Joy of Medina County Magazine July 2022

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JOB MARKET MADNESS PG. 21 Tips on finding and retaining talent

NEW! NETWORKING CALENDAR PG. 21 Looking for unrestricted networking?

TOP FITNESS MISSTEPS PG. 27 Can you guess what they are?

THE ART OF GIVING PG. 28 A local painter steps up to help out.

Where A Lake Once Lived An economic catastrophe helped change what would have been private cottage retreats into a public treasure. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

VOLUME 5 NUMBER 6 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Getting Inky by Amy Barnes Once again, here at the Joy home office, we are being contrary. We have gotten so good at it, that it has become second nature! While other publications are going more and more into digital versions and the ones in print are facing severe delivery challenges, sound the flugelhorns! Joy of Medina County Magazine is now available in a PRINT subscription! Much excitement and many late nights preceded this change, and we have been fairly bouncing off of walls with joy as we finetuned and launched this new option. As other publications begin to relinquish their print products and begin metamorphizing into digital only, we are now introducing a print product due to the insistent requests of many of our fans who love the stories so much, they want a tactile connection to them. How cool is that? What we hammered out in those wee morning hours was a three-tier patron system to enable readers to connect with the magazine. Admittedly, we were a little punchy by the time we got to naming the tiers, but the names have grown on us and if we weren’t a little quirky, you might think something was wrong! So, here it is, depending on the tier chosen, you get an assortment of thank-you bonuses. The highest-tier patrons get a

Use this link, https://bit.ly/3Nshu3P , to sign up for the print subscription and/or the digital, and we thank you for your encouragement and support and for helping us prove that people truly do love a good story! ══════⊹⊱≼≽⊰⊹══════ It has been a while since we featured a location in Medina County, and since last month’s feature story was mostly words, few pictures, we thought this month we would flip that and make this month’s feature mostly pictures and few words! I do believe it is the shortest feature story we have ever had! The beautiful photos of the Princess Ledges Nature Preserve will hopefully give all a respite from the serious issues and turmoil that seem to be coming from every direction. ══════⊹⊱≼≽⊰⊹══════ With this issue, we bid a sad but fond farewell to our kid movie reviewer, Hunter Barnard. He has moved on to other endeavors and expanded horizons. We will miss him and hope to soon have a new writer for the column. We also bid a sad and fond farewell to Shannon Davis, the columnist for “The In Box” business column. She has a new job with expanded responsibilities that make it

monthly print subscription to Joy of Medina County Magazine.

impossible for her to continue writing at this time.

Never fear, our digital version still is available to all for free so no one is denied the fun of reading this great magazine!

Stepping seamlessly into the box, is Rachel Shepard, whose first column appears in this issue. Welcome aboard, Rachel!

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller IT SUPPORT Sara Barnes Tyler Hatfield PHOTOGRAPHERS Brooklyn Media FlashBang Photography Torre Design CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Tyler Hatfield Chris Pickens Michelle Riley Rachel Shepard Janine Smalley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2021 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

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PLAYGROUND OF A PRINCESS

BITE ME!

PLANT-BASED BURGERS

by Amy Barnes About a hundred years ago, a little girl played her makebelieve games among the trees.

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THE READING NOOK

submitted by Kelly Bailey Vegetables and the right seasonings can make tasty burgers.

HEALTH

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THE GIRL WITH THE CROOKED SMILE

by Janine Smalley While there is great happiness at an animal rescue, there also is the acceptance of when the path ends for a beloved animal.

BUSINESS

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HEALTHY TRAILS

PUTTING THE BRAKES ON SQUEAKS

by Robert Soroky If your bike is talking, you might be walking.

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OF MIND AND BODY

BIGGEST FITNESS MISTAKES

by Kelly Bailey There are five mistakes that can lead to goal failure.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

COMMUNITY

by Tyler Hatfield It is not only websites that are collecting.

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by Kent Von Der Vellen Volunteers sought for school presentations.

HIDING DATA FROM COLLECTORS

APPLAUSE!

Celebrating local new hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements. THE NETWORKER

SUCCESS BEGINS WITH GLADLY HELPING

by Bob Arnold Networking works best by connecting others first.

GEMS

HELP NEEDED TO FIGHT HUMAN TRAFFICKING

IN DEED

UNDERCOAT OF KINDNESS

by Amy Barnes Nick Wemmer stepped up to help an outreach program’s project.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

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HOW TO FIND AND RETAIN TALENT

WALK IN THE PARK

THE IN BOX

by Rachel Shepard Tips for long-term success for employees and businesses

DOING BUSINESS

A calendar of area networking events

HOME AND GARDEN

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DIG IT!

HEDGE TRIMMING TIME

by Michelle Riley Guidance on getting the best results

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH Tiptoe through the tulip poplars and discover words of nature.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

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GETTING REEL

PRINCESS WAR

by Amy Barnes Timing is everything.

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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Read the clue, collect the magnifying glass letters, and solve the puzzle!

CREAMY VEGAN BROCCOLI SOUP

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VEGAN VITTLES

by Chris Pickens Add rolls and salad for a filling meal.

OH, SNAP!

photos by Amy Barnes and Torre Design Pizza, opera and a historic celebration, come see what we saw.

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LET’S DO IT!

Summertime and the events are just warming up! On the front and back covers: photos by Brooklyn Media Kristen Capp-Bigley visits Princess Ledges Nature Reserve, Brunswick Hills.

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CELEBRATE!

A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

Red-backed salamander pauses in Kristen Capp-Bigley’s hands.

by Amy Barnes photos by Brooklyn Media

At one point, according to the Medina County Park District, lot sales were so slow that the with special thanks to former science educator and avid owners resorted to giving them away as prizes at hiker and bird watcher, Kristen Capp-Bigley of movie theaters. Strongsville The presence of sandstone close to the surface made the lots almost impossible to develop or use for much. At least one little girl named Princess, nce upon a time, thousands of years ago, who was the daughter of one of the owners of the the shore of Lake Erie extended all of the way into property, found the woods and sandstone ledges Brunswick and formed sandstone ledges. A an enchanting place to play. section of this land would eventually come to be Beginning in 1973, the Medina County Park called the Strongsville Heights Allotment. District began acquiring the lots to form a park In the 1920s, the land was subdivided into lots to and renamed it Princess Ledges Nature Preserve, create summer cottages. But things would take a after the little girl who loved it there. dramatic turn when, late in the decade, the stock Want to visit Princess Ledges in person? Find the market crashed, and the Great Depression began entrance to the preserve at 4361 Spruce Avenue, with financial survival becoming more important Brunswick Hills. than summer cottages.

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Kristen Capp-Bigley, from Strongsvile, is dwarfed by a sandstone ledge.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

Welcome to the Nest! Thank you for showing your support and love for Joy of Medina County Magazine by becoming a magazine patron!

Eileen Funk

Three patron tiers are available: Excellent Egg, Cheerful Chick and Joyful Joy Bird. Each has wonderful perks with the highest tier including a print subscription to Joy of Medina County Magazine! Learn how you, too, can become a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/ JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine

Training • Classes • Group Outings • Entertainment • All Skill Levels

LEARN TO SHOOT!

Book your reservation at:

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

This Prime Real Estate For Sale To stake your claim, call 330-461-0589 Smaller parcels are available. Limited availability, call now for best parcels.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

THE READING NOOK

photos and story by Janine Smalley

There is a sheep that is near death on the side of the freeway? Bring it here now, I will have the vet here immediately. This brings us to the story of Baa.

