{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

JUNE 2019

Letter Detectives Pg. 13

VOLUME 2, NUMBER 5

Can you solve our puzzle?

THIS BUD'S FOR YOU A new gardening column premieres.

Pg. 18

THE KING OF HUMOR A local cartoonist joins our crew.

The best stories in Medina County!

Pg. 19

BIO-NESTING: IT'S NOT FOR THE BIRDS What you should know to avoid AC mold.

Pg. 20

HEART OF BLUEGRASS It was a friendship that spanned 22 years and resulted in the creation of a weekly bluegrass jam. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.


2

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 5

JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM PUBLISHER

An Exclusion of Men

Blake House Publishing, LLC

EDITOR

by Amy Barnes My column was going to be about our new cartoonist, gardening column, and reader contest, but there is a topic that keeps coming to mind and it is rubbing and annoying like a burr under a horse’s saddle blanket. I grew up in an all-female household in the seventies. Women’s lib was exploding, and a certain perfume was advertising that a woman could “bring home the bacon, fry it up in a pan…and never let him forget he’s a man.” There was a horse race between a filly named Ruffian and a colt named Foolish Pleasure, and on every commercial break, they played the song, “Anything you can do, I can do better” (hear it at https://bit.ly/1KQ2Ko9 ). When I entered the job market, I was sexually harassed at almost every job I had. The last job I had working for someone else, I was bullied by a female coworker. I guess that was an indicator that times had changed. So I understand and fully support women’s

rights, equal pay, and the right to work where we are not treated like sexual toys. However, I just cannot, no matter how hard I try, feel at ease or supportive of having events, networking groups, or meetings that exclude men. It is the same level of discomfort I felt when men were excluding women. Men’s actions in the past do not make it right for women to do the same thing that they have spent decades working to change. True power does not come from exclusion or from standing on others, no matter the gender, race or religion. Power comes from being able to do it better than anyone else and from building a strong network of support. It comes from recognizing toxic people and removing them from your life so they don’t weaken you. It comes from being proud of your dreams and being willing to be strong enough to pursue them. Power comes from within, not from excluding or crushing others.

Amy Barnes

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ed Bacho Photography FlashBang Photography

ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller

CARTOONIST Jerry King

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Kent Von Der Vellen

THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes

INTERN

Samantha Mickowski

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an eedition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

14

EARTH DAY

17

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

18

DIG IT!

3

photos by FlashBang Photography

Photos from the celebration at Buffalo Creek Retreat.

BLUEGRASS JAM

Find the words that are the recipe for a perfect bluegrass jam.

NIPPING WITH PURPOSE by Michelle Riley

Before pruning, it is very important to determine what you want the plant to be. THE NETWORKER

LISTENING FOR GOLD by Bob Arnold

While you need to know about a person’s business, keep in mind that the personal side matters, too. Bob Davis schedules the bands and oversees each Friday night bluegrass jam at  Lafayette United Methodist Church. Pg. 4

4

8 11

19

THE HEART MUST GO ON They gather on Friday nights to visit, jam and share a meal. On this night, they paid tribute to the life of one of the founders of the jam. photos by FlashBang Photography

Area residents were busy learning how to sew bunnies and creating glass fusion art.

by Steve Rak

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

20

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

SPORIFIC TIPS by Paul McHam

THE READING NOOK

Before starting up the air conditioner, learn how to avoid mold and help keep your system energy efficient.

by Christopher Barnes

GEMS

LITTLE TRUTHS

BLANKETS OF LOVE

A er a night of being bombarded by memories of a forgotten sister, Cam is not feeling ready for the challenges ahead.

13

SOCIAL MEDIA OUTVALUES CONFERENCES Comparing the investment in time and effort delivering conference presentations to using social media.

by Amy Barnes

OH, SNAP!

THE IN BOX

by Kent Von Der Vellen

Inspired by a United Way workshop, Buckeye students created a way to let other children know they care.

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

Our new monthly contest premieres! Solve the puzzle and get a chance to have your name be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

21

BITE ME!

22

LET'S DO IT!

ON THE COVER: John and Tammy Papik stand by a large photo of Larry Calhoun at a bluegrass tribute jam for him. Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed as an e-edition and in print. Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  to sign up for a subscription, to order print issues and photos, and to find additional features, as well as a list of open positions and an index of the past issues.

ORANGE-BANANA MUFFINS by Amy Barnes

A lighter, fragrant banana muffin that is perfect for breakfast, a snack or, with a little frosting, a dessert. Time to soak up sunshine and enjoy the outdoors a er a long and unpredictable spring. Including lists of farmers markets and fundraising runs, walks and golf outings.


4

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

T h e H ea r t Mu s t G o On by Amy Barnes photos by Samantha Mickowski

I

t is Friday night, and the warm camaraderie at the bluegrass jam envelopes all who walk through the doors of Lafayette United Methodist Church, starting with the group gathered at the table where the $3 admission is paid. In the hall, on the way to the cafeteria where dinner waits, sit two of the mainstay characters of the jam: Ray and Carvil Cool, proudly introducing themselves as the Cool brothers, with mischievous grins. The two brothers are the jam’s unofficial welcoming committee. They happily greet old-timers and newcomers alike. Carvil unabashedly questions everyone, usually starting with asking them if they are going to perform that night and what instrument they play or if they sing. People mill around, hugging, smiling, and chatting. Music flows from the stage and the practice rooms. Bands sign up for a time to perform and jam in the back rooms until they are called to the stage. It is in those practice rooms that experienced musicians share tips, try out different methods and songs, and mentor those who have never played. It has been known to happen that someone will wander into a practice room, join in playing with the band and end up on stage with them. Bob Davis runs the show, marshalling bands on and off the stage and running the raffle. Each jam, three small paper bags sit on the front steps to the stage until they are raffled off at intermission. The prizes are not huge in dollar value, but the competition for them is good-naturedly fierce and the winners find they suddenly have lots of friends

who want a share of the goodies. It all started because of another venue deciding not to host bluegrass performances and four people who were determined to find a home for the music. Tammy and John Papik had started attending jams at Izaak Walton League of America, a non-profit organization in Lafayette Township, around 1997. Tammy had a deep love for bluegrass music. John admits he had more of a love of southern rock. It was there that they met Larry Calhoun and became fast friends. Calhoun had a band called the Spring Valley Band that performed at Izaak Walton. Calhoun encouraged John to hang out with the band and to learn to play guitar. A year later, when band member Harold Roland le the band, John was invited to join. Then, in the early 2000s, Izaak Walton decided it no longer wanted to host the jam on its grounds at 7085 Friendsville Road. This did not sit well with the three friends. They were determined to find a new home for bluegrass musicians. They met with the Rev. Floyd Costello, who was the reverend for Lafayette United Methodist Church at 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. When the Papiks and Calhoun sat down with Costello at Dan’s Dogs in Medina, they were hoping to find a home for a weekly bluegrass jam. The reverend was looking for a way to bring more people to the church. The four agreed to start a weekly bluegrass jam at the church.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

