won the first prize of a roast and Dale Thrall won a pack of burgers for second prize.

Ready to find out who is the best shot are, from left, Aiden Herman, John Herman, Stephanie Kshywanis, Dale Thrall, and Dale Patchen.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

Joyful Word Search Looking Sharpe

HISTORY SOPHIA MARATHON DETERMINED INSPIRED RESTORATION HUNTINGTON

PARK FOUNDATION HOUSE MOVING FINDINGS LOVE BID FUTURE

A

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

With a Twinkle in His Eye

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTHY TRAILS

Finding Mindfulness

Quality Ride

by Kelly Bailey

by Robert Soroky

Do you remember the last meal you ate, how the food looked and tasted? How about your drive to work this morning? If you are like most people, you probably cannot recall what you were doing 10 minutes ago, let alone the food from your last meal. Most of us are operating on autopilot and are so disconnected with the present moment that we ignore our feelings, thoughts and sensations until they become screaming cries for help. Hunger is a great example. Many struggle with a ravenous appetite late in the day or at night, which causes overeating. They falsely believe this is a willpower problem. Nine times out of 10, it turns out they rush through their days, hardly making time to eat and drink anything but a donut and a latte. So, of course, primal hunger takes over at 10 p.m., and everything in the kitchen is fair game. The good news is that a few simple mindful eating techniques is often all it takes to curb nighttime overeating. Mindfulness is being consciously aware of what is happening in the here and now, inside and outside the body. As a therapeutic technique, mindfulness involves reconnecting with thoughts, feelings and sensations in the moment, without judgment. Cultivating mindfulness is actually simple. One of my favorite ways is to ask myself these questions several times a day: How am I feeling right now? Pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral? Am I hungry? Thirsty? Tired? Do I have to use the bathroom? Am I stressed? Happy? Rushed? Excited? Anxious? Angry? Lonely? What (if anything) do I need right now? Research-backed benefits to practicing mindfulness include improved memory, decreased negative thought patterns, lowered anxiety and stress, decreased insomnia, lower blood pressure, and improved pain management ( https://bit.ly/2n5BBPc ). I have witnessed people making better food choices and eating less. The wonderful thing about practicing mindfulness is you can do it anytime, anywhere! It takes about six months for a mindful practice to become second nature. View it as a commitment to a healthier you: mind, body and soul!

The holiday season is fast approaching and, with snow likely to join it, riding a bicycle is probably the last thing on your mind. Of course, if the thought of a new bike fills you with unbridled excitement, then taking advantage of holiday sales is the perfect incentive to get you rolling into next spring. Before you throw down the cash, though, there are a few things to consider. Last month’s column was about matching the right bike style to cycling needs ( https://bit.ly/2mif3dH ). This month, it is all about quality. First, there are the parts and materials. Reputable bicycle manufacturers are on top for a reason. Their bikes use frames built from high-quality steel, aluminum and carbon, making them noticeably lighter and significantly more durable versus off-brand bikes. They also are manufactured to more precise standards and equipped with dependable, industry-leading components. Then there is the assembly. Bicycles are complicated machines that require assembly. If you plan to order a bike online and tackle this rite of passage yourself, you will need more than a screwdriver and wrench to get the job done right. Specialty tools like wheel truing stands, cone wrenches, and hub and bottom bracket tighteners are a must, as well as a savvy knowledge of how to properly adjust derailleurs and brakes to ensure accurate shifting and safe, solid braking performance. In other words, put it together wrong and it is an accident waiting to happen. Of course, you can pick up a pre-assembled bike from a big box store, but you still will want to make sure assembly was done by someone with a solid understanding of bikes. Finally, there is upkeep. Much like a car, bicycles need occasional tender-loving care to keep them running safely and efficiently. Proper tire pressure, a clean drivetrain and yearly tune-ups are just some of the ways to increase the longevity of your investment. Do all of these things right, and you can enjoy the sport of cycling for years to come!

Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

THE IN BOX

THE NETWORKER

Traveling Man

Networking Saboteurs

by Steve Rak

by Bob Arnold

I can work from anywhere, and I often do. My job requires me to be on the road within the state several days a week, visiting various properties. On those days, I travel with my laptop and paperwork in my truck that is set up with everything from promo material for my company to hand pruners and gloves. Sometimes I do cold calls while I am out, or I might stop and help one of my crews for a few minutes, other times I stop in at a coffee shop or a favorite super-secret hipster restaurant. While I never planned to work like this, in this day and age, it is super easy to do.

I would never want to believe someone would purposefully want to sabotage someone else’s networking; however, I see it happen at networking events. It is really quite easy to sabotage someone’s networking, ignore them. No one wants to feel like they are being ignored. It will cause their self-view to suffer, and they will start doubting why they are even there. If you really want to rub it in, glance their way once in a while, making sure they see you doing so. Here is an even better way: introduce them to someone and mention something negative about them. They now feel like you do not have a high view of them, and it starts them off on the wrong foot with the new person they are meeting. Fortunately, there are not many people in a networking room who will go to these lengths to embarrass someone else, and I am glad for that. Why would we even want to trip up someone in their networking? It comes down to a simple reason. It is because of the mirror, the networking mirror. The networking mirror is something we consciously put in place in much of our networking. It is how we focus on ourselves, instead of on the person we just met. Focusing on ourselves is a natural state for humans. We have to focus on our survival, so we ensure we are getting across what we want to say when we are talking with someone. That forces us to not hear the other person as they talk. Here is the main point: Listen! Yes, it is that simple. When we listen to the other person, we focus on what others are saying, opening up whole new worlds. We find topics of interest we both share, sports teams we each may like, places we each have been to, or a myriad of other things that we share. Let us embrace networking, not sabotage it.

