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WONDERING WHY YOUR WI-FI IS SLOW? PG. 14 Learn what causes it and tips to improve it.

IT DOES NOT HAVE TO DIE PG. 20 With just the right amount of “fairy dust,” midsummer transplant success is possible.

LETTERS ASSEMBLE! PG. 24 Send in the right answer, get your name included in a Joyful Word Search

Rachael Resilient With the odds and bullies stacked against her, Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski created a better life rooted in determination, and now she leads youths out of the darkness. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 6 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Paths of Courage by Amy Barnes There are easy interviews and there are hard interviews, and then there are the interviews that break your heart and make you celebrate all at the same time. Those are the hardest interviews, listening as someone opens the doors to his or her life’s story, knowing that they are doing it to try to help others but at the same time treads on very delicate, sometimes not quite healed, areas of their lives. It takes a special kind of courage and strength to go back, lift the rocks, and expose what lives there. In this month’s feature story, Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski shares the brightness she lost at a very young age, the darkness she traveled through, and the brightness she finally was able to build and own for herself. When you read her story, you may need a box of tissues, and then high-five someone when you get to the end. In between those two points, there is a lesson that Rachael learned in the very hardest of ways and that she uses like a lamp to lead teens to their rightful life’s path. There is an upcoming networking opportunity that also is a great chance to pick up some business pointers and, perhaps, even the key to solving one of your business dilemmas. Plus, you get a free lunch! What our networking columnist, Bob Arnold, just might call a no-brainer to attend. “Empowering Women Who Advance Northeast Ohio” is a free interactive event featuring women who are successful in business. The panelists are women who will be sharing their stories and speaking about the strategies and skills that helped get them to where they are. Panelists are Ramona Hood, chief executive officer of FedEx; Grace Wikulchik, chief executive officer of Akron Children’s Hospital; and Jessica McCoy, chief solutions officer for GOJO. The discussion will be moderated by Cheryl Perez, chief executive officer for BIG-HR and Cheryl C. Perez Enterprises. Congressman Anthony Gonzalez is sponsoring the bipartisan event. After a year of trying to succeed under almost impossible circumstances, this would be a great event to shake off the hermit dust and enjoy making new connections and seeing old friends. The event will be August 9, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at The Foundry Social, 333 Foundry Street, Medina. Registration is at https://bit.ly/3yzxKsX.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Tyler Hatfield Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN

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WATCHDOG

FINE PRINT AND LEFTOVERS by Amy Barnes Examining a utility-supported protection plan and the value of roofing and driveway spur-of-the-moment offers.

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BITE ME!

AUTHENTIC HUNGARIAN CHICKEN PAPRIKAS recipe by Debbie Boehmke Debbie Boehmke is known as the executive director of the Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance, but she is known by her family for her chicken paprikas.

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DIG IT!

MIDSUMMER TRANSPLANT MAGIC by Michelle Riley It is not ideal to transplant in the middle of summer, but when it is needed, a sprinkle of “fairy dust” can make magic happen!

HEALTH

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HEALTHY TRAILS

GETTING CLIPPED by Robert Soroky Increase riding power by evenly distributing the workload for your muscles using a revolutionary system.

OF MIND AND BODY

ENDING WEEKEND OVEREATING by Kelly Bailey

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MORE THAN EXISTENCE: THE COURAGE TO RISE by Amy Barnes

Tips to keeping a Friday night indulgence from becoming a weekend binge.

COMMUNITY

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When she could not succeed at giving up, Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski decided to find what she could succeed at and found her life’s journey led to a place where she can help others rise.

BUSINESS

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THE NETWORKER

MENTORING FROM BOTH DIRECTIONS by Bob Arnold

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SOLVING Wi-Fi SLOWDOWNS

MONUMENTAL GIVING by Amy Barnes In memory of her daughter, Alicia Hornbeck helps other families honor their children.

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

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To achieve a higher level of mentoring and networking, it is important to realize how much you can learn from others.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

GEMS

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX Solve the puzzle and send in the correct answer to get your name included in an upcoming Joyful Word Search!

ROLL ’EM!

FINDING HER TRUE SELF by Hunter Barnard She was not comfortable being nice, no matter how hard she tried.

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

JOLLY GOOD

by Tyler Hatfield

Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski found her calling, now it is your turn to find her words.

Two factors influence home internet speeds, and both are in your control.

MIRTH AND JOY

THE IN BOX

MORE THAN THE PRODUCT by Amy Barnes Companies are finding it takes more than their products to garner business.

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski enjoys her first visit to The BookShelf, 105 W. Liberty, Medina Public Square.

by Jerry King

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OH, SNAP! photos by Allison Waltz-Boebel Luckily, the birds were patient with the humans during a recent falconry class.

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LET’S DO IT! Enjoy a summer of events like no other!

CELEBRATE! Our clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski has had a long life’s journey and now works in multiple counties, including Medina, for Jobs for Ohio’s Graduates as the business and community engagement specialist and the social media and marketing lead.

story and photos by Amy Barnes

of loss. That life was snatched away when her 48-year-old t was 2 a.m. when her phone rang. Sleepily, she father suddenly died of cancer in 2002. answered the phone, vulnerable and unprepared. Her mother, who had never graduated high school “Your dad hated you so much that he got cancer so and was a stay-at-home mom for Rachel and her that he could die and leave you,” hissed the voice. older brother, was far from prepared for the sudden The young girl disconnected the call and once again loss of her husband and his steady income from the tears helplessly flowed as pain overtook her. Republic Steel. More bullying. More hatred. More heartbreak. More Desperate to save her family, Karen Jolly applied desperation. for assistance but was denied because the family’s Twelve-year-old Rachael Jolly wanted nothing income was too high. Only the last two years of tax more than to return to the life she had before her returns were accepted with applications and those father died. returns showed Jeffrey Jolly’s high income for those A life of stability, a family with her mother, father years. and brother. A life when all of her wishes were They were going to have to wait two years for help, granted by a doting father. but in the meantime, food was needed, and bills had “I was a daddy’s girl,” she said, as her eyes to be paid. momentarily filled with tears, feeling again the pang

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Karen Jolly got a job at a fast-food restaurant and another one cleaning nursing homes, all while she also worked to earn her GED. Once she earned her GED, she went on to become a hospice nurse. Joshua Jolly, Jolly’s 18-year-old brother, left home. Rachael Jolly found herself grieving for her father, her former way of life, for friends who had turned on her. She began suffering from extreme, debilitating panic attacks that were so severe that she left school nine times before Christmas break. One of the panic attacks happened on picture day. She forgot her picture money at home, so her mother had to bring it to the school. The photographers refused to take her picture until her mother arrived with the money. While they waited, they told Jolly, “We’re not going to take your picture until your mom gets here with the money, because she might die on the way.” Jolly, only months from having lost her father, fell apart and went into a deep panic attack, leading to another ambulance ride. Once again, an opportunity for her classmates to ridicule her. She once had been one of the girls with all of the new, nice clothes and just about anything she ever asked for, thanks to her father. Now there was no longer money for such things. When the bullying started, it was an unbearable final straw for an already extremely shy Jolly, who desperately wanted to be one of the cool kids. “Doesn’t every little girl?” she said. As the stability of having a home teetered in the balance, and she was being told by classmates to kill herself, she decided to do just that. Twice she attempted suicide and failed. One attempt involved overdosing on an over-the-counter medication that she was allergic to. Instead of dying, she ended up sleeping. “I eventually accepted that I sucked at it,” Jolly said, with a somewhat wry smile, adding with a shrug, “In life you have to realize what you’re good at.” She was not good at suicide. So, she made a promise to God to not try to kill herself again. She said that she loved her mom, but when counseling and medication still offered no relief, she started cutting herself. Counseling did not work, because, she said, “I didn’t want it to.”