5

In summer 2018, a beloved dojo player, Arnie Bates, died. He was known for his affable nature, his love for his wife Marilyn and his willingness to play with any band that wanted him on stage, even though he played long sets with the Willow Creek band. Then, last January, Larry Calhoun died. His obituary says that he was larger than life and had a politically incorrect sense of humor that was contagious and as legendary as his large white John said that Costello did not want the jam to be moustache. a church event, even though the church would host “Everything he did was over the top,” John said. it. He wanted it to be a music event. He had faith, Known as The Banjo Man in surrounding areas, John said, that by not pushing people to attend the Calhoun was born in Michigan but eventually moved church, the jam would bring them in. to Chagrin Falls, where he taught lessons at the “We’re just folks that want to play music together, Valley Art Center and would perform at local events that’s all,” John said. as well as at the annual music festival MerleFest in The Papiks collected phone North Carolina. numbers from the Izaak Calhoun played banjo Walton audience. Tammy with novices and wellcalled them and let them known musicians as well. know there was going to be a At MerleFest, he new bluegrass venue. represented a banjo In early fall of 2002, the company in the vendor Lafayette church began tent, where he did hosting the bluegrass jam. demonstrations and gave Seventy-five people advice about all aspects attended the first jam, of banjo playing. Main including musicians and stage performers would audience members, John stop by his booth to said. By the middle of the listen, sometimes playing following year, it had grown to music with him. 300. Early in life, he wanted For more than 16 years, the to become a general three friends remained surgeon and met his Serving up the food were Roger Broggini, Amy Atkinson  and Ellyn Cool, wife of Ray Cool. guardians of the jam. John future wife, Kathleen and Calhoun performed with Watts, when he was a Spring Valley and were fan favorites. The reverend doctor’s aide and she was a nurse’s aide. They went was transferred to another church, but still on to have a son, Patrick, and three grandchildren, occasionally visits. Maxwell, Olivia and Grace. John’s mother would attend the jams, listen to her He had jobs working in police dispatch, drawing son perform and visit with friends until she passed away several years ago. Bands, performers and audience members have come and gone over the years; some have died. Some have been attending the jam from the beginning. continued, Page 6


6

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

They had stayed away from the bluegrass jam cars for a company they founded with that worked for Calhoun because the General Motors, pain and memories were and at Cleveland too much. The day Crane and Calhoun died was the Engineering. day music lost its magic His obituary said for John. he gained a “When he died, my music died, a part of me died,” national reputation for hot metal delivery systems and would design, build and install them. In 1984, he John said. Those at the jam who understood how hard it was became a co-owner of Ely Crane and Hoist Company for the Papiks to be at the jam that night, offered in Cleveland. comfort and told John to turn back to his music, Calhoun was instead of away from it. They reminded him that known for his Calhoun would have wanted it that way, he would bushy moustache and never want the music to die. John would nod his head, unable to speak except sense of humor. for a very quiet and rough, “I know.” When the He struggled with his emotions as he described his hallways would beloved friend’s outlook on life. be filled with “This story is all about how Larry approached life,” people milling John said, getting ready to share a favorite memory. around and talking, Calhoun was known to shout, “Lady with a baby! From left, Steven Naxon and Aaron  Casteel in the hallway. Lady with a baby coming through!” causing people to move out of the way and he would walk through the crowd, still declaring there was a lady with a baby. There seemed to be only one fitting way to pay tribute to their beloved friend, so Tammy and John organized a night of tribute for Calhoun at the bluegrass jam last April 5. Word spread, and the people came. Attendance that night was 220, much higher than it had been in the past few years. Bands performing that night included at least one of Calhoun’s favorite songs in their sets; and musicians shared their favorite stories about Calhoun, causing much laughter. It has been months since the death of Larry Calhoun, but the pain is still raw and fresh to John Harmonica player  Carl Amolg enjoys the jam  and Tammy. Moe Nealeigh sessions in a practice room.

continued from Page 5


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

One of Calhoun’s hobbies was building scale-model radio-controlled airplanes. He wanted to build a replica of World War I fighter ace Eddie Rickenbacker’s plane. John said that Calhoun was determined his model be accurate. John chuckled, despite the tears in his eyes, as he explained that Calhoun could not find blueprints for the plane, so he lobbied his congressman to be allowed to measure the plane, which was in the Smithsonian, so he could reproduce it as an accurate scale model. He gained permission, and his model took second place in a national competition. Throughout those who were attending the bluegrass jam celebration of Calhoun’s life, people kept asking each other, “Are John and Tammy here? I haven’t seen them, have you?” When they were assured that both were there, there would be a satisfied nod, and then it was back to the foot-tapping enjoyment of the evening’s music. There is, a er all, a strong feeling of family throughout the bluegrass community. The legacy of The Banjo Man lives on. During the winter, the bluegrass jam is weekly. During the summer, following Memorial Day, the jam is every other week. To see the schedule, go to http://lafayetteumc.net/#/bluegrass To learn more about Larry Calhoun, go to https://bit.ly/2VuFKwg

Carvil Cool tries to make a point while his  brother, Ray Cool, far right, and an  unnamed man listen.

From left, Joe Thatcher and  Jim Stone get ready to jam.

Marilyn Bates

Bryan Cozort

From left, Dallas Jerfiffie and Ray Ward take a break in a  practice room.

Hazel Bing

7


8

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

photos by: FlashBang Photography

Fusion glass is made by layering glass and heating it so the  layers melt together.

Working to create glass fusion art, from left to right, are Donna Haney, Teresa Franklin,  instructor Sheree Ferrato, Stephanie Booth, and Kiera Marsden.

Examples of glass fusion art. Sharing a laugh during the Seville Library's recent glass fusion workshop,  are Cynthia Weersing in gray, going clockwise, Gayle Foster, Peg Goelz,  and Theresa Chaumont.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

9

Kris Carbone instructs twins Makenna Lucas, wearing a tie­dye shirt, and  Maisen Lucas in sewing a bunny at Lodi Library's Sew Much Fun while  dad, Scott Lucas, watches.

From beginning to end, the bunny project.

Allie Kizzen, left, and Madison Mellott follow rabbit sewing instructions.