I can log into my accounting software from anywhere and see what is happening with my finances, company billing and bank balance. I can check my GPS software and see where each of my company vehicles are located. If I want to know what each crew has accomplished so far, I can log into my business software program and it will tell me in real time. This can all be done from anywhere in the world that has an internet connection. I also have an app for every program I have mentioned and can access everything from my phone. I have made it a habit to be able to produce from anywhere at any time. This gives me the opportunity to have more flexibility, and I do not have to stress about getting back to the office to get things done. For the people who already do this, you rock. I also know that there are many people in my age bracket, 50 and over, who might frown on all of this remote computer mumbo jumbo. But if I can do it, so can you. Try it, and if it does not drive you crazy, you might be able to get a little more accomplished. Remember, all devices have an off button, and you will need to use it from time to time. Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Mold Remediation

AirXperts

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

BITE ME!

Spicy Pumpkin Bread

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column and photo by Amy Barnes I have never been much of a pumpkin bread fan. Every recipe I have ever tasted has been rather bland and made me question why I was making the effort to eat it. In desperation to find something different and easy to take to a recent meeting, I decided to try making pumpkin bread one more time, but this time I decided to off-road the recipe and started grabbing spices to add some zip. It turned out to be the tastiest pumpkin bread I have ever had. Whip up a loaf and see what you think, I am betting it will be gobbled up by your crew as fast as it was by mine. It also makes a great, filling breakfast item (although, I still opt for pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving Day breakfast).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a mixing bowl, use a balloon whisk to stir together flour, spices, baking powder, salt, and

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour ¼ teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon cardamom ½ teaspoon cloves ½ teaspoon ginger ½ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/3 cup shortening 1 ½ generous, loose cups dark brown sugar 2 large eggs 1 cup canned pumpkin ¼ cup milk ¼ cup chopped walnuts (optional) 1 cup powdered sugar 2 tablespoons vanilla

baking soda. Beat together shortening and brown sugar in a large mixing bowl. When well combined, beat in eggs. Then add the milk and pumpkin, mixing well. Slowly add the flour mixture to the pumpkin mixture, and mix until well combined. Add nuts, if desired. Grease a 9-by-5-by-3 loaf pan. Pour batter into pan, bake at 350 degrees until a pick inserted into the center comes out clean, approximately one hour. Cool loaf in pan until it can be easily removed. If it is removed from the pan while too warm the top will separate from the bottom. Once removed from the pan, place on wire rack to cool completely. Mix powdered sugar and vanilla in 2-cup measuring cup until smooth. Drizzle sugar glaze over loaf. The glaze can be applied while loaf is still slightly warm. Slice and serve. Makes one loaf of bread.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

When Mold Finds a Home by Paul McHam

“I used to think across the street was a different world or country.”

“You can’t just undo the unexpected.” (Which does leave one to question, can the expected be undone then?)

“When I have breakfast, I’m not hungry. When I have lunch or supper, I’m still hungry.”

I recently was asked, “How does mold work to make you sick? How sick can it make you, and what are some of the symptoms?” Mold spores are just about everywhere. Spores float around, looking for a place to land that has the proper combination of water and food for survival. Different spores like different variances in temperature and light exposure, but water and food are the two most important because mold needs both to grow. Water is relative humidity over 50 percent; surface saturation, also known as surface water activity, generally 16 percent in drywall or wood; or water puddling, 100percent saturation. This water can come from a wide variety of sources, and I have written about many of them in previous columns (https://bit.ly/2FKyOAZ). Approximately 90 percent of molds can produce allergens while they grow, while the remaining 10 percent can produce mycotoxins that are toxic to humans. Some mycotoxins are nastier than others, and some folks may never respond to them. Initial reactions to mold exposure can include allergic rhinitis, histamine response (can cause hair loss), sinus fungal growth, asthma, and emphysema. A few molds go the extra mile, such as Stachybotrys (black mold); Chaetomium (what I refer to as a sister mold to Stachybotrys and produces many of the same symptoms); and Penicillium/Aspergillus, which grows fast on wet building materials and can produce Ochratoxin A and more. If someone says mold cannot hurt you, look up Mark Tatum mucormycosis and see how nasty it can get. He was known as “the man without a face” by “Ripley’s Believe it or Not!” (Editor’s note: If choosing to look up Mark Tatum, please be aware that the photos can be rather shocking.) The best thing to do is to have your home inspected for mold if there has been water damage or if you notice a musty smell, which indicates the presence of active mold. It is likely more than 83 percent of homes have a significant environmental issue and 80 percent of human ailments are caused by the environments lived in, according to the U.S Surgeon General. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

ROLL ‘EM!