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The scars still line her arms, a faint reminder of how far she has come. Jolly had gotten to a point where she no longer cared about anything. She survived each day, one after the other, but nothing more, even when her mother could not keep up with the house payments any longer and they lost the house. “I just didn’t care,” she said. Complicating things even more, Jolly had health problems that caused extreme pain and made it necessary for her to be absent from school, making her fall even farther behind her classmates and giving them even more ammunition to bully her with. By Christmas break, school administrators asked for Jolly to be removed from East Canton High School for her own well-being and education and to end the repeated disruptions caused by her panic attacks. She began home schooling and improved. “No one was yelling at me anymore,” she said. As Jolly entered her senior year, the online school she was attending went through a merger and records were lost. She was stunned to learn that the previous three years of school records no longer existed. She went from being a senior to suddenly needing to repeat all of the schoolwork she already had completed.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

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A photo collage of famous people who earned a GED is displayed on a wall in the Medina Jobs for Ohio Graduates office.

She contacted East Canton High School and asked for guidance because the school’s administrators were the last ones she felt had cared about her welfare. They suggested she turn to an alternative school called Choices. Before she was accepted there, it was required that she write an essay on why she wanted a high school diploma. Because of her issues with anxiety, she had to sit in a room by herself to write about her past and her struggles. She shared in the essay that she knew from her mother’s experiences the difference having a high school diploma could make. Even though it would have been easier at that point to earn a GED, Jolly was determined to have a high school diploma. Once she was accepted into Choices, she repeated classes, tested out of some of them, and still managed to graduate on time. It was during her year at Choices that Jolly met Lori Sexton, a career specialist with Jobs for Ohio Graduates, who also taught such things as financial literacy and conflict resolution at the school. When Jolly shared her story with Sexton, she did not get the reaction she was expecting. “Oh, my god, those are called excuses and I’m going to help you get over them,” Sexton very sweetly exclaimed, Jolly remembers. Jolly still laughs to this day about how Sexton responded. She wanted to succeed but she had not seen others exceed to the level she wanted to achieve.

“I knew what I wanted, but I didn’t know how to get there,” Jolly said. Sexton connected Jolly with a bank branch manager who was himself a product of the JOG program. Jolly began to be in a much different environment than what she had grown up in. She was constantly reminded and surrounded by what she wanted to have and what she wanted to be. “If you surround yourself with bad people, bad environments, it will seep in. You must separate yourself,” she said. She was determined to be a professional and to have nice things. Jolly visited the bank branch regularly and read all of the pamphlets and brochures in the lobby about the bank’s services. She then would approach her mentor, show off her new knowledge, and demand a job or to at least know why they were not hiring her. He finally hired her, even though there were no open positions, saying, “We’re going to have to get a restraining order or we’re going to have to hire her!” Jolly worked her way up to a full-time teller position and decided to attend college. It was around this time that her mother broke her back and needed to move in with Jolly to be cared for. Jolly still held to her plan and was attending college online while caring for her mother, when she got another fateful call. Children Services had removed her cousin’s three


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

children from their home, and they needed someone to take the children. It turned out that Jolly was the only family member that Children Services felt was suitable to place the children with because of how hard she had worked to rise and succeed in her career. Once again, saying, “yes,” meant she had to set aside her goals. Her life took a sudden and drastic turn when she agreed to take in the children. Jolly now had to figure out housing for herself, her mother and the three children Fortunately, Jolly and her brother had maintained contact over the years. He had a five-bedroom house, and his fiancé had just left him. So, Joshua Jolly suddenly found himself surrounded by family. Rachael Jolly was forced to quit her college classes so she could work enough hours to help with expenses and be a caretaker. “I was not working for my future self, I was working to get by,” she said. “I will do anything to help another person.” By this point, Jolly was working for a different bank than where she had started. There was a coworker who Jolly felt had a lack of respect for her, and she did not appreciate it. Without knowing the whole story, what Matt Kosakowski saw was a single, 21-year-old mother of three children, ages 6, 4 and 10 months, who had come from a rough background. His judgment of her situation was obvious to her. Jolly did not appreciate his attitude at all, but she was in a bit of predicament. Her car had broken down and, desperate to get it fixed and not having much money, she turned to

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Kosakowski and asked for help because she knew that he was not only a banker, but also a mechanic. Jolly freely admits she flirted with Kosakowski, hoping he would fix her car for free. What she did not plan on was for him to take the flirting as an actual interest in him. Kosakowski helped her and as he learned more about Jolly’s situation, his opinion of her changed to one of respect. Her heart melted the day he told her, “I would like to be the person you lean on.” Jolly calls Kosakowski, “my little piece of mind.” They have been together since 2012 and were married in 2016. Meanwhile, once again, life took a turn, and while the couple was dating and making plans to adopt the continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

effort, it is very easy to settle for that life, but it is not a life where you love yourself, she said. “Love sometimes is doing what is hard. In poverty, doing what is easy, you lose love.” Doing what was hard was deciding to focus only on herself and what she wanted in life. “You must surround yourself with what you want to be.” She can look back and recognize how hard her mother worked to save them after Jolly’s father died, but at the same time, it is not a place or time she would want to go back to. “My journey, while I couldn’t stand it at the time, it led me to where I am,” said Jolly. After her move to Macedonia, Jolly directed her energy toward her professional life. She started working her way up and found she had a unique talent for problem solving for bank customers. When someone would come in to apply for a mortgage or a refinance of their existing mortgage and they did not meet the criteria, Jolly would work to find ways to make the application meet the criteria, such as combining other debts. Matt Kosakowski and Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski on vacation in Grand Cayman. photo by Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski She said she was able to help those in bad financial situations and teach two youngest children and Joshua Jolly was them how to do better. For the first time, she was planning to adopt the oldest child, Children Services able to put herself and her career first and at the returned all three children to their mother, who same time still be able to help people. promptly left them with other relatives. Her talents were recognized, and the bank That was enough for Jolly, she moved out of her convinced her to take a position as a trainer to teach brother’s house and moved to Macedonia to be others how to think like she did. She accepted, even closer to then-boyfriend Kosakowski. though her true passion was to directly help people She was tired of constantly having to set aside her get out of difficult situations. hopes and ambitions to care for others. Every time Throughout the changes in her career and steps in she started to break free from mindsets she did not her journey, she always checked in with her JOG agree with, she was pulled back by an emergency of mentor “Miss Sexton” for advice and guidance before one kind or another. making a decision on how to proceed. When someone grows up in a rough environment, Then, just as she was asked by the bank to go even when it is considered acceptable to not make an deeper into the finance world of mortgages, even continued from Page 7