Assembling bunnies at Lodi Library, from back to front, were Allie  Kizzen, Madison Mellott, Ramia Donley­Saliba, and Samir Donley­ Saliba.

Jim Carbone, husband of instructor Kris Carbone, helps out by  threading needles.


10

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

CHAPTER 29    Devin spent the night rubbing my  back and telling me it would be OK  as I was bombarded by faded  memories of a baby sister I once had.    Based on the painful memories I  could piece together, my parents had  had a second child two or three years  after me, and it was a girl. She was  very healthy and, for a while, the four  of us were a happy family.    Then, one day, my dad left with my  sister and returned alone.    From that moment, the only  memories of my parents were of  fights they had. Eventually, Lea came  along, and after she was born, my  mom took her and left, leaving me  and my dad behind to fend for  ourselves.    The sun rose through the living  room curtains, and we could hear  Devin’s mom getting her day started  upstairs.    My cheeks were stained with tears,  and our eyes were bloodshot.    “I need Marissa,” I told him.    “Yes, yes, you do.”    He got up and helped me to my  feet. Moments later, we were driving  down the street toward Marissa’s  house. As we approached, we could  hear a commotion coming from  inside. There was yelling, mostly  from a man, and screeching from a  woman, but neither voice was  Marissa’s. For a moment, I thought, I  hoped, that we were in the wrong  place, but after double checking the  neighboring houses and the address, I  realized we were right the first time.    “Devin…”    “Something’s going on in there.  Come on!”    He parked on the side of the street,  smacked the hazard light button on  his dash, and fled the car as if it were 

11

on fire. I followed, running to the  door and coming to a halt just in front  of it. Devin bashed his fist into the  door with three hard, solid, loud  knocks, and everything fell silent.    It almost seemed like the man and  woman inside the house had  disappeared into thin air, but then the  door creaked open a couple of inches,  and the right side of a woman’s face  peered out from around the corner.    “What do you want?” She looked  me up and down, then did the same  to Devin.    “Um, we’re Marissa’s friends. Is  she awake?” I asked, once again  unsure if this was the correct house.    “Oh! Yes. Here, let me get her,” the  woman replied, shutting the door in  our faces.    “Her parents?” I asked, making the  assumption based solely on the half  of the woman’s face we saw and how  it looked somewhat similar to  Marissa’s.    “Must be. No wonder she never  talks about them.”    “They sound awful,” I said  thoughtfully, my gaze falling to my  sneakers.    I’d been so caught up in my own  family troubles that I’d forgotten that  Marissa and Devin didn’t exactly  have it easy either.    In fact, none of us had good  families. There had to be some way  to overcome the fighting, neglect and  outright lack of parents we had.    Marissa slipped out the door,  opening it only a few inches so she  could escape.    “Oh…hi guys,” she said, trying to  cover up the fact that she’d been  crying, but then she saw how we  looked, and she dropped the façade.    “What’s the matter?”    “I remembered something,” I  continued, Page 12


12

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

continued from Page 11

replied, grabbing her hand and squeezing it hard.    Devin and I proceeded to drag Marissa away from  her nightmare of a home and to the bench where she  and I had shared our first kiss.    The three of us sat down, looking around to make  sure no one else was near enough to overhear a  personal conversation, then I spilled the beans.    As I finished explaining everything to Marissa, she  sighed heavily.    “We just don’t have any luck, do we, Cam?”    She was clearly referring to the fight Devin and I had  walked in on earlier between her parents, and I saw my  chance. At this point, I was too tired to cry anymore or  even be sad really, and I just wanted the three of us to  have an honest conversation about our families  because I didn’t think any of us wanted to stay with  our families anymore.    “I can’t wait till the three of us can get out of these  houses for good,” I said, hoping that they understood  what I was getting at.    A moment of quiet passed as two leaves floated by  on a gust of wind. The statement sunk in, and I felt a  shift on either side of me.    Hope rose in my chest like a volcano preparing to  erupt. The wheels were turning in their minds, and I  had to sit and wait for a response.    “Me, neither. We’d be better off without our families,  huh?” Marissa asked finally.    “Honestly, we probably would. I mean, when’s the  last time you or I asked our parents for help, and  actually got it?” Devin replied.    “Ha! Help from my parents? Yeah, that was  probably…,” she paused to feign counting on her  fingers, “never!”    She burst out laughing, drawing the eyes of a couple  near­by early­morning joggers.    “Right? Besides buying me things, I don’t think my  parents have done anything for me in years,” Devin  commented, retaining his composure much better than  Marissa.    “My dad did a lot for me, but there’s nothing he can  do for me now,” I said, a bit meekly. I didn’t want us  to forget that out of our six parents, there had been a  good one, he was just gone now.    “That’s true,” Devin said before joining me in a  moment of silence.

  The moment of silence was shattered by a chime  going off on my phone. Then Devin’s. Then Marissa’s.  We all were getting the same notification.    I locked eyes with Devin, shock and panic coursing  through my veins.    “Is that…?” I half­asked.    “Someone’s at your door,” he replied.    Neither he nor Marissa moved for their phones, so I  took mine out and checked the camera mounted by the  old apartment’s door.    It was a dog.    My shoulders slumped and I glared at Devin.    “Who is it?”    “Looks like my neighbor’s dog, taking a nap in front  of the door,” I replied, annoyed.    “Oh…well, it’s not a perfect system,” Devin  chuckled, awkwardly.    Marissa started dying from laughter. Then, in our  sleep­deprived, loony state, Devin and I fell into it too.  The three of us cracked up on the bench while people  passed by and looked at us like we were crazy.    Maybe we were kind of crazy, but I didn’t care  anymore. They were my crazy people, and I loved  them.    The next few days, we hung out together almost 24  hours a day, talking about all sorts of things. From  planning what we would do when the Collettes  showed up to all the abuse Marissa had been putting  up with for the last 10 years or so to helping each other  through the bad times when we felt like blades were  the only solution.    The door’s camera went off several times a day, until  we were numb to the chime. Mailmen, neighbors  leaning against the wall nearby, kids running around  the halls, and even a couple of mysterious ghost  alarms all faked us out, until we’d given up on it  actually working when we needed it to.    Then, one day, out of the blue, the chime went off  just after sunset. The three of us were playing video  games at Devin’s house, and we nonchalantly waited  until we found a stopping point to check the alarm.    It was Devin’s turn to check, since we all were  annoyed at it by now, and we’d started taking turns  looking. He pulled out his phone and took a look.    Instead of just blowing it off, he took a moment to  squint at his screen and really look.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

