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M AY 2 0 1 9 VOLUME 2, NUMBER 4

BONUS! CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF 4-H

The best stories in Medina County!

THE READING NOOK Cam faces a startling truth hidden in a dim memory.

Pg. 13

ONLY THE LONE RANGER HAS SILVER BULLETS Pg. 23

IT TAKES A BAT AND A GOLF CLUB Spring training and fundraising for the Miracle League

Pg. 25

MUSIC TO YOUR EARS It took a dentist and few interesting happenstances to bring a brass band that plays everything from soft, romantic love songs to energetic marches to the Performing Arts Center. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 4 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM PUBLISHER

The Gift of Forgiveness by Amy Barnes Over the years, I have learned a lot about forgiveness that goes against conventional wisdom and certainly what is posted in social media. You do not have to forgive the abuser to achieve wellness or to move on. The energy spent forcing yourself to forgive someone is better used elsewhere. The only person who needs forgiveness from you is you. Forgive yourself for being a victim, for being hurt. Forgive yourself for being angry, you have the right to be angry and the right to let it go when you are ready. Forgive yourself for the time it takes to heal and for the setbacks that slow that healing. Forgive yourself for needing the help, support and resources of family and friends while you heal. As amazing as you are now, you will be even more so a er healing. When considering giving the gi of forgiveness, ask yourself these questions first: Did they say sorry and ask for forgiveness? Did they change? Not for the moment, but long term? Change proves an apology’s

Blake House Publishing, LLC sincerity. There is no deadline for forgiveness, it should not be given until change is proven. Have you healed? For as long as it takes for the bones to knit, for the bruises to fade away, for the pain and heartache to heal, they should have to wait for forgiveness. Being granted forgiveness is not a right, granting it is not a requirement. It is a gi . This Mother’s Day, forgiveness is not a gi my mother will be given from me. She once again will receive the silence she earned through the horrific abuse she was so sure no one would remember. I have forgiven myself for being too small, too weak, too young to stop the abuse or to save others. I forgive myself for not being perfect. I am comfortable with the knowledge that every day I do my best to bring joy to the world and that my children are the first in four generations to not be abused. To good mothers and to those who have mothers who loved them, a joyous, happy Mother’s Day to you. It was your existence that gave me hope when I needed it most.

EDITOR

Amy Barnes

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ed Bacho Photography FlashBang Photography

ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold Paul McHam Steve Rak Kent Von Der Vellen

THE BOOK NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

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PHOTO ALBUM

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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THE NETWORKER

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ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF HEAD, HEART, HEALTH, AND HANDS

There were a lot of smiles and dancing at the Medina County celebration of 100 years of 4-H in the county.

FOLLOW THE BAND! A noteworthy quest.

QUESTIONS LEAD TO CONNECTIONS by Bob Arnold

The second clue to solving the mystery of finding networking partners.

Rob Carter is the BBWR president and Olivia Evans from  Wadsworth is the band secretary. Page 4

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THE IN BOX

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BITE ME!

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

SILVER BULLETS by Steve Rak

If you think starting a business will be easy, you might want to think again.

FOR THE LOVE OF BRASS by Amy Barnes

Born from the love of music and led by a world-renowned music director, this brass band delivers a noteworthy musical experience to PAC audiences five times a year.

OH, SNAP! photos by Ed Bacho and FlashBang Photography

Making art with wiggly baby feet and hands and enjoying the Perfect Girl Band.

LITTLE TRUTHS

Full of texture and flavor, this recipe utilizes four different cheeses to create a filling meal.

OVERFLOWS, SIDE ROOMS AND FURNACES by Paul McHam

GEMS

by Christopher Barnes

MIRACLE BASEBALL SEASON

Devin forces Cam to face a distant memory and a deep family secret.

Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed as an e-edition and in print. Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  to sign up for a subscription, to order print issues and photos, and to find additional features, as well as a list of open positions and an index of the past issues.

by Amy Barnes

The last column in a series about basements and mold’s sneaky hiding places.

THE READING NOOK

ON THE COVER: Second cornet players, Paul Rocco, from Medina, and Lu Ann Gresh, from Wadsworth, pause in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center before a concert with the Brass Band of the Western Reserve.

LOVELY LASAGNA

by Kent Von Der Vellen

As the call of “Play ball!” goes out across the field, players of all abilities hit balls and scramble for bases.

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LET'S DO IT!

May we help you find great activities and events for all members of the family?


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

FOR THE LOVE OF BRASS by Amy Barnes photos by Ed Bacho

B

and members dressed in bright red shirts and crisp black pants enter the stage, highly polished brass instruments gleaming under the lights. The band director quickly enters the stage, his brisk step showing his eagerness to begin the performance. He turns and smiles at the audience and, with a slight bow, welcomes them in his English accent. He turns to the band, the baton rises, pauses mid-air, then swoops down in a forceful arc. What comes next is not the loud noise expected from a brass band but music such as the lilting notes of “Waltzing Matilda” or the engaging sounds of “Nobody Does it Better” that has the audience wanting more. It is the unexpected that the band’s director, Keith Wilkinson, specializes in. His eyes twinkle when he asks newcomers during intermission if the music was what they expected. He smiles with satisfaction when they express their surprise. He is known for pausing during a show to ask the audience if they are enjoying the music, which is always met with enthusiastic applause. Wilkinson knows the Brass Band of the Western Reserve can be very surprising. He said he knows that when people think of a brass band, they think of noisy crashing sounds, not the music that his band delivers. He is frustrated trying to determine how he can educate more people about the professional level of music that his 30-some member band performs. “Our goal is always the highest musical standards,” Wilkinson says. He has gotten used to the fact that, when he starts speaking, people are surprised by his English accent, and they have lots of questions about his origins and how he ended up here.