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further removed from directly helping others, JOG was busy merging its offices. It was Sexton’s turn to call for help, she needed help with the merger and to help JOG participants believe they could succeed. Jolly was tapped to give talks to graduates, to volunteer, to be part of the JOG Akron board. Whatever JOG needed, Jolly was happy to help. As her career had progressed, Jolly had managed to keep her past and her present very separate. Her coworkers did not know of her past, all they knew was the smartly dressed, bright-eyed, energetic woman that she had become. They did not know, that is, until the 30th anniversary party for JOG. Jolly convinced the bank she worked for to sponsor and provide the keynote speaker for the event. That was when the questions began as her coworkers Matt Kosakowski and Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski give ziplining a try in Honduras Roatan. photo provided by Racheal Jolly-Kosakowski wondered how she knew about JOG and what her connection was to it. Her life felt full, she had accomplished the goals she “I had to learn how to be OK with my story,” she had set out to achieve. She talked it over with her said husband, who had just bought a new truck. It was By then, her name had become Jolly-Kosakowski, decided that as soon as the truck was paid for, she and when she shared her story, her coworkers did would join the JOG staff. not believe it. Jolly-Kosakowski has been with JOG as it She had come so very far from the days of experienced extraordinary growth. In three years, heartbreak, panic attacks and being bullied. they have grown from 20 to 50 employees. Jolly-Kosakowski began to realize that when JOG She delights in helping kids, who come from asked her for help was when she felt the happiest. nothing, flourish and succeed and gain the lives they When JOG asked her to give up her well-paying job thought they would only dream of. at the bank and instead work with JOG to help kids Whatever the kids need, that is what JOG provides as Sexton and JOG had once helped her, she thought or becomes for them, Jolly-Kosakowski, said. long and hard. If it is a friend, mentor, mom, dad, teacher, it does She remembers thinking, “I have all of the things in not matter. Jolly-Kosakowski and the rest of the staff life that I wanted.” will become that for the kids. The staff also works to continued, Page 10


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Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski and Matt Kosakowski photo by Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski

expose the kids to careers and people that will help lead the way to the kids’ success. “We’re undercover superheroes,” Jolly-Kosakowski says with a laugh, then shakes her head, agreeing with herself. She knows, from both sides of the JOG desk. Sexton is now a teacher at Canton City Schools, and Jolly-Kosakowski remains in touch with her mentor, reaching out to her for continued guidance and support. These days, when Jolly-Kosakowski is off duty, as if she ever truly is, she enjoys reading, camping, boating, traveling, and riding motorcycle with her husband. She has a puppy named Low Rider, a 19pound cat called Bondo, and a 6-pound cat named Devillette. All three are rescues. The COVID-19 pandemic was of particular concern to the couple since Kosakowski has cystic fibrosis, which is a disease of the lungs and that was exactly where COVID was attacking. He had a life expectancy of 40. He is now 41. Kosakowski was prescribed a new medication in December 2019 that is showing some hope of success, said Jolly-Kosakowski.

Her deep love and concern for her husband is evident as her eyes momentarily moisten and her face tightens with resolve. Then, her huge smile returns, and she talks of the fun they have together. It is her firm belief that when you can believe everything happens for a reason, you know you are where you are supposed to be. She said that and her faith in God are what get her through tough times. Jolly-Kosakowski has achieved peace and has lifted her life to the level she once only dreamed of achieving. She did it, not for someone else, but for herself, and she values it all the more. It was a lesson long in coming. She thinks about what life would have been like if her father had not died, if she had continued to be the girl with everything, and she believes she would not be the caring person she learned to be. “I could have been one of those girls who didn’t care about other people,” she said. And those bullies who almost convinced JollyKosakowski to end her life, the ones who believed that the value of one’s clothes determined the value of the person? Jolly-Kosakowski says, with a satisfied smile, that they have not come even close to her level of success. Sometimes justice is a long time coming. The words on her father’s headstone have finally come true for her, “Your love and our memories will give us peace and joy.” “I am more appreciative of my past,” she said. “I am looking forward to seeing what’s the next chapter.”

If you know of someone between the ages of 16 and 24 who is struggling with school or direction, Jobs for Ohio Graduates can be reached at 257 S. Court Street, Suite 1, Medina, or by calling 330-725-2919.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Low Rider hams for the camera. photo by Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski

Bondo, left, and Devillette share some space. photo by Rachael Jolly-Kosakowski

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Mentoring From Both Directions

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Bringing good people good companies

by Bob Arnold A true mentor is one who learns. Every time I mentor someone, I learn from them. While growing into effective networkers, we meet a lot of people. We engage with them to learn about whom they are, their likes and dislikes, and to whom they need a connection. That is one level of learning, but there is another, deeper level of learning that true networkers will reach, and it affects their success in life, business and networking. Everybody has skills, knowledge, wisdom, and common sense they can share. We can learn from everyone we meet, and that is exactly how I think as I network. Jack Welch, the late great business consultant said it best. “I’ve been inspired by numerous people, too numerous to name. Everybody is a mentor! You can learn from every single person you meet. Even from a speech or an article. You must approach life with eyes open, ears open, wanting to learn from people that are doing! Everyone is doing something in the job better than you are! Your job is to find out a thing about what that might be and you do it. I think that way every day!” Did you catch that the best learning you can gain from others is “. . .from people that are doing!”? That is a golden key. If you ever think you are the smartest cookie in the room, you need to realize that you are only raw dough. Your attitude needs a little heat so that it can turn into a great asset for you. It could be called humbleness, lifelong learning or something else appropriate. It is having an attitude of mentoring from both directions. This is true mentoring. Whom can you learn something from today? Allow them to help shape you into a better person, business owner, employee, and occupier of space on spaceship Earth.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https:// amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Solving Wi-Fi Slowdowns by Tyler Hatfield Two factors influence Wi-Fi, or internet, speed: the package being paid for and the hardware. Internet packages almost always are rated in megabits (abbreviated as mbps). While there is a lot of math involved to get direct comparisons, a megabit is roughly equal to a small text document. When choosing internet service, packages offered are based on their speed, which is expressed in megabits. Packages typically range anywhere from 10 megabits to 100, with some even going as high as 1,000 megabits. One issue is that this number usually means nothing to the average person, so they must guess at the speed they need. For simplicity, a home with a computer or two, a few phones, and maybe some smart devices should do fine with service in the range of 100 megabits. If working from home with a service below 100 megabits, slowdowns will be noticed as people load sites, download files, or stream movies and TV shows. So, when solving a slowdown issue, always check the service level first because 10- or 20-megabit packages are still common and simply are not enough. The second important component to avoiding slowdowns is the hardware. If the equipment being used cannot utilize the package being delivered, then terrible speeds will be the result and having the higher level of service will be a waste of money. Measuring hardware capability is a bit more difficult to measure, but a modem and/or router should be replaced every four to six years. Any longer than this, and the hardware tends to wear out and struggles to keep up with all of the data flowing through it. Two issues with choosing the best hardware to use is that there are so many different modems and routers on the market and there are many different styles of homes. Both can affect the successful distribution of Wi-Fi throughout a home. For guidance on what would work for the best Wi-Fi signal, you can consult with your local technology store or e-mail me for some recommendations. Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

More Than the Product by Amy Barnes Businesses of all sizes have found they are facing a more intense than ever analysis under the microscope of public opinion for the organizations and causes their profits support. No longer can businesses donate to just anyone who knocks on their doors and asks for funding without it being questioned by their customers and potential customers. In addition to the donations that companies make that they enjoy publicizing, there are other donations that used to be conducted quietly, with little to no notice. Now, as information continues to become more readily available, few donations escape being exposed to the harsh glare of a computer screen. No longer is it just a company’s product that people care about. Now, customers question, “What happens to the profits that I helped you make?” Finding that information can be as simple as entering either of the following questions into an internet search: Whom does Company X donate to? or What companies donate to Nonprofit X or Cause X? Many companies have been caught with their digital trousers down, causing a public relations scramble to validate the company’s reasons for its donations. Other companies wait to see if their sales plummet as a result of the disclosures. No matter the size of the company, the age of expanding information has made it necessary for company decision

makers to decide what the social consciousness of a company is going to be; apologize for any missteps, if there were any; and prove their commitment While companies argue that shopper focus should be only on the quality of the product produced, trying to return to that mindset just may be more challenging than stuffing a parachute into a thimble. With so many people fighting for recognition, validation and inclusion and who are willing to spend extra for the same product with a company that matches their own philosophy, combined with the explosion of digital information, there is no going back now. It is important to decide how your company is represented through its corporate giving and to thoroughly research those who would receive funding. Choose carefully, because while some donations can increase sales, as well as great people who want to work for your company, the other side of the coin is that some donations can drive away business and quality employees. Have small business pointers you would like to share as a columnist? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com . Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN: WATCHDOG