13

  Marissa and I turned to look at him, trying to figure  out what he was doing.    “Whoa!”    “Devin?” I asked, concerned.    “Cam! It’s them! Lea and Lilith are at the door!”    “What?!” Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com

WISHING WELL WISHES Gathered at the Medina County Auditor Pet-Tacular “To have a unicorn!”  from 4­year­old Maleah Lurtz “I wish…that I keep positive and do great in life,”  from Jacky Schuster

a See if you can solve the puzzle and win!  Everyone has a chance to win every month, with up to 15 winners’ names featured in the next Joyful Word Search. Here is how it works: 1. Every month a clue will be posted in the magazine. Clues will be drawn from somewhere in the previous month’s issue  of Joy of Medina County Magazine. 2. Find the special letters scattered throughout the magazine and unscramble them to answer the clue. 3. E­mail your name and answer to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “detectives” in the subject line by the 5th of the  month of publication (May issue puzzle: May 5; June issue puzzle: June 5). 4. Everyone who submits a correct answer will be put in a drawing. Up to 15 names will be drawn to be in the Joyful Word  Search puzzle in the next issue. This month’s clue:  The name of the flugel horn soloist in the May issue. Remember! E­mail your name and answer to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “detectives” in the subject line.


14

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

h

15


16

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

Joyful Word Search Bluegrass Jam

DINNER BLUEGRASS CELEBRATION MUSICIANS GATHER BANJO HARMONICA FRIENDS BASS LAFAYETTE DOJO GUITAR BANDS MICROPHONE JAM Answer Key for Last Month's Search

Follow the Band!

17


18

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

DIG IT!

THE NETWORKER

Nipping With Purpose

Listening for Gold

by Michelle Riley

by Bob Arnold

The old idiom “nipped in the bud” still holds much relevance today. Of course, a flower that is nipped while in bud will not grow or flower. Bud nipping is an art. Espaliers (trees or shrubs trained to grow flat against a wall or lattice) may have been nipped in the bud numerous times to create their unique shape. A fruit tree might have an appointment for a bud nip to help manage and control a healthier and more robust crop. It is not about cut or color, fruit trees are not vain. With grapevines, on the other hand, you need a vision of what they are to become. Wine grapes are le with 20 to 30 buds per plant, whereas table grapes maintain 60 to 80 buds per plant. These are great examples how buds are removed with purpose, a plan for an intended outcome. This brings us to the next idiom “there are two sides to every coin.” As I write this, the Forsythia (Forsythia X intermedia) are still ablaze in bloom, blasting their trumpets of sunshine in announcement of the riot of color soon to arrive. The oldfashion lilac (syringe vulgaris) blossoms look like sleepy children struggling to open their eyes. Both of these shrubs develop their flowering buds for the next season shortly a er flowering this season. Many well-intended gardeners trim these shrubs too late in the growing season and the consequence is bud and blossom removal. To prune these shrubs for best bloom, trim them shortly a er they finish blooming. This is true for most blooming shrubs. When you garden with purpose, you understand the purpose of what you are doing. Obvious, I know. Not so obvious is when you do not know what you do not know. This, my friends, is when the garden floats silently to the land of good intentions. When you garden with purpose, as the French artist Henry Matisse once said, “There are always flowers for those who want to see them.”

A er you have identified an affinity (April’s column)

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

with a potential networking partner (May’s column), you should schedule a coffee time with them. Coffee time consists of meeting at a restaurant or café and getting to know each other better. “Should we talk about business or personal things?” is the most asked question I get. It is important to know the person some, however, you also need to know what they do and how they can help someone like you or those you know. Both are necessary to a good networking relationship. On the personal side, don’t dig into their life like a therapist, encroach on private areas, or embarrass them with your questions. The best way I have found to bring out personal likes and dislikes is to reveal a personal detail about myself first. Most will respond in some way that reveals things they enjoy. For example, I may bring up that one of our family vacations with the grandkids is a camping trip in tents along Lake Erie. That usually elicits a response about what they like to do on vacation. Now, you are on your way. It is important to listen to what they say. Do not fall into the trap of talking all the time you are together. In order to learn if they are a good networking partner for you, make sure you listen to them talk and they will reveal other areas where the two of you have commonality. They may not like camping, but it provides the springboard to further conversation that helps determine if they can be a good networking partner. The Main Point: Sit down together and listen! There is gold in their words. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

n


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

THE IN BOX

MIRTH AND JOY

Social Media Outvalues Conferences

by Jerry King

by Steve Rak I am passionate about social media and what it can do for a personal brand and business. Social media and e-mail marketing are primarily what I use for my consulting business. My social media efforts include a YouTube channel with approximately 1,300 subscribers and an e-zine (an electronic magazine) that I send to approximately 1,000 subscribers. I also have a business Facebook page, Twitter account and Instagram. In comparison to my social media efforts, I have traveled all over the country and Canada to speak at various green industry conferences and events to between 100 and 500 people. When I travel to speaking events, I am paid well and all my expenses are covered, so there are benefits. However, the amount of exposure I get at these events is relatively small compared to what I might get from shooting one video on my phone and posting it on YouTube. I can get a higher number of views on one video than the number of people who attend a conference I speak at. My videos average 750 to 1,000 views per video, with some getting 10,000 to 50,000 views. In addition, the investment of time and energy that goes into traveling is many times higher than the time it takes to shoot and post a video. The beauty of social media is that I don’t have to get on a plane and travel all over the country to get my message out. Videos help build my personal brand, and when I finally decide to sell a product or put on an event of my own, I have a built-in audience that I know will support it. Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an awardwinning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, www.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

o

19


20

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

GEMS

Sporific Tips

Blankets of Love

by Paul McHam

by Kent Von Der Vellen

Most of the possible areas for basement mold were addressed in previous columns, but one more area should be mentioned: the central air system. A central air system has three bio-nesting areas, meaning areas that can grow contamination on their own. First, the evaporator coil and condensate pan in the air conditioning system that are usually on or under the air handling unit of the system. As dirty air flows past the evaporator coil and the humidity is lowered by condensation, the dirt, mold, dust, and fibers will cling to the coil and will clog it if it is not cleaned. Condensate drips into the pan and causes mold to develop. The system will run increasingly longer to try to satisfy the thermostat. Second is the “squirrel cage” blower on the blower motor, which moves the air within the system. As the blower fins fill with debris, it also causes the system to run longer. Third is the filter section that cleans the air blowing through the system. As the filter gets dirty, it slows down air movement and decreases its ability to filter out debris. It also is important to remember the importance of proper ductwork cleaning, which should involve using brushes to eliminate dead organic material within the ductwork and furnace. Material found in ductwork can include more than 8 pounds of skin cells annually from each person in the house, hair, drywall dust, mold spores, fiberglass, and more. A proper cleaning should last up to eight years, fewer if remodeling or other strenuous projects are done. The moral of the story is to keep the system clean. Most duct cleaners will not clean these things, but they should. A proper duct cleaning will cost more than $400, but you will be healthier for it and your equipment will operate longer and more efficiently.

