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J ULY 2019 VOLUME 2, NUMBER 6

NEW! HEALTH AND FITNESS COLUMN Local expert Kelly Bailey joins our team.

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POLLEN: NOT JUST FOR SNEEZING Using a common enemy for garden good.

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FEEL LIKE A NETWORKING NOBODY? Without follow up, you will be lost in the shuffle.

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DOORWAY TO HISTORY One of Medina County’s premier historic homes is changing ownership and we have the pictures you want to see. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 6

JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

The Other Side of the Door by Amy Barnes There is something about living in a 100plus-year-old house that gets under your skin. There is a permanence, a sense of becoming a part of something that was here long before you and will exist long a er you. It is partly the splinters you get from the old wood and the number of times you bang your head on the same overhang year a er year. It is partly the challenge of seeing a marble lodged in a crevice and spending years trying to get it out (without damaging house or marble), before deciding it is in its rightful place. It is wishing that walls could talk. I own the Col. H. G. Blake House (or, more correctly, it owns me). It sits down the street from the McDowell-Phillips House, which is our feature story this month. Elizabeth Blake, daughter of H.G. Blake, grew up in Blake House. She, with her husband, Robert McDowell, built the McDowell-Phillips House, which sits where Washington Street dead ends on Prospect Street on the west side of town. When touring the McDowell-Phillips

house recently, I noticed some subtle similarities between the two homes. I had to smile. Elizabeth could not resist copying part of her childhood home. The Griesinger-McClelland family lived in Blake House for a hundred years, my family and I have lived here only 21. When Pauline Griesinger McClelland died, it was sold to people who claimed they would protect the house, but instead committed crimes against it. About seven years later, it came to be in my hands, so I well know the challenges a century home can face, including finding suitable hands to leave it in. As Miriam Phillips completes the difficult task of relinquishing her mantle of responsibility and handing over her husband’s family’s home and artifacts to the Medina County Historical Society, she has said it is a great relief to know it will be in safe hands. It takes strength and love to say good-bye. Miriam and her family will carry with them the memories of their lives there as they face their new lives on the other side of the door of their beloved home.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes PHOTOGRAPHERS Ed Bacho Photography FlashBang Photography ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes INTERN Samantha Mickowski MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an eedition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

HISTORICAL MOMENTS

Find the name of our first winning Letter Detective Mike Schwin and words connected to this month’s feature story. BITE ME!

SPRING FLING FIZZ by Ed Bacho

Photographer Ed Bacho shares one of his own drink recipes.

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HEALTHY TRAILS

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DIG IT!

Miriam Phillips at the door of her home, the  McDowell­Phillips House. Pg. 4

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photos by Amy Barnes, FlashBang Photography and Sam Mickowski Medina County residents were showing off their pets and classic cars.

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Tips that make pollination an easy garden task.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King THE IN BOX

FINDING TIME by Steve Rak

Do successful people have more time in their day than others, or do they know a secret to getting more out of their days?

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

Solve the puzzle and get a chance to have your name be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

MY BOWL RUNNETH OVER by Paul McHam

Avoiding mold and bacteria growth caused by toilet overflows. GEMS

MUSICAL RIPPLES by Kent Von Der Vellen

A Wadsworth dad is working to ensure all kids have a chance to hit the right note.

ON THE COVER: The historic McDowell-Phillips House faces West Washington Street, a few blocks from Medina Public Square. Photo by Sam Mickowski, back cover photo by Ed Bacho. Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed as an e-edition and in print. Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  to sign up for a subscription, to order print issues and photos, and to find additional features, as well as a list of open positions and an index of the past issues.

by Michelle Riley

A er making a connection at a networking event, follow up so you are not forgotten.

LITTLE TRUTHS

The arrival of Lea and Lilith at Cam’s old apartment means it is time for honesty and questions.

HOW TO BE A BEE

by Bob Arnold

THE READING NOOK by Christopher Barnes

Taking advantage of summer’s health benefits in delicious and fun ways.

AVOIDING NOBODY LAND

by Amy Barnes

OH, SNAP!

by Kelly Bailey

THE NETWORKER

LETTING GO A er 130 years, a local family has decided it is time for the Medina County Historical Society to become the keepers of their home, history and artifacts.

SEVEN SUMMER TIPS

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LET'S DO IT!

The heat is on and summer has arrived. Time to soak up the sun and enjoy the beauty of Medina County!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

Letting Go by Amy Barnes photos by Ed Bacho

M

iriam Phillips’ gaze travels over the rich details of her home of almost 30 years. She is surrounded by solid dark wood floors and stairs, 130 years of family artifacts and furniture, and so many rooms that if she used two rooms a day it would take a week to get through the whole house. A heavy mantle of responsibility, taking care of the house and heirlooms as well as dealing with her husband’s debilitating illness, rests on her shoulders. It is an odd mix of burden, pleasure and pride to be the custodian of so much history and so many memories. In the long tradition of a house where the importance of family has always been stressed, the decision to relinquish the


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

house involved family discussions. Ultimately, though, as the current head of the family, it was Phillips who decided it is time for the family’s last walk through the door as owners and to leave the responsibility for protection of a major collection of local and national history in the hands of the Medina County Historical Society. The McDowell-Phillips house came to be in Phillips’ hands through her husband. Drew Phillips inherited the house from his family, bringing it to almost 130 years of continuous family ownership of a beloved and cherished home. In 1890, Elizabeth Blake McDowell and her husband, R.M. McDowell, decided to build a house where West Washington Street dead ends on Prospect Street, just a few blocks from

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Public Square in Medina. apartments. Drew Phillips worked At the time, Elizabeth’s father’s tirelessly to restore it to a onehouse was occupying the site. Her family home. father was Col. Harrison Gray Miriam Phillips said she does not Blake, one of Medina’s most want to burden her and Drew’s respected citizens. three daughters, triplets Caroline, Blake was well-known locally for Grace and Anna, now in their early rising from poor beginnings to twenties, with the responsibility hold many leadership roles. He and continuous cost of the house’s founded Medina’s first bank, the upkeep and care of the precious Old Phoenix Bank; created the historic documents, letters, and money order system; was a friend of President Abraham Lincoln’s; was in the state legislature and Congress; and ran an Underground Railroad safe house from his previous home, now known as the Col. H. G. Blake House, that is located on the opposite side of the square on East Washington Street. Since Blake had died in 1876, the McDowells moved aside Blake’s much more modest home to make room for their grand new house. The McDowellPhillips House has been witness to many changes A restored surrey with a fringe on top waits  for a horse and riders in the covered drive­ over the years through beside the McDowell­Phillips House. and at one time continued, Page 6 was divided into


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antique dishes and furniture that fill every room, including the basement and attic. The Historical Society has been given first right to purchase the home and its contents to keep them from falling to demolition like so many other historic buildings in Medina have. Phillips said she feels peace with her decision and relief that soon the weight of responsibility will no longer be hers. In late May, the society held a private reception at the McDowell-Phillips House to kick off its campaign to raise $300,000 to purchase the home, its acre of land and two barns. The society also is working to raise an additional $200,000 for future upkeep and repair needs of the house. Society members hope to have raised enough funds to purchase the home by this coming December, in time to have a Christmas celebration there. At the May reception, Brian Feron, society president, expressed excitement and tremendous gratitude to Miriam Phillips for giving the group a chance to buy the house and its contents.