Greetings Readers, I want to take a moment to apologize for not having a story in the magazine the last two months. Every time that I sat down at my computer to tell this story, I could not get Baa arrives at the sanctuary so the words out. weighed down with years of unshorn wool that she could no longer stand. Then, when they More than 40 pounds of wool were started to flow, so sheared off of her, a regular annual did the tears. amount would be approximately 10 pounds. I contemplated not telling this story because sanctuary life is all about saving the animals, playing with cute baby goats, Henry the goat’s shenanigans, sunshine, and rainbows, right? Unfortunately, that is not always the case. The truth is that sanctuary life can be a roller coaster of emotions. One minute you are laughing and smiling while watching animals run and play, experiencing the birth of a newborn goat, or watching a mama hen teach her baby chicks how to peck at all of the yummy bugs in the pasture. Then in the next moment, you are catching up on emails, text messages, social media posts, and answering calls to help an animal that has been forsaken by their human guardians. Saving and caring for animals does not stop when the clock strikes five. It does not wait for you to finish your breakfast and savor your morning coffee. It is staying up late, getting up before the roosters, changing plans at the last minute because an animal just seems “off.” It is loving animals 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It is always foremost in my mind. “No” is not a word that I am familiar with when it comes to an animal in need. You have a rooster you cannot keep in the city? Sure, I will give it a loving home. You have a very sick baby goat, and you cannot afford to care for it? Bring it on over, we will help it.

he summer sun was high in the sky and the hay fields stood still with no breeze to help them dance in the hot July morning. The corn in the fields was getting tall, thanks to an unseasonably wet spring. It was peaceful and serene in the country. It was a perfect Saturday morning to just sit back on the porch with a cup of sweet tea and take in the sights, sounds and smells of a gorgeous summer day on the farm. The animals, full from their breakfast, were napping in the shade. Who could blame them? It was only 10 a.m., and the pavement already was so hot it could be felt through the soles of shoes. I took one more sip of tea and stood up to start the afternoon chores, filling my pockets with treats, a pocketknife and my phone, in case there were any calls for animals needing assistance. Even before I put the first flake of hay in the feeder, the phone rang. There was a sheep that was found on the side of the highway, unable to stand covered in years of heavy fleece. My heart sunk and immediately I told the humane officer to bring her to the sanctuary. I gathered all of the supplies I thought would be needed and anxiously awaited her arrival. In fewer than 30 minutes, a truck pulled into my drive. A team assembled to help this poor sheep into the barn. She could not stand; she was crying out, not knowing where she was or what was happening. I am quite sure she was extremely uncomfortable. The first step was to relieve her of the more than 45 pounds of wool her frail body was supporting. After her wool was shorn, we cooled her off with a nice soak in a kiddie pool, got her fluids, and food. The veterinarian arrived and thoroughly examined her. She was emaciated, dehydrated and suffering from snow blindness. Snow blindness caused by leaving

The Girl With the Crooked Smile

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

sheep outdoors without shelter from driving wind and snow, causing their wool to freeze to their eyes. It can cause a bacterial infection, which leads to blindness when untreated. Despite the snow blindness, it appeared that she still could see some light, and she was very responsive to sounds. This poor girl also was suffering from profound arthritis. We knew that she was old when she got to us. It was later that it was determined she was 15 years old. With a treatment plan in hand, we set up a nice, comfortable area for her. Bright lights and a speaker that continuously looped my voice reciting “Baa Baa Black Sheep” were installed in her shelter so she could navigate to her bed easier when she wanted to rest. She was started on eye drops three times a day, as well as medication for her pain and arthritis. I slept in her shelter with her the first few nights that she was at the sanctuary, stroking her and promising her that she would never have to be afraid, hungry or in pain again. Honestly, I did not think she would make through that week, much less survive long enough to feel cool fall air. She would prove me wrong. I have never seen an animal with such a strong will to live and overcome as I witnessed with Baa. Not only did Baa get strong enough to prance around the pasture, but she also regained partial vision in one of her eyes. She spent the fall munching on crisp leaves and napping in the sun. As winter reared its ugly snowy face, she took it like a champ. She pranced in the snow and never missed an opportunity to look up at the sky to feel the snowflakes land on her nose. With the approach of spring, Baa started slowing down. Her prancing turned into a slower stride; she took more naps. She was tired. The veterinarian assured me that Baa was not in any pain; she was just old. I could accept that, but what I was having a difficult time accepting was that our time was limited. I knew that no one or nothing lives forever. But my heart believed that if the love that I had for her was all that was needed to keep her around, she would be here for eternity. When I came home from work May 5, Baa greeted me at the gate for her daily banana, her massage and a kiss on that crooked smile that I adored.

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I offered her the banana, and she just sighed and had no interest in her favorite snack We walked slowly to the barn, and she laid down with me and put her head in my lap and let out a deep sigh. It was in that moment I knew she was ready. My girl with the Author Janine Smalley with Baa crooked smile was the strongest, most resilient creature I have ever had the pleasure of sharing my life with. When she was on the side of the freeway, she could have easily laid down and just given up. But she didn’t. She could have given up and given in. But she didn’t. She pushed, rallied and surged forward with all her might with the strongest most vibrant will to live. And live, she certainly did. I don’t remember what time it was, it was all such a blur. I remember picking up the phone and calling the vet’s cell phone. He answered before I could catch my breath to say who I was. “Is it Baa?, I am on my way, sit tight,” he said. Some of the sanctuary’s wonderful volunteers saw my social media post about Baa not doing well. They started Baa’s crooked smile continued, Page 18


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Baa makes a friend.

calling and texting all who loved Baa to tell them that the moment we all dreaded was here. The barn quickly filled with people who filled the air with love and laughter as we shared favorite Baa stories. There were plenty of tears, too. I laid with my head resting on hers, tears streaming down my cheeks, remembering a promise I made to her when she arrived at the sanctuary. The promise that I would never let her be in pain or to feel scared or alone ever again. I held my breath and wished for that moment to last as long as it possibly could, knowing every second took us closer to her leaving. With a shallow sigh, Baa closed her eyes and slipped quietly away. Baa passed quietly that night surrounded by so much love. She may not be physically with us any longer, but her spirit will live on forever. I truly don’t know who really rescued whom. Baa brought so much love to all that knew her. She taught us all about forgiveness, strength and the power to overcome. Life with Baa, albeit too short, was life changing. She will forever be in my heart and the hearts of all that knew her and loved her. When I look to the sky and feel snowflakes landing on my cheeks, I will fondly think of Baa and forever remember to enjoy each and every moment. Life is short, love unconditionally, find your passion, forgive those that hurt you, and do more of what brings you happiness and joy. Want to meet the animals in the story? They live at author Janine Smalley’s Whispering Acres Farm Animal Sanctuary in Medina. For more information about Whispering Acres, go to https://bit.ly/3AxRqha or https:/ /bit.ly/3Byx3lx .To arrange a time to visit, call 440-212-6769. Donations can be made at https://bit.ly/ 3lwVbiD Whispering Acres is a 501c3 organization.

Baa’s ashes will be scattered on July 6 at 6 p.m. at the Whispering Acres Farm Animal Sanctuary, 7496 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. This is the anniversary of her arriving at the farm. Her ashes will be scattered in the sanctuary’s Pasture of Peace. For more information, please go to https://bit.ly/ 3LqQL6K


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Hiding Data From Collectors by Tyler Hatfield Following last month’s article about internet security, “Cookies From Strangers,” https://bit.ly/3NdMggV, this month’s column focuses on the use of public Wi-Fi networks and protecting data. Internet privacy has been a growing concern for many people as technology advances and integrates into our daily lives. While some good practices can help to reduce the virtual paper trail we leave behind, websites are not the only things collecting data. Much less obvious is your internet service provider collecting similar information, as well. The problem is that providers often will not ask for permission, and trying to get them to stop collecting data is difficult at best. Even worse, when using public Wi-Fi, the owner or other users of that Wi-Fi connection can also collect data without you ever being aware of them. Virtual private networks, or VPNs, are an excellent tool in cases like these. VPNs work by first encrypting all data to and from your device and processing your network requests within their private servers. Any data sent is concealed so that it cannot be read over public Wi-Fi networks and is hidden from your internet service provider. This means VPN providers are making a “tunnel” from you to your destination on the web that no one else can see. By utilizing a VPN and limiting the data a website is allowed to keep, online privacy can be maintained. Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, https://www.hatsmediagroup.com/ , and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

photo by Marcus Spiske

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BUSINESS

New hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements

Landry Family Dentistry congratulates Joy Eley for working for them for seven years. They said she keeps the practice growing while maintaining the personal touch and attention to detail with each patient. The practice presented Eley with a bouquet of flowers. Has your business or an employee done something that should get applause or does your nonprofit have an announcement? E-mail the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put “Applause” in the subject line.

There is nothing more powerful than making a positive difference with elegance and grace.

