Joy of Medina County Magazine January 2022

Page 1

STRANGER CONNECTING METHODS PG. 19 How to defeat social anxiety and succeed at networking.

ART FROM OLD BIKES PG. 24 About to throw away a bike? Read this!

GOOD DEED SAVES LIFE PG. 27 Visitor seated nearby saves local man.

Talent Scouts The WCTV crew is always on the lookout for people who can provide interesting content and is willing to help them get a good dose of fame. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


2

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 12 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

The Importance of Being Together by Amy Barnes In the last few months, I have been in a local furniture store and have heard people yelling because, through no fault of the store owner, their furniture delivery has been delayed. They yell, scream, cry, and make threats. Was it not just a little more than a year and a half ago that we were upset we could not be together? That we bargained with higher powers and begged for our loved ones to survive the pandemic? Instead of celebrating that a family gathering is possible and that there are family members alive and well who can gather, people are yelling and screaming because their new furniture is delayed. Delayed because of the ripple effects of the exact same illness that caused a quarantine and is now causing supply chain issues. So what if lawn chairs have to be used? Or the old furniture is still in place? Is it not more important that Uncle Martin is present to hug again? That Cousin Lucy is attending with her husband and baby and able to vigorously laugh at an old family joke? My heart breaks for those who do not value love over their desperate need for material validation of their value or prestige. How did the celebration of love and loved ones get lost? On the positive side, the new furniture will be delivered after Aunt Mabel spilled a beer on the loveseat or Grandpa Fred’s slice of pie got bumped and squished into the sofa by Cousin Grace over the holidays. The new furniture will arrive to replace the old, now stained pieces.

When we arrived, there was a small group in front of us, waiting to be seated. Apparently, we had walked in on a situation. One of the women in the group was angrily pacing around with a medical boot on her foot and muttering about how awful the employees were. She approached a couple of employees and let them know what she thought of their training, level of customer service and attitudes because they had not seated her group yet. After pacing a bit more and muttering angrily as the employees struggled to bus tables, deliver food and take orders, she declared she was leaving and was unlikely to return. The manager approached to try to help, but the woman and her group were too busy charging out the door to care. He said that if she had stayed, he was going to offer her a job since a lack of employees was the issue, just as it is at so many restaurants and businesses. About 30 minutes later, there was another commotion on the other side of the restaurant and people suddenly were moving fast. Anymore, when that happens, you do not know whether to offer help or hit the floor. As it turned out, one man had jumped into action to save another man’s life (the story can be read in this month’s “In Deed” column) then calmly returned to his own family and coloring with the kids while diners and waitresses applauded his quick action. The man’s actions emphasized even more the selfish attitude of the earlier customer, underlining the need for compassion, caring My daughter was visiting for the holidays and understanding in times when we can and offered to take us to lunch at a local full- shine by pulling together instead of pulling service restaurant. Delighted, I was ready to apart. enjoy great conversation and a break from cooking.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Shannon Davis Tyler Hatfield Chris Pickens Michelle Riley Janine Smalley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions.

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2021 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

23

3

BITE ME!

STUFFED ARTICHOKES submitted by Michelle Vokac Measurements are not exact in grandma’s recipe, but it makes for a warm treat on a cold winter day.

WATCHDOG

ONE CLICK TO TROUBLE by Amy Barnes A whole new year ahead but the same, tired scams have followed.

HEALTH

24 4

4 16

WHEN STARS ARE BORN

26

by Amy Barnes The Wadsworth community has turned WCTV into a robust station with 1,900 local shows, four channels, a foundation, and a staff that believes in possibilities.

THE READING NOOK

GOMER AND HENRY SAVE CHRISTMAS

by Tyler Hatfield

27

by Bob Arnold Tips to help in approaching new people.

20

THE IN BOX

BALANCE BRINGS SUCCESS by Shannon Davis

28

Celebrating local new hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements.

by Amy Barnes

Giving recognition to those who go above and beyond. GEMS

FOUNDATION WAS CHILD’S DREAM by Kent Von Der Vellen

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

29 30

MIRTH AND JOY

Read the clue, collect the letters trapped in magnifying glasses, and solve the puzzle!

by Jerry King JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

SHOW TIME Find words that connect a community and create stars.

31

ROLL ’EM

JOURNEY TO ELFHELM by Hunter Barnard

VEGAN VITTLES

Movie tells where Santa came from and his trip to becoming Santa.