He said the Historical Society has been feeling growing pains because of its growing collection of pieces of Medina County’s history. The society was looking for space to add to what it has at the John Smart House, 206 N. Elmwood Avenue, Medina. When Feron finished, he asked Phillips to speak. A er sharing her happiness that the house and contents would be in safe hands, she stepped away, struggled momentarily with emotion, then regained her smile. It is, she said, time. Time for the family to move on, time for her to start a new chapter, time to pass on the responsibility. Donations to the McDowell-Phillips Campaign can be sent to MCHS, 206 N. Elmwood Street, Medina, 44256. Online donations can be made at https://bit.ly/2KDbgBA . The Medina County Historical Society is a registered 501c3 nonprofit organization and can be reached at 330-722-1341.


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On the dining room fireplace mantel is carved the word  "Salve," which is Latin for "hello" and can also be used to  say "goodbye." Note the small candle shelf just above the  hearth and the hundreds of tiny blue hand­set tiles.

A Murphy bed: the mirrored front  folds down to reveal a bed. continued, Page 8


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A Civil War letter dated June 30, 1863, from R.M. McDowell to his wife, Elizabeth, telling of the threat of rebels attacking  in Baltimore. On opposite page, left: The current owners of the McDowell­Philips  house. On opposite page, right: The sleigh that was restored by Larry  Prebis and Katie Jo Palmer.

Cast iron train doorstop


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The current owners of the McDowell­ Phillips House

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The legendary dumbwaiter in the house that Elizabeth Blake  McDowell placed a chair inside of and used as a makeshift  elevator in her later years because of a heart condition.  One day, when McDowell started to be lowered in the  dumbwaiter, the ropes broke and she plummeted straight  into the basement. She is said to have landed safely, even  though the chair broke. As she dusted herself off and stood,  she declared that the basement was much dustier than she  had imagined. To this day, the chair and dumbwaiter remain  exactly where they landed.

Elizabeth Blake McDowell's scrapbook

Col. H. G. Blake's house that was moved aside on the property for  the McDowell­Phillips House.


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Carlie Michaels, left, and therapy dog Kingston enjoyed  time with Michaels' sister, Bri MIchaels, and Thor at the  Medina Count Auditor's Pet­Tacular event in May. Thor is  Bri's finance's service dog and is trained to divert the  former Marine's attention to avoid an oncoming post­ traumatic stress disorder flare­up. Photo by FlashBang  Photography.

Igor Petrovich introduces 2­year­old Oliver Petrovich to  Roger the iguana. Photo by FlashBang Photography

From left, Carlie Hausch; Catherine Freed­line and her  chicken, Spike; and Maddy Kane enjoyed the Pet­Tacular  and visited the chicken agility booth. Photo by FlashBang  Photography


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Off the Hook Exotic Pets  brought several reptiles,  including a pewter coral glow  snake. Photo by Amy Barnes

A chameleon keeps an eye  on the birds and an eye on  the snakes at the Medina Bird  Fair. Photo by Amy Barnes Paula Clymer bought Darwin, a Timneh  African parrot, at the bird show last  year. Her sister, Sharon Clymer,  accompanied them on their return visit  to the bird show. Photo by Amy Barnes

Nine­week­old baby hedgehogs.  Photo by Amy Barnes

The OPHA Bird Fair expanded to include  reptiles and hedgehogs in its May show and  sale at the Medina County Fairgrounds. It  returns on Saturday, August 17,  10 a.m. The show helps to support Parrot Hope  Rescue, https://parrothope.com/  A spinner blast ball python  from Off the Hook. Photo by  Amy Barnes

Brooke Moses, left, events  coordinator for Parrot  Hope with green macaw  Chuck and Tammi Apple,  Parrot Hope director, with  Madison the cockatoo,  Parrot Hope’s mascot, are  ready for shoppers. Photo  by Amy Barnes

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As the rooster crows! Serama chickens  Perry Quayle, from Madison, and  were brought by Lori Castle. Photo by  Nicole Kelly, from Brunswick, were  Amy Barnes enjoying the wide variety of bird  toys. Photo by Amy Barnes

Cathy Rigby is Madison’s most dedicated fan. Rigby and  Madison, a Moluccan cockatoo, were together for 18  years, until Rigby’s husband became ill. Parrot Hope  gave Madison a home and a job, she is now the group’s  mascot. (And, by the way, Madison loves to chomp on  hats!) Photo by Hat Lady Amy Barnes

Cars and trucks of all makes and models pulled into the former Hawkins Grocery store  parking lot for the South Town Cruise­In, which will be held weekly through September  24, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Tom Shelly with his  1936 three­window  Ford. Photo by  Samantha Mickowski.

Curtis Perkins and his  1954 Ford F100. Photo  by Samantha Mickowski

2006 Corvette. Photo by  Samantha Mickowski


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

CHAPTER 30    I stared at the phone in Devin’s  hand with Lea and Lilith on the  screen, standing there in front of my  old apartment door.    Suddenly, I remembered the  microphone­speaker system Devin  had set up and that I could speak to  them through the phone.    “Oh…uh, what do I say?” I  stammered.    Devin’s eyes got wide and he tried  to gesture something, but it was  hindered by the phone in his hand.  Then I realized Lea and Lilith were  looking around as if they’d heard a  ghost.    I threw my hands over my mouth  and stared wide eyed at the screen.  Marissa nudged me from behind,  urging me to say something, but I  couldn’t form a single word.    With a sigh, Devin turned the  phone toward him and said,  “Cameron will arrive momentarily,  please hang tight.”     Then he hung up.    “Devin?!”    “Well you weren’t saying anything,  so I did. Now come on, they’re  waiting for us. For you,” he said,  sternly, as he stood.    I attempted to stutter a response,  but I was still speechless. Marissa  patted my shoulder, I sighed and  stood.    My sister and mother were waiting  for me, and I had to confront them  whether I liked it or not. I didn’t feel  prepared, I didn’t feel like I would  even be able to speak once we got  there, but I knew I had to go, because  this was the last chance I’d ever have  for closure.    After all this time of wanting them,  searching for them, and being hurt by  them, I just wanted it all to be finally 

