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WRITERS IN RESIDENCE PG. 12 An innovative program helps incarcerated youths connect with the world in a positive way.

CUTENESS ABOUNDS! PG. 16 Enjoy the local baby animals of spring.

CLOVER OR SHAMROCK? PG. 26 Learn about the 200-year-old debate.

No matter the weather, our pages are filled with the warmth of community and friendship. Turn the page, and find Joy!

LESSONS FROM AN AWARDWINNING FILMMAKER When Alex Nixon learned how to reframe the challenges of autism, he became unstoppable. Pg 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 2 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Their Letters to the World by Amy Barnes A very long time ago, around the time of

More times than could be counted, I

dinosaurs, if you ask my children, my life

turned to writing during tough times,

was changed through writing.

during wonderful times, during times when

I was 8 when I wrote my first poem. It was, in retrospect, an awful poem. Although, now that I think about it, even when I wrote it I did not think it was very good. But, for some really odd reason that I

I could not express myself orally. The scratch of the pen on paper helped me focus, and the written word became my best friend in a new way. Writing also saved me countless times

do not understand to this day, my family

from making some very bad decisions,

exclaimed over it endlessly and decided I

helped me organize my thoughts, and

was a Writer, with a capital “W.”

helped me understand myself.

Until that point, they did not have much

So, when I heard of a program for

hope that I had much talent in anything.

incarcerated youths called Writers in

After all, my best talent at that point in

Residence, I knew this magazine should be

time was walking into solid objects and

publishing works created by the youths.

falling down.

Turn to this month’s “The Reading Nook,”

Maybe they were just desperate.

to learn about the program and to read

Whatever the reason, what I learned is

works by those who are trying new ways to

that I actually did have value. I also

communicate with a world that does not

learned that maybe, just maybe, one day I

seem to hear them.

could write stories that others would enjoy as much as the stories I liked reading. I would come to learn that instead of

A tip of the hat to Zachary Thomas, the program director, and Jaclyn Balliet, the youth fulfilment coordinator at the Medina

reacting in unacceptable ways to

County Juvenile Detention Center, who help

situations, I could turn to my notebooks

these youths find their voices and empower

and journals to find peace.

them to change their lives.

That was a turning point in my life. Paper and pen became a retreat where I could escape the world, while at the same time, it gave me a way to communicate in a world I found confusing and frustrating.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Tyler Hatfield Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

To the youths in the program, thank you for allowing me to publish your words.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN

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DIG IT!

CELEBRATING CLOVER by Michelle Riley The 200-year botanical debate over clovers and shamrocks continues.

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BITE ME!

BEEF STROGANOFF recipe by Amy Barnes A super easy dump it, leave it and enjoy it meal.

HEALTH

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OF MIND AND BODY

ALL IN THE TIMING by Kelly Bailey Discover how when you eat is just as influential as what you eat.

HEALTHY TRAILS

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CHANGE THE RIDER, CHANGE THE RIDE by Robert Soroky If your bike feels sluggish and you want to lighten your ride, there is somewhere else to look first.

THE POSITIVE POWER OF ALEX by Amy Barnes When local filmmaker Alex Nixon was diagnosed with autism almost 20 years ago, his battle getting the help he needed had just begun, but he would come to find that hidden within disability is ability.

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THE READING NOOK

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OH, SNAP!

COMMUNITY

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FINDING THEIR VOICES

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

GETTING A DEAL ON COMPUTERS AND PRINTERS

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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ROLL ’EM!

by Tyler Hatfield

THE NETWORKER

33

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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LET’S DO IT!

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CELEBRATE!

THE IN BOX

ABOUT THE BOX Take note of these tips on combating one of the top shipping expenses for a company that does low- to medium-volume shipping: the boxes.

On the front and back covers: photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel Local filmmaker Alex Nixon has a lot going on behind his lens.

by Hunter Barnard

by Jerry King

by Bob Arnold

by Amy Barnes

PIANO MAN HAS SOUL

MIRTH AND JOY

I FEEL RUDE

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Read the clue, then gather and unscramble the magnifying glass letters to solve the puzzle.

Pixar’s recent effort gives food for thought with Joe, who desperately wants to return to Earth, while 22 clings to The Great Before and refuses to accept change.

Searching for the best price takes a watchful eye and timing.

When deals are sealed and connections made with a handshake, what are the acceptable alternatives during a pandemic?

by Kent von der Vellen

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel

BUSINESS

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RUNNING FOR HELP This is the perfect group for those who enjoy running with scissors and buzzards!

Enjoy a selection of poems from youths in the Writers in Residence program.

No matter the weather, the spring babies will arrive.

GEMS

THROUGH THE LENS Find the words that are an important part of filmmaker Alex Nixon’s goals.

Leprechauns are waiting in the calendar of events as spring arrives.