VEGAN DONUTS

GETTING REEL

by Chris Pickens

DUELING WITH MULTIPLE VERSIONS

A healthier, vegan donut recipe that also is more economical to make.

22

VISITOR SAVES MAN’S LIFE

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

HOME AND GARDEN

21

IN DEED

Cassidy Jackson would not live long enough to see her dream come true, so her mother made sure it did.

Utilizing these tips can lead to less stress and achieving goals easier.

APPLAUSE!

EATING TO 100 YEARS OLD

THE JOY OF GREAT SERVICE

THE NETWORKER

STRANGER CONNECTING METHODS

OF MIND AND BODY

A visiting Cincinnati man gave a local man more to celebrate.

Facebook says huge social media shutdown in October caused by command used during maintenance.

19

Got a new bike? Read this before disposing of your old one.

COMMUNITY

BUSINESS TYPO CAUSED MASSIVE SHUTDOWN

by Robert Soroky

What and how you eat affects longevity.

by Janine Smalley

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

SPARE PART-Y

by Kelly Bailey

The goats did such a good job, you never knew how close it came to Christmas being cancelled!

18

HEALTHY TRAILS

DIG IT!

MOTHER-IN-LAW TO THE RESCUE by Michelle Riley Follow these guidelines and decrease toxins, increase oxygen in your home.

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Johanna Perrino sits in front of the rest of the WCTV crew, from left: Jarrod Evangelist, John Barnard and Drew Bicksler.

by Amy Barnes When viewing “The Last Duel,” it helps to know the story is going to be told multiple times.

32 38 43

OH, SNAP!

photos by Amy Barnes and FlashBang Photography Shop With a Cop and a pawsitively fundraising treat!

LET’S DO IT! Start the new year by trying something new!

CELEBRATE! A clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


4

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Drew Bicksler works on editing a show. Bicksler covers community events, sports, directing city hall meetings, and helps with studio shows and special projects.

photos and story by Amy Barnes

H

omer Baldwin would be proud of WCTV, the Wadsworth community TV station he fought so hard to give space to grow. While he had faith in how much a community asset WCTV could become, it might stun even him to know that the little-TV-station-that-could has grown from the almost 200 shows it had in the 90s to become the proud home today of 1,900 locally produced shows that are viewed around the world. Little would Baldwin, one of the original Wadsworth Cable Commission members, also know that the driving force and endless dedication for the station’s growth would come from Johanna Perrino, who was 27 when she joined the station on June 1, 1992, as its facilitator/trainer.

It is of little wonder that Perrino would remember the date so exactly, it was the day she found her place to be. When she talks about WCTV, it is obvious how passionately she loves the job she has held for 29 of the station’s 38 years. “I have never once woken up and said I didn’t want to come to work,” she said. Now, as the public-access station’s operations and community relations coordinator, Perrino is proud of the Wadsworth TV station’s accomplishments, and she is determined to continue to help it soar to even greater heights. Joining her in that effort are production and programming technician John Barnard, who has been at the station for 22 years, and part-time employees Jarrod Evangelist and Drew Bicksler.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

The two full-time employees and two part-time employees make a team that is fiercely dedicated to the success of the station and its shows. Part of what makes Wadsworth’s WCTV station different from the county’s other public-access stations is its four channels; its 1,900 locally produced shows; and its annual awards, called Clappers, named after the traditional clapperboard used to mark scenes. The four channels are public, educational, government, and community. The community channel currently acts mostly as a bulletin board for upcoming events and public service announcements, but the station’s team has started adding programming to that station as well. More than any other factor, what really sets the station apart is the intense level of community involvement and dedication, from the four-person staff to the members of the community who come from all walks of life to volunteer to produce the array of shows. Perrino said that the people who have walked through the station’s doors wanting to produce their own shows have different talents and hobbies, and some have been a little “kooky.” “I wish I had written just a line or two on every person who has walked into our studios,” Perrino said.