The band’s story begins in 1996 when Keith and his wife, Audrey, were living in England with their two daughters, Debbie and Katie. Keith was a retired Nottingham University mathematics professor and a band director for the William Davis Band in England. He had been the band director with the GUS Band and had guest conducted in Switzerland and Scotland. In addition, Keith had been the bandmaster and Audrey the choir director for their local Salvation Army church. Regarding his retirement as a math professor, Keith said, “I was so busy traveling the length and breadth of the country (England), as well as regular trips into Europe conducting bands, that maintaining a full-time teaching position was

The band director, Keith Wilkinson, and his  wife, Audrey. Photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

impossible. Something had to give!” Then an invitation from the Salvation Army changed everything. The Salvation Army needed a band director and choir director in Cleveland, so the Wilkinson family packed what belongings they could, sold what they had to leave behind, except for their house, and headed for Cleveland. “Everything electrical we had to leave behind,” Audrey said, noting the differences in electricity between the two countries. At the time, Debbie was 19 and Katie was 16. Katie had just finished high school in England, but on her arrival to the U.S., she learned she had to repeat her senior year because of the different graduation requirements in U.S. schools. Audrey and Keith recall that Katie made friends and seemed happy but she lamented having to choose what to wear to school each day. In England, the schoolchildren wear uniforms. Katie missed being able to go to her closet and grab her uniform without any thought or planning. As part of their new responsibilities, Audrey and Keith visited each of the more than 30 Salvation Army worship centers in northeast Ohio to encourage adult and youth music groups. They also began leading the Divisional Youth Band and Divisional Youth Chorus, whose members were drawn from northeast Ohio Salvation Army

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Abigail Mollenkopf pauses in her cookie munching to  pose with her father, David Mollenkopf, BBWR second trombone.

centers. Eventually, Audrey and Keith would come to realize that they would be staying in the U.S. and they sold their house in England. Their daughters had both married and become choir teachers and the first grandchild had arrived. In 1997, only a year a er their arrival in the U.S., Pastor Rod Taylor, who owned Taylor Band and Orchestra in Akron, discovered that Keith was a renowned band director who had led performances and been an adjudicator across Europe, the U.S., and Canada and living in Strongsville. Taylor decided it was time to put Keith’s skills to work conducting area musicians who were looking for an outlet for their talents. Those interested in joining the band were carefully chosen and had to audition. “We were looking for players of the right caliber and

Steve and Jeri Scafidi handle the sales table. They are the parents of Nicole  Scafidi, the band's solo horn player.

continued, Page 6


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From left, Kenneth Smith, solo cornet player Marcia  Kline, and Mary Lee Smith. The Smiths are long­time  concert attendees from Norton and Kline was one of  the founding members of the BBWR.

commitment, which is sometimes a challenge,” said Keith. Band members include college students, high school teachers and others with an interest in playing music on a professional level. Audrey puts together the program that is handed out at each

From left, Weijuan Zhou­Gates, BBWR principal cornet  player Andrew Gates, Carol Harris, Brian Gates, and  Kimberly Gates.

Anthony Chiporo performs a solo on the flugel horn.

performance and serves as the announcer at the holiday concert. “We are an amateur group performing at a professional standard,” Keith said. Taylor became a member of the band. Since he also was the pastor Ellet Community Church of God, near Akron, he invited the band to practice in the church. One night, Taylor arrived to perform with the band but found the brain tumor he was fighting was causing so much discomfort that he could not play. A fervent supporter, he still stayed for the concert. He died soon a er. To the present day, Taylor’s company remains a loyal supporter of the band and their ad can be seen in every band program, as can the ads of other loyal supporters, including the Medina County Arts Foundation. In 2013, during a chance conversation Keith had with his Medina dentist, Dr. Ron Ricci, Keith mentioned that the band needed a place in which to present its annual concert series. Already interested in expanding the musical culture of Medina, Ricci suggested the band start


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

using the Performing Arts Center at Medina High School. Ricci did the groundwork, and the band started performing at the PAC that year. The band also performs at other venues such as the Willoughby Fine Arts Center, Columbiana, Shaker Heights, and Malone University in Canton. Their practices currently are held at Ellet High School. In the years following the band’s formation, Audrey and Keith once again were asked by the Salvation Army to move to Columbus with Keith becoming the music director there and Audrey taking on the role of the area coordinator’s administrative assistant. Their commitment to the band has not wavered, however, and Keith traveled almost 17,000 miles from his home in Delaware last year to attend BBWR practices, board meetings and performances. Keith has more than 100 published musical arrangements and some of his arrangements have been used as test pieces at major championships. He also has his own publishing company, Alum Creek Music. The band is a registered, non-profit 501(C)3 organization. All of the band members, as well as Keith, are volunteers who play for the sheer joy of playing and do not receive a salary. Band members are particularly proud of the embroidered banners that adorn their stands they were able to purchase through donations a couple of years

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Keith Wilkinson, BBWR music director, on right, chats  with a concert attendee and Steve and Jeri Scafidi,  seated, and Kathy Navarro.

ago. Audrey and Keith agree that the banners give the band a professional flair. Music the band performs comes from around the world, in many genres, including movie music, at five concerts throughout the year at the PAC. Each performance includes an intermission where performers intermingle with audience members in the PAC lobby where tables of cookies brought by band members are available. Donations for the snack and funds from ticket sales are used to help offset the costs of the band’s performance. Costs the band faces for each performance include rental of the PAC; rental of a truck to haul percussion instruments, other instruments, and

Principal alto horn Nicole Scafidi performs a solo.  continued, Page 8


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continued from Page 7

Scott Purdum performs a cornet solo.

Keith Wilkinson addresses the audience.

equipment to the center; printing of programs and posters; and sheet music that has to be ordered from England. “Most of our music comes from England,” Keith said, adding that it is very difficult to find brass band music in the states. Another frustration for the esteemed director is the lack of attendance by high school students, especially since they can attend for free. For the past two years, the Medina High School Concert Choir has performed with the band for the holiday concert. The Summit Bells are a regular feature of the holiday concerts, as well. The band’s next Medina concert will be May 18 at 7 p.m. Tickets are sold at the door and on the band’s website at http://www.bbwesternreserve.org/events/ Prices are $12 for regular admission, $10 for

seniors, $5 for college students, and free for high school students. Nursing and retirement home groups are charged $5 per ticket. To sample for free the music the BBWR delivers, go to https://bit.ly/2P3dydr . You just may be surprised.

Jennifer Mollenkopf and Victor Lee,  principal percussion.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

David and Olivia Evans, BBWR  euphonium player.

Michael Greene, BBWR tuba player,  and Paityn Brumfield.

Cody Floyd

Jessica Payne, first baritone, performs a solo.