In summer 2015, Buckeye High School hosted the United Way’s Dream It, Do It workshop, which encouraged teenagers to create ways to benefit their communities. As a result of the workshop, Buckeye Blanket Buddies was created by Samantha Ponomorenko and Kaitlin Sluss to supply children in need with items such as soap, toothpaste and small toys tied up in a fleece blanket. Initially made up of Buckeye Intermediate and Buckeye Senior High School students, the group now includes volunteers from other area schools and colleges. Group members meet at Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, to create the blanket buddies. Ponomorenko is very excited about how the organization has grown and says the idea was to have children helping children. She believes it is important for children going through difficult times due to financial causes, a family situation or illness know that other children care. Referrals come from several sources, including The Children’s Center of Medina County and United Way. When Blanket Buddies was created, Ponomorenko was a Buckeye sophomore, now she is a Kent State University sophomore. Though she is still involved, college commitments limit what she can do. Her sister, Alexandra Ponomorenko, has taken her place in planning and organizing the group’s activities. Alexandra is five years younger than Samantha and has been involved in the group since fi h grade. Blanket Buddy volunteers raise funds doing face painting and making balloon animals for donations at local events, such as the Valley City Frog Jump. The group operates under the Buckeye School District charter for its non-profit status. Their advisor is Gayle Telford, who also manages their funds. Howard Calame is their mentor and supporter, making regular donations for needed items. For more information about the Buckeye Blanket Buddies, go to https://buckeyeblanketbuddies.weebly.com or visit their Facebook page at https://bit.ly/2H5RN9h .

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

t


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

21

BITE ME!

Orange-Banana Muffins

y

by Amy Barnes By using self-rising flour in place of regular flour, it makes this version of an old standard less dense. The orange oil can be omitted, but it adds another delightful dimension of flavor. I never bother mashing the bananas, I depend on my mixer to mash them as they get mixed in since over-ripe bananas are fairly mushy already. •3 ½ cups self-rising flour •2 ½ teaspoons baking powder •1 teaspoon baking soda •1 1/2 teaspoon salt •1 1/3 cup sugar •2/3 cup shortening •4 eggs •¼ cup milk •2 drams orange oil (found in candy-making supply sections) •2 cups mashed, over-ripe bananas (approximately 6 bananas) •2 pounds chocolate chips (milk or dark chocolate) •2 cups chopped nuts (optional) •Frosting (optional) Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line muffin cups with paper liners. Yield will be 44 muffins. In large bowl, use balloon whisk or fork to combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Use a mixer to beat together sugar and shortening, making sure to scrape sides of bowl. While mixer runs, add orange oil, when well combined, continue beating and add milk and eggs, one at a time. Alternate adding the bananas and flour mixture.

Once batter is smooth, add chocolate chips and nuts. Pour into lined muffin pans. Bake for 20 minutes, test for doneness with a toothpick inserted in the middle of a muffin. Bake until toothpick comes out clean. When cooled, add frosting to change these from a breakfast treat to a yummy dessert.


22

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

c

June 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Saturday, June 1 Dare Day https://bit.ly/2DvMlLO Kids Day of Safety and Play, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Games, music, dancing, prizes, safety fair, face painting, summer reading program kickoff, more. Free admission. www.mainstreetmedina.com Teen Summer Reading Kick-Off Concert, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Enter to win prizes, sign up for Summer Reading program, enjoy local teen bands, contribute to sidewalk graffiti art piece. ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Hip to That, 7 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring lawn chairs, picnic, blankets, family. Rain location: United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Free. Sunday, June 2 National Bubba Day https://bit.ly/2IEiYLh All Medina County District Libraries closed on Sunday for the summer. Monday, June 3 Repeat Day https://bit.ly/2Gvyfut Outer Space Magic, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Adventure with Jim Kleefeld and ZORK, see saucer, create magic. Register at https://bit.ly/ 2Q1DmHf Care and Feeding of Your PC: Basic Computer Maintenance, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn how to delete unneeded files, perk up machine, more. Register at https://bit.ly/ 2LGwDnC Kerbal Space Program, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn basics of rocket launch, see if your crew can survive a launch. Grades 8 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/ 2Q4jkM1 Monday Movie Matinee: “Show Dogs,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Movie about a K-9 police officer teaming up with an FBI agent to stop an animal smuggling ring. Free. Reserve a space by calling 330-335-1513. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Stand-Up Paddle Boarding for Adults, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake, Parschen Boulevard,

Brunswick. Meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot, next to Panera. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25. Register by contacting Christine, ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-210-7449. Card Making, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2LGusR3 Veterans Roundtable, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. Curt Schwehm will speak. All ages. No registration. Tuesday, June 4 Hug Your Cat Day https://bit.ly/1oxmIgN and Old Maid’s Day https://bit.ly/2GuXfCe Kerbal Space Program, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn basics of rocket launch, see if your crew can survive a launch. Grades 8 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/30iPrMU Volunteens: Orientation and Sole Hope, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, Medina. Summer volunteer orientation and cutting pieces for denim shoes for Sole Hope. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2Hrd9hw American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Learn With NASA: Space Exploration, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Meet NASA manager and Cloverleaf graduate Nicole Smith. Grades kindergarten through 5. https://bit.ly/2VocKkO DIY Bookmarks: Creative Expressions, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/2VlcFOH 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Be Prepared: Wadsworth MedicAlert and SafeReturn Registration, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Village of St. Edward, 102 Main Street, Wadsworth. Alzheimer’s Association will present information on identification program for those suffering memory loss. Bring recent photo of dementia sufferer, free on-site registration. Call 234-284-2759 to register. Follow up is available for those who cannot attend. Wednesday, June 5 Hot Air Balloon Day https://bit.ly/2vaXeRn Natural Discoveries Program, 10 a.m. to 11