5

Anyone who has an idea for a show is encouraged by the staff to stop into the station, located within the Wadsworth Community Center at 619 School Drive, Wadsworth. Perrino listens to ideas and advises how to best turn an idea into an actual show and provides the training and resources. “Our goal is to train community members to produce their own shows,” Perrino said. “We train everybody who uses our equipment to ‘shoot to air,’ to vary shots and how to signal the talent.” It takes Perrino approximately 20 minutes to train volunteers on how to use the equipment for their shows. She said it is very much a learn-as-you-go situation. Several days prior to a show’s recording, Perrino checks to see what graphics will need to be added in and coordinates that with the show’s producer. “We do a lot of training and coaching before the production of the show so we can shoot to air,” Perrino said. “Our goal is for them to become selfsufficient producers.”

Watch WCTV Wadsworth City Link Channels 15, 16, 17, and 18 Spectrum Channels 1023, 1024 and 1025 On demand: https://bit.ly/3sh6xuT

continued, Page 6


6

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

continued from Page 5

She said that 99 percent of shows that air on the station’s four channels is “live to tape,” meaning that the shows are recorded to the station’s vault and then go to John Barnard for programming, without any editing or even viewing by station employees. The station has two sets available for use. If a show is recorded in-studio, a staff member will direct the show unless there is a volunteer to do it. “All of us here do production,” Perrino said. Public access stations, also known as PEGs (Public Educational Government stations), were designed to give the public access to the airwaves. The Federal Communications Commission does not have oversight of PEGs, said Perrino, but content must comply to community standards. She added that there are thousands of PEGs across the U.S., most of whom belong to the Alliance for Community Media. Perrino has served as the chairperson for the Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, Indiana Conference. The alliance gives member PEGs a change to share ideas and programming. A show about sewing, ceramics or playing the piano recorded in Wadsworth could be used by other PEGs across the country to help bolster the programming available on their channels. “We have been top in volume of programming in the alliance, above cities such as Cincinnati,” Perrino said.

The COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing shutdown caused a boost for WCTV as local viewers struggled to feel connected to their community, but it also added challenges to producing shows. Before the pandemic, three to five shows a day were recorded in the station’s studios. Once the shutdown was put in place, Perrino said she had to contact the show producers to figure out how to continue. She worked to introduce them to the various virtual meeting options and how to make it all work so it would correctly fit WCTV’s format. Out of all of the show producers, only four or five found the new process too overwhelming to continue, Perrino said. “We learned to adapt,” she said. Prior to the pandemic, eight churches took advantage of the opportunity to air their services on the station. That quickly jumped to 12 churches once the shutdowns were put into place. Each of the churches purchased their own recording equipment and started regularly sending in the recordings of their services. School games, where attendance was limited by COVID restrictions, were aired by WCTV, making it so anyone could watch the games live. The Ohio High School Athletic Association, having temporarily lifted its ban on live game broadcasting due to the COVID restrictions, has since left it up to individual schools as to whether games are aired live.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

7

Jarrod Evangelist looks out over the Wadsworth High School basketball court from the WCTV sports studio. He works on sports productions, city meetings, and community events.

Some have a concern that live coverage gives competing schools an advantage of downloading opposing teams’ game videos and using them for training purposes. To combat that, before playoff games, Perrino said WCTV takes down recorded games to avoid giving competitors the upper hand. Home and away football games and home junior varsity and varsity basketball games are recorded by WCTV staff. Other games, such as volleyball, lacrosse and soccer are recorded by parents on everything from WCTV equipment to cell phones and tablets and then electronically transferred to WCTV. Even before COVID, Perrino said the broadcasting of games was appreciated by grandparents and others related to players who were unable to attend the games or who live outside of the area, making inperson attendance challenging. While Wadsworth does not air the football or basketball games live, they usually are posted for viewing within minutes of a game ending, said John Barnard, the station’s production and programming technician, who joined the station in 1999. “We have an incredible partnership with the schools,” Perrino said. Aside from sports and city meetings, most of the shows aired on WCTV are not Wadsworth-specific and give general information useful to a wide audience, Perrino said. One such example is the wine review show.