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over. I didn’t even care if it would be  a happy ending with them or not  because I already had Marissa and  Devin, and I was proving to myself  every day that I didn’t need anyone  else. I had my family. They weren’t  blood, but they were the people I was  closest to, and I loved them.    I cleared my throat. Marissa and  Devin looked at me.    “OK. Let’s go.”    Marissa smiled, Devin nodded,  then, in a flash, we were out the door.    The three of us ran down the walk  to Devin’s car, jumped in, and he  revved the engine while we put our  seat belts on. In the passenger seat,  the mechanism made a satisfying  click as it locked in place, keeping  me safe, and I thought back to that  night in the Impala for the millionth  time.    I wondered what my dad would be  saying to me now if he were the one  driving me. I wondered if he would  have explained to me why I  remembered having another sister. I  wondered if he would be happy about  what I was about to do.    But I knew none of it mattered,  because he was gone. It was just  something to keep my mind occupied  so I wasn’t panicking all the way to  my old apartment.    It seemed like hours before we  pulled up in front of the old complex.  When we did, Marissa and Devin  started to get out, but I knew I  couldn’t let them. Not this time.    “Guys, can you actually stay here?  I think I have to do this alone,” I said  softly.    Devin shut his door, turning to me  with a deep frown.    Marissa sputtered, “No way! What  if you need us again? We’re going to  be right by your…” continued, Page 18


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  “No,” Devin interrupted her, “He’s right. With us  there, they might feel overwhelmed and outnumbered.  They’re already in a different country, in a place  they’ve never been before, we don’t want to cause  them concern. Cam should go alone, and we’ll wait  right outside for him. So, if you need us, we’ll only be  feet away.”     He nodded at me as he finished his little speech, and  I gave him a slight grin.    With that, we all left the car and walked up to the  building, but Marissa and Devin stopped outside the  door. They both embraced me, and Marissa pecked me  on the cheek. Then they let go, and we stepped back  from each other.    I took a deep breath, turned around, and went inside.    The apartment building smelled like cigarette butts  and forgotten laundry. Nothing out of the ordinary. I  was just inside the west entrance, the staircase winding  upward in front of me, and, well, at that point, there  was nothing else to do.    I started my trek up the staircase, all kinds of  scenarios running through my head of how this could  go. As I climbed, I was coming to the conclusion that  all scenarios I thought of would end badly, but that  didn’t stop me.    I had to face them, alone and face them I would.    I emerged from the staircase, into the hallway that  led to my old apartment, and Lea and Lilith were  standing there, about 30 feet away. They turned toward  me, and I froze. They froze, too, all three of us  motionless, staring at each other.    My heart started pounding in my chest, but I  couldn’t back down. One foot in front of the other, I  made my way toward them as they watched and  waited for me to get close enough for a conversation.  We were only 5 feet apart when my mom finally  spoke.    “Cameron, I wanted to start with an apology,” she  began, stopping me in my tracks.    An apology? She wanted to say sorry to me?   After all these years, after all she had put me through,  she finally decided she wanted to apologize for it all. I  didn’t believe it for a second.    “Honestly, I don’t want to hear it,” I replied quickly.    Whether she had a speech of an apology for all the  wrongs she’d done to me throughout my life or she 

just wanted to say sorry for showing up mostly  unexpectedly, I didn’t care. I had already come to  terms with her absence and hearing her apologize for it  would have just irritated me.    She was caught speechless. I’d shut her up instantly,  and she stood there awkwardly silent, clearly not  having planned on me shutting her down as soon as we  met.    “Cameron, please listen to what we have to say,” Lea  said finally, my mother still silent.    “Look, I don’t want to hear any sappy, half­hearted  apologies. I don’t care if you’re sorry or not, because  this all happened, and it sucked, but it’s in the past  now. OK? I have been through a whole lot this past  month or so, but from this moment on, I’m only  moving forward. So, if you have something else to say,  go ahead.”    I looked from Lea to Lilith and back to Lea.    “Okay,” Lea spoke again, “We won’t apologize even  though we are very sorry. But we didn’t come here just  to apologize. We came here to ask if you wanted to be  a family again.”    A family. A family? I had my family: Devin and  Marissa. This was my mom and my half­sister. This  was my real family, but I didn’t need them. Or did I?    Marissa and Devin were great, and I loved them  more than anything else, and there was no way I’d be  where I was without them, but they weren’t parents,  even if Devin took care of us like one sometimes.    My mom was standing right in front of me and  wanted to move forward like I did, and she wanted to  do so with me.    So, the question came down to if I could forgive her  or not.     At the time, my mind was telling me no, and that I  just wanted to be done with Lea and Lilith and never  see them or worry about them again, but I wasn’t sure.  I couldn’t be sure, because there was one more  missing link that I had to find first.    “We can’t be a family with a member missing,  though,” I argued, not ready to commit to a yes or no  just yet.    My mom sighed heavily and hung her head.  “Cameron, your father is gone…”    “Not him. I’ve already come to terms with that  without your help. I’m talking about my sister. The 


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

one older than Lea. The one who disappeared when I  was just a child. You know, my other sister?” I said,  accusingly.    As I spoke, my mom’s expression shifted from pity  to worry to awkward concern.    “How do you…how do you know about that?”    Lea hummed softly, and my mother turned toward  her, then back to me.    “Well, I guess I have some explaining to do then,”  she said, with a sigh.    “Yes, yes you do.” Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/ Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com

If a service dog approaches  you alone, call 911 and  follow the dog. Service dogs  are trained to go for help  when their people are down  and need assistance.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

Joyful Word Search Historical Moments

BITE ME!

Spring Fling Fizz photo and column by Ed Bacho •2 ounces gin •1 ounce freshly squeezed lemon juice •¾ ounce honey simple syrup •1/2 ounce pasteurized egg white •1 ounce club soda •grated lemon zest Add the first four ingredients to a shaker and dry shake (without ice) for about 10 seconds. Add three or four ice cubes and shake very well. Strain into a chilled glass, and top with club soda. Photographer Ed Bacho steps in this month with another talent: creating beautiful drinks. His website is www.edbacho.com and he can be contacted at 330-5954109. Mention seeing his ad in Joy of Medina County Magazine and get 15 percent off of a portrait package.

BLAKE PHILLIPS HISTORICAL MCDOWELL FAMILY BARNS DOCUMENTS TIME PRESERVATION CENTURY FURNITURE ARTIFACTS DOLLS COLLECTIONS Answer Key for Last Month's Search MIKE SCHWIN

(a winning Letter Detective!)