Fine Print and Leftovers by Amy Barnes Insurance or protection plans designed to cover items that home insurance does not can be a good purchase, but it is important to read the fine print very closely. The Exterior Electrical Line Protection Plan endorsed by Ohio Edison and FirstEnergy through third-party Connecticut-based HomeServe does not seem to offer much protection from anything. According to the brochure for the plan, it offers priority repair status, a 24-hour emergency repair hotline, and a repair guarantee. Sounds pretty good, until reading the very tiny print on the back of the brochure. The plan is advertised as protecting homeowners “from the expense of unexpected repairs to your exterior electrical system” but the fine print severely limits the conditions under which that protection is provided. Only damage that is caused by “normal wear and tear, not accident or negligence” is covered. What is not covered, according to the company’s brochure, is “Damage or failure due to disconnection or interruption to the main electrical supply, transformers and damage from accidents, negligence or otherwise caused by you, others or unusual circumstances.” Perhaps you have had a different experience, but the only times I have seen damage to outside lines has been from a freak ice storm that closed down the city, a diesel truck boom snagging the line, and a tornado. When I learned of the plan, I was ready to sign up. A diesel truck with a raised boom, just the month before, had snagged the main electric line to the house and ripped it down, yanked the service box off the side of the house, and caused all kinds of damage. My homeowner’s insurance would have covered it, but because of the high deductible, it would have cost me more to go through my insurance than it would to pay the repair costs outright. The spray of sparks and the live wire dancing in the street distracted any onlookers so the truck driver was gone before anyone could make note of truck company or license plate number so there was no accountability on the part of the person who caused the damage. In light of all of that, I figured the protection plan would be great to have should something like that happened again, until I read the fine print. Cost of the plan is $2.99 a month for the first year, then it automatically renews at $5.99 a month, or whatever the thencurrent price is. The first year, the coverage is for only 11 months because of a 30-day waiting period before coverage begins. Before signing up for the plan, stop and consider what the plan actually covers and what the chances are that it is a plan that you will ever utilize.

For those who are not aware: If anyone approaches you with a “great deal” because they were “working in your area and have leftovers from another job,” tell them to hit the road. If you need roofing, driveway or any other kind of work, call local, established businesses for quotes. These are the companies that invest in your community, have established businesses, and can be held accountable. The companies offering you so-called leftovers from other jobs will often take deposits and never return, and if they do the work they are often impossible to find later if the work turns out to be shoddy. Also, if so inclined, ask to see their credentials that they must have from the police department to conduct door-to-door sales. While not all surrounding areas require them, Medina does. If they do not have them and they are required, be sure to contact your local police department with a description of the salesperson and the vehicle make and license plate number.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

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HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Authentic Hungarian Chicken Paprikas recipe by Debbie Boehmke Litchfield resident Debbie Boehmke dropped by the Joy kitchen this month to share one of her beloved family recipes. Boehmke, a Hungarian, was taught to cook by her grandmother. She said her chicken paprikas was a staple in her home when her two sons were growing up. Her sons are now grown, both graduates of Buckeye High School, but she is still known in her family for her chicken paprikas. The spelling of paprikas without the “h” is the true Hungarian spelling, Boehmke said. As executive director of the Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance, Boehmke is kept very busy but she makes sure to have time to enjoy being with her family, her husband, her Labrador, and her two cats, as well as pursuing her hobbies of yard work, hiking, refurbishing furniture, and reading. • 3 ½ pounds chicken thighs • salt and pepper to taste • 2 tablespoons bacon fat or real butter • 1 sweet onion, chopped • 1/2 green pepper or red pepper, thinly sliced • 3 cloves garlic, chopped • 4 tablespoons or more REAL sweet Hungarian paprika (not Spanish paprika) • 2 cups chicken broth, up to 2.5 cups if you want more sauce • 3/4 to 1 cup sour cream • a little flour • splash of water Season chicken with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a stewing pot, add bacon fat or butter, and sear the chicken on

both sides until nicely brown. Do not overcrowd the chicken. Once the chicken is seared on both sides, remove it to a plate, and add onions and peppers into the same pot. Sauté onions until translucent, for about five minutes. Add garlic and cook for one minute. Add chicken broth and paprika, and place chicken back into the pot. The broth should just cover the chicken. If it is submerged, the paprikas will be soupy. Place a lid on the pot and cook until chicken is fully cooked through. To prepare the roux, combine sour cream with flour and a splash of water. Start gradually adding a little bit of sauce from the pot with the chicken to it to temper it until it is a full cup. Then, pour it over the chicken in the pot and let it come to a boil. This will thicken the paprikas. Serve with dumplings. Chicken may fall apart. Chicken can be served in pieces, or the meat can be broken up and put it back into pot.

Hungarian Dumplings • • • •

6 eggs, beaten 4 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup milk teaspoon of salt

Fill pot with water and bring to a boil. In bowl, beat eggs with a fork. Using a large wooden spoon, stir in flour, milk and salt. When water is boiling, take teaspoons of dumpling batter and drop into water. This must be done in batches. Let dumplings boil for about three to four minutes. They will float to the top when done. Use a slotted spoon to take out the finished dumplings and place them on a plate in single layers. Continue until finished.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Midsummer Transplant Magic column and photos by Michelle Riley Once upon a time, there was a jolly homeowner who owned an ornamental pear tree. This jolly guy did not appreciate his next-door neighbors who liked to garden at midnight. He desperately desired an instant landscape block for the boundary of his and the midnight gardeners’ backyards. He was tortured by their antics and could not bear to watch. One day, the jolly homeowner realized he had planted his ornamental pear far too close to his home. The tree had morphed from a darling little pear into a towering 25-foot beast with a spread of more than 15 feet. It was hanging over the roof, encroaching on the porch, and

There was only one problem. It was the middle of July, and the pear tree was mature. No one would dig a pear tree in the heat of summer to transplant it, but the tree needed to be removed regardless, and he decided to take the chance with the transplant. The day arrived. It was hot and dry. The pear was partially hand dug and then machine excavated. It was dug outward, 1 foot for every inch of the pear’s trunk caliper, creating the depth accordingly. The new hole was dug in the backyard. It might as well have been a grave. No one expected the tree to live. Hold your breath! Magic was about to happen.

was simply planted too close. Then, he had an idea! What if he dug this pear tree out and transplanted it to the backyard where it would have plenty of room to block the midnight gardeners’ yard? The pear tree was the perfect size to block the desired space.

A container of landscape “fairy dust” had been purchased for the occasion and was unceremoniously sprinkled into the new planting hole. The pear was then planted, watered in and given many well wishes. It never dropped a leaf. Not one leaf even turned yellow. Many years later, it continues to thrive, providing a visual block from the midnight gardeners. What was the landscape fairy dust? Mycorrhizal spores, probiotics for the soil. The spores ease transplant shock and create nutrient availability. Check next month’s column for more about the wonders of gardening with mycorrhizae!