“Wine With Wanda” provides a 5- to 10-minute review of wines and etiquette pointers by Cantonresident Wanda Haynes. While anyone in Wadsworth can record a show for the station, those from outside of Wadsworth must have a Wadsworth resident sponsor them. While it is preferred a Wadsworth resident is involved at some level of production, a sponsorship can be as simple as signing a form establishing a connection between a Wadsworth resident and the show’s producer, said Perrino. Volunteers find that producing a show gives them a feeling of accomplishment, and with it being made as simple, easy, efficient, and quick as possible, Perrino said, they come back to produce more shows. There is no official class, training is done on an asneeded basis, so someone could walk into the station’s lobby with a show idea and be taping their show within an hour, depending on what equipment or set they may need. To recognize the efforts of the vast number of station program volunteers, WCTV started awarding Clappers in 1991. At that time, there were eight categories and 200 eligible shows. For the Clappers this year, there were 17 categories and 1,700 eligible shows. Traditionally, the Clappers have been awarded at a special awards dinner. As the number of awards and eligible shows grew, so did the venue. They started in continued, Page 8


8

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

continued from Page 7

Production and programming technician John Barnard

Receiving the Clapper Award for the Most Viewed Online show were, from left, Scott Kerley (senior Jackson Kerley), Joe Herbert (junior Jackson Herbert) and Dave Wagner (senior Kam Wagner). The three fathers covered Wadsworth High School boys’ soccer games.

Johanna Perrino, operations and community relations coordinator, pauses to check out what is playing on each of WCTV’s four channels in the WCTV lobby.

Ready and waiting! One of the sets available at the station.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

9

Some of the awards WCTV has won are displayed near the station’s lobby door.

A memorial to Homer Baldwin hangs outside of the WCTV studios in tribute to Baldwin for all of the work he did to ensure the station’s success.

John Barnard explains that the large, floor-to-ceiling shelves, where WCTV shows used to be stored, are not used for much nowadays. With technological advancements, shows now are stored digitally. Barnard does all of the programming and processing of WCTV’s shows. He is known for how quickly he can get shows on the air.

continued, Page 10


10

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

continued from Page 9

Front to back, Drew Bicksler, Jarrod Evangelist and John Barnard in the heart of WCTV’s coverage of basketball games and other events on the court, which is right outside the window in the background.

the Wadsworth Library’s community room, then used a variety of venues over the years, including city council chambers, the Galaxy Restaurant and the Grace Lutheran Church. Soprema Café provides the dinner. In 2020 and 2021, the Clappers were forced by COVID restrictions to be virtual. That did not dampen the spirits of the three fathers who won in 2021 for winning the Best Sports Coverage category for their Wadsworth High School soccer game coverage. The fathers, Scott Kerley, Joe Herbert and Dave Wagner, said they had fun dressing up and hosting a watch party to view the virtual awarding of the trophies. Clapper nominations begin in August and are taken until mid-September. The voting is held the first two weeks of October. Voting is done online with ballots and links sent to all nominees to share to encourage voting. Anyone worldwide can vote. Winners of Clapper awards are determined by two factors, one is the online voting and the other is the quality score given by the judges. The two scores are combined to determine the winners. Perrino finds volunteers to judge the shows from among her media business contacts. Local fame also is enjoyed by show producers and on-camera talent when they get shout-outs of

recognition in local grocery stores and other venues, which encourages them to continue recording shows, Perrino said. One very popular show, and the longest-running public-access show in the country, is “Polka Time Again.” The polka show has aired 1,408 shows since starting in 1994. The show was hosted by Gene Kovack and Joe Gabrosek, until Gabrosek’s death in 2019 at age 95, https://bit.ly/3Fbsdw8 After Gabrosek’s death, Kovack’s son, Mike Kovack, the Medina County auditor, stepped in as cohost of the show, Perrino said. “Polka Time Again” has a wide viewership because of technology that makes it possible to view all of WCTV’s shows from anywhere around the world by visiting https://bit.ly/3sh6xuT “We have people in Europe watching the polka show,” Perrino said, with a big smile. Another popular WCTV feature is “Ticket Trivia,” hosted live and interactive by Roger Polk on the station’s Facebook page (https://bit.ly/3GXDf8M) every Thursday at 7 p.m.. Trivia questions are asked, viewers answer the questions and when someone wins, a lottery scratch-off ticket is scratched (with a wide variety of objects!) and that is the winning


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

11

The 2021 CLAPPER AWARD WINNERS Presented to the producers of the best shows on WCTV in the past year. Watch these and all WCTV programming at https://bit.ly/3IA7DHQ Best School Event

Best Sports and Recreation

Honorable Mention: Franklin Veterans Day (Kevin Auerbach & Roger Havens)

Honorable Mention: Glory on Grandview – History of Art Wright Stadium (Roger Wright)

Runner Up: National Technical Honor Society Induction Ceremony (Roger Wright)