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The Perfect Girl Band performed for an appreciative audience at the  Wadsworth Library as part of programming sponsored by ORMACO. From  left to right are band members Tony Batey, Jake Ross and Sam Holik.  Photo by FlashBang Photography

A worn­out Gavin Fussi takes a break on the shoulder of Larissa  Zallar. Photo by Ed Bacho

It took both mom Carolina and dad James to steady daughter Mila  Mitchell for the tickling of the paintbrush on her feet. Photo by Ed Bacho

Mike Zebrowski helps his son, Austin, make colorful handprints at  the Brunswick Library. Photo by Ed Bacho

Mom Nichole and Genevieve Kakavas pause while creating  their handprint artwork. Photo by Ed Bacho


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

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Andi Salupo kept her hat white but managed to get  paint on her cheek. Photo by Ed Bacho Adihra Stoll and baby Vasanthi Janardha Nan created a colorful  rainbow of foot and hand prints. Photo by Ed Bacho

A pathway of footprints leads to a pot of gold for Sarah and  baby Sebastian Kosinar. Photo by Ed Bacho

From left, Andi, mom AnnMarie, and Logan Salupo. Photo by Ed Bacho

Thomas is trying very hard to resist wiggling while creating  artwork with his mom, Mary Hayn. Photo by Ed Bacho Michaiah (mom), Katie (being held by mom), and  Charlie (holding picture) Rundell show off their art.  Photo by Ed Bacho


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

CHAPTER 28 THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

Marissa, Devin, and I sat in my dad’s  apartment, awaiting Lea and Lilith’s  arrival. The letter we’d received said  they were already on their way, so  we didn’t want to miss them.    In the meantime, Marissa was  showing me another one of her  poems while Devin was texting  someone, probably Heath. It turned  out Marissa had snuck into her secret  room in the bowling alley one last  time after we returned from London  and cleaned it out herself.      After I’d discovered the sealed  vent shaft, I asked her about it, and  she told me she had  retrieved every  poem, notebook, guitar, and beanbag  chair from that place, and left only  one thing: the blades.    Afterward, she called the bowling  alley anonymously and told them she  had heard rumors that some teens  were using the unused vents for  hiding places. It was welded shut the  very next day.    At her mention of the blades, my  eyebrows rose. She made eye  contact with me, and said, “We don’t  need those anymore, Cameron. They  can stay locked away in there  forever.” And I didn’t disagree.    Now, she was showing me some of  her older poems and asking me what  I thought about them. It was a nice  way to keep my mind off of what we  were waiting for.    The main problem with deciding  that we’d face them was that we  didn’t know where they were or how  close they were to arriving at the  apartment. I just hoped they were a  few days away, because I was not  prepared for them.    “Heath says ‘good luck,’” Devin  spoke suddenly.

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  We had told Heath and Garret  about what was going on so they  wouldn’t be looking to hang out  with us.    “Oh, tell him thanks,” I replied,  raising my head from the poem I  was reading.    “Already did. So, I did some  calculations based on a few  assumptions,” he said, putting his  phone down and turning toward us.    Marissa snickered, but I looked  at him inquisitively.    “If we assume that they were as  shaken about the whole situation as  we were, then they probably used  the next few days to recover and  figure out what they were going to  do next. However, since this letter  was already at your door, and we  can safely assume it took at least  four days to get here, then they  must have sent this letter off not  too long after we left London.”    “If that’s the case, they must be  desperate to patch things up,”  Marissa chimed in, now listening  intently.    “Right. But if they decided to  come to us so quickly, and Lea  already knew the address, then  they should’ve been here already.  They probably beat the letter here,”  Devin continued.    “Lilith is a lot of things, but I  don’t think she’s stupid. She had to  have known that the letter would  take longer than a flight,” I said.  “Did they just want to rub it in my  face that they pretended to try to  fix things with me? Did they do  this so they could put the blame on  me for our separation?”    “Well, hold on now, Cam. I may  be giving them the benefit of the  doubt here, but I think the letter  continued, Page 14


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was sincere. From what I  understand about their current  situation, I doubt they had enough  money for two plane tickets to  come here right away. So instead,  they sent a vague letter that they’d  get here eventually and have been  working on raising enough money  to do so since.”    Devin scratched his head as his  brain worked wonders that I never  would have thought of. The  connections he made based on his  logical assumptions were quite  impressive. For the millionth time  since I’d lost my dad, I found  myself marveling at him and being  glad that he was my best friend.    “But then there’s no telling when  they’ll get here!” Marissa  exclaimed, throwing her arms out  and sinking into the couch.    “Hey, I’m not done yet,” Devin  said, with a smirk.    We looked at him expectantly. He  just grinned at us.    “Well?!” Marissa shouted at him.  She was cute when she was  annoyed.    “You have to consider that this  decision was probably huge for  them and that raising the money for  not one, but two plane tickets  would be quite difficult without a  job. So, if we assume they’re doing  anything they can to get money, as  they can’t realistically get a job just  out of the blue, then I’d guess that  it will take them somewhere  between six to 10 days to meet  their goal,” he concluded, looking  satisfied.    “So, we have at least another  couple of days then before they get  here,” I summed up for him.    “Yeah, basically,” he replied with 

an awkward chuckle, adjusting  himself on the couch, and realizing  he could’ve just said that.    “Then, we come back here in a  couple days and sit around hoping  they show up?” Marissa asked.    “Of course not, that’s a waste of  time,” Devin replied as he stood  and stretched.    “I don’t want to miss them,  Devin,” I reminded him.    “We won’t. Here, come with  me.”    With that, Devin took us back to  his place and revealed a few  interesting gadgets he had lying  around.    His plan was to set up a remote  camera and microphone, attached  to my old apartment door, so that  we could see who was outside it  and be able to talk to them if we  linked up his laptop to the  microphone. This way, we didn’t  have to sit in that old apartment  every day just waiting for them,  and we’d still never miss them.    It took late into the night to get it  set up correctly, but between the  three of us, we figured it out. We  were able to view who was at the  apartment door from not only  Devin’s laptop, but also all of our  cells by linking the camera to some  weird app Devin found.    As for the microphone, Devin  showed me how to link that to my  phone as well so I could speak into  my phone and it would come out of  the door. It was really cool,  actually. Marissa and I said so, and  Devin promised to teach us about  this stuff when this whole Lea and  Lilith thing was resolved.    Once it was all set up, Marissa  headed home and Devin and I 