Bluegrass Jam

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Advertising once is like expecting to win a marathon with one step. It takes consistent, repeated advertising with a variety of ads to win the race.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

HEALTHY TRAILS Seven Summer Tips by Kelly Bailey Summer is finally here! Health may not be top of mind during busy summer days, but summer is the perfect time to shape up. Here are seven tips to having a healthier summer. Skip the gym and go for a walk outside. Summer in Ohio is short. Walking outside is arguably the best kind of exercise for humans. The combination of movement, fresh air and natural light can decrease stress hormones and improve sleep. Eat the rainbow by shopping locally and in season. High quality and locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables are now available. Check out local farmers markets for the freshest inseason options. Hydrate with roughly half of your body weight in ounces of water every day. So, if you weigh 140 pounds, drink 70 ounces of water. Add fresh mint, crushed berries, lemon slices, or cucumber chunks to infuse water with interesting flavors. Get more sun. It increases the body’s stores of Vitamin D and boosts serotonin. Since too much can harm skin and eyes, if planning to be in the sun for more than 15 or 20 minutes, use a high-quality mineral-based sunscreen and wear a hat and polarized sunglasses. Go barefoot outside, called “earthing.” Essentially, your body draws electrons from the Earth when walking barefoot on natural surfaces. Research points to some remarkable health benefits, including reduced inflammation, better sleep and boosted immunity. Open windows. Did you know we spend nearly 90 percent of our lives indoors and indoor air is up to five times higher in pollutants? Indoor air quality suffers because we rarely open our windows anymore. Open windows and let in fresh air at every opportunity. Your lungs will thank you! Marinate meat before grilling. Grilling is healthier than eating at fast-food restaurants, but the char on your chicken is loaded with known carcinogens. A simple way to reduce cancer-causing compounds is to marinate meats for several hours before grilling. A big helping of fresh fruits and veggies also helps counter potential health hazards. So, go ahead and fire up that barbecue. Just do not forget to invite me over! Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach and owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and reach her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

DIG IT!

THE NETWORKER

How to Be a Bee

Avoiding Nobody Land

by Michelle Riley

by Bob Arnold

When speaking of pollen, it typically provokes thoughts of early to mid-season tree pollen, mid- to late-season grass pollen, and the ever-bountiful ragweed. The symptoms are universal: stuffy noses, scratchy throats, watery eyes, sometimes headaches and nausea accompanied by an aboding sense of dread as we ask in a quivering voice, “What is the pollen count today?” Outside, everything is le to the mercy of the trees and grass as they dust the world in a bright smattering of thousands of pollen particles, somewhat like Mother Nature turning on a high-powered electric mixer without checking the speed, and mayhem ensues. It is funny how something that is seemingly so wrong can be so right. All pollen is not a villain. Pollen makes possible the bushels of local produce available at farmers markets for eager shoppers looking for the yummiest fresh treats. Although, you may prefer to grow your own edible garden. It is a wonderful feeling to work the soil, plant the seeds, and care for a crop, as it may soon bless your table. Knowing the difference between the male and female flower parts in a veggie garden is the first step to understanding pollination and, with a little help, possibly watching a bodacious crop grow. A flower that contains both male and female reproductive parts within the same flower is considered a perfect flower. A few examples of plants with perfect flowers are tomatoes, strawberries, raspberries, peas, and beans. All of these are pollinated by wind or sometimes bees and are usually a foolproof crop. To ensure pollination, you can play bumblebee by placing a simple electric toothbrush just below the flower and turning it on to gently shake, shake, shake the stem a couple of seconds, voila! You are pollinating. Some crops, such as zucchini, squash, cucumber, and melon, have separate male and female flowers. Pollen can be transferred from the male anther to the female stigma by using a small, clean artist’s brush or by rubbing the male flower gently face-to-face with the female. If you want a bigger crop, don’t leave it to chance, remember: You are the wind!

The really important stuff is now before us, because you can be quickly forgotten. As important as it is to find affinity (April’s column) with your new networking partner (May’s column) over coffee (June’s column), it is 10 times more important to follow up with them. This is where most networkers drop the ball. I would hate to see wasted all of the work you put into getting to know someone, and you become a nobody. This is the time to send new networking partners a note to let them know how nice it was to meet with them. Briefly share what you learned about them, how you may be able to help them with their efforts and remind them how they may be able to help you in yours. This can be accomplished through an e-mail, a mailed letter or thank you card, a text message, or any other way you feel comfortable doing so. Reach out to them through social media sites and ask them to connect. Let them know you are interested in “liking” their business pages. Visit their website so you become more familiar with them. Some of these things you may have done before you went to have coffee with them, but I recommend you definitely do it now if you did not before. You may not hear back from them. This is the harsh reality of networking. Most people simply do not follow up with those they get to know. If they enthusiastically respond or follow up with you, then you know you have a good connection. The Main Point: Be persistent. Do not let yourself become a nobody!

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

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Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

THE IN BOX

MIRTH AND JOY

Finding Time

by Jerry King

by Steve Rak We are all busy beyond belief, and we just do not have enough time in the day, or so we say. Let me ask you a few questions. Did Steve Jobs have a secret time machine that gave him more hours in a day? Does Elon Musk have more than 365 days in a year? Did Edison have extra weeks in a month? I think not. We all have the same amount of time, unless we are dead that is, then all bets are off. If you are a business owner or anyone who would like to do more than watch Game of Thrones all the live long day, then you had better get on the whole time management thing. Pronto. Something I do to help manage my time is I set up specific days where I am going to focus on certain tasks. For example, I have to go out and meet with clients, look at properties and check on my employees. I try super hard to keep my “out” time to Tuesdays and Thursdays. If someone wants to meet with me, and it is not an emergency, I will let them know I am available on Tuesday or Thursday. I try not to let them dictate when we will meet. On the other hand, I try to keep my office time to Mondays and Wednesdays. That way my staff knows I will be available to do all the fun things a chief executive officer gets to do like sign documents, drink office coffee and have the dreaded staff meetings. What about Fridays? I keep Fridays open because there are always things I do not get to Monday through Thursday. I also periodically take a few hours on a Friday to go somewhere with my laptop and set goals, look at my calendar, and try to get organized. It is time batching and I try to do the same thing throughout the day, set up tasks that can be done together and do them all at once. Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an awardwinning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, www.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