Runner Up: Tommy Maroon Sports Show #107 (Tommy Maroon)

Clapper Award: WHS Veterans Day (Jason Knapp & Chris Sieber)

Clapper Award: Right and Left #180 – Transgender Females in Sports (John Grom)

Best Look Into Our Schools

Best Sports Coverage

Honorable Mention: Isham Elementary Art Show (Sally Lucas, Isham Elementary School)

Honorable Mention: WHS Bowling vs. Cuyahoga Falls 2-9-21 (Jason Sollars)

Runner Up: 2021 State of the School (Dr. Andy Hill)

Runner Up: WHS Freshman Volleyball vs Brunswick 8-28-21 (Zig Novak)

Clapper Award: Bruce On The Loose #47 – Dr. Andy Hill (Bruce Lorincz)

Clapper Award: WHS Boys Soccer – Varsity at Medina 9-12-20 (David Wagner, Joe Herbert, Scott Kerley)

Best School Performance Honorable Mention: WHS Choir Holiday Spectacular Concert (Kalyn Davis) Runner Up: WMS / WHS Night of Percussion (Dana Hire & Ryun Louie) Clapper Award: 2021 Overlook’s Got Talent (Overlook School) Best Youth Production Honorable Mention: Overlook Holiday Music (Diana Gorsuch) Runner Up: Storytime - Cookies (Wadsworth Public Library) Clapper Award: Bruce On The Loose #30 – Pete the Cat (Bruce Lorincz) Best Documentary Honorable Mention: Mrs. Titus’ Treehouse Library (Roger Havens) Runner Up: The Vanishing of Beverly Potts (Kevin Kelly) Clapper Award: Let’s Go Adventure Series - An American Journey (Roger Polk) Best Religious Message Honorable Mention: Mosaic Church Wadsworth (Adam Barton, Larry States) Runner Up: New Life Ministries / Acts Chapter II – April 2021 (Paul Blankenship) Clapper Award: What Catholics Really Believe #438 – Father Pat Schultz (Tim Perry)

Best Instructional Honorable Mention: Wine With Wanda – Holiday Wines (Wanda Haynes) Runner Up: Brush Tips With Cheri #57 – Sunset By The Lake (Cheri Smith) Clapper Award: Dear Bin Hogs (Jenny Young, Recycle Medina County) Best Informational Honorable Mention: Bruce On The Loose #42 – Roger Wright (Bruce Lorincz) Runner Up: We Love Birding! (Medina County Park District) Clapper Award: Wine With Wanda – Wines of Italy (Wanda Haynes) Best Talk Show Honorable Mention: Wadsworth History on Film – Adrianne Patrick (Caesar Carrino) Runner Up: Stand Up 4 All Kids – Ella Bard, 2021 SheBelieves Hero Award (Mike Hose) Clapper Award: The Real News – July 12, 2021 (Mark Vlcek) Best Entertainment Honorable Mention: Ghost Stories of Wadsworth (Roger Havens) Runner Up: Wine With Wanda – Valentine’s Day (Wanda Haynes) Clapper Award: Polka Time Again #1388 (Gene Kovack & Mike Kovack)

Best Worship Service Honorable Mention: Crossroads Reimer Road Church Runner Up: Sacred Heart Church Clapper Award: Mosaic Church Wadsworth Best Performing Arts

Host With The Most - Janie Parish Diamond Disc Award – Series Polka Time Again Diamond Disc Award – Single

14,863 Views Produced by Gene Kovack & Mike Kovack 17,587 Views

Honorable Mention: Polka Time Again Live #1 (Gene Kovack & Mike Kovack)

COVID-19 Vaccine Sign Up Demo

Runner Up: The Ohio Conservatory of Music Piano Recital (Matthew and Dimitri Jurewicz)

Produced by Soprema Senior Center & Medina County Health Dept.