Where the Lions Roar by Hunter Barnard The new “The Lion King� is a very funny movie. I liked this one more than the animated one because, in this one, there were more hyenas chasing Pumbaa, and it had more jokes. The music was good and made me want to dance, just like in the first movie. Scenes were more colorful in the animated movie, but this one was still good because the animals all looked real. It did a good job of being just like the first movie, they only really changed how it looked and put in more hyenas. Simba was cool because he was brave and chased away all of the hyenas. He runs a lot faster in this movie, and he looks like an actual lion, which means he is bigger and cooler. Pumbaa eats a lot of bugs in the movie and he is really funny. He told lots of good jokes and made everyone laugh. Timon was funnier in the first movie, but he was good in this one, too. Simba and Nala looked a lot happier in this movie, and the ending with the baby lion was really cute. I thought the movie was really good and funny, and I cannot wait to watch it again. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

OFFICER RONALD DEAMICIS

OFFICER DEREK CROOKS

BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

MEDINA POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST NANCY FITZ

OFFICER MICHAEL WOVNA

BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPT. | DISPATCH

MEDINA POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

OFFICER JEFFREY HOLUB

PATROLMAN JUSTIN HARVEY

BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

MEDINA TOWNSHIP POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

SERGEANT KEVIN SCULLIN

PATROL OFFICER ZACH DENTON

BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPT. | OUTSTANDING TRAFFIC SAFETY RECOGNITION

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. | TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT

PATROL OFFICER JOEL ECKSTINE

OFFICER STEVEN SZUTER

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. | TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT

BRUNSWICK POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

PATROL OFFICER CORY SEARLE

PATROLMAN NICHOLAS BALLI

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

BRUNSWICK HILLS POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

SERGEANT SCOTT SCHMOLL

OFFICER BRENT HAVEN

MC SHERIFF’S OFFICE | OVI ENFORCEMENT

LODI POLICE DEPT. | OVI ENFORCEMENT

TROOPER DAN JONES

OFFICER ASHLEE MILLER

OH STATE PATROL | CLICK IT OR TICKET ENFORCEMENT

LODI POLICE DEPT. | COMMUNITY OUTREACH LEADER

SPECIAL RECOGNITION: MEDINA COUNTY CAREER CENTER MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

WESTFIELD GROUP

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

SANDERBECK FAMILY

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

DEPIERO FAMILY MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

SCHAFFER FAMILY

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

REPRESENTATIVE STEPHEN HAMBLEY

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

SENATOR LARRY OBHOF

MONTVILLE POLICE DEPT. COMMITMENT TO COMMUNITY SAFETY

The Medina County Safe Communities Coalition is a community-based program designed to promote safe driving practices and create awareness and prevention of injuries caused by traffic crashes. The coalition is comprised of local law enforcement, highway officials, and several other local agencies. It is funded by the Ohio Department of Public Safety, the Ohio Traffic Safety Office, and the National Traffic and Highway Safety Administration, and coordinated by the Medina County Health Department.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

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DIG IT!

Bulbs are Beckoning column and photo by Michelle Riley When preparation meets opportunity, nature sings. Plants do communicate. Color and fragrance, as well as tiny unnoticed frequencies, abound in the plant world. They also stimulate human emotion. I am sure you can recall many instances a plant caused you to have an emotional response such as sadness when the favorite family tree was destroyed by a raging storm, anger when an uninvited plant decided to invade the entirety of the garden or lawn, or elation in finding a new delicious plant flavor to spice up an uneventful dish. Our eyes may overflow with tears of joy or sadness when we are delivered a bouquet of flowers after a loved one has passed. Giant allium Add fragrance to aesthetics, and a band of emotional waves are unleashed. When struck by a wall of aroma from the hyacinthus varieties such as Carnegie, for many, a smile is not optional, it is mandatory and involuntary.

Hyacinth

Giant allium

A spring garden of white hyacinths in front, vinca in the middle, and clusters of daffodils in the back.

I first met giant allium (Allium giganteum) or allium globemaster, when I was a teenager, my eyes bulged as I exclaimed to my mother, “Is that a giant dandelion?� My imagination went wild with visions of large, paratrooping seeds blown loose by a huge puff of breath. Imagine my delight when I learned you can paint the giant flower head any color

Bulbs waiting to be tucked in for the winter.

you choose once they are finished blooming. Giant allium heads make the best fairy wands! What better way to create joy than to plant ahead for a spring pallet, to brighten the eyes and pull us from fragrance to nostalgia? Spring overflows with the joy of blooming abundance from snowdrops cascading lightly throughout the garden; crocuses and grape hyacinths exploding in purple brilliance; and every shape, color and size of the tulip family dancing among spring daffodils. Now is the time to plant. As the weather cools, spring bulbs beckon for undivided attention. The bulb catalogs are endless, pick your favorites and find the perfect spot. This fall, why not get ahead of spring, and plant a bit of joy in your garden? As long as the ground is not frozen, you can plant. What are you waiting for? Get great planting tips and inspiration at https://bit.ly/2o2KWrE Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