GEMS

My Bowl Runneth Over

Musical Ripples

by Paul McHam

by Kent Von Der Vellen

In previous columns, we have covered the attic and basement and now will move to the first and second floors. The most troublesome areas are sinks, tubs and toilets. I probably see more problems with toilets than with any other single inside water source. Overflow is the obvious problem with toilets. Too much paper, the wrong kind of paper, toys, stuffed animals, eyeglasses, towels, clothing, or sometimes even too much of what it was intended for. The question is not what happens to cause the water to hit the floor but what happens a erward. Depending on the installation, the water will run under or next to the porcelain and under the floor covering, whether it is self-stick tile or Linoleum. Then the water will run between layers of subfloor and lie there to slowly dry while it grows mold and bacteria. One way to correct this is to have a structural drying company on standby to dry everything out a er it happens, but the best way is to ensure it is sealed off and cannot get under the toilet or between floor layers or covering, then just remember to keep a bucket and mop handy. Once the water gets under the porcelain or the floor covering, it does damage. If your sub-floors are OSB (Oriented Strand Board, similar to particle board), they will begin delaminating, swelling, and coming apart. It will eventually dry, but maybe not before it has a chance to become a health problem with mold or bacteria. Assume it grows a little mold, then dries out. The floor will ultimately act like a bellows and blow mold spore out as you walk across it. I recently pulled my main toilet off its flange, which was installed in 2001. I found out that, when it was installed, the wax ring was folded down into the soil pipe. Water and everything else had been leaking onto the wood floor all of that time. There was mold and much more under the linoleum. So, you see, I learned this firsthand. We will get off our toilets in the next article.

It took a parade, a marching band and a love of music to cause a local father to realize that students were missing out on the opportunity to make music. In December 2018, the Wadsworth High School marching band was invited to play in the Citrus Bowl parade in Orlando, Florida, but there were concerns about making the trip affordable for all students. Efforts to secure funding so all of the band members could make the trip led to Warren Owens realizing that a lack of finances kept many children from participating in their schools’ music programs because of the cost of renting or buying an instrument. Owens thought about his daughters, Kathryn and Sarah, and their strong musical abilities and how they had the opportunity to play instruments. He wondered how many children had ability but lacked funds. He decided to take action and founded Music Pebble. Music Pebble is a nonprofit organization that helps fi h and sixth grade students have access to school music programs by providing instruments, free of charge, a er financial need is demonstrated through an application. At last count, Music Pebble had 12 instruments to loan out for the coming fall. Owens is hoping more instruments will be donated over the summer. Donated instruments are refurbished by Larry’s Music in Wadsworth. When students receive an instrument, they are able to keep it for as long as they participate in their school’s music program all the way through their senior year. Currently, Music Pebble assists Wadsworth City School students and is planning to expand into other Medina County school districts, with the possibility of adding northern Wayne County, as well. Music Pebble will be participating in the Main Street Wadsworth’s First Friday Nonprofit Night on July 5, in an effort to gain additional donated instruments. Corporate sponsorships are welcomed. Wayside Furniture has provided some funding. In addition to donations, the organization is seeking area school district music program teachers for its advisory council. To volunteer, make a donation or learn more about Music Pebble, visit its website at https://www.musicpebble.org or its Facebook page at https://bit.ly/2IbJTM6

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

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July 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Monday, July 1 International Joke Day https://bit.ly/1qacZfY Debunking Amazon Alexa, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn Amazon Echo, Google Home, Apple HomePod. Register at https://bit.ly/2JJlhgS Mary Poppins Returns, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults only. Watch Mary Poppins as July monthly movie matinee. Register by calling 333-335-1513. Stand-Up Paddle Boarding for Teens, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Ages 13 to 17. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25. Register by contacting Christine, ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-210-7449. Veteran’s Round Table, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Medina. Local veteran John Rocha shares experiences serving in the military. Tuesday, July 2 I Forgot Day https://bit.ly/2JutbLm and World UFO Day https://bit.ly/2LIVB0F Fantastic Fireworks, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Ages 3 and up. Use straws to create firework picture. Register at https://bit.ly/30QMTpy American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast Create a Galaxy Night Light, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 12 to 18. Make starry nightlight looks. Register at https://bit.ly/2YWQYXr

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Road Trip Foods, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Make healthy, no-bake snacks for the road. Register at https://bit.ly/2VQPR9O Wednesday, July 3 Compliment Your Mirror Day https://bit.ly/2JK756U American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Thursday, July 4 Sidewalk Egg Frying Day https://bit.ly/1iPLiID Unless your sidewalk is a hard-to-walk-on 158 degrees, your egg will not fry. The hood of a car is a different story! All Medina County libraries are closed. Friday, July 5 National Apple Turnover Day https://bit.ly/2HS2BYK Medina Community Band Summer Concert Series, 8:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Ice cream sold by varying nonprofits. Cancelled if raining, check website. Free, donations gratefully accepted. http://www.medinacommunityband.org/ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, July 6 International Cherry Pit Spitting Day https://bit.ly/2HEeqjd Hiking for the Health of It, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Blue Hen Falls Trailhead 2001 Boston Mills Road. Boston Twp. Four- to five-mile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the weather, wear appropriate footwear. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. Chess Club, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 2 and up. Chess sets provided. Register at https://bit.ly/31utlYz

Fireworks

Ju l y 3 , 2 0 1 9 City of Brunswick 10:30 p.m. Brunswick High School 3581 Center Road, Brunswick City of Medina Dusk Medina High School 777 E. Union Street, Medina City of Wadsworth dusk Downtown Wadsworth, on High Street Ju l y 4 , 2 0 1 9 Valley City Dusk Maple Street, Valley City Board Gamers United, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Try games of strategy. Pinwheels and Whirligigs Garden Club, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make pinwheels and whirligigs. Register at https://bit.ly/2W0TR7Q ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Neo Dixie, 7 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring lawn chairs, picnic, blankets, family. Rain location: United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Free. Sunday, July 7 Tell the Truth Day https://bit.ly/2tmHrdS Monday, July 8 Math 2.0 Day https://bit.ly/2umPbwt Meet Animals of the Rainforest, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. All ages. Meet animals from Akron Zoo rainforest. Register at https://bit.ly/2wnnMwu Robotics 101, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades 4 to 8. Learn coding and construction


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with LEGO Mindstorms. Register at https://bit.ly/2wvxsoB REGISTRATION IS FULL. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Grace Baptist Church, 3480 Laurel Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Stand-Up Paddle Boarding for Adults, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Ages 18 and over. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25. Register by contacting Christine, ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-2107449. Tuesday, July 9 Sugar Cookie Day https://bit.ly/2tG0nqd Kids Summer Fishing Camp: Beyond the Basics, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Not for beginners. Bring poles, bait, tackle. Three-day program, July 9 through 11. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2wvxsoB WAITING LIST Young Naturalist Camp 5, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., and Camp 6, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Both are July 9 to 11, multiple park locations. Ages 7 to 12. Search for scat, learn burrowers, builders, more. Fee: $10. Register for Camp 5 at https://bit.ly/2WIj6Ae, register for Camp 6 at https://bit.ly/2IeqrOx American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Diary of a Wimpy Kid, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 3 to 6. Design a comic strip. Cra s and games. Register at https://bit.ly/2JGJlkl Robotics 101, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades 4 to 8. Learn coding and construction with LEGO Mindstorms. Register at https://bit.ly/2wvxsoB FULL 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Gearheads: Space Launch, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Build and launch rocket, four-week workshop. Register at https://bit.ly/2ModdEu Space Art Exploration, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625