Our clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

by Amy Barnes photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel

understood, and his life was changed. His family had moved frequently by the time he was lex Nixon’s parents knew something was in fifth grade. He was born in Illinois, started school different about him when he was very young. in California, and spent a year in Wisconsin before Among other things, he liked to line up his toys in the family put down roots in Medina. very specific ways, and he was very quiet. He did not “My social scene was pretty askew,” Nixon said, so seem to laugh as much as other children did, either. the frequent moves did not affect him. When he was around 6 years old, he was diagnosed After arriving in Medina, he attended Garfield as autistic. School, but struggled and said that he often had to It was not until years later, when he was in fifth advocate for himself in trying to get the help he grade and had started attending Lawrence School in needed. Sagamore Hills, that he finally felt his needs were At Lawrence School, Nixon found he no longer had

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

to work so hard to learn. The school was designed specifically for children with learning challenges such as dyslexia, ADHD and autism. The school’s motto says it all: “Great minds don’t think alike.” At Lawrence, Nixon found the smaller classes and lower-stress environment were much more comfortable for him. He received occupational therapy that taught him things such as to not stand on his toes. Nixon also was given scripted notecards to practice with so he could learn appropriate social responses

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and ease the strain of social interactions. The school emphasized how to use parts of autism, such as his high attention to detail, his intense focus, and his highly sensitive hearing, to his advantage. “It’s all about reframing things,” Nixon said, adding that there are learning differences, not learning disabilities. He took what he learned at Lawrence and expanded on it to teach himself how to present his challenges as positives in job interviews. Nixon is open to sharing that he is autistic, the continued, Page 6


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continued from Page 5

difficulties he deals with and the ways he has turned what many view as a disability into perfect abilities to accentuate his filmmaking talents. “I owe a lot to Lawrence School,” Nixon said. “I consider myself very fortunate to have overcome the weaknesses of high-functioning autism.” His venture into filmmaking began when he would watch movies with his family. He always would spot when continuity within a film was not maintained. He did it so much that his parents, John and Jennifer, suggested he pursue a career in it. Nixon’s favorite films are “Hot Fuzz,” a 2007 action comedy film by Edgar Wright, and “Airplane,” a 1980 film from Ken Finkleman, David and Jerry Zucker, and Jim Abrahams. His father, John, has his own business, Asperta, and does consulting for insurance appraisals. His mother, Jennifer, is the manager of the Swarovski store at Summit Mall. His younger brother, Liam, is attending the University of Toledo, majoring in business.

Nixon has a bachelor’s degree in film studies from Baldwin Wallace University. While there, Nixon also worked at the university’s radio station. Currently, he is attending Cuyahoga Community College to earn an associate degree in visual communications and design, with a focus on web and interactive. He is in his second semester of web design classes and is learning more about 2D animation, which aligns with his original dream job of going into animation. “I’m giving myself options,” Nixon said. Animation also is a part of his life through a web comic he created on Reddit that has a Dungeons and Dragons theme and is called “ORKZ.”. “It is a roulette as to whether something gets seen (on Reddit),” Nixon said. “ORKZ” can be found at https://www.reddit.com/r/ORKZcomic/ While Nixon’s original goal was to go into animation, he found there was an obstacle that was


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

the industry is through film contests, which have a little more than he could overcome: the expense. been particularly difficult to participate in during the “You’re not paying for the degree as much as for the last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. connections that you need to find employment” in “It has become incredibly difficult to get teams the field, Nixon said. together and go on location,” Nixon said. Nixon also films weddings as an independent One of the biggest film contests nationally is the 48 contractor for Elite Entertainment and works part Hour Film Project in Cleveland. time at the Staples in Medina. Competing in the film project is challenging. One of his long-term goals is to create commercials, Filmmaking teams are given a character, a prop, a especially ones that would air during the Super Bowl line, and a couple of genres to choose from, such as football game. horror or comedy for their films. Nixon said that in filmmaking the best way to get The teams then have only 48 hours to determine known and have good networking opportunities in their budget, check to see who is available for acting continued from Page 7


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

and to collaborate with, write the script, complete filming and editing, and submit their final product. Once they have the full team in place, the script written, and locations chosen, they create the storyboard, which shows what the scenes will look like, and start filming. “The actors just go at it,” Nixon said. They shoot all of the scenes needed for each location before moving onto the next location. Scenes will not necessarily be in order, but it saves time and effort to visit each location only once. Finally, there is the sound design work, which is the part Nixon is responsible for, and the film editing. One of the parts of autism for Nixon is being particularly sensitive to sounds and the nuances that others commonly miss. Through sound design, he has found a way to use his highly tuned hearing to his advantage. The trick to sound design, Nixon says, is to make the sound effect sound natural. He uses a wide variety of objects, even throwing canned pumpkin in his mother’s sink (it was her suggestion!). “That’s why I enjoy sound design, because of the creativity,” Nixon said. While the film team members that Nixon works with change from film to film, one constant is his best friend from high school, Eli Manos, and Eli’s brother, Sean. At 24 years old, with his clean-cut, boy-next-door looks, Nixon does not initially come across as someone who loves comedic horror movies, much less someone who creates them. Nixon loves comedy because it can be used to break the tension in other genres, such as horror. He said horror movies are the easiest to make, especially when first venturing into filmmaking. Another reason comedy is his favorite is because “people like to laugh.” Last year, the team Nixon worked with won Best Film at the FunMill Films Competition for their movie “Deerly Departed,” which features two men perched on a truck tailgate and portraying two deer that have just been hit by the driver and arguing over whose fault it was. The film will be part of the Cleveland International Film Festival this year. In 2019, Nixon won Best Sound Design for “Becoming McClane” in the regular Cleveland 48