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Success Begins With Gladly Helping by Bob Arnold It was not intentional! But it happened, and I learned a valuable networking lesson from it. In last month’s column, I noted there are ways to attend and succeed at a networking event, even if in a very quiet mood. This month, it is the opposite. Most teachings about networking focus on what you can get out of networking. Yet, recently, I was at a networking meeting, and I asked everyone what the top benefit was they desired from their networking time. The answer is always the same. Every person in the room wanted to learn how to help others. I always find that interesting, yet little happens. What if you actually “spent” yourself for others to benefit? What would happen if you truly listened to what others indicated they need in the way of connections? Incredible things will happen, especially if you follow through and spend some time helping a few people in the room get what they need. I call it “being gladly spent.’” When the word “gladly” is added, we start realizing that we have had a mind shift. That person is no longer a simple request written on a piece of paper. They become a person you have put effort into. A person you went out of your way to help gain something; someone you gladly spent time and resources helping. When you are done pouring yourself into connecting this person to the right people (take note that it is not always singular) you may feel absolutely spent. You know you could not do any more, and you feel it in every fiber of your being. You are a true connector when this happens. You will find that others will see that commitment in you and will want to help you find the connections or referrals you need to grow your business. Be very clear about what you need when it is your turn to explain. Gladly spending your time on others grows you! Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at theNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

How to Find and Retain Talent by Rachel Shepard Businesses continue to struggle with labor shortages as they attempt to attract and retain employees. Job openings have declined from record highs but still remain elevated. Many employees are feeling burned out at work due to the extra heavy workloads that result from staffing shortages. These workers often leave. Did you know more than 4-million employees quit their jobs each month in the United States? One-third of employees quit after just six months, according to statistics. A business should strive for a turnover rate of 10 percent or less. A full staff and a low turnover rate will save a company a lot of money in the long run. Bringing on the right employees is an investment in the future of the company. How to create an environment that attracts and retains the best talent? First, stop looking for the perfect candidate. Instead, focus on those candidates that fit the company’s culture. Those candidates will be smart, qualified, teachable, and hard working. Second, seek to understand what employees want. Employees want a smooth onboarding process with upfront training and clear expectations of job responsibilities. It will take a new hire approximately 12 weeks to become fully productive at work. It may take up to one or two years for highly specialized fields. If the onboarding process is a mess, your new employee likely will move on. Employees value open communication in an environment where their ideas are heard. Many employees want promotional opportunities as well as training and development. There are some companies that offer rotational programs that give employees an opportunity to work across different functional areas or lines of business. Small businesses often have limited resources, but they can offer a great culture that includes trust, inclusion, appreciation, and recognition. Managers should establish clear goals and responsibilities. The workplace can offer flexibility and hands-on training. Consider your industry and model the companies with the best retention rates. They likely have a clear mission and vision that their employees believe in; this creates connection and a common goal. Give your employees purpose and meaning and they will become your best recruiters. The long-term success of your

business is dependent on attracting and retaining the best talent. Rachel Shepard is the founder of LonaRock, LLC, and a resident of Medina County. She specializes in helping businesses understand financials and access capital. Shepard can be reached by email at rshepard@lonarock.com.

Doing Business Local business networking events, not category restricted Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce Wednesday, July 20 Networking WOW!, 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 5050 Eastpointe Drive, Medina. No walk-ins. Chamber membership requirement after two events, $12 member attendance charge, $15 non-member attendance charge.

Thursday, July 21 Medina County Young Professionals Chippewa Lake Park Tour, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., The Oaks Lakeside Restaurant, upper parking lot, 5878 Longacre Lane, Chippewa Lake. No attendance charge. https://bit.ly/3P2NlJp

Medina County Entrepreneurs Wednesday, July 20 Buffalo Wild Wings Wednesday Networking, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 5050 Eastpointe Drive, Medina. Open networking, no membership required, no fee.

Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Wednesday, July 13 After Hours Social, 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Tangled Vine, 3511 Center Road, Brunswick. Tour Phase 1 of Plum Creek Greenway led by Nate Eppink, park director, 3:30 p.m. to 5 pj.m. Followed by networking at Tangled Vine, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Open to all. Register at http://tinyurl.com/2p8wfnwh

Seville Area Chamber of Commerce Thursday, July 14 Monthly luncheon, 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawthorne Suites, 5025 Park Avenue, Seville. Membership requirement, check with chamber, $8 lunch donation at the door. No reservation needed. More information by calling 330-350-6434.

Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce Thursday, July 14 Business After Hours, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Buffalo Wild Wings, 5050 Eastpointe Drive, Medina. Free.

Monday, August 1 Women in Leadership, noon to 1 p.m., Soprema Café, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Chamber membership requirement, $15 charge. Reserve space at https://bit.ly/3ugazEb

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Hedge Trimming Time column and photo by Michelle Riley July is a great time to trim hedges, particularly ones of Buxus (evergreen boxwood), Taxus (evergreen yew) and Euonymus compactus (deciduous compact burning bush), Berberis (deciduous barberry), Ligustrum (deciduous privet), Ilex (evergreen holly), and many more. These hedges take well to a mid-summer trim. However, summer- or spring-flowering hedges of Forsythia sp. (deciduous forsythia), Syringa (deciduous lilac), Hibiscus syriacus (deciduous rose of Sharon) and Rosa (deciduous rose) should be trimmed within two to three weeks of their blooms finishing. Do not trim these at mid-summer or the blooms from both the summer and the spring bloomers will be removed. Both already will have set bud for their next bloom by the middle of summer, unless they are a repeat-bloom variety and care dictates a summer trim to promote a new flush of blooms. When trimming hedges, it is important to keep the four K’s in mind. � Keep yourself safe. Wear goggles if needed. It is a good idea to not wear loose

A plumb line can help ensure straight trim lines. photo by Michelle Riley

clothing when using hand shears, as there is potential for clothing to get caught in the shears. � Know what you are trimming. Identify the hedge being trimmed and be sure it is the proper time to trim it. � Keep trimmers clean. Sanitize trimmers before and after using them on a particular hedge. If it is suspected a hedge may be diseased, clean trimmers more often to prevent spreading the disease. Also, consider treating the hedge with a remedy before trimming. � Know the desired outcome. Is the hedge rounded? Squared? Run a plumb line if needed. At each end of the hedge, drive a stake into the ground at the desired height. Run a plumb line from one stake to the other, checking to ensure the line is level. Small levels that hang on a string can be purchased to use. With enough practice, a plumb line will not be needed. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com ; and https:// neohiogarden.com . She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.

S A trimmed yew hedge

photo by Michelle Riley


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

REAL FIBER. REAL FAST. ARMSTRONG IS WORKING HARD TO BRING THE FASTEST FIBER-OPTIC EXPERIENCE TO THE MEDINA COMMUNITY. Our state-of-the-art fiber broadband network will allow us to continue to meet the bandwidth demands of an even more connected future. Scan the code to find out more.

www.ArmstrongOneWire.com/network

Keeping Medina connected.

Whole-Home Wi-Fi Network I Superior Network Reliability I Free Local Support

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HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

Creamy Vegan Broccoli Soup by Chris Pickens

Looking for a healthy, tasty, and filling meal? This is it! I recently made this for dinner. With a side of fresh-baked rolls and a green salad, your summer meal is all set! Remember, all ingredients listed are vegan.

photo by Davor Nisevic

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Plant-Based Burgers recipe by Kelly Bailey A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey writes our monthly column, “Of Mind and Body.” She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. To learn more about her, visit https://bit.ly/3M4y3Ch Find her blog, visit her Food Freedom page, and contact her at https:/ /www.kellybailey.fit/ � � � � � � � � � �

1/2 red bell pepper, diced 1/3 red onion, diced 1 clove garlic, minced T 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup cooked quinoa 1 can black beans, drained 1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce 1/2 cup flour (or gluten-free alternative flour) High-heat cooking oil, such as coconut or sesame

Saute bell pepper, onion and garlic in olive oil until tender, about 8 minutes. Allow to cool for a few minutes. Add sauteed veggies and all other ingredients to a food processor. Mix on high until well combined. It will be very thick. Use hands to form small, thin patties (this is easier with latex gloves). Heat cooking oil over high heat. Make sure oil is hot. Add patties. Try not to over-crowd them. Cook 8 minutes per side (may need longer). Serve hot on regular buns or over Farro Garbanzo Tomato Salad recipe from last month, https://tinyurl.com/5h5hhsa3 . Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to all ages who would like to submit a recipe.