returned to his place.    It was quiet, as his dad was out  on a work trip again, and his mom  was already in bed. We walked into  a dark living room and Devin  stopped, without turning on any  lights, and turned to me.    “Devin?” I asked in the dark.    “Something’s been bothering me,  Cam.”    “Yeah?”    “Well, you relayed the exchange  you had with Lea to us, but I’m  still confused about something,” he  said, leaning against the wall,  effectively imprisoning me  between him and the door behind  me.    I tried to laugh off the discomfort  he was causing me and shrug, but  he wasn’t having it. He stepped  forward, giving me very little  breathing room, and looked right  into my eyes.    “Cam, you said that Lea said you  weren’t an only child, and then you  called her crazy. But why would  she say that? What in the world  would have put the thought in her  head that you had some sort of  sibling other than her? And, also,  how come your mother told her  that your father hurt her so badly?  Things just aren’t adding up, and I  don’t think you can point all the  blame at a crazy mother.”    “Devin, you’re tired, let’s go to  sleep,” I tried to argue and push  past him, but he grabbed my  shoulder and held me firmly in  place. He had quite the grip.    “Cameron. Are you keeping  something from me?” Devin  frowned hard. The wrinkles in his  brow were so deep you could’ve  used them as a castle’s moat.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

  “Devin, I’m not­”    “Aha! I knew it!” Devin  exclaimed suddenly.    “What!?” I shot back, my heart  fluttering.    “You always say my name first  before you lie to me. What are you  keeping from me?”    In an instant, his expression and  demeaner fell from interrogation  and hardness to one of soft, gentle  hurt.    “You know you can tell me  anything, don’t you?”    I was silent for a while, thinking  long and hard about what I was  going to say next.    In reality, when Lea had  mentioned me not being an only  child, a flash of a memory shot  through my mind, and it scared me.  I didn’t know what it was, but I  remembered Lea, as a baby, except  she had blonde hair. She was in a  baby carrier, draped in a soft green  blanket, holding a stuffed hippo.  She had a pacifier with a sun on it  in her mouth, and she was softly 

sucking at it as she drifted off to  sleep.    Except, it wasn’t Lea.    I knew it wasn’t Lea, I had  known all along that it wasn’t Lea.    I just hadn’t  accepted it until  Devin cornered  me in that dark  living room and  asked me so  directly.    It couldn’t  have been Lea,  because I was  still a toddler,  and the baby  had blonde hair.    “Oh… Devin,” I  whimpered, the  realization  flooding my  veins as I fell  into his sturdy  arms. “I had  another sister.”

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Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com

Movers for Moms   Gather your extra new soaps, shampoo, conditioner,  bedding, clothing, baby items, and diapers!    It is time for the annual Movers for Moms collection for  homeless and domestic violence shelters.    Donations are being accepted from April 3 to May 8, 2019,  at Two Men and a Truck, 1005 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Items  will be delivered by Two Men and a Truck employees to the  Battered Women’s Shelter of Medina County on May 12,  2019.    In addition to the previously listed items, coloring books,  crayons, Play­Doh, other items to entertain children, and gift  cards are welcome donations.     Movers for Moms is a nationwide effort with local donations  remaining local.  Photo by Timothy Dykes


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

One Hundred Years of Head,

Heart, Health, and Hands Photos by FlashBang Photography

Started by A.B. Graham in Clark County, Ohio, in 1902, the original focus of 4-H was teaching new agricultural technology to rural youth as a way to get resistant adults to accept the newer agricultural methods. As 4-H expanded into urban areas the focus changed to the personal growth of members. To read more about the history of 4-H, go to http://4h.ucanr.edu/About/History/

Julie Wiseman, in a floral dress, concentrates on dance  steps while Kayligh Ethington, in a blue­and­white  patterned dress, is caught dancing on air.

There were lots of laughs, dancing and prizes to  celebrate the 100th birthday of the Medina County 4­H at  Root Candles in Medina.

They left Earth: Putting some lift in their  dance steps are, from left, Logan Spittle,  Quade Mainzer and Varun Natarajan.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

Leading the way are Logan Spittle in front and Colleen  Flannery in a light green shirt, as Quade Mainzer does a  cross step and, behind him, Cecilia Mainzer puts an extra  twist to her dance.

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It was fun for all as a skipping and smiling Lydia  Flores, OSU Extension program assistant, left;  Barry Jolif, teamwork and team play recreational  leader; and Morgan Domokos, 4­H Extension  educator, enjoy a dance.

continued, Page 18


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

continued from Page 17

Looks like there was more than one line dance happening at once!  With legs in the air were, from left, Halen Kochmit, Sophie Terwilliger,  Erika Evans, Natalie Cunningham, and Domonique Yatsko.

From left, Ashlynn Reck, Caley Chung and Taylor  Domokos share a laugh at the 4­H birthday party.

With a kick and a clap, the party rolled on! Out in front were, from left, Amelia Mainzer, Varun Natarajan  and Colleen Flannery.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

Adding a touch of royalty to the party were, from left, 2018 Erie County Fair Queen  Kalynn Welch, 2018 Erie County Fair king first runner­up Morgan Otto, and 2018  Medina County Fair Queen Grace Braver.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

Joyful Word Search Follow the Band!

BRASS MUSIC BANNERS BAND VOLUNTEERS

HISTORIC COOKIES ENGLAND RICCI PAC

CONCERT WILKINSON TICKETS CONDUCTOR COMMITMENT

Answer Key for Last Month's Search

The Man Behind The Curtain

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

THE NETWORKER

Questions Lead to Connections by Bob Arnold The second clue in the mystery of networking shi s the journey to finding effective partners. Here is an example of how a conversation might go. “Hi, I’m Julie Mongo, and I work at the Sweet Water Café.” I smile and shake her extended hand while saying, “Well, hi, Julie, I’m Bob! May I ask how you make a customer feel welcome at the café?” To which she might reply, “Oh, my, while I’m behind the counter helping a customer and I see someone come in, I tell them ‘Welcome to Sweet Water, I’ll be with you in just a moment! Please look over our sweet options.’” “Well, Julie, that’s fantastic!” I would reply. “Why do you find it important to greet them?” She beams as she says, “Because that person just walked through my door and is looking for some refreshment. I might as well start their experience as soon as they cross the threshold. Besides, a little while before, they decided to travel here, so I want them to feel welcome and important for making that choice.” What would I have learned about Julie by having her answer those questions? In last month’s column, I mentioned that the first clue is to find an affinity with the person you are meeting. Through my questions, I did just that, without telling her anything about me except my first name. What I would have learned about Julie is that I want to talk with her more because I just found out she cares for her customers in a very similar way to how I care for my future customers. That is an affinity and something upon which Julie and I would be able to build a networking relationship. The Main Point: I would have found a potential networking partner! Next month: What comes next? Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