a.m., Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Astronomy Class: Harry Potter Club, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Lean about connections between the universe and the wizarding world. Make your own galaxy. Register at https://bit.ly/2LFILoE Thursday, June 6 Drive-In Movie Day https://bit.ly/2rQuSbF and Yo-Yo Day https://bit.ly/2IS1NSu You could play with a yo-yo while you wait for the movie to start! Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Drive-In Movie; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Design cardboard car, watch “Aladdin.” Popcorn. Register at https://bit.ly/2JBpmTq American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Teen Iron Chef, 6 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Compete against other teens creating best food using provided ingredients. For those entering grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2VlDD8V Summer Soiree Fundraiser and 32nd Service to the Arts Awards, 6:30 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Benefits the Medina County Art Council. Tickets $25 to $125 at https://squ.re/2Wr7UUY Ten Things About Basic Home Electrical Maintenance, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free. Friday, June 7 VCR Day https://bit.ly/2sztt8O and National Doughnut Day https://bit.ly/2pXMuB2 Just don’t put a doughnut in a VCR…if you can find a VCR! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Butterfly Bonanza, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019 Boulevard, Brunswick. Variety of butterfly activities, game, cra . Free. Tween A er-Hours Hide and Seek, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Play different versions of hideand-seek in library a er hours. Grades 4 and 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2HhuvhJ Saturday, June 8 Best Friends Day https://bit.ly/1kPHjde Migratory Bird Banding, 9 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. Wadsworth Airport Young Eagles Day, 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Wadsworth Municipal Airport, 840 Airport Drive, Wadsworth. Local chapter of Experimental Aircra Association give each child a brief ground school and free flights in members’ planes. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2JGblnG Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Therapy dogs visit the children’s area to be read to. To the Tooniverse, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Artist Jeff Nicholas entertains with original illustrations, stories, poems, draw-along characters. Register at https://bit.ly/2WLUzqQ Butterfly Bonanza, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Variety of butterfly activities, game, cra . Free. Teen Tech Trek, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Letha House Park West, 5745 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Teens only, bring smart phone or tablet. Learn how to use technology to study the parks and create research-quality data to help scientists. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2E9hNQm Tie Dye T-Shirts, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring shirt, create art. Register at https://bit.ly/2WNh52B Arts for the Ages Reception, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Meet

artists, celebrate Arts for the Ages. Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served. Sunday, June 9 Donald Duck Day https://bit.ly/2KWXD1x Butterfly Bonanza, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Variety of butterfly activities, game, cra . Free. ORMACO Selvaggio/Taddeo Jazz Duo (Sax and Percussion), 2 p.m., Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free but reservations recommended due to limited seating. For reservations, call 330-722-2541 or email tsigel@ormaco.org K-9 First Aid, 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Red Cross-based dog first-aid class on CPR, resuscitation, and the basics on keeping a dog alive until getting to a veterinarian. Do NOT bring dog to class, dog mannequins provided. All ages. Free class, book with DVD available for $20. Register at https://bit.ly/2VzmKfL Wadsworth Community Band Concert, 7 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 7808 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Outside if weather allows, inside if not. Bring lawn chair. Free. Monday, June 10 Ball Point Pen Day https://bit.ly/2GV1d61 Outer Space Magic, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Adventure with Jim Kleefeld and ZORK, see saucer, create magic. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/

23

2ybO4Rp Stand-Up Paddle a Boarding for Kids, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake, Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot, next to Panera. Ages 8 to 17. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25. Register by contacting Christine, ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216210-7449. Tuesday, June 11 Corn on the Cob Day https://bit.ly/2HwHVF4 Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Stroller Hike, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Children can be in strollers, backpacks, or toddle on own. Mid- to full-size or jogger-type strollers recommended. Free. 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Family Food Fest, 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Food demonstrations, kid food activities, samples. Food-themed prizes. Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Chippewa Rail Trail, meet in trailhead parking lot, Chippewa Road east of Lake Road. Bike 6 to 10 miles. Helmets required. Ages 17 and older. Wednesday, June 12 National Jerky Day https://bit.ly/2IT80xs Jungle Terry Animal Show, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Sacred Heart gym, 330-335-1295. Free, sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Life Skills: Money Management for Teens, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/2W0qqGS Thursday, June 13 National Weed Your Garden Day https://bit.ly/2HmHEaf Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community


24

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Playing With the Wind, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Playing with air with bubbles, balloons, parachutes, while learning. Free. Register for 10 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2vXdR0C Register for 11 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2vUl7u3 Cancelled if raining. Life Skills: Money Management for Teens, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/2HhgZuD Mandala Playshop for Kids, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, Wadsworth. Make two mandalas, one drawn and one with items from nature. Ages 7 to 13. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2E5mNFn Castle Creations: Tween Scene Summer

Edition, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/2W1t4MH American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Sharon Township Administration Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon Center. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Fact or Fiction: Can You Escape?, 4 p.m. and 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Race the clock to replace article about to publish that is against Escape events. Register for 4 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2WP5mjG or register for 5 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2VledbF An Evening in Paradise, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Oaks Lakeside Restaurant, 5878 Longacre Lane, Chippewa Lake. Benefits SHC’s Camp Paradise.

n

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241

Shale Creek Golf Course Weymouth Country Club 3946 Weymouth Road, 5420 Wolff Road, Medina Medina 330-723-8774 330-725-6297

Saturday, June 1 St. Paul Lutheran Church 10th Annual Golf Outing 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Benefits: Maryssa’s Mission Foundation Bunker Hill Golf Course Monday, June 3 25th Annual Jack Vigneault Memorial Golf Outing 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Benefits: Medina Hospital Foundation Weymouth Country Club Saturday, June 8 Bill and Dean Field Memorial Golf Outing 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Benefits Young Life, Medina Bunker Hill Golf Course Sunday, June 9 Maggie’s Place Golf Scramble

Noon to 6 p.m. Benefits Maggie’s Place Shale Creek Golf Course Monday, June 10 28th Annual Leadership Medina County Golf Scramble 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Benefits Leadership Medina County Weymouth Country Club Saturday, June 22 Odd Fellows Golf Outing 2 p.m. Bunker Hill Golf Course Saturday, June 29 Miracle League of NE Ohio Golf Outing Fundraiser 7:30 a.m. Benefits Miracle League of NE Ohio Bunker Hill Golf Course