Clapper Award: Wadsworth Community Band – Independence Day Celebration

Platinum Disc Award – Series

3,897 Views

Story Time - Produced by The Wadsworth Public Library Best Public Awareness Honorable Mention: Bruce on the Loose #43 – Robert Patrick (Bruce Lorincz) Runner-Up: Recycle Right – For Their Future (Jenny Young, Connie Collins, Ann Folky, Recycle Medina County) Clapper Award: Take Me Home – Shelter and Rescue Animals (Mike Kovack)

Platinum Disc Award – Single

4156 Views

2020 WHS Choir Holiday Spectacular - Produced by Kalyn Davis Golden Disc Award – Series

3299 Views

WHS Varsity Boys Soccer Produced by David Wagner, Joe Herbert and Scott Kersey

Best Promotional Honorable Mention: Art Experience (Medina County Juvenile Detention Center)

Golden Disc Award – Single

1134 Views

Walking The 2021 Blue Tip Parade - Produced by Roger Polk

Runner Up: Think Spring (Jenny Young, Soprema Senior Center) Clapper Award: Wadsworth Fire Levy (Tom Stugmyer, Wadsworth Fire Department)

Milestone Awards: 100th Program - The Tommy Maroon Sports Show #100

Best Special Event Honorable Mention: Holiday Flavors of the Chamber (Wadsworth Chamber of Commerce) Runner Up: The Tommy Maroon Sports Show – Christmas Special (Tommy Maroon) Clapper Award: Wounded Warrior Project Carry Forward Fundraiser (Dawn Blue)

Produced by Tommy Maroon on June 9, 2021 200th Program - Story Time - Author Mo Willems Produced by Wadsworth Public Library on August 6, 2020 1400th Program - Polka Time Again #1400 Produced by Gene Kovack & Mike Kovack on October 11, 2021

continued, Page 12


12

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

continued from Page 11

viewer’s prize, even if the scratch-off is not a winner. Contestants can be from anywhere but have to be able to pick up their prize from the station. There have been a variety of guest scratchers on the show, but Terri Kreider has been on the show the longest, Perrino said. Even though participation can happen only when the show is live on Facebook, it is recorded for broadcast later on the station’s channels and ondemand at https://bit.ly/3sh6xuT People of all ages are welcomed into the station’s programming, and, unlike bigger stations, at WCTV, “we let people touch buttons,” said Perrino, emphasizing the level of involvement that is available at the station. One such person who learned which buttons to push was second grader Ken Buck. Buck wanted to do a news program for kids that he called WKID News. He recruited friends to sit on the news desk with him and help with production of the show. Throughout his high school career, Buck continued to work at WCTV and went on to do sports coverage, direct football coverage, and more. Now in his mid-30s, Buck works in production for CSpan. WCTV was started in 1983 by Warner Cable as part of a franchise agreement with the City of Wadsworth. As a Wadsworth High School custodian, Homer Baldwin was a frequent visitor to the station that was tucked away in the high school. A part-time film maker and documentarian during his off-work hours, he noticed that school events were going unrecorded, so he started recording them for the station and became a WCTV advocate. By 1990, Warner Cable had handed operations of the studio over to the City of Wadsworth due to negotiations headed by Baldwin and Bill Lyren, the city service director. The station became a city department, just like the water or electric departments, Perrino said. At that time, David Fry was the station manager, and all of the shows were what Warner Cable wanted to produce. Lyren thought the shows should be what Wadsworth wanted, not what Warner wanted, Perrino said. A staff for the station was added at Baldwin’s urging. Baldwin would later work to convince the high school to give WCTV more space, which it did in early 2013, after Baldwin’s death in 2009. When the city took over the station, it was changed to a PEG access center, which necessitated adding the position of facilitator/trainer. Becky Ramnytz was

hired to fill the position. That also was when John Madding joined the station, replacing Fry as manager. Ramynytz held her position for about a year, and when she left, Perrino was hired to replace her. At the time Perrino was brought on board, approximately 200 shows a year were being produced. As the facilitator/trainer for local programming, Perrino focused on getting nonprofits to produce shows to help them increase awareness of what they did and their need for funds. She also taught people how to host shows and how to use the cameras and microphones. When Madding left the station in September 2020, Perrino took over his duties as well. It all was a far cry from the computer science career Perrino’s father had suggested for her, partly because of her love of math. “I do love math,” Perrino said, adding, “I took a lot of math.” Her path changed from computers to TV show production when she took a TV class in college as an elective. “I just absolutely loved every bit of it,” Perrino said. Her father was supportive of the change, she said. “I was shocked when I was in college and I learned I could get paid for watching television,” Perrino exclaimed. As an undergraduate, she earned a bachelor’s degree in communications with a TV-production focus and followed that up with earning her masters with a focus on marketing through the University of Akron. Her first job was the midnight to 8 a.m. shift, Friday and Saturday nights, at the now-defunct WAKC-TV 23 in Akron, which was an ABC affiliate. Her job was to manually run commercials. It was 1988, and she was paid $4.50 an hour. Some echoes of WAKC are evident at WCTV. At both stations, it was the story, not the polish that mattered. “It can be as raw as you want it to be, it can be as polished as you want it to be, we feel it is the message that is important,” Perrino said. “That’s what I love about it.” WAKC was known for being “scrappy” and hiring people who could tell a story but did not necessarily have as polished a look as some of the Cleveland stations’ news personalities, according to a 2016 article in the Akron-Beacon Journal. According to the article, the long shadow of the Cleveland news stations, financial shortages and ownership changes all led to the dismantling of WAKC.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Johanna Perrino shows one of the microphones and cameras that WCTV has available for show producers to borrow in order to host shows outside of the studio. Those wanting to record a show for broadcast are provided with training and tips before leaving with the equipment.