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Hour Film Project. It can be viewed at https://bit.ly/2ZUPFLe Nixon also won Best Sound Design in 2018 for the film “My Skin is Grey,” which won several awards in Cleveland’s 48 Hour Horror Film Project. The film has graphic content and may offend sensitive viewers. It can be seen at https://bit.ly/3aVR6iB Nixon will be making his directing and writing debut this May as part of the FunMill Film Fest. While Nixon regrets poor timing causing him to miss the deadline for this year’s FunMill Film contest, his film will be part of the FunMill Film Festival, and he is excited about his debut. For the first time, some of his friends from Baldwin Wallace will be part of the filmmaking team. Nixon is not sure yet where he would like his career path to take him, but he does know one thing for sure, it must be something creative. “I do want to be in a creative role.”

For more information: 48 Hour Film Project http://bit.ly/3e2ynEn FunMill Film Fest and Competition http://bit.ly/3swGvRe Cleveland International Film Festival http://bit.ly/3aXyyPh


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

The Reading Nook

FINDING THEIR VOICES Editor’s note: This month’s guest writers are residents at the Medina County Juvenile Detention Center. Names of the writers been changed in observation of privacy laws and regulations. Capitalizations; line breaks; and, in some cases, spelling are left to the creative choices of the individual writer.

Introduction

"They're more relatable," Honoree said. "For the first time, too, I actually cared about what someone else was going through, and that hadn't been the by Zachary Thomas, program director case as much before this experience." Unlike the other juvenile facility residents who wear riters in Residence is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that teaches creative writing to youths blue or pink uniforms, Honoree wears a yellow uniform that symbolizes his honoree status. For him who are incarcerated. to base his pseudonym on his achievement shows The program’s mission is to empower the youths’ the pride he feels in having earned his status. voices and to assist them in their re-entry into A resident becomes an honoree by first following society. It also strives to reduce the recidivism rates MCJDC’s rules for seven days without any violations, of the residents and to participate in the which moves the youth from Level 1 to Level 2 and transformation of the juvenile justice system. Originally founded as a student-run organization in makes the youth eligible for honoree status. Next, the resident must apply for honoree status by 2017 at John Carroll University, Writers in Residence completing a questionnaire about goals, dreams, currently partners with more than 10 colleges, responses to certain scenarios, and lessons learned universities and juvenile facilities across Ohio while incarcerated at the juvenile facility, while still including John Carroll University, Oberlin College maintaining positive behavior. and the College of Wooster. Finally, the supervisors and assistant Support for the program is provided by the superintendent review the resident’s application and Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards and the Cleveland Foundation. Since 2019, more than 275 youths have decide to approve or deny the application. Successful applicants are awarded a yellow jumpsuit participated in the program. During the winter holiday season, when most of the and additional privileges related to visitations, snacks and programming. residents at the Medina County Juvenile Detention The success of the pilot workshop solidified the Center felt even more alone and isolated from family and friends, especially during the pandemic, Writers partnership between Writers in Residence and MCJDC, who will offer the residents a 12-week in Residence piloted a two-week creative writing creative writing workshop this spring. workshop for them. Workshops will be weekly, 60-minute virtual One of the MCJDC residents, who asked to be sessions and will culminate with the works being referred to as “Honoree,” said the creative writing showcased in a published chapbook. The chapbook workshops helped him learn how to better manage his stress and allowed him to begin healing from his serves as an advocacy tool to raise awareness about the juvenile justice system and to enact change trauma caused by incarceration. within the community for the support of the youth. Honoree also mentioned that he enjoyed working with the college student volunteers.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

The Family is by Honoree, 17 years old

Untitled by R

The family is solid as a rock we always will have respect and love for one another even though our music is quite different the honesty between us never fails we may fight as most families do but at the end of the day we help each other make our dreams come true the family is solid as a rock.

They think I’m a risk They think I’m a menace But it’s all talk cuz they never seen me outside these walls

Six-Word Memoirs by D 1. I am pushing on, feeling hopeful 2. Love is tough, so am I 3. Work later, have fun right now 4. Big Mac from McDonalds is good 5. Baconator fills my tummy all up 6. Keep friends close, but enemies closer 7. Word hard, expect greatness in return 8. Everything is earned, nothing is given 9. I’ll be alright in 90 days

Untitled by B The family is the forbidden fruit The fall of man, yet a gift even when you aren’t who they expected. Love is love and family can’t change that. You are you no one can change that. Only you can change that.