Wolff Road, Medina. Create string art. Register at https://bit.ly/2MfLztb Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail. Meet at nature center entrance, 1473 Parschen Boulevard Brunswick. Non-aggressive 6- to 10-mile ride. Drones: The Eye in the Sky, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults only. Learn about drones and how they have expanded where humans can see. Wednesday, July 10 Teddy Bear Picnic Day https://bit.ly/2McJ5aV and Clerihew Day https://bit.ly/2JscmR7 Healthy Water, Healthy Kids, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Roscoe Ewing City Park, 605 Berkshire Drive, Medina. Grades 2 to 5. Learn about clean water with Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District. Register at https://bit.ly/2MIw4dv Natural Discoveries Program, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Letha House Park East, 5745 Richman Road, Spencer. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Outback Ray’s Amazing Animal Show, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. All ages. Live animals at hands-on event. Register at https://bit.ly/30OuCci WAITING LIST Space Day with the Wilderness Center, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 5 to 12. Activities, experiments. Drop in any time during program. Manga Cartooning, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Grades 6 to 12. Sharpen manga and cartooning skills. Register at https://bit.ly/2wnvvux WAITING LIST American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Comic Drawing, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Grades 3 to 5. Bring sketchbook. Study drawings and

cartooning with Unbound cartoonist Douglas Laubacher. Register at https://bit.ly/2EDrh6p Glass Fusion, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make a glass-fusion pendant. Material fee of $15 for first pendant, $10 for second, pay presenter. Pick up finished pendant a er 11 a.m., July 11, at library. Register at https://bit.ly/2VY2rnI Know Your Bike, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A. Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2QzMYcC Thursday, July 11 Cheer Up the Lonely Day https://bit.ly/2snBVq3 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. Kindermusik, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Storytime Room, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Ages birth to 5 years, with adult. Music and movement. Siblings welcome. Bring socks. Register at https://bit.ly/2X4nk5c WAITING LIST Outer Space Magic, 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Ages 4 and up. Have a space adventure with Jim Kleefeld and ZORK, the flying alien. Register at https://bit.ly/2Wwufjn Tween Scene: Frankentoy, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 9 to 14. Create a new toy out of old one. Toys provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2XmirBi Paws for Reading, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Grades 1 to 4. Practice reading skills by reading to furry friends. Register at https://bit.ly/2X9rxS9 Space Rocks: Can You Escape? 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 12 to 18. Use clues to prevent completion of deadly machine. Register for 4 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2Kb8xif and for 5 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2F7w0Oe Friday, July 12 Different Colored Eyes Day https://bit.ly/2HEquB5 Three Little Pigs Puppet Show, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Storytime Room, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Ages 2 to 5. Puppet show. Register at


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019 https://bit.ly/2XyduFF FULL Fireflies, Noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Find out why fireflies glow, cra s, more. Fantastic Beasts Movie Marathon, noon to 5:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. See both movies and enjoy pizza, movie trivia. Free, no registration. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Medina Community Band Summer Concert Series, 8:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Ice cream sold by varying nonprofits. Cancelled if raining, check website. Free, donations gratefully accepted. http://www.medinacommunityband.org/ Saturday, July 13 Embrace Your Geekness Day https://bit.ly/2Jt8xeC American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Mandala Play Shop for Adults, 10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road. Mandalas and relaxation exercise, more. Register at https://bit.ly/2EJo6u5 Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs. Bee Festival, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Opening of the hive, honey tasting, beekeeping information, more. Fireflies, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Find out why fireflies glow, cra s, more. Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association and Pop-Up Library, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in

barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served. Cancelled only if severe thunderstorm. Sunday, July 14 Shark Awareness Day https://bit.ly/2t0RV2J Fireflies, Noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Find out why fireflies glow, cra s, more. Hunting for Grasshoppers, 2 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Find and learn all about grasshoppers. All ages. ORMACO Kevin Walters: Sound the (French) Horn! 2 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free but reservations recommended due to limited seating. For reservations, call 330-722-2541 or e-mail tsigel@ormaco.org Monday, July 15 Be a Dork Day https://bit.ly/2JvFB5F and Cow Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2JAglXH Healthy Water, Healthy Kids, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Durling Park, 224 E. Boyer Street, Wadsworth. Grades 2 to 5. Learn about clean water with Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District. Register for 9 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2F4b9uV and for 1 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2WwiwBw American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Celebrate NASA’s 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11’s Moon Landing: Webcast, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library,132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Guided recreation of Apollo 11’s journey to see how the mission was executed. Live webcast event. Tuesday, July 16 World Snake Day https://bit.ly/2t0JUdW Young Naturalist Camp 7, 10 a.m. to 11;30 a.m., and Camp 8, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., July 16 to 18, multiple park locations. Ages 7 to 12. Learn about burrowers, builders, search life in streams. Fee: $10. Register for Camp 7 at https://bit.ly/2ERZ9fY , register for Camp 8 at https://bit.ly/2wEz9QP Baby Prom, 11 a.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Birth to 3 years. Dress up children, take

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photos. Register at https://bit.ly/2I8vKiK Hip Hop Workshop, 3 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 3 to 5. Three-day workshop teaches breaking, popping, more. Wear comfortable clothing, tennis shoes. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Shoot for the Moon, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 5 to 12. Go to the moon through stories, cra s and games. Bring two empty 2-liter bottles or a cereal box to make rocket pack. Register at https://bit.ly/2KhOIps Wednesday, July 17 Yellow Pig Day (a celebration of the number 17) https://bit.ly/2sD82pH Shoot for the Moon, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 5 to 12. Go to the moon through stories, cra s and games. Bring two empty 2-liter bottles or a cereal box to make rocket pack. Register at https://bit.ly/31sErx4 Beat the Heat Movie, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. All ages with adult. Popcorn and movie. Call 330-278-4271 for titles. Register at https://bit.ly/2I1lQz5 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Hip Hop Workshop, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn breaking, locking, popping, street jazz, funk. Wear comfortable clothing, tennis shoes. Starry, Starry Night: FUSE, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 12 to 18. Look at constellations, create one. Register at https://bit.ly/2W8U6m2 History Series: Lodi’s Development, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library. Stories of Lodi’s development and its progressive roots. Register at https://bit.ly/2IyqLrG Music at The Lodge: Box of Squirrels, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Acoustic instruments and