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https:// theplantmall.com/; MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com; and NeOhioGarden.com. She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266. A pear tree in full bloom

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

Getting Clipped

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HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY Ending Weekend Overeating

by Robert Soroky

by Kelly Bailey

As riders become more comfortable on their bikes, they often start looking for ways to improve overall ride performance. One of the best ways is to ride “clipless.” When it comes to pedaling a bike, we are used to doing it the traditional way, with feet resting on the pedals and consistently pushing them down. But, did you know you can actually have your feet clipped into the pedals? What is the benefit? Well, by clipping directly to the pedals, you can pull them up, as well as push them down. This application of power across the entire pedal stroke helps to evenly distribute the workload to your muscles, thereby keeping your legs fresher for longer rides and steeper climbs. Efficiency is key, which is why this system benefits every level of rider. Now, you may be asking, “Why is it called ‘clipless’ if you are actually clipped into the pedals?” Good question. For the longest time, the only way to attach your feet to the pedals was with curved plastic clips that screwed onto the front of the pedals. These were (and still are) great for keeping your feet from sliding off, but were not sturdy, nor did they encompass enough of the foot, allowing a rider to actually pull up on the pedals. Eventually, fabric straps were added that wrapped around the pedals and through the plastic clips, creating a “cage” that held the feet on the pedals. This allowed a rider to finally pull the pedals up but required the cages to be fairly tight around the rider’s shoes, making it cumbersome to slip in and out. Some major rethinking needed to be done, and out of that came a revolutionary new system that eliminated the plastic clip and cage altogether (hence “clipless”). Now, by wearing special shoes with cleats mounted on the bottom, riders can quickly and easily clip directly to these redesigned pedals and get the most efficient pedal stroke ever. Of course, there was some initial trepidation as many riders felt they might be too locked in and would not be able to snap out quickly enough if something went awry. Fortunately, it takes a minimum amount of practice to get the hang of clipping in and out. Once mastered, many will wonder why they ever road a bike any other way.

I used to overeat like a boss on weekends. I would be "good" all week, then come Friday night, I was ready to cut loose, have a few beers, and dive into an extra-large pizza. Friday's overindulgence would snowball into a weekend full of runaway eating. Anyone else familiar with this story? Eating is supposed to be pleasurable, and we all overeat sometimes. It is normal. But the fun of overindulgence comes with consequences. Bloating, gas, achy joints, meat sweats, guilt, and eventual weight gain are just a few of the unpleasant side effects of spending weekends in a food coma. Yuck. Here is how I stopped the weekend binges.

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

1. I stopped dieting during the week. I realized I was being so restrictive that my willpower was gone by Friday. Low willpower plus hunger plus stress from a hectic week plus alcohol equaled weekend binge. These days, no foods are off limits for me. I focus on hunger signals and how I want to feel later. (Let me tell you, it is no fun to put on a bathing suit the morning after a pizza binge!) Most of the time I do not want to feel bad, so I choose to eat healthy. But a mid-week ice cream cone or a glass of wine with dinner on a Thursday is no longer a big deal, so I never feel deprived by Friday. 2. I follow the principles of mindful eating during the week and on weekends. This is simple: Sit down and slow down. Try putting your fork down between bites. Give yourself permission to slow down and enjoy food. You will be amazed at how much less you need to eat to be satisfied when you actually pay attention! 3. Use the "clean slate" approach. A Friday night indulgence is not a problem unless you say, "Screw it, I messed up," and it turns into an entire weekend of overeating. Remember that every new moment is a "clean slate" and another opportunity to do better and feel better. Let Friday night go and start fresh at the next opportunity!

A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

COMMUNITY: GEMS

The family was informed by the hospital that if they could not

Monumental Giving

afford a gravestone, they would be provided with a postcard-

by Amy Barnes

sized plaque with Sophia’s name on it. The memory of this

Sophia Miller was a beautiful 2-year-old girl with red hair and a conversation stuck with Hornbeck. She knew she wanted smile that would light up the room, remembers her mother, Alicia Hornbeck. Hornbeck said people would comment on how a smile from Sophia would turn their bad day around and they would feel much better. In February 2012, Sophia died when she was accidentally struck by a car driven by a friend of her oldest brother. The two boys were able to give her medical attention and keep her alive

something more in her daughter’s memory. Through donations from the congregation at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Medina and the community, costs related to Sophia’s death, including a headstone, were covered. Hornbeck chose a headstone with a lamb of God design, matching the one her grandmother had used when she had lost a baby. The thought of the small, flat, gray stone with her child’s name

until paramedics arrived because of training they had received

stayed in Alicia’s mind and it bothered her that many families

from a volunteer firefighters youth program.

would not be able to afford to have the headstone of their

Eighteen hours later, doctors informed the family that Sophia was brain dead, and the family made the decision to let her go.

choice to remember their lost child in their own way. Hornbeck wanted to do something more in memory of her daughter but was overcome with grief.

Sophia being held by her brother Bryce. photo by Alicia Hornbeck


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021 After the two-year anniversary of Sophia’s death, Hornbeck’s

Sophia's Smile

future daughter-in-law, Erica Fogle, helped motivate her to find a 447 Township Road 350 Sullivan, Ohio 44880 way to honor Sophia. 330-421-8479 Only six weeks later, they had a 5k run and 1-mile walk Web address: none fundraiser organized, and Sophia’s Smile was created. The run Date of formation: 04/25/2015 Organization type: 501(c)(3) and walk were chosen for the fundraiser because they were a Description of Organization’s Purpose: To help provide family of runners. Sophia’s four older brothers ran track and families that have lost a child with financial support for cross country in school and for the Catholic Youth Organization. purchasing a headstone Even Sophia had participated by riding in a stroller that Alicia Is the organization's registration status current? No Reporting Year: 2018 pushed when on a run. Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2018 Funds raised help families buy their choice of headstones for Reporting End Date: 12/31/2018 their children who have died. Total Revenue: Though the group so far has helped everyone who has made a Total Expenses: request, it becomes difficult to honor all requests because they on funds from only the annual fundraiser and donations

Total Program Expenses: Percent of Total Expenses: Total Assets:

received throughout the year. In Hornbeck’s words, “Somehow God finds a way.” This year’s run will be July 24 at Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. For more details and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3ddltBS To learn more about Sophia’s Smile or to donate, go to https:/ /bit.ly/3jeiexX or e-mail ahornbeck2195@gmail.com

E photo by Timothy Hornbeck

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Finding Her True Self

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by Hunter Barnard

Emma Stone portrays the title character in Disney’s newest backstory movie, “Cruella.” photo provided by Disney

“Cruella” is a movie about the villain in “One-Hundred and One Dalmatians” with the two colors in her hair. The movie was kind of sad, but it was funny and cool, too. Cruella does not really have a happy story, but she was pretty cool even if she is a bad guy now. Cruella is very smart, and she is good at making clothes. She does not like to listen to people a whole lot, so that is not good, but she is not really a bad person. She had a hard time growing up, so she did the best she could. She would make disguises for her and her friends to steal things, and the disguises looked good. She eventually gets a chance to be a clothes designer for a really famous person, and she wins all of the fashion shows. Cruella finds she cannot be the person she keeps trying to be. She has another name, too. It was a little confusing, but now I think of it like two personalities. One is really nice and named Estella, and the other is Cruella. They both live in her head, and she tries to be nice Estella, but she does not really like to be that way. My favorite part in the movie was when Cruella was trying to distract some police officers. She was driving a garbage truck, but she did not actually know how to drive. It was so funny! She was very creative in how she got away from them. Even though this movie is not happy, I still liked it. After seeing everything that happened to Cruella, it is hard for me to say if she is good or bad. She may have done some bad things, but I do not think she is really a bad person. Everyone around her was really mean and did not really give her a fair chance, so she just acted the way she had to. I think it is a good movie that everyone should watch to decide if they think she is a bad guy or not. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who is a former Brunswick resident who now attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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yful Word Search July 2021 26

JOLLY GOOD

Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Joyful Word Search Jolly Good