They say I got whip skills and they just seen me burn him They’re gasing me up and we’re bumping the beamer Yeah I’m out now and I ain’t got no bracelet so best believe I’m hyped can’t nothing faze me

For more information about the Writers in Residence program, go to https://writersnresidence.org/ or contact Zachary Thomas at writersnresidence@gmail.com If you would like to become the next featured author in The Reading Nook, please contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

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cupscafe.org


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Baby pygmy goat Delilah shows off for her mom, Maggie.

Petunia, a miniature pot-belly pig, goes nose-to-nose with one of her piglets. She gave birth to four piglets on February 9.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

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Spring babies have arrived! Thank you to Faye and Jeff Farley who shared the new arrivals at their farm, Majestic Meadows Alpacas and Boutique, 4195 Abbeyville Road, Medina.

While two of Petunia’s babies ham for the camera, their two siblings burrow into the straw.

A pile o’ pigs! Where is the fourth?

Oh, there he is! Under everyone else!

continued, Page 18


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

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At only a few weeks old, baby Delilah plays with her mom, Maggie.

Lunch time!


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Pygmy goat Maggie shares a disciplinary moment with her kid Delilah. continued, Page 20


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Catie and Gabriel (not pictured) Burris traveled with their two sons, Kessler and Kolston, from Dayton to visit the farm. Catie and 1-year-old Kolston pet 4-month-old Diamond, one of the farm’s two young donkeys. Meanwhile, 5-year-old Kessler reaches out to pet other animals.

Six-month-old Bella, the other young donkey on the farm, gets nuzzled by an alpaca.


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Kessler Burris feeds Larry, a Suri llama, while his younger brother, Kolston, heads over to watch.

Samson, a few-weeks-old black pygmy goat, nibbles a piece of straw while Delilah enjoys being petted and her mom, Maggie, waits patiently for feeding by the Skomrock family, from left, mom Stephanie, 3-year-old Jace, dad Fritz, and 10-year-old Zach. The Skomrocks are from LaGrange. continued, Page 22


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A mom and her kid feed a mom and her kid! Stephanie and Jace Skomrock feed Stella and Samson.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Getting a Deal on Computers and Printers

I Feel Rude

by Tyler Hatfield Now that we are a few months into the new year, the initial round of computer and printer sales and deals that companies often push mostly have ended. Which brings up an interesting point: When is the best time to buy a new computer or printer? There are a few times each year when stores put the most expensive items on sale. However, computers have their own best sales that are usually different from printers, and black Friday is not always the answer. For laptops, especially, although this sometimes can apply to desktops as well, the end of the year and just into the new year is the best time to get a deal on a computer. During the months of December and January, stores tend to put computers on end-of-year sales to move them out before the new models come in. Year-end sales can be a bit finicky since stock is usually limited and unpredictable, but if you keep a close watch on store sales and in-store specials, you can find the best deals. Printers, on the other hand, do not often go on sale and, when they do, they are not very large sales. Since models of printers tend to stick around, they often will maintain the same prices year-to-year and will not have year-end sales. There is still hope for someone looking for a deal on a printer, though. Printers do eventually move out as newer models come in, so it is best to watch manufacturer and store websites. While this does take some more work, it is an easy way to catch deals when an old printer model is going on clearance and when stores might offer purchase incentives. Finally, the back-to-school season is a great time to watch for deals. While these sales may have smaller discounts and be fewer, it is a great time to watch for any flash sales on electronics. Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

by Bob Arnold We learn a lot about a person simply by shaking hands. For now, that is all gone. Over the last two weeks, I have attended at least six inperson meetings of two to 10 people. At only one were handshakes exchanged. We shy away from shaking hands. I feel rude as I walk into a meeting and wave at other attendees and when I do not shake their hands as we part. I understand the safety aspect and that avoiding contact is something we need to do during the pandemic. However, I feel like I am missing out on getting to know some people I am meeting for the first time. I mean really getting to know and connect with them. The physical contact of shaking hands while looking each other in the eye with greetings or salutations is missing. A lot of my deals are sealed with a handshake or used to be. So, what can we do to get that closeness, yet not shake hands? There is the fist or elbow bump, but they are not the same. We could wear gloves, but it is not the same, either. What can we do? Well, there is the chest bump, the salute, the prayer hands, and the foot bump. Oh, I almost forgot the hip bump, the wave, the bow, the peace sign, the fake hat tip, the head nod (when I use this one, I include an eyebrow raise), the nontouch high-five, the non-touch exploding fist bump, an air kiss, or just take a rain check. I would bet that you did not imagine there were so many alternatives. Some have been around for a long time, but are rarely utilized. My advice: Pick one or two that you are comfortable with and use them or customize them to suit your style. It is one way to get people to remember you and your unique answer to the handshake dilemma. Long live the handshake! And may it return soon. Till then, a tip of the head to you! Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at zMore networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