MIRTH AND JOY

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

by Jerry King

Backing Into a Cloud by Austin Steger

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

There is a saying in the tech world when it comes to data: If it is not saved in at least three places, then it does not exist. Today's technology is capable of so much, but it is not immune to failure. When technology fails, it can be extremely difficult or even impossible to retrieve the data. With today's wide range of technology and services, there is almost no excuse not to back up data. Keeping at least two physical copies of your data, such as one copy on a computer hard drive and another copy on a flash drive or external hard drive, and then a third copy on a cloud-based service is the best solution for keeping data backed up and safe. This way, if the computer’s hard drive fails, you have another physical backup with you. If that physical backup fails, the cloud backup can be used to restore everything. Keep in mind, if one backup fails, it is important to find another way to back up data before it is too late. As technology has improved, cloud-based data services have become more widely available than ever before, and they have become more user friendly and intuitive. Cloud storage is a service that uses a computer or set of computers somewhere in the world, with lots of storage, to keep data safe. The cloud is accessed through the internet, so you can save and retrieve data with the cloud whenever and wherever you have internet access. These services can be used to back up data from your home personal computer, work computer, smartphone, tablet, smartwatch, and more. Oftentimes, a small base storage amount is provided that can be upgraded by paying a monthly fee. The internet is full of tutorials and walk-throughs on how to back up files, but if you do not feel confident that you can do it yourself, there is no shame in hiring a professional to help. It will be far cheaper to pay someone to do a backup, than paying a huge fee to retrieve lost data from a bad hard drive or destroyed phone. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

GEMS

Brightening the Holidays by Kent Von Der Vellen It was 2000, Pam Myers had just left Eat’n Park when she noticed a man on the corner holding a sign asking for help over the holidays. Myers called her sister, Kim Blessing, and asked her if she thought they could help. The sisters then contacted the Medina Office of Older Adults and discovered no meals are delivered on Thanksgiving or Christmas Day. It had been a difficult time for their families, their father had recently passed away and Myers was dealing with the loss of her son. They felt the need for change. With help from the Medina County Senior Services Network and the Brunswick Rotary, they used Myers’ kitchen to prepare and then deliver 25 meals on Thanksgiving Day and 75 meals on Christmas Day. A couple of kitchens and moves later, they ended up in the kitchen basement of St. Francis Church and have been there since. This is the 20th year they have delivered holiday meals to homebound elderly and disabled people. Myers’ daughter, Meredith, says they look forward to helping each year because they know they are making a difference. Pam Myers said on one delivery she made, a home aide brought her into the home to an elderly couple in medical beds. The older woman invited Pam to stay while she opened the meals and gifts of basic necessities, such as socks and toothpaste. With each item, she thanked Myers and hugged her. Fifteen-year volunteer Roberta Woodard said 1,003 meals were delivered last year, and they expect to add 150 more this year. Because so many meals were prepared last year, local nursing home Avenue of Medina loaned part of their kitchen to help. Many of the Medina facilities that serve the elderly make donations every year, and the Office of Older Adults promotes the holiday meals. To volunteer or to register for a holiday meal, call 330-334-4664. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

November 2019 Friday, November 1

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8

Author’s Day https://bit.ly/2x9IJfU

a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All

Take Me to Your Leader: Civics 101 Medina County, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail a.m., Council Chambers, Wadsworth City Hall, 120 Maple Street, Wadsworth. Panel discussion moderated by Medina County Auditor

bswartz@zoominternet.net

Mike Kovack. Learn about political structure, elected officials, funding,

Quarter Auction, 10:30 a.m., The Achievement Center, 4691 Windfall

how to interact, and emergency situations. Active alumni, $15; general

Road, Medina. Benefits Aktion Club and Special Olympics Medina

public, $20. Register at https://bit.ly/2UoLzHK

County. Bring at least one roll of quarters, bid on items using quarters.

First Friday: Wadsworth History and Hauntings, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.,

Auction paddles are $5. Doors open at 10:30 a.m. and auction begins at

Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

1 p.m. Tickets are available at The Achievement Center Adult Services

Wadsworth.

Office or by calling 330-725-7751, Ext. 266.

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

Pinterest Projects: Felt Flower and Burlap Hoop Wreath, 2 p.m. to 4

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth.

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional Free. WAITING LIST. Call 330-722-9364. Sunday Cinema Club: “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” 2 p.m. to 4 donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Saturday, November 2

Wadsworth.

Book Lovers Day https://bit.ly/UqBXeV

Monday, November 4

A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m., Wolf Creek

Common Sense Day https://bit.ly/2xeDUmr

Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Monthly vigorous Hepatitis A Immunizations and HIV Screenings, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Hope Recovery Community, 200 Highland Drive, Medina. Call Medina 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10 to adult.

County Health Department, 330-723-9688, for more information.

Jingle and Mingle Craft Show, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Lafayette United

Halloween Candy Buy Back, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dr. Kathy Brisley-Sedon,

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. For more information, 10 W. Main Street, Seville. Get $1 per pound of Halloween candy turned in. Candy is sent to military troops. call 330-416-6906. De-Stress Fest, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library,

Beginner Web Design, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center

635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Games, crafts, snacks, and a therapy dog

Street, Seville. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2nVaNBa

visit. Grades 6 to 12.