� � � � � � �

¼ cup vegan butter 5 cups broccoli, chopped* ⅔ cups carrots, chopped ⅔ cup celery, chopped ⅔ cup onions, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 6 tablespoons flour

� � � � � � �

4 cups vegetable broth 2 cups non-dairy milk** ¾ cup canned coconut milk ¼ cup nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon lemon juice ½ teaspoon salt black pepper (to taste)

In medium saucepan, heat butter over medium heat. Add broccoli, carrots, celery, onion, and garlic. Sauté until onion is translucent and veggies are tender. Sprinkle veggies with flour. Gradually add broth and milk. Stir constantly. Add coconut milk and nutritional yeast. Simmer soup over medium-low heat 10-15 minutes. Blend soup. It is recommended puréeing one third to two thirds of the soup in a blender until smooth. Stir in lemon juice. Add salt and pepper. Can be served hot or cool. *It is recommended chopping the broccoli first, to get the full nutritional benefits. **Original cashew milk is best with this recipe. Chris Pickens is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic health coach. She has been a vegan since 2016. Pickens enjoys sharing her recipes, getting feedback (good or bad) on her recipes, getting requests for future recipes, and sharing information about veganism and why she became vegan. She can be contacted by emailing her at momof4chris@gmail.com Please put “The Joy of Medina Attn: Chris” in the subject line.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

Putting the Brakes on Squeaks by Robert Soroky If you ride bikes long enough it is no surprise that, at some point, things are going to go wrong. Usually, it is a flat tire (“Fixing Those Inevitable Flats,” Page 21, October 2021, https://bit.ly/3HY1WDL), which, with a little practice, can become a very doable repair for most folks. But what about other problems that the bike may encounter like, say, squeaky breaks? Or, heaven forbid, loose breaks? Believe it or not, some brake issues, much like flat tires, can be handled by the everyday person. Let us start with the squeak. There are a few reasons why brakes might squeak. Sometimes, it is caused by a buildup of either dirt, grime or an oily substance on the brake pads. A quick fix for this is to use a small piece of sandpaper to lightly sand the surface of the brake pads to remove the buildup. Most times, this is all that needs to be done. Another option, specifically on bikes with rim brakes, is to slightly angle the front edge of each brake pad in toward the rim. Note that this is a very small adjustment, a couple of millimeters at the most, just enough for the front of the pad to hit the rim first when braking. If you have tried both of these methods and the squeak persists, it may be time to replace the pads altogether. Now, let us address those loose rim brakes. Traditional cable-actuated rim brakes stretch over time. As that cable gets longer, squeeze after squeeze, the brake handle pulls closer and closer to the handlebar grip, causing less braking power. The fix here is to tighten up the cable. Although this can be done by the non-bike mechanic, some additional adjustments may be needed after the cable is tightened, so having a bike shop mechanic do the initial adjustment might be the smarter way to go. However, most mechanics will let you watch the process so you will know how to make that adjustment in the future. Next month’s column will cover maintenance and operation of disc brakes! Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

Greater Medina Chamber

REGISTER TODAY!

PRIVATE COURSE PRIVILEGE Support Your Chamber and Join Us FOR A Great Day of Golf!

Prizes awarded for on course skills contest and top teams.

Invites You to Our

GOLF OUTING Westfield Country Club

August 1, 2022

Make new connections. Join in friendly competition. Join us for an exclusive day of golf at Westfield County Club, the outing will utilize both the NEWLY redesigned North and South courses.

Registration 10am • Shotgun Start 11am Lunch, dinner, keg beer, Gatorade and water included in entrance fee.

Visit www.medinaohchamber.com or call 330-723-8773 to register


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

Biggest Fitness Mistakes by Kelly Bailey Throughout my career, I have found people making mistakes that lead to failure in reaching their fitness goals. Here are the biggest ones I have seen people making and suggestions on how to combat them. 1. Inconsistent training. If you want it, work for it. Plain and simple. Working out occasionally will not get results and might actually get you hurt. This is the number one thing holding most people back. If you are not ready to be consistent, that is OK, too. Do not beat yourself up. But do come to terms with the fact that you will not meet your desired goal. 2. Not waiting long enough to see results. Most people want what they want, and they want it yesterday. Results often take far longer than many expect. You should give a program at least six weeks before looking for change. And more likely, 12 weeks before seeing real results and that is only if the first mistake listed is avoided. 3. Focusing only on the scale. Ugh. The scale. It is the bane of a strength coach's existence. Pound for pound, muscle takes up less space than fat. That means you may lose inches and look fabulous, but your weight may not change at all. Scale weight also can fluctuate by up to 10 pounds every 24 hours due to hydration changes. When evaluating progress, it is more important to look at other measures of progress such as how clothes are fitting, whether energy levels have increased, if sleep is better, and whether joints are less painful than it is to step on a scale and count the pounds. 4. Skipping strength training. Skip cardio before skipping strength training. While both cardio and strength training should be done, for the most efficient and beneficial workout, strength training beats cardio in almost every aspect. So, if you are short on time or are not terribly motivated to work out in the first place, do the thing that is most efficient. 5. Not challenging yourself enough. Ladies, I am talking (mostly) to you. You can do 47 reps with those tiny pink dumbbells and never see the kind of change that will come from performing the same exercise, for fewer reps, with heavier weight. You will not "bulk up," I promise. A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

COMMUNITY: GEMS

for the trafficker to be a friend or acquaintance of the victim with estimates as high 42 precent that the perpetrator is a Help Needed to Fight family member. Human Trafficking Ewing said the coalitions’ biggest need is for volunteers who by Kent Von Der Vellen can be trained to present educational programs at the county’s Human trafficking is usually thought of as transporting schools. It is not uncommon after a presentation for a student people across international borders to be used by a criminal to recognize a danger sign and approach a teacher or counselor organization. about a possible situation. In Medina County, human trafficking more commonly involves For more information, call the coalition at 330-764-8891 or manipulation, coercion, blackmail, and/or drug use. Those visit https://bit.ly/3btOUBJ. targeted often are in difficult financial situations, suffering from a drug addiction, or are young. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a Physical and sexual abuse are common, with traffickers volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the involving victims in the sex trade. Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. In Ohio, the definition of human trafficking is using force, Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by efraud, or coercion to compel someone to engage in sexual mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling activity or involuntary servitude. Human trafficking is hard to prove, resulting in few traffickers being charged or convicted. In most cases, it is not the traffickers, but the clients who are charged with importuning or solicitation. If convicted, penalties can include fines, community service, little to no jail time, and being added to the sex offender registry. In 2014, Ohio updated its human trafficking laws to mirror federal guidelines more closely. That same year, the Medina County Coalition Against Human Trafficking was created through a state grant. The coalition is under the nonprofit designation of the Children’s Center of Medina County and reports to its board, but operates as a separate organization with its own volunteers, funds and budget. Coalition members are from related disciplines with the goal of educating the community and helping victims. Co-chair Beth Ewing said the original funding in 2014 was temporary. Since then, the coalition has had to raise additional funds. It briefly had one paid member, but today it is operated completely by volunteers. The coalition works with churches, community organizations, motels, and salons to identify warning signs someone may be involved in a human trafficking situation. Traffickers target teens and preteens because they are struggling with body, emotional and social changes. Add to this peer pressure, family situations, and dealing with different relationships and it offers the trafficker many opportunities. While the internet and social media make it easier for a trafficker to pose as a friend or a peer to win trust and later ask to meet, Ewing pointed out that the majority of human trafficking victims know their perpetrators. It is not uncommon

330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts under the Help tab at https:// www.joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/.

COMMUNITY: IN DEED

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Undercoat of Kindness by Amy Barnes Congratulations to our newest “In Deed” award winner, Nick Wemmer! It all started with Laurie Beal, site and ministry director for The Garage at 126 N. Pardee Street in Wadsworth. She was working to set it up so volunteers could paint a mural on the side of The Garage’s brick building. In order for the mural to be painted, though, the rough brick wall needed to be prepared so the mural would look its best and last. Much to Beal’s delight, that was when Wemmer of Wemmer Painting stepped up. Wemmer donated all of the supplies and time to power wash the wall, fix the gutter above it, caulk the windows, and then painted the wall a dark gray for the background color. In addition to all of the work he already has done, he is planning to return to seal the mural after it is finished. To thank him for all he is doing to help the community and to make The Garage’s project successful, Wemmer will be receiving a gift card to a local business from this magazine. Congratulate Wemmer by contacting him at 330-336-7944, and tell him you learned about his good deed in Joy of Medina County Magazine!


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

Joyful Word Search Joyful Word Search

MIRTH AND JOY

WalkIN in THE the Park WALK PARK S J W X G Y S D N B M E P W

Z N Y I G D N D R A U K Y D

A Z O G L J G U O N T S N D

X N L I G D N R E O R U N N

E D Z N C L D I T W S A F A V L Q L A Y W R P N R L J E

G Y O I E E M P O S B E R J

B N C T C N O R S W V Y T Z

PRINCESS NATUREPRINCESS BRUNSWICK NATURE WOODS BRUNSWICK HIKING WILDFLOWERS WOODS SPRUCE AVENUE

L K I U S P T E O R E L M S

T W R K P D C S E F I R K T

V P J I I N N S H A K A S B

S R L T I H E A R O O C Z B

T U N R K R R T S J R V O P

by Jerry King

T K P N P D N R Y B N E M R

ROCK FORMATIONS TULIP POPLARS ROCK FORMATIONS PRESERVE TULIP POPLARS SANDSTONE PRESERVE TRAIL ANCIENT SHORE SANDSTONE OAKS TRAIL ANCIENT SHORE OAKS

HIKING WILDFLOWERS SPRUCE AVENUE

Joyful Word Search Answer Key for Last Month’s Search Liberation Liberation N D L E G I S L A T I O N Y D