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BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

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About the Box by Amy Barnes One of the pain points for low- to medium-volume shipping is

One of my favorite sources for new boxes is a local paper

the cost of shipping boxes. There is not enough shipping to buy

supply store. Such stores can be found by doing an internet

boxes in bulk, but the by-the-box cost can drastically cut into

search for “paper stores” or “papercraft stores.”

profit margins. There are a few tricks to decreasing the cost. Free used boxes are the first way to save money. Used boxes have the plus that you can reassure customers you are doing everything possible to help reduce waste and save the environment. Make sure the used boxes are clean, not ripped, and that all labels are removed. Sources for used boxes could include any shipped to your business or home, friends, and local businesses. If you also

It also is easy to save on packing filler materials. Recycling packing materials from other packages is a great option. However, packing peanuts and bubble wrap are not the only options. Another great option is crumpled, used wrapping paper (remove any tags). It makes a great, environmentally friendly, festive filler. The long cardboard tubes from the gift wrap can be z-folded and used as a lightweight packing aid. Clean cardboard drink carriers and crumpled newspapers also work well for bracing items in a package.

work for another business, check into what they do with their used boxes and tap into that possibility. Many shipping boxes do not have any markings on the outside of the box other than the shipping label, which is easily covered by crossing out the old label and placing the new one on top.

Have small business pointers you would like to share as a columnist? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.

If there are brand names, numerous markings on the outside of the box, or a really stubborn label that is too big to be covered by the new shipping label, flip the box inside out. A box can be flipped by first opening the bottom of the box. Next, find the side seam and carefully separate it. Turn the box inside out, and reassemble it. To refasten the side seam, use a glue stick and apply a layer of glue to the sides that need to be joined. Cover over the seam with packing tape,

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reseal the bottom of the box. While flipping a box may be a little awkward at first, after flipping a couple, you should have the hang of it and be able to do it quickly and efficiently. Keep an eye out for deals on new boxes and stock up when they are on sale. As long as you do not go crazy stocking up on boxes, it does not take much room to store them. Boxes, new or used, can be stored flat on end by simply opening the bottom of the box. Store in ascending size order to facilitate quickly grabbing the needed size. For an idea of how much space storing boxes would take, I have more than 100 flattened boxes stored in this way in a 4foot long, 2-foot wide space.

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photo by Michelle Riley

photo by Amy Barnes

photo by Michelle Riley


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Beef Stroganoff by Amy Barnes • • • • • • • • •

2 pounds cubed stew meat 1 medium onion, cut in eighths 1 large package mushrooms, sliced 2 beef bouillon cubes 1 can cream of mushroom soup ¼ cup water 1 cup sour cream cooked noodles parsley flakes

Dump meat, onion, mushrooms and bouillon in slow cooker. Mix can of soup with water, and pour mixture over meat in cooker. Cook on low for eight hours or on high for five. About 20 minutes before finish, stir in sour cream. Serve over cooked noodles, sprinkle with parsley flakes. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made it your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to anyone who would like to submit a recipe.

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HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

All in the Timing

Change the Rider, Change the Ride

by Kelly Bailey It used to be believed that a calorie is a calorie and that the timing of calorie consumption did not matter when it came to weight and health. We were wrong. Studies are increasingly showing that the timing of consuming calories does matter for three reasons. First, eating late at night interferes with the cellular cleanup processes that occur while the body is sleeping. If your body is putting its efforts into digesting food, it cannot begin the critical repair work that would normally happen during sleep. Additionally, eating late appears to disrupt deep and REM sleep cycles. REM sleep is when brain activity increases, intense dreams happen and there is rapid eye movement. Second, eating late causes a spike in blood sugar and insulin. Insulin is the hormone that instructs the body to store calories as fat. Since not much energy is expended during sleep, those extra calories are simply not needed. Thus, the body is more likely to store late-night calories as fat tissue. Finally, late-night food choices tend to lean toward processed and easy, quick-to-grab junk foods. Be honest, you probably are not craving broccoli at 10 p.m. Late-night eating often has little to do with true hunger and much more to do with stress and poor habits. I do not know about you, but when I was a kid, the kitchen became an off-limits zone after dinner. My parents would say, “You should have eaten more at supper.” The fix on this is not easy, but it is simple: Kick the latenight eating habit. Make sure you eat enough earlier in the day, and then turn off the kitchen light after 8 p.m. As a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