THE IN BOX Silver Bullets by Steve Rak A wise old business man once said to me, “Son, there ain’t no silver bullets when it comes to running a business.” Ah, the old silver bullet theory, you know they have a new name for it now, it is called “hacking.” Do an Internet search for “business hacks” and you will find all kinds of articles and books about business hacking. Guess what? There are no successful business hacks, just like there are no silver bullets! I know quite a few business owners and not one of them has ever said to me that they hacked their way to the top. I never have had one person drag me into a corner and whisper, “Hey wanna see my silver bullet? It helped me make my first million.” Quite the contrary, my conversations usually go something like this: “Oh, you own a business too, how do you find employees? Because I’ve found that I’d rather stick my head into a vat of boiling lava than interview one more person that won’t show up on Monday.” So, here is the skinny: Business is hard. Remind yourself of that if you are planning on starting a business. If you already own a business, you probably try to stop reminding yourself of that on a daily basis. I am not trying to be a buzzkill, I am just keeping it real. There is no easy shortcut in business, there never has been. Business is hard and no silver bullet or hack will ever change that. Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an awardwinning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, www.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

BITE ME!

Lovely Lasagna by Amy Barnes This recipe fills a 6-quart slow cooker. •1 pound lean ground beef, 80 percent or higher •Seasoned salt •1 large chopped onion •Small package of sliced mushrooms (optional) •2 tablespoons garlic powder •2 tablespoons Italian seasoning •2 28-ounce cans of crushed tomatoes (can substitute tomato sauce) •30 ounces ricotta cheese •24 ounces small-curd cottage cheese •4 cups shredded mozzarella cheese •½ cup Parmesan cheese •1 pound uncooked lasagna noodles Start frying beef with onion and sprinkle with seasoned salt, stirring occasionally to cook evenly. When meat is slightly browned, add mushrooms. Continue to fry till meat is browned, onions are translucent, and mushrooms are lightly browned. Drain excess fat and discard. Stir in Italian seasoning and tomatoes. In large bowl, combine all cheeses. Line slow cooker crock with slow cooker bag. Put approximately one fourth of the tomato and meat sauce in the bottom of the cooker. Add a layer of noodles. Cover with a third of the cheese mixture. Keep repeating a layer of meat sauce, then noodles, then cheese mixture until completely used, making sure to reserve some of the meat sauce to pour

Photo by Amy Barnes

over the top. Then cover. Cook on low for four to five hours. Note: The onion can be omitted if you have onionsensitive people enjoying the lasagna with you. A second container of cottage cheese can be substituted for the ricotta cheese, if desired.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

GEMS

Overflows, Side Rooms and Furnaces

Miracle Baseball Season

by Paul McHam

It was 2 a.m. on an April morning in 2016 and Ken Richardson was standing on a Medina ball field eating a bratwurst while talking to a neighbor. The previous day, the new artificial surface had been installed at the Sami Masi Park ball field. For the next four days and nights, volunteers took shi s to keep animals and people from disturbing the new ball field so it could set properly and give the Miracle League of Northeast Ohio an improved field. “We wanted to create a place that was safe and welcoming to our players,” said Richardson, league president. In 2011, the Miracle League was created as a standalone non-profit by families and friends of Challenger Little League Baseball players. Challenger was created in the mid-90s so children with disabilities could play baseball under the Medina Youth Baseball Association’s charter by Ron Knight, Bill Nicolay, Chuck and Chris Thomas, and Mike Rocheck. The Miracle League offers American and National leagues in which more than 100 disabled players now participate, leading to the need for a second field. Players currently range in age from 5 to 57. Each player has walk-up theme music as they come up to bat, similar to the major leagues. Rob Snow with Stand Up for Downs suggested recruiting parents and students from the Medina High School Student Council to act as game announcers. Spring training was started at the suggestion of Leadership Medina County, resulting in 40 players being coached by Jessica Toochek and the Medina High School so ball team. This summer, the league will play an exhibition game against Findlay’s team at Cleveland’s Progressive Field at the invitation of Major League Baseball’s commissioner as part of All Star weekend festivities. League sponsors have included the Willard Stephenson Foundation, the Catanzarite Family Foundation, Flowerama, and the Lubrizol Corporation. More information is available at https://bit.ly/2I2Na2u and on Facebook at https://bit.ly/2Idzlh5 More information about this year’s golf outing fundraiser is available at https://bit.ly/2K8HRQV

Over recent months, we have spent considerable time on the basement area, and we will finish it now. The time spent is well warranted, as the basement may well be the No. 1 spot for mold growth in a home. While studying the peculiarities of your basement, take a moment to look up at the floor overhead. O entimes, if you have had an overflowing sink drain, tub or toilet, there are discolored lines (rivulets) of debris flowing down between the cracks of the subfloor where soap-filled water drained down through the subfloor. It does not mean there is mold between your hardwood floor and the subfloor, but it is a possibility. Professional air testing is likely to be the best way to identify any mold. If mold growth has occurred, the floor will act as a bellows when walked on and will spit out mold spores. An air test walking on the floor and then again a er should tell the story. Occasionally, the basement may have a side room that is under a porch. Usually the porch is built by putting down framing with plywood on top. Then cement is poured on top, and it is finished on the upper side to become a porch. In the winter, the cement gets very cold (as does the underside) and moisture (vapor) in the basement will hit dewpoint on the cement and condense into significant levels of water dripping from the ceiling in this room. Sooner or later there will be mold! The furnace in most basements will have three bionesting areas where mold will grow on its own. To avoid mold growth, have a HVAC service company clean these areas every few years: the evaporator coil, condensate pan, and drain line; the blower motor and squirrel cage fan; and the filter section. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

by Kent Von Der Vellen

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

May 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Wednesday, May 1 Batman Day https://bit.ly/2p6R2Ug ESL Conversation Group, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Practice English with others in a relaxed setting. Faux Stained Glass, 2:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Free. Improving Your Digital Photography, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn how to use camera settings, buttons, dials. Register at https://bit.ly/2DdbhYp