Tuesday, November 5

Fall Family Hike, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985

Election Day https://bit.ly/2lGciCy

Windfall Road, Medina. Enjoy changing colors, temperatures, and

Brunswick City Schools closed.

creatures.

Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to

You Can Play the Ukelele, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room B,

2 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road,

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Bring a uke or borrow one.

Wadsworth. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies

Register at https://bit.ly/2nkHtE5

provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register for 10 a.m.

Board Gamers United, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Community Rooms A and B,

at https://bit.ly/2mamljH and for 1 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2mmegs7

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Try games of strategy.

Library Art Store, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and

Sunday, November 3

South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Shop with

Zero Tasking Day https://bit.ly/2kSX1gp

library bucks, practice money counting skills and make a piece of art.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 8 a.m. to noon, Litchfield Township

Grades kindergarten through 2. Registration at https://bit.ly/2o17Gb5

Fire Station, 9487 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp


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Scribble Drawings: ZenTeen, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A,

Grades kindergarten to 12th, children must be present. Photo

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at

identification required.

https://bit.ly/2lHqZFo

Maple Sugaring: Ravine’s Edge, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community

Beginner Web Design, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center

Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn how tree sap

Street, Seville. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2nj8AiK

becomes maple syrup, all about backyard hobby sugar making, more.

Writer Series: Impactful Cover Design, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community

Taste syrup sample from Ravine’s Edge Maple Farm. Register at

Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn what

https://bit.ly/2nZAAbx

an artist needs from writers to create the perfect book cover. Presented Louis Bromfield and Malabar Farm, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room via video conference. Register at https://bit.ly/2nZzpJa

North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.

Thanksgiving Fun!, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room,

Learn the history of Malabar Farm State Park and Ohio Pulitzer Prize

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, games,

author Louis Bromfield. Register at https://bit.ly/2njhlJE

crafts. Decorate Thanksgiving cards and make turkey popcorn treat to

Author Visit: Kathryn Long, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A,

take home. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2lKPd1x

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Local author and

Wednesday, November 6

retired teacher discusses latest mystery novel and challenges of

Marooned Without a Compass Day https://bit.ly/1GOX6qK

publishing a book.

Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Chippewa Rail Trail, east of

Friday, November 8

Lake Road, Chippewa. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free.

Tongue Twister Day https://bit.ly/2yN9lVB

No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Scene 75

Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Entertainment Center, 3688 Center Road,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina County

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

AMVETS Post 1990, 620 N. Broadway Street, Medina.

Purrrfect Play, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Road, Medina. Create a catnip toy for your cat and one for a local

Art With a Heart Auction and Benefit, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Blue Heron

rescue. Grades 6 to 12.

Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. $50 per person.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Crestview

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

Elementary School, 300 W. 130th Street,

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional

Empower Parent Workshop: Surviving the Holidays! Keeping Kids

donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country

on a Routine, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Education Room, Summa Health

bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Medical Building, 3780 Medina Road, Medina (enter in the Emergency

Saturday, November 9

Room doors). Tips on keeping a routine while school is not in session.

Chaos Never Dies Day https://bit.ly/2ysCepb

Sensory-friendly holiday activities included. To register, contact

Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room,

Jennifer Gannon at jgannon@medinaesc.org or at 330-723-6393, Ext.

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with

125.

therapy dogs

Know Your Muslim Neighbors, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room

Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1472

North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.

Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about turkeys through variety of

Council on American-Islamic Relations shares information about Islam

activities.

and Muslims, learn the basic beliefs and practices, as well as the

Sunday, November 10

common ground between Eastern and Western religions. Register at

Forget Me Not Day https://bit.ly/2yrKuWj

https://bit.ly/2msADMA

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8

Holiday Scams, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library,

a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about 12 scams of Christmas,

guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more

including letters from Santa, phony charities, more. Register at

information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail

https://bit.ly/2ngQiyB

bswartz@zoominternet.net

Thursday, November 7

Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1472

Men Make Dinner Day https://bit.ly/2EjGWu2

Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about turkeys through variety of

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649

activities.

Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help

Live at the Library: Sylvia Wehrs, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A

those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first

and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Cleveland

served.

violinist performs solo music from Bach’s “Partitas” to Piazzola’s

Coats for Kids Coat Distribution, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Fraternal Order of

“Tango Etudes.”

Eagles, 696 Lafayette Road, Medina. Serving Medina County residents.


30

Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019 Seth Borgen helps guide creative writing process. Bring writing, be ready to discuss. Trio of workshops. Register at https://bit.ly/2nVDb69

Wednesday, November 13 National Indian Pudding Day https://bit.ly/2nU0zkE and World Kindness Day https://bit.ly/ZTMDpL A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations.

Gift in a Jar, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Assemble ingredients for edible gift. Grades 6 to 12.