by Robert Soroky As a video game fanatic, I have learned that “leveling up” a game character can go a long way toward more efficiently tackling challenges within a game. Similarly, leveling up, or upgrading, a bike can have the same effect on a ride. However, knowing when and how to upgrade is key, and there are several methods that can be used to accomplish it. This month’s column’s focus is on the rider. Usually, the biggest complaint people have about their bikes is the weight. Outside of the obvious solution of buying a lighter bike, many choose instead to pursue changing out heavy parts for lighter ones. Both of those solutions can be pricey, so in the interest of cost savings, let us back up the conversation just a bit. A fun question I like to ask is: “What do you think is the heaviest part of your bike?” Their answers range from wheels to frames to tires. My response is: “Nope, it’s YOU.” That may sound like a harsh reality check, but honestly, the best and cheapest way to reduce weight on a bike starts with the rider. Case in point: In 2019, I committed to a diet-and-exercise program that resulted in a weight loss of more than 20 pounds. My current road bike just happens to weigh in at 20 pounds. By the time I started riding that spring, I was faster, climbed better and rode farther, all thanks to a personal upgrade that cost me essentially nothing. In fact, losing 20 pounds off my body was the equivalent to erasing the entire weight of my bike from the ride! What if you already are a svelte human being in Adonis-like shape and are just looking to get that extra edge out of your bike? Does it make more sense to upgrade individual parts or to buy a whole new bike? Those answers and more can be found in next month’s column! (I just love cliffhangers, how about you?) Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

photo by Elena Mozhvilo

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Running for Help

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by Kent Von der Vellen This year marks 33 years that Roy Heger has been sober and running. Running helped Heger then and became a passion he still enjoys. Over the years, he became an ultra runner, someone who runs races of 20, 60 or 100 kilometers. A 100-kilometer race is 65-miles long. Heger also has run 100-mile races. When Heger is not running, he volunteers at the Community Assessment and Treatment Services in Wadsworth and the Brooklyn Exchange Club in Hinckley. In 2007, Heger wanted to help a friend’s daughter who was participating in a fundraiser. He decided to hold an ultra run at the end of October. In preparation for the race, Heger placed books at key locations along the race route. Race participants were to cut a page from each book to turn in at the finish line. Instead of an entry fee, Heger sold scissors to be used to cut out the pages and called the race Run with Scissors. It was a success, with many of the runners wearing Halloween costumes. Though Run with Scissors had to be cancelled in 2020, Heger is planning its return in 2021. Six years ago, Heger added a spring race called the Buzzard’s Day Race to coincide with Hinckley’s celebration of the annual arrival of buzzards. Because of the unpredictability of March weather, runners need to come prepared for any type of weather. Heger said one year the 100k race was run on an indoor 5k course because snow and rain made it unsafe to run outside. This year’s race will be held on March 16, the day after Hinckley’s Buzzard Day at Ledge Lake, 1151 Ledge Road, Hinckley. Funds raised frome the Buzzard’s Day Race and the Run with Scissors Race are used throughout the year to support individuals and families in need through the nonprofit Run to Share. Run to Share gives aid and acts as a referral service to connect people with local private organizations and government agencies that provide aid.

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Editor’s note: Information is from the nonprofit’s most recent filings with the Ohio attorney general.

Run to Share 5109 Montville Trails Drive Medina, Oh. 44256 330-241-9928 Date of formation: 07/23/2015 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of Organization’s Purpose: Promote and hold sporting events and distribute profits to existing charities and those in need. The financial information below is from the organization’s most recent filing within the on-line system. If the items below are blank, the organization has not yet filed information on-line or they may be exempt from filing an annual report. Reporting Year: 2019 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2019 Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 Total Revenue: Total Expenses: Total Program Expenses: Percent of Total Expenses: Total Assets: Among many others, Run to Share was able to help a family who was living in poor conditions move into a home by helping with the security deposit and first month’s rent; another person in need was provided with a mattress; a family was provided with a dinner table; another family was provided with needed appliances; and children were given beds. More information on Run to Share is available at https://bit.ly/2ZpisHp and race information is available at https://bit.ly/3s3j9CM, or call 330-241-9928.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Piano Man Has Soul by Hunter Barnard For my movie this month, I watched “Soul.” It is a really nice movie, and I liked it a lot. There is a man who is the main character named Joe and his friend, 22. The movie is all about actual souls. Joe decides he is not ready to be a soul yet and wants to get back to being himself. While he is trying to do that, he meets 22, a soul who has not found any reason yet to want to be a person and go to Earth. Joe loves jazz music, and he says it is his whole purpose for living. He is a really good piano player, and he wants to get back to being himself so he can play the piano with a really good band. But, before he can do that, he has to help 22 find its purpose. Because it does not know what it will do once it is a person, 22 is kind of mean. I think 22 is actually pretty nice, it is just hard to tell. Joe and 22 do all sorts of things to try to find their spark, their purpose, but nothing works. I thought that was a really cool part of the movie because it showed all sorts of things you could do and be good at. My favorite part of the movie was watching all sorts of people get to do the things they really like to do. It was nice to see everyone happy. I thought the movie was really good and I think everyone would like it, even little kids. There is lots to learn, and kids will see all sorts of cool things they can do when they grow up! Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