L X G B H Y S T H E L P

D L K O A L E R O E D N

Y E P O L R A N A U O Z

T E N I S C R D R I G M

I G K I H A E I T U W H

N S R A M R K A E S O N

U R E A S R R O U R E J

M L E H D I E C W W S Y

JOURNEY INSPIRATION DETERMINED SUCCESS GRADUATE HELP RACHAEL TOUGH NEW LIFE

M J I E P U C T L S L N

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

O P O S R E A I E L K L

C T W I N R B S S S A E F C T J O E D N Y W I L

JOBS HOPE COMMUNITY SKILLS JOBS JOLLY HOPE CAREER COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP SKILLS BARRIERS JOLLY KOSAKOWSKI CAREER

RNEY PIRATION ERMINED CESS ADUATE P HAEL LEADERSHIP Joyful Word Search June 2021 UGH BARRIERS Answer Key for Last Month’s Search W LIFE KOSAKOWSKI Walton Wanderings

Walton Wanderings

C O N N E C T I O N D G R R T

N P A D V O C A T E E R Y V K

W K R R Z Q W D X N M Z D Y L

M R G E D L N I V I Z A A K N

S D F M S M Z I L S Z H N N L

V D V A R E R D R D W B S M D

E Z N G L O R O Q L L G L I Q

Z C J A N C O V A Y P I K W F

N B N M L D O R A R Q L F Z K

W V E E T T C N E T A Y E E P

K N Z U I H E S R R I R T K Q

T B O J E C P W U Y U O X Q W

T B M R M E S T D T D Y N R Y

B N Y Z C M A Y U T N L X M Q

Z R Y T P N D F N R A T Z Y W

Q R X V Z M G G M M L Z T M R

“Why doesn’t baldness go side-to-side instead of front to back or back to front?”

“Being a woman is stressful!” complained an 18-year-old. K


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Chris Shaffer, Cuyahoga Falls, holds a fierce-looking owl under the direction of Dorrian.

Dorrian introduces Savannah to the group. She is from the genus family Buteo and is considered a hawk or buzzard. While many use the term buzzard and vulture interchangeably, they are not the same.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Charlie Antonucci bonds with owl Hensen.

Charlie Antonucci braces for one of two Harris’s hawks to land on her arm.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Nikki Antonucci closes her eyes as a hawk lands on her arm.

Two-point landing with a flourish and a bow on the arm of Chris Shaffer.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

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July 2021 Nonprofit Calendar All month: Fairy Tale Scavenger Hunt, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Pick up clue sheet at Children’s Reference Desk, then hunt for characters throughout department. Special sticker for completing form. July 17 through July 31: Bee Fest at Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Thursday, July 1 International Joke Day Deadline to purchase Medina County dog licenses without penalty. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3wuLGmU Nature Story Walk, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., through July 3, Brunswick Library 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Enjoy a story walk of “The Hidden Rainbow” around the building. Nature-themed activities in children’s department. Friday, July 2 World UFO Day Nature Story Walk, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., through July 3, Brunswick Library 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Enjoy a story walk of “The Hidden Rainbow” around the building. Nature-themed activities in children’s department. Saturday, July 3 Compliment Your Mirror Day and National Eat Your Beans Day A perfect combo! Because if you eat beans it is unlikely anyone will be around you to give compliments! Nature Story Walk, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., last day, Brunswick Library 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Enjoy a story walk of “The Hidden Rainbow” around the building. Nature-themed activities in children’s department. Sunday, July 4 Sidewalk Egg Frying Day https://bit.ly/3jzX91j Great way to keep kids busy, but unless the sidewalk is 158 degrees, they will not get far! Fourth of July Parade, 1 p.m., starts at Gloria Glens Town Hall, 7966 Lake Road, Gloria Glens Park Village. Sponsored by the Chippewa Lake Lions Club Foundation. Free participation, but must register at chippewalakelions.com Medina Community Band, 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Free, donations gratefully accepted. In memory of Medina County residents who died from COVID. Monday, July 5 National Bikini Day Tuesday, July 6 International Kissing Day Wednesday, July 7 Tell the Truth Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team Show, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone welcome. Party in the Park, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Memorial Park, 421 E. Homestead Street, Medina. Sponsored by Medina Community Recreation Center and Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital. Music, games, food, more. Free, but registration is required at https://bit.ly/3ptCHjG Thursday, July 8 Video Games Day Friday, July 9 National Sugar Cookie Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S.

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Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, July 10 National Kitten Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Family Fishing, 9 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Fishing is permitted at this park only during this program. Bring rod, reel, bait if possible. Limited number of fishing poles and bait available. No experience necessary, staff will help. Children must be accompanied by an adult. All ages. Free. Registration required at https://bit.ly/3dBXMn4 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Department, 1616 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medina County Historical Society Garden Tour, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina. Selfguided tour of 11 gardens. Benefits the historical society and restoration of the John Smart House Museum, the McDowell-Phillips House Museum and historical collections. Refreshments at McDowell-Phillips House, 205 S. Prospect Street, Medina. Restrooms at Bicentennial Commons, by 122 Public Square. Parking is in lots around Public Square. Wear comfortable shoes, it is mostly a 2-mile walking tour. Tour is rain or shine, no refunds. For more information about the gardens and the tour is at https://bit.ly/3w4ZSmJ Tickets are $12 in advance at https://bit.ly/3iunqxm or at the Medina County Convention and Visitors Bureau, 32 Public Square, Medina, or Miss Molly’s Tea Room and Gift Shop, 140 W. Washington Street, Medina. No admission charge for children 12 and younger but must be accompanied by an adult. Day of event tickets are $15 per person at the John Smart House, 206 N. Elmwood, Medina. Community Car Show, noon to 4 p.m., The Echelon, 635 N. Huntington, Medina. Music, food trucks, raffles, trophies. Proceeds benefit Alzheimer’s Association. Register car by July 1 with Janice, 330-635-7047, or to Carol, 330-591-2777. Admission, $5 per person. For more information, call 330-591-2777. Forest Hike, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Walk with naturalist and observe plants and wildlife. Register at https://bit.ly/3yooVlD ORMACO Opera Under the Stars: NEO Dixie, 7 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Rain location: United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty, Medina. Bring a picnic, blankets, lawn chairs. Free, donations gratefully accepted. Sunday, July 11 National Cheer up the Lonely Day and National All-American Pet Photo Day Seems like you could combine the two by visiting a lonely someone with your pet, take a picture, and create an incredible day! Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Mill Street Makers’ Market, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mill Street alleyway between South Court and South Elmwood Streets, Medina. Handmade arts and crafts and food. More information and vendor form are available at https://bit.ly/3gagvrA Elephant Excursion with the Toledo Zoo, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Medina Library. Visit with a Toledo Zoo elephant and her keeper. All ages. Will receive details after registering at https://bit.ly/3jKzI5l