O E M A N C I P A T I O N N N

I T N C X O T R T L T L O N C

T E N T O R I B J R N I X O Q

A R K O M N R T A D T N M J N

N M E X I D S D A A M M L O R

I I R C N T I T R C E X I T V

T N D V O T A T I M I T T W Y

S A D X I G S M O T A L L Y L

A T R O N N N R A R U P B Z N

R I N Z O M A I B L L T Z U X

C O N M P T D E T T C N I Y P

O N E L I T L D M I Q O G O T

R D N O G E R T G T O R R M N

P X N N C L M L P B L N N P V

Regarding an online dating profile: " ‘Government’ is too vague, it could mean anything from ‘I’m an international spy’ to ‘I just handle the accounting.’ "

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

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ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL

evident, but it is mixed nicely with the sword and multi-weapon action. I say multi-weapon because this princess Princess War knows how to turn everything around her by Amy Barnes into a weapon. She uses everything from Movie: “The Princess” parts of her wedding gown to the beads Seen: at home, Hulu from her necklace and even dislocates her Rating (out of 5 possible): thumb to escape handcuffs, then uses Ever watch a movie and you end up them as a weapon as she kills guard after yelling at the screen because the main guard. character is missing obvious plans of She ensures each guard is dead before action or things that could be used as moving on to the next adversary. It is weapons and you wish he or she would be about time; I am tired of yelling at the smarter? screen that you have to make sure the This is not that movie. attackers are dead before turning your “The Princess” really earned only three back on them! birds, but I am giving it a fourth just for Through flashbacks, viewers learn how having perfect timing on its release. the princess learned her fighting skills The mature rating this movie has is well from Linh, daughter of the king’s advisor. deserved. There is a lot of blood, violence Her mother looks upon it as a distraction and attempted rapes. from her etiquette lessons. Her father, While this is not a princess movie for however, is enraged when she asks to kids, some parts would be considered a train as a knight. typical princess movie. The princess is Some of the dialogue for the movie is promised in marriage to Julius, a just sheer fun in our present climate. psychotic power-hungry maniac. He locks “Someone needs to teach you your her in a tower for refusing to marry him. place,” growls Julius, the would-be groom Her family is locked in the hold of the to a princess spattered with the blood of castle, and the peasants cower. the men who tried to stop her. It is assumed the princess is too weak “I’ve heard that before,” the princess and too stupid to be of any threat. shoots back, readying her weapon. The princess, however, has been Disappointingly, despite the strength of underestimated, and when she says, the lead character, the princess is never “No!” she means, “No!” called by an actual name, her only name She battles her way out of her tower is “the princess.” Perhaps a constant prison, determined to save herself and her reminder that her perceived value is only family, without expecting any help along in being the princess. the way. As the princess attacks Julius, he The only knights in shining armor are the admonishes her by saying, “Not exactly ones trying to kill her. the ladylike behavior I’d expect of you.” “Be the weak little person you are meant Then he adds an extra jab, “You are an to be!” snarls Moira, a whip-wielding oddity.” female character who also happens to be “I was born this way,” the princess a sexual plaything for Julius. Fight scenes are well choreographed and the martial arts influence that director Le-Van Kiet brings with him is

retorts, unfazed and ready to battle.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

This month’s clue: A TV series mentioned last month Last month’s answer: Armyworms, “Dig It: Army Munches Onward,” Page 21, May 2022

a

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

People visited Uptown Park, Medina Public Square, for the annual Pizza Palooza pizza-tasting contest and to learn more about the numerous nonprofit organizations and social-service providers that had booths there. photos by Torre Design

Grayson Mayber and his grandmother Debbie Melnik tried some of the pizzas.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2022

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People were lined up for pizza from Gionino’s Pizzeria, which was voted the 2022 Pizza Palooza winner.

Ellie Christensen, left, and Danielle Batchelor were all smiles.

Attendees at ORMACO’s Opera Under the Stars in Uptown Park, Medina Public Square, were treated to performances by soloists from the Cleveland Opera. photos by Torre Design. continued, Page 34


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

continued from Page 33

Soloist Brian Skoog

Soloist Claire Connelly

Soloist Elizabeth Frey


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

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Medina had its first observation of Juneteenth this year, one year after it gained federal holiday status. It is a celebration of freedom, Black history and achievement. To learn more about Juneteenth and what local leaders had to say about the holiday, go to http://tinyurl.com/2p8h6xu4 photos by Amy Barnes

The crowd enjoyed the entertainment, food and vendors.

Mac Overmyer, left, and Kristi Thomsen Anamaria Feyervari manned a booth for the Hope and Healing Center, previously known as the Battered Women’s Shelter and Rape Crisis Center.

Hanging out at the Medina Police Department booth were, from left, Chris Neal, Billy Landers and Officer Al Roland.

At the Carlo Moni Hair Care booth, from left, Julia Price, Monay Slayton, owner Monica Slayton, and Tamara Dampeer try out their best sales pitch on an event attendee.

Chatting and selling at The Bead Slayer booth were, from left, Ohetha McReynolds, Kenyatta Harrison, Wayne McReynolds, Kevin Harrison, and Walker Storey.

continued, Page 36


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

continued from Page 35

Charlie Glover-Fowler and her mother, Tamarra GloverFowler, of Medina were enjoying the weather and vendors at Juneteenth.

Ashley Powell, left, and son Jacobe Powell visit with Regina Houston, Jacobe’s godmother.

Generations of love, from left: Louise McMorris, 80 years old; Enid Gant, 98 years old; Tracey Ruffin, 56 years old; and Carol Robinson, 75 years old.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

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July 2022 Nonprofit Calendar

Friday, July 1 Creative Ice Cream Flavors Day Time to let your imagination loose!

Saturday, July 2 World UFO Day and I Forgot Day Be careful, if you spot a UFO, you might not remember it! Kids’ Yoga in the Garden, 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Medina County Community Garden, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Parents required to remain. For children ages 5 and older. No charge, but donations gratefully accepted. To register, go to https://bit.ly/3OuxW54 Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Every Saturday through September 24. Guided walking tours of collection of more than 40 streetcars, interurbans and rapid transit cars. Tours are every hour on the half hour and take 30 minutes. Second and fourth Saturdays, weather permitting, also rides on a 1914 trolley car, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Admission to museum is free. Tickets are good for all day riding. Trolley rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children 5 and younger. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ Woodlawn Cemetery Mausoleum Opening, 1 pm. to 3 p.m., 200 College Street, Wadsworth. Hosted by Friends of Woodlawn Cemetery. Learn history, stroll the grounds. All are welcome. Rain date: July 3, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Drop-In Crafts, noon to 8 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Wednesdays through October 12, 2022. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Scattering of Baa’s Ashes, 6 p.m., Whispering Acres Farm Animal Sanctuary, 7496 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. Baa the sheep was the farm’s first rescue at the age of 16. This is the anniversary of her arriving at the farm. Her ashes will be scattered in the Pasture of Peace. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3LqQL6K Chippewa Lake Water Skiing Team, 7 p.m., 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Shows are free for the audience and serve as practice sessions for the team in getting ready for competitions. Donations toward costumes, cost of competing are gratefully accepted.

Thursday, July 7

Compliment Your Mirror Day Because you are good enough, you’re smart enough, and doggone it, people like you! Discovery Drop-In: Wetlands, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Drop in any time. Naturalist available on boardwalk over the weland with supplies and to answer questions. Medina County Historical Society Open House, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., John Smart House, 206 N. Elmwood, Medina. Self-guided tour, docents available for questions. Admission $5 adults, $4 MCHS members and seniors, $3 students 7 to 18 years old. Children younger than 7, no charge with hand-holding adult. More information at 330-722-1341.

Tell the Truth Day Hopefully you heeded our warning yesterday! Camp Wired: Are You Ready to Go Cashless?, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about tap-to-pay apps, digital payment apps, security, more. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Summer Smoothies, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to make three superfood smoothies. Register at https://bit.ly/3umRYWV Forest Therapy Walk, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Relaxed sensory experience forest therapy walk. Goal is to sense, embody, appreciate relationship with natural world. Led by Jason of Whisper Shifter. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3Ajsxcz Wonderful World of Bubbles, 6:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Indoor show with the Bubble Lady.

Monday, July 4

Friday, July 8

Sunday, July 3

National Country Music Day YEEHAAAWWWW! See box for July 4 celebrations.

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Tuesday, July 5 Workaholics Day Senior Strides, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina.. For senior citizens aged 55 and older. Aim is to build a support system for those who would like to hike but do not have anyone to hike with. Casual 1- to 2-mile walk led by retired nurse/park volunteer. Dress for weather and wear appropriate footwear. Create! Canine Crafts, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 123 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create dog stickers, create canine companion, bookmarks. Dress for mess. Ages 12 to 17. Register at https:// bit.ly/3ulPkAS Didgeridoo Down Under, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about Aussie culture, sea creatures, more. Arrgh: A History of Piracy on the Great Lakes, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Historical and cultural examination of thievery, mutiny and more.