Joyful Word Search Through the Lens

CAMERA LIGHTS CLAPBOARD RADIO ACTION COMMERCIALS FUTURE SOUND

EDITING FILMING BEST FRIEND AWARDS FILM FESTS TRIPOD MICROPHONE CHALLENGES

E Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Love Language

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

March 2021 Nonprofit Calendar All Month: Adult Take and Make: Leprechauns at all Medina County District Library locations. All supplies provided, except scissors. Free Seed Share at all Medina County District Library locations. Bring in homegrown, dried seeds saved from last year, put in provided custom seed packets, label and add notes for the next gardener. Take a few to try. Native, heirloom and pollinator plants preferred. Seed Share bins at all locations beginning March 1. Seedling Sales, through April 2, sponsored by the Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District, 6090 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Sold in packets of 10 tree seedlings, $12. For ordering form and more information, go to: https://bit.ly/39wfQNP or call 330-722-9322

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, March 6 National Frozen Food Day A good day to take inventory in your freezer! Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Baby & Me Signs, 11:30 a.m., virtual. Learn signs to communicate simple commands with babies. Register at https://bit.ly/3bvNz9Q

Monday, March 1 World Compliment Day StoryWalk, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Follow the trail and read the story “Watch for Warm Sunday, March 7 Weather,” by Jean Taft along the way. National Be Heard Day Huh? What? Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 Tuesday, March 2 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Old Stuff Day https://bit.ly/36wf6X7 Dr. Seuss Day, 1:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Seville Library. Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along Participate in Read Across America with activities, a craft, and the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Seuss classics. Register at https://bit.ly/37CJcZH Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Wednesday, March 3 I Want You to be Happy Day and If Pets had Thumbs Day Monday, March 8 https://bit.ly/3jbujlx National Proofreading Day https://bit.ly/3pDiYwT Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 Thursday, March 4 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, March Forth and do Something Day

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Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code Friday, March 5 word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Learn What Your Name Means Day https://bit.ly/3rf4Bj3 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the Afternoon: Op Art, 4 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn about optical art using shapes, colors and patterns to create images that look like they are moving or blurring. View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Monday Night Intrigue: “The Third Rainbow Girl,” 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Focus is on the 1980 murders of two women who were murdered in Appalachia. Register for link at https://bit.ly/3pEC05n

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Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Planning Your Trip to the Emerald Isle, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Featuring highlights of Ireland, history, heritage. And traditions. Link will be e-mailed prior to the presentation.

Tuesday, March 9 Panic Day https://bit.ly/2L6yPoV Alphabet Adventure: Z is for Zoo, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Friday, March 12 Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Stories, practice the letter Z, fun Alfred Hitchcock Day https://bit.ly/2Yy71wE with snake patterns, make silhouette zoo animal art, more. Yoga poses to imitate zoo animals. Materials pickup available at library with registration at https://bit.ly/2ZEGG0l View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Author Visit with Julie Buxbaum, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual, hosted by Medina Library. New York Times best seller list author for “Tell Me Three Things.” Link will be e-mailed to all registered participants. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3k7J2hV Wednesday, March 10 International Find a Pay Phone Booth Day https://bit.ly/3ctqNBC More challenging than a license plate game! Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Leadership Medina County Program Preview Party, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., virtual. Learn all about the different programs offered by Leadership Medina County. Register at https://bit.ly/3ujxkFI COVID-19 Vaccine Question and Answer, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Register at https://bit.ly/3dwEuk2 To ask a question, use the following link https://bit.ly/2NomHkb Thursday, March 11 Popcorn Lover’s Day

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, March 13 International Fanny Pack Day and Smart and Sexy Day This has got to be a mistake! Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Baby & Me Signs, 11:30 a.m., virtual. Learn signs to communicate feelings with babies. Register at https://bit.ly/3bvNz9Q Together for Toys 1920s Speakeasy, 6:30 p.m., Blue Heron Wedding and Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Benefits Toys 4 Tots. Chicken, sort ribs, alcohol, cigars. Sold in tables of 10, $50 per person. For more information and tickets, go to MilShields.com/toys Sunday, March 14 National Pi Day https://bit.ly/3tlXBCT


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Teen Juried Art Competition/Show Call for entries: March 1-3 for Grades 6-12 Art displayed March 10-31 B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina For more information, go to https://mcdl.info/Art