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021 Monday, July 12 National Simplicity Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Arts Week Festival: Access the Arts: Hands on Experience, Public Square, Medina. Make and take planes and kites. Arts Week Festival: Medina Centre for Dance Arts students perform, 6 p.m., Public Square, Medina. You’ve Got Talent!, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Show off talent. Will receive details after registering at https://bit.ly/3hf7yh4 Monday Night Intrigue: “The Perfect Father,” 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual and inperson options. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Story is about the Watts family tragedy. Their lives looked perfect on social media, but the truth led to murder. Register for link at https://bit.ly/3dIk9at Arts Week Festival: Design Your Own Animal Crossing Cards, virtual, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sponsored by Medina Library. For grades 6 through 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2SNydbC Arts Week Festival: Bobby Ray and Night Train perform blues, 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Tuesday, July 13 Embrace Your Geekness Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Arts Week Festival: Ignite Dance Studio dance class for all, noon, Public Square, Medina. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Pet Club, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Meet the ponies of Medina Riding Academy. Grades 3 through 12. Will receive details after registering at https://bit.ly/3dIfDsB Arts Week Festival: Nick Elkevizth and Lodi Music Students Performance, 6 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Arts Week Festival: Henna artist, 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Donations accepted. Arts Week Festival: Grady Miller Performance (Americana, roots), 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Wednesday, July 14 National Tape Measure Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Arts Week Festival: Chalk Art With Adam Michel, 10:30 a.m., Brunswick Lake walkway, meet at Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Road, Brunswick. Learn techniques, create art on walkway. Party in the Park, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Ray Mellert Park, 331 N. Huntington Street, Medina. Sponsored by Medina Community Recreation Center and Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital. Music, games, food, more. Free, but registration is required at https://bit.ly/3ptCHjG Arts Week Festival: ShowBiz presents “Theatre at its Best,” noon, Public Square, Medina. Audience participation. Around the World: Let’s Visit Austraila, 30-minute sessions at noon, 1 p.m., 1:45 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Noon session is virtual and can be viewed at https://bit.ly/3vjz412 , supply packets available through July 21 at the library after registering. For ages 5 to 12. Go to https://bit.ly/3iyvJYY to pick which session to register for. Arts Week Festival: Sunset Painting Class, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted

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by Medina Library, materials provided by Medina County Arts Council. Learn how to paint and blend. Kit pick up at library branch of your choice. Grades 3 to 5. Details and pickup time will be e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3jGRgPW WAITING LIST Teen Clay Art, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Sculpt and paint own creation, two-day workshop. Register at https://bit.ly/3hAt4f9 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp FULL South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Arts Week Festival: Hailey Peterseim performs with ukulele and voice, 6 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Arts Week Festival: Baker’s Basement Swingin’ Folk Funk Concert, 6:30 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by ORMACO and Medina Library. Register at https://bit.ly/2Un5lHq Arts Week Festival: Jim Gill Performance (acoustic, folk, roots, humorous stories), 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Arts Week Festival: bUFFLEhEAD Performance (rock), 7:30 p.m., Lodi gazebo, Central Park, downtown Lodi. Sponsored by Lodi Music. Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team Show, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone welcome. Thursday, July 15 Gummi Worm Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina.

G Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 13 through October 2, 2020 Produce, consumables and crafts Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 1 through October 30 Produce, consumables, crafts, and knife sharpening Front parking lot, May 1 through 22 Main Market behind VFW Post, May 30 through October 30 Medina VFW Post 5137 3916 Pearl Road, Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 15 through October 16 Produce and consumables Medina Public Square Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3vLZY2W Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 29 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r1v9ni Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 12 through September 25 Produce, consumables and crafts Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/3r8trRd


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Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Arts Week Festival: Artists Showcase, noon to 8 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Local artists demonstrate or perform in front of various businesses around the square. Arts Week Festival: Community Chalk Art Contest, Public Square, Medina. Sponsored by All Fired Up! Call 330-723-1112 to sign up. Arts Week Festival: “Chalk It Up” with Adam Michel, noon, Public Square, Medina. Learn sidewalk chalk art techniques, fill sidewalks around square with art. Arts Week Festival: Instructed Art Class for Kids, 5 pm. to 6 p.m., free. Call Brush Tips Studio, 330-623-7900, for location. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Masks required. Arts Week Festival: “Broadway in Your Backyard,” 6 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Performances by CAMEO Community Theatre Company alumni. Explorastory: Pout Pout Fish, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Read stories, learn ocean rhymes, play fish-matching game, make Puffy paint pout pout fish, more. After registration, pick up supply packet at the library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth, until July 22. Register at https://bit.ly/3qIJZRb Preserving Your Land, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn how to protect your family’s land from Andy McDowell, Western Reserve Land Conservancy. Best suited for landowners of 20 or more acres. Details will be e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3qL07kT Arts Week Festival: Paint and Pour, 6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Public Square,

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A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174 or 216-469-9241 Coppertop at Cherokee Hills 5740 Center Road, Valley City 330-225-6122 Friday, July 9 Gene Hickerson Memorial Golf Outing 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Benefits: Cleveland Touchdown Club Coppertop Golf Club Saturday, July 10 Marine Corps League 569 9th Annual Fundraiser Golf Scramble 12:30 p.m. Benefits: Marine Corps Bunker Hill Golf Course Sunday, July 11 Mimi and Chadly 16th Annual American Cancer Society Golf Outing 11:30 a.m. Benefits: American Cancer Society Bunker Hill Golf Course Saturday, July 17 Miracle League Golf Outing Fundraiser 1 p.m. Benefits: Miracle League Bunker Hill Golf Course Friday, July 23 Medina Football Fundraiser Golf Outing 8 a.m. Benefits: Medina football Bunker Hill Golf Course

Medina. Brunswick art teacher Kelly Harrison instructs on making a paint and pour canvas to take home. Unique Ohio Getaways, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room B and virtual, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. https://bit.ly/3ylNhMF Arts Week Festival: Medina Arts Council scholarship winners recognized, 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Arts Week Festival: Laid Back and Lazy Performance (country and pop), 7:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. I Love the 90s Trivia Contest, 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Fast-paced trivia game, prizes. Need stable internet connection; two devices, one will be used as a controller, one as a screen. Details will be e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3hOe8dR Friday, July 16 World Snake Day Anyone else think it is funny this followed Gummi Worm Day?!? Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Arts Week Festival: KS Vocal Studio Performance, noon, Public Square, Medina. Arts Week Festival: Medina Community Band Chamber Ensembles (classical chamber music), 6 p.m., Public Square, Medina. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Paddle the Parks, 7 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Bring kayak, paddle, personal flotation device. Join naturalist on the water to paddle through park. All ages. Free. Register by July 15 at https://bit.ly/3ht64yJ Saturday, July 17 Wrong Way Corrigan Day https://bit.ly/2TpATwu Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh K-9 Kapers, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages, children must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration. Bee Fest: Opening of the Hive, 10 a.m. to noon, front lawn, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Ask questions, see inside the hive. Weather permitting. Explore the Forest Floor, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Shady hike with naturalist to learn about forest floor dwellers. All ages. Register for 10 a.m. walk at https://bit.ly/3heX2qe Register for 1 p.m. walk at https://bit.ly/3yfq4f9 How to Twist Balloon Animals, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn from Nate the Great how to twist balloons into animal shapes. Grades 3 and up. Pick up supplies through July 16. Details will be emailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3qL0tIf Scattergories Live, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Join in to play Scattergories. Will need paper and pencil. Details will be e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3Anq1jc Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served. Sunday, July 18 National Sour Candy Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Arts Week Festival: Art in the Park, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Paintings, sculptures, photos, more. Meet the artists, enjoy more than 100 booths.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021 Monday, July 19 National Get Out of the Dog House Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Tuesday, July 20 Space Exploration Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Chalk the Walk, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Chalk and sidewalk provided, you provide the creativity. Author Visit: Paul Brown, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Writer and illustrator of “The Wild Robot,” “Creepy Carrots,” “My Teacher is a Monster,” and more. Details e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3qIB3eq American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Wednesday, July 21 National Be Somebody Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Bee Fest: Story Time, 9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Special Bee Fest story time. All children and caregivers welcome. Details after registering at https://bit.ly/3dGBJeY Animal Tails With Akron Zoo, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Meet animals with tails and how they use them, interactive learning experience. Register at https://bit.ly/2SLwdk1 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Browsers and Search Engines, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about browsers and search engines. Register at https://bit.ly/2V11qjX Ghosts of Cleveland Past, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library, presented by Western Reserve Historical Society. Enjoy a Victorian holiday, explore ghosts and folklore. Details sent after registering at https://bit.ly/3ymG8vu Summer Teen Event: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Need stable internet connection and two devices, one for screen, one for controller. Grades 6 to 12. Details e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3Aoc30t Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team Show, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone welcome. Music in the Circle: Caribbean Night With Rolando, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sharon Center Circle, intersection of State Routes 94 and 162, Sharon Township. Sponsored by Access the Arts. Latin/Calypso music featured. Bring chair, blanket and enjoy refreshments provided by Sharon Women’s Club. Party in the Park, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Fred Greenwood Park, 350 W. Sturbridge Drive, Medina. Sponsored by Medina Community Recreation Center and Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital. Music, games, food, more. Free, but registration is required at https://bit.ly/3ptCHjG Thursday, July 22 National Rat Catcher’s Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural

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Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Tween Scene: Native Americans, 1 pm. To 1:20 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Lean how to play Awithlaknannai, make art, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3jFKARX View program at https://bit.ly/3vjz412 Can You Escape? The Aussie Games, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. It is time for the 2021 Aussie games! No download or special software needed. See tutorial at https://bit.ly/345sWiL Register at https://bit.ly/2TwZdMR Slo Roll: A Real Railroad 5.2-mile Ride, 6:30 p.m., Lester Rail Trail MCCC, 1101 West Liberty Street, Medina. Bike Medina County guides rides. Children under 12 must be accompanied by adult. All riders must wear helmets; water bottle suggested. Bikes must have blinking white front lights and red back lights. Waivers must be signed prior to ride.

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Painting Through the Pandemic Through July 17 Brad Rice’s watercolor and acrylic night scenes illuminated by moonscapes B. Smith Gallery, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina NOEA Teacher and Student Summer Art Exhibit July 26 through August 21 Art by 40 Northeast Ohio art educators and their students B. Smith Gallery, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Fused Glass July 26 through August 21 Fused glass pieces by Kelly Hartman Jadach B. Smith Gallery, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

F A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Thursday, July 1-25 Save the Farm 6 a.m. to 8:59 p.m., virtual. Event to raise awareness and money for the Heritage Farm, an 1860s era small Ohio farm. Proceeds support educational programs and expansion project. For fees, information and registration, go to: https://bit.ly/3tQLYml Saturday, July 24 6th Annual Sophia’s Smile 5k and 1-mile Fun Run Registration 7:30 a.m., race begins 9 a.m.; pre-register by July 1 for T-shirt; Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Raises funds for families who have had a child die to purchase a headstone for their choice. For fees, information and registration, go to: https://bit.ly/3wdJksb Friday, August 6 Collin Cares Glow With the Flow Twilight Run 5k Kid Run/Walk, 7:30 p.m.; Glow With the Flow Twilight Run/Walk, 8:30 p.m., Root Middle School, 333 W. Sturbridge, Medina. Benefits Collin Cares Cure Cancer. For fees, information and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2UUKdIT


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

Friday, July 23 National Hot Dog Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, July 24 National Day of the Cowboy Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., through July 25, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Family Fishing, 9 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Fishing is permitted at this park only during this program. Bring rod, reel, bait if possible. Limited number of fishing poles and bait available. No experience necessary, staff will help. Children must be accompanied by an adult. All ages. Free. Registration required at https://bit.ly/3xgwL0r American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Rick Smith Jr. Magic Show, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Magic, mentalism, world record card throwing trick shots. Kindergarten and up. Details will be sent by e-mail after registering at https://bit.ly/3dIjgid Cornhole and Bocce Ball Tournament Fundraiser, Point Park Chippewa Lake. Bocce starts at 1:30 p.m., cornhole at 4 p.m. Benefits Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team. Entry fee, per event, $40 for each couple. Music, games, face painting, food truck, more. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3wdZS34 To register for competition, go to https://bit.ly/3AmQhdA To learn more about the team, read story at https://bit.ly/3jEYHXB Sunday, July 25 National Merry-Go-Round Day Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Lightning Bugs, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., last day, Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Signs along the Large Lake Loop nature trail teach about lightning bugs, how they glow and why they do not all glow the same. One sign has a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form, next to the hike title. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3mDq7eh Valley City Annual Frog Jump, Valley City. Competition and summer fair. Monday, July 26 National All or Nothing Day and National I Got U Day https://bit.ly/3xdRSjO Chess Camp A, July 26 through July 30, 9 a.m. to noon, Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. Lessons, games, snacks, tournaments, prizes. Campers get T-shirt, trophy, prize folder. Ages 6 to 12. Fee: $215. Register at https://bit.ly/369H7mN Games for Pre-Olympians, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Through July 31. Balance beam, broad jump, more for young athletes. No registration. Chess Camp B, July 26 through July 30, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. Lessons, games, snacks, tournaments, prizes. Campers get T-shirt, trophy, prize folder. Ages 6 to 12. Fee: $215. Register at https://bit.ly/369H7mN American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Jackbox Game Night, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Play games from the Jackbox Party Pack 6, including Push the Button, Murder Trivia Party and Dictionarium. Need smartphone or tablet to use as a controller and computer or other device to use as main screen and to access Discord. Link for private game room will be sent after registration. Information about Discord is available at https://bit.ly/3cu9ik2 Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2UmTTf0 Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or with sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. View at https://bit.ly/3vjz412 Tuesday, July 27 National Love is Kind Day

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Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Games for Pre-Olympians, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Through July 31. Balance beam, broad jump, more for young athletes. No registration. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/3qIQDH5 Wednesday, July 28 National Buffalo Soldier Day https://bit.ly/3qV76rT Nature Explorers: Creek Critters, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Drop off program for children ages 7 through 12.Space is limited. Wade through creek to search above and below water for critters. Register at https://bit.ly/3qHGhXT Games for Pre-Olympians, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Through July 31. Balance beam, broad jump, more for young athletes. No registration. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Around the World: Let’s Visit Ancient Egypt, 30-minute sessions at noon, 1 p.m., 1:45 p.m., 2:30 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 6:30 p.m., 7:15 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Noon session is virtual and can be viewed at https://bit.ly/3vjz412 , supply packets available through July 21 at the library after registering. For ages 5 to 12. Go to https://bit.ly/3iyvJYY to pick which session to register for. South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Habitat for Humanity parking lot, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to all antique, classic or collectible cars. Weather permitting. Free. Files and Folders: Organizing Your Computer, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Brunswick Library. Learn how to organize, move and save documents. Learn how to save to a flash drive. Details sent by e-mail after registering at Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team Show, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Everyone welcome. Party in the Park, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Memorial Park, 421 E. Homestead Street, Medina. Sponsored by Medina Community Recreation Center and Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital. Music, games, food, more. Free, but registration is required at https://bit.ly/3ptCHjG Thursday, July 29 Time to feast! National Chili Dog Day, National Chicken Wing Day, National Lasagna Day. It also is National Lipstick Day, which will need re-applying after all of those messy foods! Games for Pre-Olympians, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Through July 31. Balance beam, broad jump, more for young athletes. No registration. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Friday, July 30 National Talk in an Elevator Day Games for Pre-Olympians, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Through July 31. Balance beam, broad jump, more for young athletes. No registration. Saturday, July 31 National Dance Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Going to Kindergarten Story Time, 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., virtual. Get prekindergarten children ready for school. Details will be e-mailed after registering at https://bit.ly/3qIL8rI Games for Pre-Olympians, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Last day. Balance beam, broad jump, more for young athletes. No registration. Scales and Slime, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Use nets to survey pond shore, look for tadpoles, frogs, invertebrates, and what they eat. Also will keep an eye out for snakes. Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers: All Aboard!, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Ride miniature train around railroad and station house. All ages. Free.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2021

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Cable, Internet, Phone

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Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Joy of Medina County Magazine July 2021  

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