Wednesday, July 6 World Kissing Day Be careful whom you kiss, because of what tomorrow’s holiday is!

Body Painting Day We do not know why. Picnic on the Patio, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Medina County Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. Lunch, entertainment. Open to everyone. Senior citizens, 60 and older, $4; everyone else, $5. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Medina Community Band Concert, 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square. Free, but donations gratefully accepted at the concert for sheet music and other band expenses.

Saturday, July 9 National Sugar Cookie Day Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Native Plant Sale, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Benefits Friends of Medina County Parks. For list of plants available, go to https://bit.ly/3tc0PdC Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Every Saturday through September 24. Guided walking tours of collection of more than 40 streetcars, interurbans and rapid transit cars. Tours are every hour on the half hour and take 30 minutes. Second and fourth Saturdays, weather permitting, also rides on a 1914 trolley car, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Admission to museum is free. Tickets are good for all day riding. Trolley rides are $4 for adults and children 13


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

Fourth of July Observations Friday, July 1 WADSWORTH

SPENCER

Spencer Independence Day Celebration, 12:30 p.m. with fireworks at dark, Firestone Park. Park Drive, Spencer. Parade, festival with DJ, games, bounce houses, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. animal show, 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.. clown, 2:30 p.m. helicopters, food trucks. For more information and updates, go to http:// tinyurl.com/2p994rf8

Wadsworth July First Friday: Fireworks and Food Trucks, 10 p.m. to 2:30 a.m., 102 Main Street, Wadsworth.

Sunday, July 3 BRUNSWICK

Brunswick Fireworks Show, dark, approximately 9:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Brunswick High School, 3581 Center Road, Brunswick. Rain date: July 5

MEDINA

Medina Recreation Center Festival, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., 777 E. Union Street, Medina. DJ, games, chalk art, food trucks, bounce houses, water balloon toss, pool party. Free contests: pie eating, frozen T-shirt, hot dot eating. Must preregister for pool party ($5 per person) at http://tinyurl.com/2ufytp3z and for free contests at http://tinyurl.com/3cta99e3 Cornerstone Chapel Fireworks Fest, 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Cornerstone Chapel, 3939 Granger Road, Medina. Food trucks, kid activities, games. Free, but collecting food for West Virginia families. Then watching Medina fireworks show from hill and parking lot. List of needed foods: Ramen noodles; canned vegetables, stew, ravioli, and meats; peanut butter and jelly; and spaghetti noodles and sauce. Medina Fireworks Show, at dark, Medina High School, 777 E. Union Street, Medina.

years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children 5 and younger. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Therapy dogs visit the children’s area to be read to. Making Fresh Pesto!, 11 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Medina County Herb Society creates a fresh pesto using herbs and other ingredients. Allergen Alert: Nuts will be used. Register at https://bit.ly/3abDKkU Hummingbirds, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Drop in any time to enjoy games, displays, activities that teach all about hummingbirds. ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: SaVon Bass and the Indigo Jazz Ensemble, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square. Rain location: United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Free, but donations gratefully accepted. For more information, go to https:// tinyurl.com/y5s2ujt2 or call 419-853-6016.

Sunday, July 10 National Kitten Day Through July 9: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Hummingbirds, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Drop in any time to enjoy games, displays, activities that teach all about hummingbirds. Photography Workshop: How to Use Histogram, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Pay $15 at the door. Register at https://bit.ly/3OVKthy Native Plant Sale, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Benefits Friends of Medina County Parks. For list of plants available, go to https://bit.ly/3tc0PdC ORMACO Concert in the Country: James Marron, Classical Guitar, 2 p.m., HeARTland, 8187 Camp Road, Homerville. Rain location: Homerville United Methodist Church, 9097 Spencer Road, Homerville. Free. For more information and reservations, call 419-853-6016 or go to https://tinyurl.com/ 2p9f8dur

Monday, July 11 National Cheer Up the Lonely Day by giving someone a blueberry muffin and also observe National Blueberry Muffin Day Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Monday Movie Matinee: “Encanto,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Makerspace Mondays: 8 mm and 16 mm Transfer, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Family History and Learning Center, Medina Library, 210 S.

Monday, July 4 CHIPPEWA LAKE

Chippewa Lake Lions Club Foundation Fourth of July Parade, 1 p.m., parade starts at Gloria Glens Town Hall, 7966 Lake Road, Chippewa Lake, and ends at Lions Park. Shuttles available, prizes awarded. For more information, go to http://tinyurl.com/27c2ycxu Chippewa Lake Water Ski Team, 5 p.m., Chippewa Lake. Free Fourth of July show.

MEDINA

Medina Fourth of July Parade, 4 p.m., starts at Medina High School, 777 E. Union Street, Medina. Parade travels south on Spring Grove, west on Liberty Street, and around the square. Medina Community Band Concert, 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square. Free, but donations gratefully accepted at the concert for sheet music and other band expenses.

VALLEY CITY

Valley City Parade, Car Show, Concert, and Fireworks, noon to 11 p.m., Mill Stream Park, 1200 Maple Street, Valley City. Parade starts at 11 a.m., follows State Route 303 to West River to School Street to Maple Street to Mill Stream Park. Concessions available.

Broadway Street, Medina. See a demonstration of how to use new photo by Tejas Prajapati equipment in the Makerspace. Register at https://bit.ly/3IdldkB Victory on Two Fronts: Cleveland Indians and Baseball, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Story of the team during WWII. Monday Night Intrigue: “Homicide,” 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Follow Baltimore police as they try to solve 234 murders. Register at https://bit.ly/3P3Xupv

Tuesday, July 12 Different Colored Eyes Day How cool! Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Dimension of Illusion Magic Show, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Rusty Ammerman gets audience to participate in magic, comedy show. Teen Magic Workshop, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For Grades 6 through 12. Register at https://bit.ly/3ND2HU8 Coffee and Canvas, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Create an original painting. Pay $20 supply fee to presenter at event. Register at https://bit.ly/3yB3joY

Wednesday, July 13 Embrace Your Geekness Day Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Explore habitat and adaptations of American mink. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. Ages 7 to adult. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3egtk1S Party in the Park, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Ray Mellert Park, at Foundry Street and Miner Drive, Medina. Sponsored by Cleveland Clinic Medina and the Medina County Recreation Center. Varying activities. Art, music, games, food, more. Other dates: July 20 and July 27. Register for any of them at https://bit.ly/3Nvrkm7 Let’s Play Outside! 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bubbles, chalk, hula hoops, jump rope, more. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Wednesdays through October 12, 2022. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Vintage Artists Through July 22, 2022 Paintings by senior citizens Brunswick Library 3649 Center Road, Brunswick The Perfumery Through July 24, 2022 Paintings by A.E.F. Richardson B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Two Moms and a Paint Brush Through July 30, 2022 Paintings by Leslie Conder and Angela Glasser

Highland Library 4160 Ridge Road, Medina Brad Rice: Watercolor Florals Through August 31, 2022 Lodi Library 635 Wooster Street, Lodi Interlaced Art August 1 through 28, 2022 Women in Art works in variety of mediums B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Safe Easy Shopping Online, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn basics of online shopping. Chippewa Lake Water Skiing Team, 7 p.m., 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Shows are free for the audience and serve as practice sessions for the team in getting ready for competitions. Donations toward costumes, cost of competing are gratefully accepted. Medina Show Biz Company “Gypsy” Auditions, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., Haddad Theatre, 144 N. Broadway, Medina. Performances will be September 30 through October 2 and October 7 through 9. For more information and requirements, go to https://tinyurl.com/4rfdsxey

Thursday, July 14 Pandemonium Day We call that every day here! Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Baby Handprints, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Materials provided. Register at https://bit.ly/3R40Pqd Spy Camp, 11 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Complete spy mission training, receive badge and secret identity. Learn codes, ciphers, interrogation, and more. Register for 11 a.m. at https://bit.ly/3nyE542 . Register for 1 p.m. at https://bit.ly/3OHTDP9 . Make Your Own Flag, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Design, create flag that represents your values, hopes, interests, dreams. Bad Art Night, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Supplies provided, create awful art. Teens welcome. Register at https://bit.ly/3P4KXSN Breaking the Mystery of Picture Book Writing, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn 5 basic structures of picture books and how to prepare your manuscript for submissions. Register at https://bit.ly/3yFyBLv Medina Show Biz Company “Gypsy” Auditions, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., Haddad Theatre, 144 N. Broadway, Medina. Performances will be September 30 through October 2 and October 7 through 9. For more information and requirements, go to https://tinyurl.com/4rfdsxey

Friday, July 15 Cow Appreciation Day Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival

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Shark Tank Science Show, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Mr. Molecule takes attendees beneath the waves to meet creatures. Grades kindergarten through 5th. Cartooning with Jeff Nicholas, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn how to build characters. Register at https://bit.ly/3ydcQkD American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Slo Roll: A Real Railroad to Century 7 1/2-Mile Ride, 6:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 1101 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Meet at trailhead in Medina County Career Center parking lot. Younger than 16 must be accompanied by parent. Helmets required. Water bottle suggested. Bikes must be equipped with blinking white front lights and red back lights. Assemble at 6:15 p.m., ride starts 6:30 p.m. Medina Community Band Concert, 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square. Free, but donations gratefully accepted at the concert for sheet music and other band expenses.