Wednesday, March 17 Submarine Day https://bit.ly/3oBFaXd Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp ORMACO and Medina County District Library present: Pat Masalko: An Evening of Irish Tunes, 6:30 p.m. Featuring Irish folk and popular music by Irish native songwriters. Register for the concert at https://bit.ly/3j7q7U2 St. Patrick’s Day Fun, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Stories and make a leprechaun, a rainbow twirler, shamrock suncatcher. Ages 3 to 10. Materials pickup available at library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth, with registration at https://bit.ly/3aAolb3 View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 ORMACO Sunday Live Stream Concerts: Any Road: I Americana, 2 p.m. Featuring discussion of American music with performances of examples of the genre. To stream live, go to: Thursday, March 18 https://bit.ly/3cyKzvP Awkward Moments Day https://bit.ly/3pAMhQZ Our kind of day! Monday, March 15 Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 Everything You Think is Wrong Day https://bit.ly/3alTv4L p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code Discoveries award. For more information, go to word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Discoveries award. For more information, go to Tween Scene: Paperbag Art, 4 p.m. to 4:20 p.m., virtual. Hosted https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 by Wadsworth Library. Discover art that can be made from paper Let’s Explore: The Science of bubbles, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., lunch bags. Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/2M7vaHP virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Public Library. Make bubbles OSU Good Agricultural Practices, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., virtual. within bubbles, paint with bubbles, measure bubbles, more. Covers water quality, produce safety, worker training and health, Materials pickup available at library with registration at manure and compost handling, animals, storage, transport. https://bit.ly/3k2NLS0 View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Certificate of completion at end of training. Free. Register at https://producesafety.osu.edu/events Tuesday, March 16 Author Visit with Margarita Montimore, 6:30 p.m. to 7 :30 p.m., Everything You Do is Right Day https://bit.ly/3oBIJfY virtual, hosted by Medina County Library. Margarita Montimore is a USA today best seller. Register at https://bit.ly/3dwEuk2


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021 Explorastory: Frog and Toad, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Fun stories and songs. Materials pickup available at library with registration at https://bit.ly/3scqn7i View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC

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American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Author Visit With Anne Bogel, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Link for meeting will be sent once registered. Register at https://bit.ly/2OXEOxR Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., with Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. View at https://bit.ly/2H62Naj

Friday, March 19 National Let’s Laugh Day Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Tuesday, March 23 Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. Puppy Day https://bit.ly/3cFN8fF https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Register for required Saturday, March 20 meeting link at https://bit.ly/3bpwBKs International Day of Happiness Day, International Earth Day This is How We Brew It, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. and Extraterrestrial Abductions Day https://bit.ly/3crLiyE Examination of beer’s brewing process. Tour, history, more. EWhat a weird combination! mail will be sent with link after registration at Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 https://bit.ly/37sX48v p.m., through March 21, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Old Fire Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Baby & Me Signs, 11:30 a.m., virtual. Learn signs to communicate foods and health babies. Register at https://bit.ly/3bvNz9Q Sunday, March 21 National Common Courtesy Day Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Blue Jays, 7 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., last day, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Learn all about blue jays while hiking. Signs along the nature trail examines blue jays with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Monday, March 22 National Goof Off Day


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021 Free Seed Share at all Medina County District Library locations. Bring in homegrown, dried seeds saved from last year, put in provided custom seed packets, label and add notes for the next gardener. Take a few to try. Seed Share bins at all locations beginning March 1. photo provided Wednesday, March 24 Chocolate-Covered Raisins Day Bubblemania! 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., virtual. Learn about shapes and colors. For ages 4 and up. Presented by the Great Lakes Science Center. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Identifying Scams, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn how to be safe and avoid being scammed. Register at https://bit.ly/2NnliKK Thursday, March 25 Waffle Day Virtual Escape Room: So Many Books, So Little Time, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Library-themed breakout. No download or special software needed. See tutorial at https://bit.ly/345sWiL Register at https://bit.ly/2KbzR2A Social Media: Modern Tools for a Modern Job Search, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn why social media utilization is a must and tips and tricks to some of the more popular sites. Presented by Ohio Means Jobs Medina County. Register at https://bit.ly/3pKWXfb Ready, Set, Garden, 7 p.m.to 8 p.m., Bird Park Community Garden, 560 Bird Street, Wadsworth. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn the basics of gardening from experts. Weather permitting. Register at https://bit.ly/3duavca Friday, March 26 National Spinach Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, March 27 National Scribble Day Baby & Me Signs, 11:30 a.m., virtual. Learn signs to communicate simple signs with babies. Register at https://bit.ly/3bvNz9Q Sunday, March 28 National Something on a Stick Day

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Monday, March 29 National Mom and Pop Business Owners Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, March 30 National Take a Walk in the Park Day Wednesday, March 31 National Crayon Day


Joy of Medina County Magazine | March 2021

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Cable, Internet, Phone

Medical Massage

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

238 S. Elmwood Avenue, Medina (Inside GotMilt Health and Fitness) Contact: Rachael Hall Phone: 330-461-0769 Website: www.KnotYourself.com

Dentist

Photographer

Armstrong

Knot Yourself

Landry Family Dentistry

Allison Waltz Photography

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Phone: 567-203-2287 Website: https://www.allisonwaltz.com/

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Furniture

Wallace Home Furnishings 883 N. Court Street, Medina Contact: David and Richard Wallace

FlashBang Photography/ Videography

Renovations

North Shore Renovations Contact: Tony Ciero Phone: 216-676-4700 Renovations and 24-hour emergency service Website: https://nsr911.com/

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Owners

Phone: 330-723-3006

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


Click on “follow” below so you don’t miss a single edition of Joy of Medina County Magazine! Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Joy of Medina County Magazine March 2021