Dinner and the Swizzle Stick Band performs. Tickets $50 at https://bit.ly/2JCiNzU or call 330722-1900, Ext. 196. Seasons of Giving, Medina County Women’s Endowment Fund, 6 p.m., Blue Heron Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Celebrating women and philanthropy in Medina County. Tickets are $50 to $5,000 at https://bit.ly/2W6FXly ORMACO Sounds of Summer: An Evening of Music, Fine Food and Celebration, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Corkscrew Saloon, 811 W. Liberty, Medina. Heavy hor d’oeuvres and desserts. Live music. Benefits area schools lacking funds for music, arts, cultural outreach programs. Tickets, $40, at www.ormaco.org or call 330-722-2541. Goat Yoga, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Beginning yoga poses with baby goats. No yoga experience necessary. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2vW2Kom Friday, June 14 Monkey Around Day https://bit.ly/2kUMcb0 Out of This World Storytime and Cra , 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Involves friendly aliens, space, astronauts, stay and make alien out of clay. Ages 4 and up. https://bit.ly/2E5YvLv Butterfly Bonanza, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, i Brunswick. Variety of butterfly activities, game, cra . Free. Friendship Bracelets, 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Grades 3 to 5. https://bit.ly/30edoEZ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Family Stand-Up Paddle Boarding, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Brunswick Lake, Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot, next to Panera. Ages 8 to 17. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25 per person, $45 for two, $65 for three, $85 for four. Register by contacting Christine, ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-2107449. Wine and Canvas Night, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Bring wine, go home with 11x14 original painting. Bring cash or check made payable to Artists Uncork’d. Supply fee $15. Register at https://bit.ly/2vXW4X8 Saturday, June 15 National Hollerin’ Contest Day https://bit.ly/2Hx8Xwe Healthy Strides, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Lake Medina, State Route 18, Medina. Physician talk and 1- to 3-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. No


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019 registration. Medina County Pizza Palooza, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Medina Public Square. Buy tickets to sample local pizzas, enjoy non-profit fair, and music. www.mainstreetmedina.com Learn With NASA: Mission to Mars, 10:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Meet NASA retiree Larry Smith, see NASA footage of Mars rover. Grades kindergarten through 5. Register at https://bit.ly/30edRXL Pollinator Palooza, noon to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about variety of pollinators. Dress as your favorite pollinator for a parade. Free. Butterfly Bonanza, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Variety of butterfly activities, game, cra . Free. Kids Fishing Party, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Izaak Walton League, 7085 Friendsville Road, Lafayette. Bring poles, bait. Free. Blast Off! DIY Rockets, Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Design and blast off rocket using Alka-Seltzer and water. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2HjEtPW ORMACO Opera Under the Stars, 7 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Cleveland Opera Theater performs. Bring picnic, lawn chairs, blankets. Rain location: United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Sunday, June 16 Fresh Veggies Day https://bit.ly/2vlUcqN Butterfly Bonanza, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Variety of butterfly activities, game, cra . Free. Casablanca: Sunday Cinema Club, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free. Monday, June 17 Eat Your Veggies Day https://bit.ly/2EJFL1Z American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 to 6 p.m., Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Stop Motion Animation, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Create own videos using stopmotion animation techniques. Two-day event for Grades 4 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2VCYM3x American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Make a Mess Day, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make an aquarium out of a shoebox, balloon rockets, a marble run, ghost mud, marshmallow molecules, more. Bring shoebox. Ages 5 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/

2Vp0YGE Travel Hacks, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to use apps and websites to make travel planning easier and how to identify scams. Register at https://bit.ly/2Vp05ho Wellness Yoga, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Gentle yoga. Attend one class or all three. Register at https://bit.ly/2LBvnlw Tuesday, June 18 Go Fishing Day https://bit.ly/2qvq9tH , International Sushi Day https://bit.ly/2VuAJmA , International Picnic Day https://bit.ly/2W5u4fw , and International Panic Day https://bit.ly/2EJFGey We’ve got this! Go fishing so you have sushi for your picnic, but then you panic because you forgot your fishing pole! Kids Summer Fishing Camp: Beyond the Basics, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Not for beginners. Bring poles, bait, tackle. Three-day program, June 18 through June 20. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2JKqZ1h Story Walk at Leohr Park, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Leohr Park, between High Street and West Main Street, Seville. Listen to stories while walking. All ages. Galaxy Sneakers, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Use special techniques and paint to alter sneakers. Bring pair of white canvas sneakers, paint provided. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2JEJy70 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Blue Tip Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., 274 Grandview Ave., Wadsworth. Blue Tip Parade, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., starts at Wadsworth High School, travels through downtown. Learn With NASA: Living in Space, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. NASA retiree Larry Smith talks about issues and concerns, shows videos, about humans living in space. Grades Kindergarten to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2LHDaOV Wednesday, June 19 Sauntering Day https://bit.ly/2IFiyo9 Volunteens: Gardening at Feeding Medina County Garden, 10 a.m. to noon, 901 Lafayette Road, Medina. Waiver at https://bit.ly/ 2Jl5gNV and permission slip https://

25

bit.ly/2vWSqwI Blue Tip Festival, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., 274 Grandview Ave., Wadsworth. Carnival rides, amusements, food, games. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Health o Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Make a Mess Day, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make an aquarium out of a shoebox, balloon rockets, a marble run, ghost mud, marshmallow molecules, more. Bring shoebox. Ages 5 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2HhhNzF American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Life Care Center of Medina, 2400 Columbia Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Explore the Elements: FUSE, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use interactive app to see samples of elements in 3D, facts, figures, everyday examples. Register at https://bit.ly/2JCXH4m History Series: Giant Captain Bates and His Two Wives, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit.ly/2WG26XV Essential Oils, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn how to use essential oils. Free. Music at The Lodge: Zach, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Folk music. Has performed with Neil Young, Gin Blossoms, more. Free. Thursday, June 20 National Bald Eagle Day https://bit.ly/2GuPwDZ Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,


26

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 9 through October 13 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 4 through October 12 Medina Public Square 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, June 18 through August 20 Medina County Center for Older Adults 246 Northland Drive, Medina No new vendors are being accepted. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2DC3Vxs Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 25 through September 28 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 15 through September 14 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc 4 p.m to 7 p.m. Wednesdays: June 26, July 24, August 21 Village of St. Edward, 880 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Guide to Eliminate Diets/Circuit Training 101, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Library, Healthy Wadsworth, Cleveland Clinic team up to bring information about how to maximize your body’s potential. Blue Tip Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., 274 Grandview Ave., Wadsworth. Carnival rides, amusements, food, games. Alcohol Ink Jewelry, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Make jewelry out of beads, washers, alcohol inks. Register at https://bit.ly/2WHMeEe Garden Insects and Pollinators, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Master Gardeners teach difference between beneficial insects and invaders. Johnson’s Island: Prison for Confederate Soldiers, Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Civil War scholar Roger Pickenpaugh gives presentation. Register at https://bit.ly/30jbq6s Friday, June 21 Take Your Dog to Work Day https://bit.ly/2ITPcON Hmmm, wonder if that means our office dogs will want the day off? A er-Hours Hide and Seek, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Play different versions of hideand-seek in library a er hours. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2w5oyhL Blue Tip Festival, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., 274 Grandview Ave., Wadsworth. Carnival rides, amusements, food, games. Saturday, June 22 Onion Ring Day https://bit.ly/2sGohPE Ride for Recovery, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Heartland Community Church, 3400 Weymouth Road, Medina. First bike out, 10 a.m.; last at 11 a.m. Benefits Hope Recovery Community. Features five stops, 100-mile ride. Last stop is cookout at Cornerstone Chapel, 3939 Granger Road, Medina. Awards, raffles, door prizes, speakers, kid activities, entertainment. Tickets are $25 per rider. Register online at https://bit.ly/2KfaRqi Contact Stefanie Robinson with any questions, 216-406-8599. Cell Phone Safety, 10 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Lecture-style class on cyber security, scams, spoofs, cookies, caches, Wi-Fi safety. Register at https://bit.ly/2E8wEdA Pounded Flowers Workshop, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Transfer herb and flower pigments to silk scarf using a hammer. Scarves and flowers provided, bring hammer and cutting board for pounding. Fee: $20.