To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Mug Cakes, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland

Saturday, November race beer at P.J. Marley’s, provided. Chip timing and 9 The T-Strong Fall Dash, 8 a.m., awards. For prices and registration, go to Medina. Benefits children https://bit.ly/2mbf4QC fighting cancer at Akron Thursday, November Children’s Hospital. Location 28 was not available by press Turkey Burner 5k, 8:30 a.m. to time. For prices and 11 a.m., Hinckley Reservation, registration, go to Bellus Road, 910 County https://bit.ly/2LpVCYX Saturday, November Highway 140, Hinckley. Benefits Faith In Action. Race 24 Run Santa Run 5k Fun Run, 9 day registration, 7:30 a.m.; Family Turkey Hunt, 8 a.m.; a.m., Public Square, Medina. race and walk, 9 a.m. For prices Benefits Toys for Tots. Festive and registration, go to dress encouraged. Race shirt; https://bit.ly/2lBCJJf Santa hat, beard, gloves; hot chocolate and cookies, post-

Paint Pizazz, 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Room B, Medina

Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make own microwave cake in a mug. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2msx7Sn Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Use Puffy paint, use more than just brushes, get messy. Grades 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2nihxZM Cookies and Canvas, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Use markers to create picture, use rubbing alcohol to turn it into an abstract. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2msAhFL What is the Cloud? 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how the cloud works, what it is, what you can do with it. Bring device for hands-on class. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2nqAVDD Rust Belt Burlesque, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. History of Ohio’s burlesque scene past with vintage photos and question-and-answer. Book signing follows. Register at https://bit.ly/2o1SVox

K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Allardale West Parking Lot, 401 Remsen

Wadsworth Coal Mines, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B,

Road, Medina. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non- Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Hosted by retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog.

Wadsworth Historical Society.

All ages. Free. No registration.

Thursday, November 14

Monday, November 11

Pickle Day https://bit.ly/2mpSh3o

Origami Day https://bit.ly/2kRzCMC

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County

All Medina County District Libraries closed for staff development.

Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick.

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer

Art in the Afternoon: Collage Letter, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s

skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages

Can You Escape?: Inventor Problem, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room

5 to 10.

A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. On a field trip to

Tuesday, November 12

the U.S. Patent Office, the door closes and locks behind you. You must

Chicken Soup for the Soul Day https://bit.ly/2ieMStu

solve clues to prove yourself worthy of a patent and escape. Ages 12 to

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room,

18. Register at https://bit.ly/2o276tL

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

Tween Scene: The Great Taste Test Challenge, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.,

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour

Wadsworth. Chip taste test, identify foods while blindfolded, more.

Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley.

Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/2nW3wB6

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

Alphabet Adventure: T is for Turkey, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional

Stories, make turkey headbands, play. Register at https://bit.ly/2niyiUG donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country The Arts Series: Writing as a Craft, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 S. Broad Street, Wadsworth. Local author

bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

31

An Evening of Wine, Music and Celebration, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.,

adult evening with heavy appetizers, open bar, musical performances

Serenite Restaurant, 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. ORMACO annual

by Medina Bees Musical Groups, art displays and auction, more.

dinner celebrating nine years of bringing culture to the community.

Tickets $50 for MCSF members, $60 for non-members. Contact

Dinner, live music. Per person, $30. Tickets at http://bit.ly/2HKDqtr (fee info@medinacityschoolsfoundation.org for tickets and further applies) or by phone, 330-722-2541.

information.

Author Visit: Seth Borgen, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A,

Saturday, November 16

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Borgen will read

Have a Party With Your Bear Day https://bit.ly/1yjBIVo and National

from his book, “If I Die in Ohio,” and discuss his process and how to

Fast Food Day https://bit.ly/2ytZjrp The two seem to go together well!

become published.

Basket Weaving 101: Snowman Basket, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek

Friday, November 15

Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. All materials

Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day https://bit.ly/1zzKWKp

provided; no experience necessary. Cost: $18 per basket. Call Betty

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Rettig, 330-975-4251, to register. Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina.

Black Friday Preview, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Rooms A and B,

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to search

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United

for best deals and avoid scams. Discover hot new tech toys. Register at

Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina.

https://bit.ly/2mwqYV8

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Charlie Brown Thanksgiving, 11 a.m. to noon, Seville Library, 45

Free Sensory-Friendly Haircuts, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Catalyst Farms, 1021 Center Street, Seville. Thanksgiving feast, Snoopy style, and stories Ridgewood Road, Wadsworth. Free haircuts by stylists with therapists

and crafts. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2nlWa9M

on hand to give haircuts to children on the autism spectrum or with

Wrap up the Perfect Mix, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room,

sensory difficulties. Half-hour appointments. Register by calling 234-

Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make treats to give as gifts

206-0815 or e-mailing info@catalystfarm.com. Registered children

in a jar. Sweet to savory. Register at https://bit.ly/2msJais

receive a story created by a therapist to help prepare for haircut day.

Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1472

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United

Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about turkeys through variety of

Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

activities.

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional Herbal Wreath Workshop, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country

Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Create fragrant herbal wreath,

bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

learn history of classic herbs used in homes. Led by Medina County

Annual Plan Public Forum, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Board Conference Rooms

Herb Society. No experience necessary. Fee is $35, pay at the door.

1 and 2, The Achievement Center, 4691 Windfall Road, Medina.