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harmony vocals. Popular cover songs. Free. Thursday, July 18 Lodi Sweet Corn Festival, through July 20 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. Nature Play, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Ages 2 to 5. Nature-based sensory and STEM activities. Outside, rain date will be Thursday, July 25 at 10:30 a.m. Register at https://bit.ly/2I8x59g American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Summa Health Center at WadsworthRittman, 195 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Paws for Reading, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Practice reading skills by reading to furry friend. Grades 1 to 4. Register at https://bit.ly/2XKefM4 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6

p.m., Montville Township Police Department, 6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Scene 75 Entertainment Center, 3688 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Shake and Make Ice Cream, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Ages 5 and up. Chill out with summer stories and ice cream sundae. Register at https://bit.ly/2QwhvIk FULL American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Smart Snacking/Fitness Tracking Devices, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Register at

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Medina Country Rawiga Golf and Shale Creek Golf Course Club Swim Club 5588 Wedgewood 10353 Rawiga Road, 5420 Wolff Road, Medina Road, Medina Seville 330-723-8774 (330) 725-6621 330-336-8809 Friday, July 26 Salvation Army Golf Outing 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefits: Salvation Army Rawiga Golf and Swim Club Monday, July 29 Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce Golf Outing 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Benefits: Medina Chamber Westfield Country Club

Westfield Country Club 6600 Greenwich Road Westfield Center, OH. 44251

Monday, August 5 Give Back on the Green Golf Outing 9 a.m. Benefits: SHC, the Arc of Medina County Medina Country Club Thursday, August 22 Annual Golf Outing and Casino Tailgate 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Benefits: Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Shale Creek Golf Course

https://bit.ly/31v1wis Shipwrecked!, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Explore infamous disasters, rescues, tragedies with Lake Erie Wrecks. Register at https://bit.ly/2Qxy4Dx Cars, Explorastory, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages 2 to 6. Stories, rhymes, games. Register at https://bit.ly/2Mqwrce Friday, July 19 Stick Out Your Tongue Day https://bit.ly/2teeKBb Lodi Sweet Corn Festival, through July 20 Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn songs though dance, instruments, more. Didgeridoo Down Under, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Hear Australian instrument and intergalactic storytelling. Celebrate the Moon Landing, 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Moon cra s, sensory table, astronaut reads a story. Fireflies, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Find out why fireflies glow, cra s, more. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth United Methodist Church, 195 Broad Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medina Community Band Summer Concert Series, 8:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Ice cream sold by varying nonprofits. Cancelled if raining, check website. Free, donations gratefully accepted. http://www.medinacommunityband.org/ Family Stand up Paddle Boarding, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera, 1473 Parschen Boulevard Brunswick. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25 and up. Register by contacting Christine, ccancianadventures@gmail.com or 216-210-


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019 7449. Saturday, July 20 National Lollipop Day https://bit.ly/2M8aeQp Seems like this should have been yesterday! and Space Exploration Day https://bit.ly/2un5LfC Lodi Sweet Corn Festival, last day. Healthy Strides, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Physician talk and 1- to 3-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. Ride Against Hunger 2019, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Cups Café, 126 N. Court Street, Medina. Charity ride to collect canned food and funds for Cups Café. Prizes. Rain date, July 27. Cost is can of soup, plus solo rider, $20; rider and passenger, $30. For details and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2NfnuPR 2nd Annual Writers Conference, 9 a.m., to 4:30 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Workshops on taking writing from hobby to career, publishing and marketing, book giveaway, ghost writing, more. Register at https://bit.ly/2VSA3U5 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Family Escape Room: Apollo, to the Moon, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., 11 a.m. to noon, noon to 1 p.m., 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Celebrate 50th anniversary of Apollo II moon landing. Participants work as astronomers preparing for museum opening, everything is mixed up, out of order. Must get all in order in 45 minutes, when doors open. Pick one of six available times to register at https://bit.ly/31ysLsL American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Reformed Church, 3535 Gra on Road, Brunswick. www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast Fireflies, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center 1473 Parschen Boulevard Brunswick. Find out why fireflies glow, cra s, more. Teen Tech Treks, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Bring smartphone. Learn to research protecting nature. Register at https://bit.ly/2wqm9ht Sunday, July 21 Junk Food Day https://bit.ly/2tGfn7y

Fireflies, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Find out why fireflies glow, cra s, more. Jake Von Der Vellen Foundation Fundraiser, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Basket raffle and food to raise money for scholarships in honor of memory of Jake Von Der Vellen. No admission charge. Natural Discoveries Program: Perfect Pollinators, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Greenleaf Park 1674 S. Medina Line Road Sharon Center. Learn pollinator species, relationships with plants. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Monday, July 22 Ratcatcher’s Day bit.ly/2sYpqTb and Pi Approximation Day https://bit.ly/2te3Jje American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/ 2ybO4Rp Teen Yoga, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Strengthen body and mind with yoga poses. Register at https://bit.ly/2HT2Vqj Ready, Set, Kindergarten! Storytime, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Ages 4 to 6. Prepare kindergarteners with school readiness activities. Register at https://bit.ly/ 2YTk6Pb Tools to Help Family Members Deal with Addiction, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room

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A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Nar-Anon Family groups representative will present techniques to help family members dealing with addictions. Tuesday, July 23 National Vanilla Ice Cream Day https://bit.ly/2X2gNVq Kids Summer Fishing Camp: Passport to Fishing (beginner), 9:30 a.m. to noon, Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Three-day program, Jul 23 to 25. Ages 7 to 12. Free. Register at bit.ly/2Kk8912 WAITING LIST Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Young Naturalist Camp 9, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., and Camp 10, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., July 23 to 25. Multiple park locations. Ages 7 to 12. Learn about squirrels, search for life in streams. Fee: $10. Register for Camp 9 at https://bit.ly/2Zbr4zb , A register for Camp 10 at https://bit.ly/2K0GAuj Free Clinic


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 9 through October 13 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 4 through October 12 Medina Public Square 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, June 18 through August 20 Medina County Center for Older Adults 246 Northland Drive, Medina No new vendors are being accepted. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2DC3Vxs Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 25 through September 28 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 15 through September 14 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc 4 p.m to 7 p.m. Wednesdays: June 26, July 24, August 21 Village of St. Edward, 880 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