Register at https://bit.ly/2HgYyq0 Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Storytime with Griffin, the therapy dog. Register at https://bit.ly/2JkvakE Sensory Storytime, Story h Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with autism, sensory integration challenges, or who have difficulty sitting still or focusing. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2WJ3toH Blue Tip Festival, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., 6 p.m. to 11 p.m., 274 Grandview Ave., Wadsworth. Carnival rides, amusements, food, games. Family Mosaics, noon to 2 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Wear apron or old clothes, family creates mosaic together with guidance. Grades 3 to 7 with adult. Pick up finished project June 29. Register at https://bit.ly/2VygZze American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers, All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. All ages. Free. No registration. Sunday, June 23 National Columnists Day https://bit.ly/2DyuK5J and Typewriter Day https://bit.ly/2GZzjd5 Contact your favorite columnist and show them some appreciation! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Jerusalem Evangelical Lutheran Church, 9282 Acme Road, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series: Dragonflies, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Award-based hiking series. Search for dragonflies. Bring net. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Monday, June 24 Swim a Lap Day https://bit.ly/2qtSotG Historic Tax Credit Coffee, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Information on rehabbing older commercial buildings using tax credits. Presented by Heritage Ohio. Free. Readers Theater, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Plan to attend all five days. Grades 2 to 5. Young actors practice reading for Friday performance. Register at https://bit.ly/2VBijBo The Wonderful World of Bubbles, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Indoor show with Bubble Lady. Register at https://bit.ly/2W4uWUT Video Game Programming with Mike Gemmer, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring game and learn programming


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2019 techniques using Scratch. Two-day event. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2YvTQuj Learn With NASA: Space Exploration, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Videos, information about current projects. Register at https://bit.ly/2vVlC71 What is Nar-Anon? 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Drug-Free Wadsworth-sponsored talk from Nar-Anon Family Groups who help addicts. Tuesday, June 25 Please Take My Children to Work Day https://bit.ly/2GUMigh Health Talk, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Sponsored by Cooperative Community Services. Register with Karen by June 18 at 234-802-1407. 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Crazy Hats, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Listen to hat story and make own crazy hat. Materials provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2W0KqJy Garden Chats With OSU Master Gardeners: Garden Insects and Pollination, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Garden bugs are not all bad, learn who the pollinators are and who the invaders. Register at https://bit.ly/2vVmGYz Wednesday, June 26 Chocolate Pudding Day https://bit.ly/2qtVM72 Crazy Hats, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Listen to hat story and make own crazy hat. Materials provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2W0LPQk Summer of ’69 Movie Series, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Classic films, light refreshments. Planet Sun Catcher, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Sun catcher resembles planets with simple supplies. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2Yrn6Cs Making Cards With Alcohol Inks, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit.ly/2Q19ef3 Mobile App Basics, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn all about apps, bring device for hands-on lesson, or attend for a lecture-style session. Register at https://bit.ly/2HyZa9t Thursday, June 27 Sunglasses Day https://bit.ly/2JK3jaA Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community

27

r

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Saturday, June 1 StAR4Life 5k/1 Mile Run and Walk, 7 a.m., registration; 8:30 a.m., 5k and 1 mile, St. Ambrose Parish, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Benefits cancer research and cancer care. For pricing and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2Uv5GHi

Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Citizens Bank Wadsworth, 214 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Build a Zoo STEM Challenge, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Use everyday objects to build zoo structures. Grades Kindergarten to 2. Register at https://bit.ly/2E5QCWw Matt Jergens Comedy Juggling, 11 a.m. to noon, Sacred Heart gym, Wadsworth. International gold medalist juggler performs. 330-335-1295 Miniature Horse Visit, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Meet Thunder, the miniature horse. All ages. You’ve Got Rhythm! Tween Scene Summer Edition, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Musical freeze tag, other games. Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/2Jz1KPj American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Meet in ball field parking lot. Bike 6 to 10 miles. Helmets required. Ages 17 and older. Free. Vegan Desserts, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Highland. Learn how to make vegan desserts. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2JjiJG1 Friday, June 28 Tau Day https://bit.ly/2IUN4GK

Friday, June 21 Wadsworth Matchstick 5k, 10k, Half Marathon, 6:15 p.m., Art Wright Stadium, 185 Grandview Avenue, Wadsworth. Shirts, gear check, live radio broadcast, chip times, food, live DJ, more. For pricing and to register, go to https://bit.ly/2IvHOw9

Saturday, June 29 Hug Holiday https://bit.ly/2Hz0UyY American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Plant This, Not That, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Basics and benefits of backyard habitat, tour grounds, learn what will work for you. Free. We Cheer for Beer, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Wadsworth Brewery brews and Girl Scout cookies. Adults only, must be 21 or older to participate. IDs checked at the door. Register at https://bit.ly/2HkEa65 Sunday, June 30 Meteor Watch Day https://bit.ly/2L3z6YP ORMACO Party Bus to “Dear Evan Hansen,” 11:30 a.m., Playhouse Square, Cleveland. Bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine, homemade cookies, chocolates, cheese, more. Tickets $125 for balcony or orchestra. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., E & H Ace Hardware, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

o


Click on "follow" below so you don't miss a single edition of Joy of Medina County Magazine! Joy of Medina County Magazine

1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

p

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine June 2019  

NEW reader contest, bluegrass jam feature, gardening, farmer market list, students show they care, orange-banana muffins, AC mold, and alway...

Joy of Medina County Magazine June 2019  

NEW reader contest, bluegrass jam feature, gardening, farmer market list, students show they care, orange-banana muffins, AC mold, and alway...