Register at https://bit.ly/2lJnoa3

Community members are invited to attend and provide comment and

We Love Accordion, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi

input on the Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities

Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Free concert.

annual organizational plan. Copies of the plan are available by calling

Sunday, November 17

330-725-7751, Ext. 226.

Homemade Bread Day https://bit.ly/2xIYNH2

Eat, Drink and Bee Giving, 7 p.m., Weymouth Country Club, 3946

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8

Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits Medina City Schools Foundation. An a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All


32

Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

33

guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth United

information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail

Methodist Church, 195 Broad Street,

bswartz@zoominternet.net

Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

ORMACO Party Bus to “The Band’s Visit;” 11:30 a.m. Playhouse

Advanced Robotics Camp, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room,

Square, Cleveland. Bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3626 Medina

Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Four-day advanced robotics

Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine, homemade cookies,

series to create with Lego Mindstorms. Grades 4 to 8. Register at

chocolates, cheese, more. Tickets $75 for balcony, $105 for orchestra

https://bit.ly/2oc1RYg

seating. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541

Food Science Stations, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and

Talkin’ Turkey, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1472

South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Make bubble

Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about turkeys through variety of gum, launch marshmallows, create plastic toys from milk, more. activities.

Register at https://bit.ly/2oi49Fz

Medina County Park District: K-9 First Aid, 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Wolf

Secrets of the Infrared Spectrum: See in the Dark, 6 p.m. to 7:30

Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Red Cross-

p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street,

based dog first-aid class on CPR, resuscitation, and the basics on

Medina. Use thermographic cameras to detect light invisible to the

keeping a dog alive until getting to a veterinarian. Do NOT bring dog to

human eye. Learn how it is used to track suspects, see into a fire,

class, dog mannequins provided. All ages. Free class, book with DVD

detect medical disorders, more. Participate in experiments. Register at

available for $20. Register at https://bit.ly/2lJphn9

https://bit.ly/2mMTyBZ

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Dumpster Divers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Holiday Card Making, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Award-based

Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Create 10 cards. Supply fee of $10

hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to

due to presenter at event. Bring own adhesive. Adults. Register at

https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

https://bit.ly/2m5qQvS

Monday, November 18

Tea Exchange, 6:30 pm. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street,

Push Button Phone Day https://bit.ly/2NBdKy4

Seville. Attendees will be told a total number of tea bags to bring, enjoy

Monday Movie Matinee: “A Dog’s Way Home,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

treats, go home with new teas in gift-worthy package. Register at

Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

https://bit.ly/2mKi4Ui

Wadsworth. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center,

The Making of “It’s a Wonderful Life,” 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room

330-335-1513.

A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Discussion of the

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United

making of the movie.

Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street,

Wednesday, November 20

Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Absurdity Day https://bit.ly/2nVX7WR

Scrapbooking, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North, Brunswick

Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North

Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create four scrapbook pages.

and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent

Supply fee, $8, payable to presenter. Bring own adhesive. Register at

DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150.

https://bit.ly/2nCviTi

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640

Let’s Explore: Science of Magnets, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s

Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. All

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA,

ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2m23W8D

623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Pay Cash for the Holidays!, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Rooms A

Thanksgiving Snack, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff

and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to

Road, Medina. Snack of delicious foods, may contain allergens. Grades

save money quickly to enable paying cash for holiday items. Register at 6 to 12. https://bit.ly/2lZFXGZ Thanksgiving Storytime, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Story Hour/Activity Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Turkey tales, songs, craft. Ages 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2lW2zIm WAITING LIST

Tuesday, November 19 Simple Word Processing, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn basics of word processing. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2nCcvqS Brown Bag Concert, noon to 1 p.m., St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 317 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Jim Gill performs. Coffee and tea provided. Bring lunch or buy one for $5. Call at least 48 hours ahead to reserve a lunch, 330-725-4131.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019 Medina County Government Academy: Communications for the Public Official, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., University of Akron, Medina County University Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ NuFit: Diabetes Nutrition 101, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Meeting Room A,

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

The Art of Erica Diffee Through November 9, 2019 Ephemeral splendors of flowers captured in photographs Highland Library 4160 Ridge Road, Medina

Cliffside Artists Collaborative: Cathy Welner November 1-December 31, 2019 Works in watercolors Highland Library Gallery 4160 Ridge Road, Medina

Folk Spirit November 4-December 1, 2019 Art from recycled material by

Elizabeth Gierosky Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Healthy Wadsworth presents information on the benefits of nutrition and fitness. Turkey Treats, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Story, craft, turkey bingo, snack. Ages 3 to 7. Register at https://bit.ly/2oo4nLd Explorastory: “If You Give a Cat a Cupcake,” 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Read the story, play games, count sprinkles, make

18th Annual Nature Art Fest

bookmarks and Puffy paint cupcake. Ages 2 to 6. Register at

November 9, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. November 10, noon to 4 p.m. Art inspired by nature. Paintings, stained glass, more. Wolf Creek Environmental Center 6100 Ridge Road,Wadsworth