To help in safeguarding WCTV’s future, it was announced in November that a new foundation was being formed that would enable WCTV to accept donations it previously had to turn away because it lacked a vehicle through which to accept them. It also could open the door to possibly charging a fee for the currently free service the station offers of transferring home movies recorded on VHS tapes to DVDs. The timing of the foundation’s forming is fortuitous. Funding for WCTV comes, not from tax dollars, but from the franchise fee paid by cable subscribers. The TV station gets 5 percent of the fee. With cable subscriptions dropping in favor of streaming services, the funding for the station has been dwindling. Once again, the station is adapting to change, enabling it to remain a staple of the Wadsworth community and to continue providing programming that is enjoyed around the world. Donations can be made to the station by sending checks made out to the WCTV Foundation and mailed to: WCTV, 619 School Drive, Wadsworth, Oh. 44281.

One of two sets in the WCTV studio, this one shows a panoramic view of Wadsworth in the background.

13


14

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

15


16

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

THE READING NOOK

Gomer and Henry Save Christmas photos and story by Janine Smalley

“W

akkkkeeeeee up, Wakkkkkeeee up,” Henry the goat bleated, as he jumped from hay bale to hay bale. “It’s almost Christmas, everyone!” The rest of the animals in the barn were still half asleep, curled up in the straw and keeping nice and toasty warm. Henry had taken everyone by surprise because the sun was just starting to peek above the horizon and the roosters were not even up yet. With big yawns and stretches, all of the animals curled back up in their warm stalls and went back to sleep for a little while. That is, except for one other goat. Gomer peeked out of the barn and saw Henry

Santa takes a break with Gomer after delivering all of the presents.

leaping and jumping in the air and thought that looked like a lot of fun. So, out of the barn he pranced, ready to join Henry in the pasture. Gomer and Henry Henry smiles as he remembers the fun of had known Christmas. that Christmas was coming. They had checked the stockings that hung on their stall doors every morning, waiting to see if Santa had left them anything yet. As tempting as it was, they did not pull the stockings down or eat them. That counts as being nice and behaving, right? All of the other animals on the farm would laugh and laugh at Gomer and Henry and remind them that troublemaking goats do not get any treats from Santa. They both already knew that Santa would not bring any treats to goats that are on the naughty list. So, every day they tried and tried and tried with all their might to move


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

from the naughty list to the nice list. There was just so much fun to have on the farm, and they would soon forget that they were supposed to behave. There were bales of hay to knock over; tables to jump on; fruit to eat off the farmer’s trees; treat buckets to break in to; fences to push open; and, their favorite of all time, chomping on the farmer’s shoelaces. When the other animals started to wake up and come out of their stalls, they joined Gomer and Henry for breakfast. They all were so excited thinking about what would be in their stockings tomorrow morning. The pigs were oinking and squealing in delight thinking about the fresh grapes that they had on their Christmas list. The chickens and turkeys were pecking at the ground, clucking, and gobbling with joy. All they could think of was eating all of the yummy treats that they would be getting for Christmas. It was a happy day for all the animals on the farm. The animals spent the day playing in the snow, making snow angels and building snowmen. The wise old sheep even joined in the fun and shared her carrots for the snowmen’s noses. The sheep was pretty wise to Gomer and Henry’s ways, and she made them promise to not eat the noses off the snowmen. With big sighs, they put their heads down and agreed to behave and not eat the yummy carrots. The sun was starting to set, and it was getting colder. The clouds were dark, and it looked like they were going to be in for a big snowstorm. The animals made their way back into the barn for the night. When the farmer came to feed them their dinner, he smiled and laughed when he heard them chattering about Christmas. Once the lights were turned down, the goats all hopped up on the hay bales and got comfortable for the night, the chickens flew up and got comfortable on their roosts, and the pigs all snuggled under their straw. After the wise old sheep made sure everyone was safe and tucked in, they all drifted off to dreamland. They all dreamed of with stockings filled with candy, cookies, fruits, and vegetables. Suddenly, there was a screech, then a crash, then a big bang, boom!