Thursday, May 2 No Pants Day https://bit.ly/2peKVN8 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Tween Scene: Mini Pinata, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 9 to 14. Free. Garden Chats with OSU Master Gardeners: Hostas, for the Love of a Leaf, 6:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. History of hostas, how to care for them. Register at https://bit.ly/2UBxKZQ Author Event: Three Ohio Families and the Civil War, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Local author Kathryn Popio-Hardgrove shares her family’s Civil War-era letters and story. Free. Friday, May 3 Lumpy Rug Day https://bit.ly/2q6n7wK and World Press Freedom Day https://bit.ly/2IxbmGD

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, May 4 Star Wars Day https://bit.ly/2IxbmGD and Herb Day https://bit.ly/2Ucm0I1 Free Comic Book Day, all day, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Create art using melt beads. Free comic book while supplies last. Star Wars Day, all day, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Jedi skill games, activities, dress up for prizes. Read-a-thon: Read off Your Fines! All day, all MCDL locations. Up to 17 years old. Read or listen to someone read to you. Every 15 minutes waives one fine. 86th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks, 7:30 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwOlpN Medina County Park District: Hiking for the Health of It, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.,

Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Four- to five-mile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the weather, wear appropriate footwear. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. Community Shred Day, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities, 4691 Windfall Road, Medina. Four boxes or bags per vehicle. Rain, shine, or snow. Free. Weymouth Preservation Society Plant Sale, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Old Weymouth School, 3314 Myers Road, Medina. Hanging baskets, heirloom tomatoes, herbs, vegetables, perennials. Free admission, parking. Rain or shine. Medina County Pet-Tacular! 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Pinnacle Sports, 313 Medina Road, Medina. Celebrates pets with give aways, pets for adoption, kid activities, discounted micro-chipping, vaccinations, pet painting, pet items, informational sessions and contests, 50/50 drawing, more. Free admission. Herbs to Tea, 10:30 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. How to plant, grow, harvest herbs. Register at https://bit.ly/2v3jT Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Book Lovers Luncheon, 11:30 a.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring dish to share. Review of new books. Register at https://bit.ly/2Xe4zZJ Star Wars Movie Marathon, noon to 8 p.m., Recovery Center of Medina County, 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Star Warsthemed snacks, light sabers and


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

costumes encouraged. Woodland Wander: May the Forest be With You, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Medina. Search for woodland creatures All ages. Steak Roast and Fundraiser, 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., FOP Lodge, 716 W. 130th Street, Brunswick. Benefits National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the American Cancer Society, and Vel San Bike to Cure. Tickets, $25 per person, includes steak, sides, beer, wine, pop. For tickets contact Carl DeForest, cdeforest@brunswick.oh.us, or Brian Ohlin, bohlin@brunswick.oh.us

Sunday, May 5 National Hoagie Day https://bit.ly/2GzhuRP Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Incredible Edibles Workshop, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Program for children to learn about vegetables, including pounding on plant parts to create artwork. Adult supervision required. Cost $6. Registration until April 26 or until class is full. Register at https://bit.ly/2VI66a8

Monday, May 6 Beverage Day https://bit.ly/2Z8TZ82 and International No Diet Day https://bit.ly/2qaVhyv Make and Take, all day, all Medina County District Library locations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Montville Township Police Department, 6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Veterans Roundtable, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. All Ages. No registration.

Tuesday, May 7 National Teacher’s Day https://bit.ly/1DpTket

Beginner Computer Boot Camp, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn computer basics in two-day class. Register at https://bit.ly/2KAXnp6 WAITING LIST Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2IumneY for 10 a.m.; https://bit.ly/2URvFZ5 for 1 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Creative Expressions: Polish Projects, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use old bottles of nail polish to decorate your keys and earbuds, a light switch plate, more. Ages 12 to 18. Register at https://bit.ly/2IiTzXt Garden Chats With OSU Master Gardeners: Raised Bed Gardening, 6 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register at https://bit.ly/2v41AXz Terrific Tuesday: Mother’s Day Bouquet, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Create paper flowers for or with a special mother in your life. Register at http://bit.ly/2TxC2AV Alphabet Adventure: I is for Ice Cream, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Enjoy ice cream stories, visit hands-on activity stations including games and making a puffy paint ice cream cone. Register at https://bit.ly/2Df3jxE

Wednesday, May 8 No Socks Day https://bit.ly/2q7wu Natural Discoveries Program, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Award-

based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Western Reserve Masonic Community, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Make and Take for Moms, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make floral gi . Grades 6 to 12. History of Tommy Lucas, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn about Tommy Lucas and his contribution to Wadsworth.

Thursday, May 9 Lost Sock Memorial Day https://bit.ly/2ZaOPIE Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Summa Health Center at Wadsworth-Rittman, 195 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tween Scene: Mother’s Day Surprise, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make gi for mom. Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/2VH29Cs Raiders of the Lost Locker: Can You Escape? 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. In the 1950s, lockboxes were used as lockers, help determine who an unopened locker belongs to. Ages 12 to 18. Register for 4 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2UgDGCp , register for 5 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2ZcrciI Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019 Mom’s Day Cra , 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Make a gi . Register at https://bit.ly/2Dopimb Fusilli, Orecchiette, Pappardelle, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Pasta making, eating, history. Register at https://bit.ly/2UU4c93 FULL

Friday, May 10 Clean Up Your Room Day https://bit.ly/2v4C1G0 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Wandering Ohio on the Buckeye Trail, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 ridge Road, Wadsworth. Beth and Chuck Hewett recount adventures from completing a 1,400-mile, 76-day hike on the Buckeye Trail. Free. Medina High School Showtime, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Admission $10 at the door or at https://bit.ly/2UR8jTo

Saturday, May 11 Eat What You Want Day https://bit.ly/2KArs8g and Twilight Zone Day https://bit.ly/2EmqNPe 86th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks, 7:30 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwOlpN Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100

Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. Basket Weaving 101: Mother’s Day Basket, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. All materials provided, no experience necessary. Cost: $17 per basket. Call Betty Rettig, 330-975-4251, to register. Sherri Litwin and Leslie Ciammaichella Art Show Opening, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Medina Gem Company, 23 Public Square, Medina. Silk painting, paintings, photography. Show continues throughout May. https://bit.ly/2I19ZUd Pots and Plants, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Paint pot, plant indoor plant. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2UVscbS WAITING LIST Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Special Olympics Horse Show, noon, Medina Creative Therapy Ranch, 5200 Lake road, Medina. Equestrian Special Olympics team demonstrates its skills in competitive event. Open to the public, free. Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. A Ladies Day in May, 2 p.m., John Smart House, 206 N. Elmwood Avenue, Medina. Desserts, champagne, recipes. Learn how “Early Medina Entertained.” Benefits Medina Historical Society. Members, $40;

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non-members, $45. For more information, call 330-722-1341 or e-mail mchs@zoominternet.net. For reservations, send check, payable to MCHS, to 206 N. Elmwood Avenue, Medina, 44256. Medina High School Showtime, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Admission $10 at the door or at https://bit.ly/2UR8jTo How to Use Your Own Telescope! 8 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Spencer. Cuyahoga Astronomical Association members will give instruction on how to use your own telescope. Free.

Sunday, May 12 Medina County District Libraries closed. Limerick Day https://bit.ly/1jRPncY American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., BAPS Charities, 2915 Laurel Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp ORMACO Party Bus to “A Bronx Tale,” 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Playhouse Square, Cleveland. Bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3616 Medina Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine, homemade cookies, chocolates, cheese, more. Tickets $75 for balcony, $125 for orchestra seating. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541 Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

activities. Free. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. ORMACO Miles Reed: Musician and Filmmaker, 2 p.m., Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free but reservations recommended due to limited seating. For reservations, call 330-722-2541 or e-mail tsigel@ormaco.org

Monday, May 13 Frog Jumping Day https://bit.ly/1PCzwLR Baby Footprint Art, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Ages birth to 2 years. Register at https://bit.ly/2IrGVVr Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. Monday Movie Matinee: “First Man,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Movie with Ryan Gosling about the years leading up to Apollo 11 mission. Free. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., H. G. Blake Elementary School, 4704 Lexington Ridge Drive. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the A ernoon: Decoupage, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use tissue paper to create box. Ages 5 to 10. Register at https://bit.ly/2UyNywh American Red Cross Blood Drive, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick High School, 3581 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Monday Night Intrigue: Amy, My Search for Her Killer, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. James Renner shares his search for the killer of Amy Mihaljevic. Register at https://bit.ly/2VEnJHE

Tuesday, May 14 Dance Like a Chicken Day https://bit.ly/2Z7cauF Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Music Together, 11 a.m. to noon, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Ages birth to 4, with adult. Music and movement. Register at https://bit.ly/2DbbriU Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m.,

Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. Hydrangea School, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Root Community Room, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Registration deadline is May 8 or when class is full. Learn about hydrangea varieties, care and selection and take a hydrangea home. More information at https://bit.ly/2TTVUcB Cost $30. Call 330-725-4911 to reserve spot. Writing as a Cra , 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Workshop by local author Seth Borgen to give writers a boost.

Wednesday, May 15 Chocolate Chip Day https://bit.ly/2yFsYQ6 Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Button Maker Challenge, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make buttons in new


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019 ways. Grades 6 to 12. Zoetrope Animation, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn about 19th-century toy that created moving pictures and evolution of motion pictures. Create own zoetrope. Ages 12 to 18. Register at https://bit.ly/2P8nHFy History Series: History of the First Congregational Church of Lodi, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Presenter: Jarred Grant. Register at http://bit.ly/2u4b04V

Thursday, May 16 Love a Tree Day https://bit.ly/2KAlUdC Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Therapy Dog Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. A different therapy dog each hour. Visit, pet, read to them. All ages. Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. Medina County Government Academy: Communications for the Public Official, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., University of Akron, Medina County University Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ 8-Bit Art, 6 to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create melting bead cra . Grades 4 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2Hw9GzE Inflammation Fighting Foods/ Maximize Your Fitness Recovery, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Facts, recipes, tips. Register at

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A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Saturday, May 18 9th Annual Dave Hopkins Bookin’ 5k Run and Fun Walk, 8 a.m. Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Registration at 8 a.m., run and walk start at 9 a.m. Scavenger hunt at 9:15 a.m. All welcome. For prices and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2VHSQlR Saturday, May 25 Medina Runs Down Cancer Series: Medina Half Marathon and 5k, 6:45 a.m. for half marathon, 7 a.m. for 5k, 93 Public Square, Medina. Register by May 14 for shirt. For prices and registration, go to http://www.runmedina.org/ Saturday, June 1 StAR4Life 5k/1 Mile Run and Walk, 7 a.m., registration; 8:30 a.m., 5k and 1 mile, St. Ambrose Parish, 929 Pearl https://bit.ly/2UXaXH6 Writers Series: Building Imaginary Worlds, 6:30 pm. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Melissa Sasina, fantasy author, shares tips. Register at https://bit.ly/2v0CQiY

Friday, May 17 Pack Rat Day https://bit.ly/1XwqKqg Sit, Stay, Read, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading with Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2Ce84ab Strings in the Park, noon, Public Square, Medina. Medina High School orchestra and returning alumni perform. Bring blanket and lunch. Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s

Road, Brunswick. Benefits cancer research and cancer care. For pricing and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2Uv5GHi Friday, August 9 Medina Runs Down Cancer Series: Collin Cares Glow With the Flow 5k, 7:45 p.m. mile run kids and 8:15 p.m. 5k. Family friendly events, music, food. Glow in the dark “goodies.” For registration and pricing, go to https://collincares.net/ Sunday, September 15 Medina Runs Down Cancer Series: Race With Grace 5k, 9 a.m., Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. For registration and pricing, go to https://bit.ly/2KEHMoy largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, May 18 No Dirty Dishes Day https://bit.ly/2EjNu6J 86th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks, 7:30 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

Brunswick

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 9 through October 13 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV

Medina

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 4 through October 12 Medina Public Square

Seville

9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 25 through September 28 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk

Wadsworth

9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 15 through September 14 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc 4 p.m to 7 p.m. Wednesdays: June 26, July 24, August 21 Village of St. Edward, 880 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc breeding grounds. Free. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwOlpN Hospice of the Western Reserve Warehouse Sale, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Hospice of the Western Reserve headquarters, 17876 St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. First of two days. Gently used home furnishings, artwork, lamps, dishes, jewelry, more.

Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Physician talk and one- to three-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. K-9 Kapers; 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Steps of Change, noon to 4 p.m., Medina High School Ken Dukes Stadium, 777 E. Union Street, Medina. Sponsored by OhioCAN and Recovery Center of Medina County. Music, food, speakers, refreshments, activities for children. Attendees are invited to bring a pair of shoes to represent someone they know who is struggling or who has passed from addiction. Tags will be provided to label shoes with name. There will be a moment of silence and a reading of names. Public is invited and children are encouraged to attend. Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. Recycled Magazine Art, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2IxOc6e Brass Band of the Western Reserve: From Sea to Shining Sea, 7 p.m., Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets at the door. Adults, $12; senior citizens, $10; students, $6. See this month’s feature story for more about the band! Evening Amphibian Walk, 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., Chippewa Inlet Trail North, State

Route 42, Lafayette Road. Search for frogs, toads, salamanders with naturalist during blue moon.

Sunday, May 19 World Plant a Vegetable Garden Day https://bit.ly/2Pb1OWi Hospice of the Western Reserve Warehouse Sale, noon to 4 p.m., Hospice of the Western Reserve headquarters, 17876 St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. First of two days. Gently used home furnishings, artwork, lamps, dishes, jewelry, more. Giant Salamanders, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Brunswick. Learn more about Ohio’s largest salamander, the scarce 2-foot long Hellbender, through various activities. Free. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Sunday Cinema Club: “On the Waterfront,” 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free. Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series: Moss Mosey, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Award-based hiking series. Learn moss biology and how to distinguish common moss groups. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

Monday, May 20 Make and Take, all day, all Medina County District Library locations. Movie Monday! 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 6 and up. Free. No registration. Drug-Free Wadsworth: What is the Medina County Health Department, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Representative explains role of health department in fight to improve Medina County.

Tuesday, May 21


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019 Be a Millionaire Day https://bit.ly/2P5Zf7E American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Board Game Night, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Bring favorite game to share or play one there. Popcorn and hot chocolate. All ages. Meals in a Mug, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn how to make meals and snacks in a mug. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2UfcZ14 Tales From Down Under‌Six Feet Under, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 32649 Center Road, Brunswick. Hear the stories of more than 20 people buried in the area including royalty, murderers, heroes, a saint. Register at https://bit.ly/2IuBi8V

Wednesday, May 22 Talk Like Yoda Day https://bit.ly/2HbedoU American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Avenue Care and Rehabilitation Center, 699 E. Smith Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Writers Live: Paula McLain, noon, Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Bestselling author. Lunch included. Tickets $25, available April 17 through May 15 at MCDL locations. A ernoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call for title, 330-273-4150. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

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A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Rawiga Golf and Swim Club 10353 Rawiga Road, Seville 330-336-8809

Weymouth Country Club 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina 330-725-6297

Friday, July 26 Salvation Army Golf Outing 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefits: Salvation Army Rawiga Golf and Swim Club Monday, June 3 25th Annual Jack Vigneault Memorial Golf Outing 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Benefits: Medina Hospital Foundation Weymouth Country Club Light Switch Makeover, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wol Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Travel Hacks, 6:30 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Hands-on learning how to use travel websites and apps, how to identify travel scams, how to use technology to ease travel planning. Register at http://bit.ly/2HCjxEn

Thursday, May 23 Lucky Penny Day https://bit.ly/27OUnaU Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Baby and Me Sign Language, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Class by the National Interpreting Agency. Ages 3 to 12 months and adults. Teaches babies to communicate needs. Two-part class. Register at https://bit.ly/2GnvD3a

American Red Cross Blood Drive; 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served Author Event: Bernard Bertram and Honor, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Bertram shares inspiration and writing process.

Friday, May 24 Scavenger Hunt Day https://bit.ly/2qJ4AZc American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina County AMVETS Post 1990, 620 N. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, May 25 National Tap Dance Day https://bit.ly/2UcodTP Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Superhero Saturday Storytime, 11 a.m. to noon., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Meet Spiderman, learn what it takes to be a superhero. All ages. Register at http://bit.ly/2XVl8e1 Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Memorial Day Weekend Family Fishing, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 ridge Road, Wadsworth. Fishing is permitted in this park only during this program. No experience necessary, help will be available. Limited number of rods, reels, and bait available, suggest bringing your own. Children must be accompanied by adult. All ages. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2KAxmGm

Sunday, May 26 World Lindy Hop Day https://bit.ly/2KAvihE Medina County District Libraries closed. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth.

Monday, May 27 Sunscreen Day https://bit.ly/2GF8PJX

Medina County District Libraries closed.

Tuesday, May 28 National Hamburger Day https://bit.ly/2uZQcMu Health Screenings, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Blood pressure, glucose screening. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Wednesday, May 29 Put a Pillow on Your Fridge Day https://bit.ly/2uS4rFQ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp School’s Out, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Games, food. Outside, weather permitting. Grades 6 to 12. Probiotic Snacks, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Using foods for health. Samples provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2VNg75W

Thursday, May 30 My Bucket’s Got a Hole Day https://bit.ly/2GGNrnC Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Master Gardeners: Planting in Raised Beds and Containers, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn about traditional gardening alternatives.

Friday, May 31 Macaroon Day https://bit.ly/2uZQsuW Summer Reading Program Kick-Off: A Universe of Reading, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Cra s, games, face painting, balloon art, NASA display. Birth through Grade 5. Read books through August 10 for prizes. Children play in MCDL locations, teens play online or in the libraries. More information at https://bit.ly/2UdvVNG American Red Cross Blood Drive, Noon to 5 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bingo for Children, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Win books, prizes. Ages 5 and up. Free. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Submitting Calendar Events Events listed in the calendar must be a festival or fair or hosted by or bene a non-profit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Event information is not accepted by phone. The calendar is also available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional event information.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2019

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Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine May 2019  

C’mon and follow the band! Enjoy stories and photos about those who toot their own horns, a 4-H celebration 100 years in the making, how a g...

Joy of Medina County Magazine May 2019  

C’mon and follow the band! Enjoy stories and photos about those who toot their own horns, a 4-H celebration 100 years in the making, how a g...