Friday, November 22

Ashton Wood Art November 13-23, 2019 Photorealism in colored pencil Highland Library 4160 Ridge Road, Medina

https://bit.ly/2nzIPuD Go For a Ride Day https://bit.ly/2RMkkov 35th Annual Medina Candlelight Walk, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Lighting of approximately 1,500 luminaries by Boy Scout Troop 501. Medina Town Hall and Engine House Museum, 50 Public Square, open 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.. Holiday Market on Broadway, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Choir performance, gazebo, 5:45 p.m. Lighting of Christmas tree and Historic District, 7 p.m. Caroling with Medina County Show Biz, 7:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country

8-Bit Keychain Art, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Highland

bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Use melting beads to create

Saturday, November 23

character. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2lZQzpj

Fibonacci Day https://bit.ly/2fp7zwC

Teen Advisory Council Blind Taste Test, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Medina 1907

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick

Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Challenge

Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road,

taste buds in series of blindfolded taste tests.

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Gratitude Practice, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina

Retreat Into Nature, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Krabill Shelter, 7597 Ballash

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn ways to create a

Road, Medina. Women invited to take a break and retreat into nature.

gratitude practice. Register at https://bit.ly/2mQhdkX

Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2mdaqlf

History Series: Teddy Roosevelt, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community

Read Local: Author Fair, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Rooms A and B,

Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Ted E. Dudra shares the

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Local indie authors

life and times of Teddy Roosevelt in the first person.

will meet with readers and autograph copies of their latest works.

Thursday, November 21

Children activities also available.

World Hello Day https://bit.ly/2lKCPPe

35th Annual Medina Candlelight Walk, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Public

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library,

Square, Medina. Shuttle bus available 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Visit Santa at his

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills.

workshop, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Holiday Market on Broadway, 1 p.m. to 9

Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

p.m. Ice carving demonstration, 3 p.m. Smart House Singers, 3:30 p.m.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Citizens Bank

to 5 p.m. Bookmobile, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., on Broadway Street. Medina

Wadsworth, 214 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Town Hall and Engine House Museum, 50 Public Square, open 5 p.m. to

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room,

8 p.m. Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive, 6:30 p.m., on Broadway

Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Domestic Relations Court

Street/Santa Lane, and stay until 9 p.m. for photos ($).

volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | November 2019

35

Holiday Parade of Lights, 5:30 p.m., parking lot, Medina High School,

Movie Matinee, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina

777 E. Union Street, Medina. Parade travels from the high school to

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Popcorn and a movie about

Public Square. Fireworks from top of parking garage after parade.

an elephant with large ears. All ages.

Sunday, November 24

Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S.

Celebrate Your Unique Talent Day https://bit.ly/2fIpM8H

Broadway Street, Medina. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese

Turkey Shoot: Medina Chapter Izaak Walton League of America, 8

culture, more. Grades 6 to 12.

a.m. sign-up, 10 a.m. shoot starts, 7085 Friendsville Road, Medina. All

Wednesday, November 27

guns will be gauged for proper chokes, decisions are final. For more

Pins and Needles Day https://bit.ly/2ysJEJ3

information, call Brenda, 330-416-8261, or e-mail

Block-a-Palooza, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

bswartz@zoominternet.net

Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Play

35th Annual Medina Candlelight Walk, 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Public

with assortment of blocks in various sizes and shapes. Register for only

Square, Medina. Shuttle bus available 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Holiday Market

one session. Children of all ages with an adult. Register for 10:30 a.m.

on Broadway, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. Visits and photographs with Santa, noon at https://bit.ly/2mQRJ72 and for 2 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2mHlx6c to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. ($) Medina Town Hall and Engine House

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station

Museum, 50 Public Square, open 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tree of Remembrance 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp and Candlelight Memorial Service, 5 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., at the

Thursday, November 28

Bicentennial Commons on the square. Carols at St. Paul’s Episcopal

Thanksgiving https://bit.ly/2nPFUxX

Church, 317 E. Liberty Street, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

All libraries closed for Thanksgiving.

Monday, November 25

Friday, November 29

National Parfait Day https://bit.ly/2zcy2Hs

Square Dance Day https://bit.ly/2hJw2zd

Teen Art Night: Fandom Art, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room

Saturday, November 30

North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick.

Stay at Home Because You are Well Day https://bit.ly/2yMKjpL

Make craft based on favorite fandom. Grades 6 to 12. Register at

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Library,

https://bit.ly/2mQ3P04

3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity

Merry and Bright Holiday Mart, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Weymouth Country

Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories,

Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits The Children’s Center of

songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those

Medina County. Various vendors selling wares. Tickets are $4 or $15 for

with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers. All

sneak peek. More information, tickets or vendor information at

ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2obxKjD

https://bit.ly/2Msz8cx

Tuesday, November 26

Lego Tournament, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Story Time Room,

Cake Day https://bit.ly/2hHOrMX

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Test of speed and

Health Screenings, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center

creativity. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2mt5IzL

Road, Brunswick. Blood pressure, glucose screening. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine November 2019  

Think saving a historic home is easy? Read about a local couple who won’t give up. There’s lots more in this issue: a new technology column...

Joy of Medina County Magazine November 2019  

Think saving a historic home is easy? Read about a local couple who won’t give up. There’s lots more in this issue: a new technology column...