Saturday, July 16 National Toss Away the “Could Haves” and “Should Haves” Day Through July 17: Medina County Arts Week https:// www.medinacountyartscouncil.org/arts-week-festival Flea Market and Rummage Sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Spaces available through July 2, call 330-725-6176. Medina Fest, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square, Medina. Live music, food, Medina business and maker showcase, family and kid activities, in combination with Medina Farmers Market. Come visit the Joy of Medina County Magazine booth! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Department, 1616 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Native Plant Sale, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Benefits Friends of Medina County Parks. For list of plants available, go to https://bit.ly/3tc0PdC Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Every Saturday through September 24. Guided walking tours of collection of more than 40 streetcars, interurbans and rapid transit cars. Tours are every hour on the half hour and take 30 minutes. Second and fourth Saturdays, weather permitting, also rides on a 1914 trolley car, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Admission to museum is free. Tickets are good for all day riding. Trolley rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children 5 and younger. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ Bee Festival, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Hive is opened, show and tell, bee balloon art with Nate the Great, story time. Access the Arts: Sharon Showcase Art and Music Festival, 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., 1322 Sharon Copley Road, Sharon Center. Music, more than 70 vendors, food, children’s activities, beer garden. Hummingbirds, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Drop in any time to enjoy games, displays, activities that teach all about hummingbirds.

Sunday, July 17 National Ice Cream Day Medina Art League 48th Annual Art in the Park, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square, Medina. Paintings, sculptures, photos, more. Hummingbirds, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Drop in any time to enjoy games, displays, activities that teach all about hummingbirds. Native Plant Sale, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Benefits Friends of Medina County Parks. For list of plants available, go to https://bit.ly/3tc0PdC ORMACO Live at the Library: Any Road, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free, but due to limited space, reservations are recommended. For more information and reservations, call 419-853-6016 or go to https://tinyurl.com/ywchpwjb

Monday, July 18 National Get Out of the Dog House Day Good luck! Outback Ray’s Amazing Animal Show, 10:30 a.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Tiny Library: Become an Author, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Brainstorm and write a


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

book. Come back July 28 to celebrate the publishing of your book. Books will stay in the library for everyone to read. Grades 2 through 6. Register at https://bit.ly/3R8FHz0

Tuesday, July 19 National Urban Beekeeping Day Afternoon Movie: “The Music Never Stopped,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Free. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Altered Books, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Create illustrated blackout poetry with books. Register at https://bit.ly/3NEJMZ3

Wednesday, July 20 National Moon Day Dragonology, 11 a.m. to noon, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn fun facts about dragons through crafts and games. Crafts, obstacle course, play games, feed a dragon. Register for 11 a.m. at https://bit.ly/3yB0vYY. Register for 1 p.m. at https://bit.ly/3a7nhON . Register for 6:30 p.m. at https://bit.ly/3yD8Ye7 Party in the Park, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Fred Greenwood Park, 350 W. Sturbridge, Medina. Sponsored by Cleveland Clinic Medina and the Medina County Recreation Center. Varying activities. Art, music, games, food, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3Nvrkm7 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Wednesdays through October 12, 2022. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Files and Folder Organizing, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to save to a flash drive, move documents and pictures. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3OYKfWV Chippewa Lake Water Skiing Team, 7 p.m., 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Shows are free for the audience and serve as practice sessions for the team in getting ready for competitions. Donations toward costumes, cost of competing are gratefully accepted. Access the Arts: One Fine Day, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., 1322 Sharon Copley Road, Sharon Center. Local cover band performs all-girl sounds from the 50s through the 80s. Rain location: Sharon Center Town Hall, 6449 Ridge Road, Wadsworth.

Thursday, July 21 National Be Someone Day We have faith in you! Camp Wired: Create a Travel Brochure, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about copy/ pasting, layouts, research. Tween Thursday Summer Edition: Castle Creations, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Defend your lands and make a fortified tabletop castle. Register at https://bit.ly/3nxyQ4X Alphabet Adventure: F is for Flamingo, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Games, stories, songs, crafts. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https:// bit.ly/3NEFwZz Edible Landscaping, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community Garden and Education Center, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Hosted by OSU master gardeners. Dress for weather. Mental Health 101, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Explore what is at the heart of mental health conditions, how it affects everyone’s life. Register at https://bit.ly/3AnB524 Lost Civil War: The Disappearing Legacy of America’s Greatest Conflict, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Author Laura DeMarco shows how battlefields, buildings have been destroyed or overgrown.

Friday, July 22 National Rat Catcher’s Day Well, everyone needs to be loved. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Kindermusik, 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Move and groove. Siblings welcome.

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Address Guide: Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241 Rawiga Golf and Swim Club 10353 Rawiga Road, Seville 330-336-8809 Westfield Country Club 6600 Greenwich Road Westfield Center, Oh. 44251 330-887-0391 Weymouth Country Club 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina 330-725-6297

Thursday, July 14 2022 Pastors Masters 8 a.m. Bunker Hill Golf Course

Monday, August 1

Greater Medina Area Chamber of Commerce Golf Outing 10 a.m. Westfield Country Club

Monday, August 8

Wadsworth Area Chamber of Commerce Golf Outing 9 a.m. Rawiga Golf Club

Monday, September 19 The Trinity Rose Foundation 16th Annual Golf Outing 9:30 a.m. Weymouth Country Club

K

Picnic on the Patio, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Medina County Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina. Lunch, entertainment. Open to everyone. Senior citizens, 60 and older, $4; everyone else, $5. Jake Von Der Vellen Annual Memorial Fundraiser, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Basket raffle, food and beverages available. Suggested donation: $10 per person. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3vJ3CN0 Medina Community Band Concert, 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square. Free, but donations gratefully accepted at the concert for sheet music and other band expenses.

Saturday, July 23 National Gorgeous Grandma Day Kids’ Yoga in the Garden, 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Medina County Community Garden, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Parents required to remain. For children ages 5 and older. No charge, but donations gratefully accepted. To register, go to https://bit.ly/3OuxW54 Introduction to Mindfulness Meditation, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. All abilities welcome. Age 18 and older. Course is six-weeks long. Registering for first session automatically enrolls for all sessions. Register at https://bit.ly/3bLGupD American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Every Saturday through September 24. Guided walking tours of collection of more than 40 streetcars, interurbans and rapid transit cars. Tours are every hour on the half hour and take 30 minutes. Second and fourth Saturdays, weather permitting, also rides on a 1914 trolley car, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Admission to museum is free. Tickets are good for all day riding. Trolley rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children 5 and younger. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ Alice in Wonderland Celebration, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Card tricks, meet Alice and the White Rabbit. Games, tea and cakes, more. Balloons Over Wadsworth, 2 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Wadsworth Airport, 840 Airport Drive, Wadsworth. Hot air balloons, plane rides, vintage aircraft, car show, food trucks, kid activities. For updates and information, go to https:// www.facebook.com/wadsworthairport/


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022

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award. Ages 7 to adult. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/

3egtk1S

Monday, July 25

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Monday, July 4 Medina Twin Sizzler, 7:45 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina Public Square, Medina. 5k and 10k walks, runs and bike races; 27-Mile Citizen or Bike Race registration ENDS MAY 31, 2022. 1-mile Fun Run standard registration ends June 30, 2022. More information, registration and fees can be found at https://bit.ly/ 3MK0MNw Sunday, July 24 Sophia’s Smile, 7:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. race start, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. For more information about the nonprofit, go to https://bit.ly/ 39jeLv1 More information, registration and fees can be found at https://bit.ly/3ORl4pY Sunday, July 31 Mischief Managed 5k, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., 103 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Family-friendly course ends near the square. Runners are asked to wear best wizarding outfit. Benefits Canine Companions, which provides service and facility dogs. Meet future and current service dogs. More information, registration and fees can be found at https://bit.ly/3a9wQMN