Pressure, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Presentation, 11 a.m., Community Room, Room North, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Road, Brunswick. Learn how to work with Sponsored by Cooperative Community pharmacist and physician to optimize care Services. Information on services available, who qualifies for help. Register by July 16 by and reduce harm. Thursday, July 25 calling Karen, Thread the Needle Day 330-802-1407. https://bit.ly/2sJILFK Cut It Out, noon to 7 p.m., Buckeye Library, Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Bring paper, use Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Ellison die cut machine. Reserve a time at Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh 330-725-4415. computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, Jaw-some Encounters, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., 330-725-0588. Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Paws for Reading, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Ridge Road, Medina. All ages. Encounter Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. sharks through stories, more. Register at Grades 1 to 4. Practice reading skills by https://bit.ly/2XatTQL reading to furry friends. Register at 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 https://bit.ly/2Rh58jB p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic Tween Scene Summer Edition: Candy Sushi, tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Wadsworth. Age 9 to 14. Use fruit roll ups Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. and Rice Krispies treats to make candy Watch anime, cosplay, learn L sushi and learn Japanese culture. about Japanese culture, more. Register at Aliens!, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., https://bit.ly/2YTbPuH Meeting Room A and B, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad p.m. to 6 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Street, Wadsworth. Ages 5 to 12. List to Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp “Aliens Love Underpants,” make alien, UFO, slime, mask, play games. Register at https:// Cell Phone Safety, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick. bit.ly/30V30ma Lecture-style class on cyber security, scams, Mediation and Mindfulness, 7 p.m. to 8 spoofs, cookies, caches, Wi-Fi safety. Register p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway at https://bit.ly/2WNJGYK Street, Medina. Learn meditation. Adults. Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m. Register at https://bit.ly/2X91NIJ to 8 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Wednesday, July 24 Medina. Non-aggressive 6- to 10-mile ride. Tell an Old Joke Day https://bit.ly/XhpOen Meet a Pool Shark, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Aliens!, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Wadsworth. Ages 5 to 12. List to “Aliens Love Ridge Road, Medina. Teens, adults. Learn to Underpants,” make alien, UFO, slime, mask, play pool, rules, tricks. Register at https://bit.ly/2W9IOhw play games. Register at https://bit.ly/ Friday, July 26 2XKt0yi System Administrator Appreciation Day Shark Matinee, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster https://bit.ly/2VO6liO Martian Meltdown A er Hours Escape Street, Lodi. All ages with adult. Make shark Room, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, popcorn holder and watch “Shark Tale” Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades movie. Register at https://bit.ly/2Wq0FA8 6 to 12. An army of Martians ambushed the Harry Potter Escape Room, 3 p.m. to 4:30 spaceship, escape before they take over. p.m. and 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Activity Room, Register at https://bit.ly/2W9JtQ2 Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 Grades 4 to 12. Register for 3 p.m. at p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 https://bit.ly/2KcjRef and register for 5 p.m. Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 at the library, 330-769-2852. p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation Medication Management: High Blood admission $3, dinner is additional donation


Joy of Medina County Magazine | July 2019 request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Wine and Canvas Night, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring wine, go home with 11x14 original painting. Ages 21 and older. Bring cash or check made payable to Artists Uncork’d. Supply fee $15. Register at https://bit.ly/2WJ412a Medina Community Band Summer Concert Series, 8:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Ice cream sold by varying nonprofits. Cancelled if raining, check website. Free, donations gratefully accepted. http://www.medinacommunityband.org/ Saturday, July 27 Take Your Houseplants for a Walk Day https://bit.ly/2eQSEA2 and Take Your Pants for a Walk Day https://bit.ly/2l6G8vX Celebrate both at once! Farmers Market Storytime, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Maria Stanhope Park, at triangle intersection of West Main Street and Pleasant Street. All ages. Story times and cra s during the Farmers Market. Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Storytime with Griffin, the therapy dog. Register at https://bit.ly/2WsQc7V Out of This World Project Runaway, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Create an outfit with CDs, old books, duct tape, plastic, other materials. Walk runway in front of judges. Register at https://bit.ly/2I9nBup Northeastern Ohio Live Steamers, All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. All ages. Free. No registration. Sunday, July 28 Milk Chocolate Day https://bit.ly/2snGqRc ORMACO Party Bus to “Come From Away,” 11:30 a.m., Playhouse Square, Cleveland. Bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine, homemade cookies, chocolates, cheese, more. Tickets $75 for balcony, $105 for orchestra seating. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541 Monday, July 29

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A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late. Thursday, July 4 44th Annual Medina Twin Sizzler, 7:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Faith in Action Medina County Caregivers. Numerous categories: 5k, 10k, 27-mile bike race, 1-mile fun run, more. DJ, refreshments, vendors, face painting. Registration and pricing at https://bit.ly/2Jf2IAX

Sunday, August 4 Hope Still Lives 5k Run and Walk, 7:45 a.m. to 11 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Star Legacy Foundation, which provides stillbirth education, research, education, programming. All ages and pets welcome. For registration and pricing, go to https://bit.ly/2Z2O43w

Sunday, July 28 5th Annual Nate Vermote Run to Freedom, 9 a.m. to 11 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Medina County Coalition Against Human Trafficking. First 200 registered get shirt. For registration and pricing, go to https://bit.ly/2WcNnTq

Friday, August 9 Medina Runs Down Cancer Series: Collin Cares Glow With the Flow 5k, 7:45 p.m. mile run kids and 8:15 p.m. 5k. Family friendly events, music, food. Glow in the dark “goodies.” For registration and pricing, go to https://collincares.net/

International Tiger Day https://bit.ly/2sNLQHu Medina County Fair begins and goes until August 4. Come see the Joy of Medina County Magazine booth and do a cra with us! Tuesday, July 30 International Day of Friendship https://bit.ly/1e404d1 Worm Races, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Dig up, name, register, and race worm. WAITING LIST. 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. The Power of Positive Communication, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Therapist offers insight into communicating. Wednesday, July 31 Uncommon Musical Instrument Day https://bit.ly/2snC4tr and Mutt’s Day https://bit.ly/2JKEGgY Harry Potter Family Party, noon to 8 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Wadsworth. All ages. All things Harry Potter, cra s and games. Bring new pair of socks for house elves (they will be donated to Marian’s Closet). Drop in any time. I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Storytime Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Ages 5 and up. Chill out with summer stories and an ice cream sundae. Register at https://bit.ly/2HGvcBo FULL American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medicare Seminar, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. For those turning 65 within 12 months or those already on Medicare. Register at https:// bit.ly/2WtmDSN Romancing the Eagle: The Recovery of the Bald Eagle in Ohio, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore North and South, Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Adults. Learn about bald eagles in Ohio. Register at https://bit.ly/2XkJAoB


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Joy Of Medina County Magazine July 2019  

Explore a historic home and learn a family's history that spanned 130 years and the Civil War; see what you can learn from our health and fi...

Joy Of Medina County Magazine July 2019  

Explore a historic home and learn a family's history that spanned 130 years and the Civil War; see what you can learn from our health and fi...