Saturday, August 27 Race for Glory 5k Run and Walk, 8 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. start, Buckeye Woods, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Benefits The Society and Special Olympics Ohio. More information, registration and fees can be found at https:// tinyurl.com/38th5nyf Saturday, September 10 The Amazing Race, hosted by the Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance. For more details, go to http://tinyurl.com/ycx5p2ne Sunday, September 11 through Sunday, October 16, 2022 Healthy Kids Running Series: Brunswick, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick. Each run has a variety of distances. For fees, registration and more information, go to https://bit.ly/3tWhiCi Sunday, September 11 Tunnel to Towers 5k Run and Walk 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation. For more information: http:// tinyurl.com/3zaewxmk

National Merry-Go-Round Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Mindful Monday, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Creating vision boards to help set goals. Short, guided meditation included. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3OEwJIs Just How Weird is Ohio? 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Road, Seville. Paranormal researcher shares favorite weird places and oddities. Crafting Beer at Home, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Fundamentals of brewing process, leave knowing how to craft own beer. Register at https://bit.ly/3IbJurh

Tuesday, July 26 National Boop Your Pet Day https://bit.ly/3bPDiJL Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome! Register at https://bit.ly/3nzRl8J

Wednesday, July 27

Well, here is a challenge, try celebrating all three at once! Walk on Stilts Day, Take Your Pants for a Walk Day and Take Your Houseplants for a Walk Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Outback Ray’s Amazing Animal Show, 10:30 a.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Sunday, September 18 Messy Sensory Play, 11:30 a.m. to noon, Sycamore Rooms North and Friday, August 5 Harvest Walk and 5K Run, 7:30 Collin Cares Glow With the Flow a.m. registration and check-in, 9 South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Dress for mess. Twilight Run 5k, 1-Mile, 8:15 p.m. a.m. kick-off, Mapleside Farms, Ages 6 months to 3 years. Register at https://bit.ly/3ui7NOQ kids run/walk starts, 8:45 p.m. Brunswick. Benefits the Kidney Happee Birthdae, Harry, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth adult fun/run begins.Root Middle Foundation of Ohio, Inc. Awards School, 333 W. Sturbridge, Medina. ceremony. For more information, Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. A birthday party for Harry Potter. All runs and walks end at 11 p.m. fees and registration, go to https:// Trivia game, Gryfindor crafts, hunt for Hagrid, play tabletop Qidditch, Features lights, music and a disco tinyurl.com/2p9yyuyv decorate a cookie. Register at https://bit.ly/3AnndVO ball. Benefits Collin Cares Cure Cancer. For more information Race with Grace, 9 a.m., Cleveland Plastic Bag Monster! 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Highland about the nonprofit, go to https:// Clinic Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about the ocean’s ecosystem, bit.ly/3avScEc More Washington Street, Medina. For meet monster. information, registration and fees more information, fees and can be found at https://bit.ly/ registration, go to http:// South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 3t0DLy7 tinyurl.com/26429ux9 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Wednesdays through October 12, 2022. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Mermaid Wall Art, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, Sunday, July 24 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Create nautical wall hanging. People with Tell an Old Joke Day diverse abilities welcome. Register at https://bit.ly/3R8HkwC Medina Cars and Coffee Cruise-In, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., 39 Public Square, Teen Improv Alive! 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and Medina. Live music. Hosted by Main Street Medina. South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https:/ st 61 Annual Valley City Frog Jump Festival, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Valley /bit.ly/3bOMMow City. Theme this year: “Hop on the Frog Twain.” Frog jump contest with Growing Garlic and Onions, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Community 750 frogs, prizes, food, beverages, souvenirs, music, activities. No Garden and Education Center, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Hosted by admission charge, free parking, charge to enter frog jump. “Mark Twain” OSU master gardeners. Dress for weather. will visit. For more information and schedule, go to https://bit.ly/3I2c8LI To Party in the Parks: Memorial Pool Party, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., 421 E. purchase apparel and register for the jump, go to https://www.valleycity.org/ Homestead Street, Medina. Sponsored by Cleveland Clinic Medina and the Tats 4 Cats, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mission Possible Animal Hospital, 910 Lake Medina County Recreation Center. Varying activities. Art, music, games, Road, Medina. Proceeds benefit Alleycats and Aristocats. Fee is $100 food, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3Nvrkm7 cash, many designs to choose from. Last seating at 4:30 p.m. Food Chippewa Lake Water Skiing Team, 7 p.m., 3196 Clark Mill Road, available for extra charge. Kittens available with pre-approved application. Norton. Shows are free for the audience and serve as practice sessions for ORMACO Concert in the Country: Tischler Klezmer Orchestra, 2 p.m., the team in getting ready for competitions. Donations toward costumes, HeARTland, 8187 Camp Road, Homerville. Bring lawn chairs, blankets to cost of competing are gratefully accepted. enjoy the concert by the pond. Rain location: Homerville United Methodist Church, 9097 Spencer Road, Homerville. Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 Thursday, July 28 at the door. Call 419-853-6016 for more information. Get tickets at https:// National Milk Chocolate Day bit.ly/39SnhCc Monday Movie Matinee: “Clifford the Big Red Dog,” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Buzzing Bumbles, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Explore habitat and adaptations of American mink. Counts toward Natural Discoveries


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2022 Camp Wired: Discovering the Great Lakes Webquest, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about using the internet. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rcblood.org/ 32i1sbg Underwater Journey: “The Last Reef,” 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn about coral reefs, the creatures living beneath the water. Light refreshments provided. Register at https://bit.ly/3yB6i0E Slo Roll: Brunswick Lake and Plum Creek Greenway, 6:30 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Guided ride with Bike Medina County. Younger than 16 must be accompanied by parent. Helmets required. Water bottle suggested. Bikes must be equipped with blinking white front lights and red back lights. Assemble at 6:15 p.m., ride starts 6:30 p.m. Intro to Cypress Resume Maker and Resume Tips and Resources, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/3Iaqrh3

Brunswick 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sundays, June 12 through October 2 Produce, consumables and crafts July 24: Christmas in July September 11: Butterfly release October 2: Canine Costume Contest Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Call 330-441-0292 for more information.

Friday, July 29 National Talk in an Elevator Day Wine and Canvas Night, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring wine, go home with art. Supply fee of $20 due to presenter at event. Ages 21 and older. Register at https://bit.ly/3OExBgc Paddle the Parks, 7 p.m., Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Naturalist-led paddle to explore seasonal happenings. Bring own kayak, canoe or SUP; paddle; flotation device. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/ 3RaJUCG Medina Community Band Concert, 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Uptown Park, Medina Public Square. Free, but donations gratefully accepted at the concert for sheet music and other band expenses.

Medina 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 7 through October 29 Produce, consumables, crafts, knife sharpening Cornerstone Chapel 3939 Granger Road, Medina Enter lot from Weymouth Road Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3MQSaFJ 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 14 through October 15 Produce and consumables Medina Public Square Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3vLZY2W

Saturday, July 30 International Day of Friendship American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https:// rcblood.org/32i1sbg Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Every Saturday through September 24. Guided walking tours of collection of more than 40 streetcars, interurbans and rapid transit cars. Tours are every hour on the half hour and take 30 minutes. Second and fourth Saturdays, weather permitting, also rides on a 1914 trolley car, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Admission to museum is free. Tickets are good for all day riding. Trolley rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children 5 and younger. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ International Friendship Day, noon to 2 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make bracelets, cards for friends. Register at https://bit.ly/3ui8yra LEGO Tournament, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Drop in, build creation, invite friends and family to vote July 30 through August 13. Prizes for most those with most votes. Grades kindergarten through 9th. Register at https://bit.ly/3yB6Fby Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: All Aboard!, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Ride miniature train around railroad and station house. All ages. Free.

Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 28 through September 24 Produce, consumables and crafts Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3I5Az9l Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 11 through September 24 Produce, consumables and crafts Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r8trRd

Sunday, July 31 Uncommon Musical Instrument Day Cathy’s House Cornhole Tournament, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Benefits Cathy’s House. Family-friendly event. Activities for kids, raffles, food trucks. For more information and to register, go to https://cathyshouse.org/cornhole ORMACO Party Bus: Ain’t Too Proud, 11:30 a.m. departure from Buehler’s River Styx, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. Travel in the party bus to see “Ain’t Too Proud: The Life and Times of the Temptations,” a new smash-hit Broadway musical. Catered box lunch, beverages, cookies, chocolates served on the way. Trivia quiz. Cost is $55 to $105, allinclusive. Limited seating. To book tickets, call 419-853-6016 or go to https://bit.ly/3LH6rnu

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

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Simulated Shooting Range

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Locations in Medina and Avon Lake Visit EVR website for information and to book appointments. Website: https:// www.engagevirtualrange.com/r/b9aSrM

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589