17

Gomer and Henry were startled awake and pranced outside, but could not see through the awful blizzard. Then, there it was in the distance, a bright red glow. They ran toward the glow and were surprised to see that it was Santa and his reindeer. Santa looked very sad as he stepped out Gomer shows off his stylish hat. of his sleigh and walked toward them. He told Gomer and Henry that with the blizzard, being as bad as it is, he was not sure that he would be able to deliver all the presents in time for Christmas morning. Santa said that the reindeer are all very tired and hungry from flying and running through all the snow and he just did not know what to do. But Gomer and Henry had an idea! While Santa was filling all of the animal’s stockings (even Gomer and Henry’s!), they ran over to the snowmen that they built that afternoon. Henry jumped up on Gomer’s back and pulled the carrot noses off each snowman and took them back to the reindeer for a snack. Santa smiled with joy at their kindness. Before he knew it, the reindeer were helping Gomer and Henry get in line and get their reins secured. Gomer and Henry took the lead as Santa called out “Go Gomer, fly Henry, on Dasher, on Dancer, let’s go Comet and Cupid, up and away Donder and Blitzen.” With his command, they were off, with Gomer and Henry leading the way to make sure that everyone received their Christmas presents. Want to meet the animals in the story? They live at author Janine Smalley’s Whispering Acres Farm Animal Sanctuary, Medina. For more information about Whispering Acres, go to https://bit.ly/3AxRqha or https://bit.ly/3Byx3lx .To arrange a time to visit, call 440-212-6769. Donations can be made at https://bit.ly/ 3lwVbiD Whispering Acres is a 501c3 organization.


18

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

where Facebook’s data is kept suddenly lost their connection Typo Caused Massive Shutdown and stopped forwarding internet traffic as a result. This would be like your local postal center saying they forgot by Tyler Hatfield where your town is, so now all mail coming to you gets tossed in Last month, the subject was how data travels to an individual the trash. computer (https://bit.ly/33trzMN). This month let us look at a As far as the length of time Facebook and related real example of the internet not working as expected. services were down, only a few details are known. On October 4, 2021, Facebook and some of its branches like First, many of Facebook’s administration and communication WhatsApp and Instagram, experienced an outage lasting tools rely on their backend system, which suddenly approximately six hours. disappeared from the internet. The blackout cost Facebook an estimated $100 million in lost Notably, some security systems, like door locks, were entirely revenue, and some of their advertisers saw drops of 30 to 70 unusable during the initial phase of the outage. However, even percent in sales compared to the same period a week earlier. once technicians were able to access devices and begin repairs, What caused the outage, and why did it take so long to fix? they had to activate small sections of the systems at a time to As discussed in last month’s column, the internet avoid stressing their servers and causing more miniature works similarly to a postal system with many intricate parts outages. This resulted in a cascading effect where some people that all have to work seamlessly for a package/information to could access certain Facebook services, but others had to wait. reach its destination. So what shut down their backbone system? In this case, one of the essential parts of the system failed. The While the details here are even vaguer, Facebook claims a domain name system, or DNS servers, responsible for knowing command used during routine maintenance caused an accidental shutdown of some systems, which likely caused others to go out as the load was balanced. While there is no way to know for sure, Facebook’s explanation could mean that a simple typo caused millions of dollars in losses. Lesson? Watch your spelling if you are ever managing a multibillion-dollar system. Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, https://www.hatsmediagroup.com/ , and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com photo by Florenz Mendoza

Ti re d of t he fi rep la ce you r bu il de r cho se ? Get a fireplace makeover that fits your home, personal taste, and family ’s lifestyle!

330-239-4000

2377 Medina Road, Medina YourPlace4.com *Come in or go online to learn more: YourPlace4.com/Fireplaces-and-Hearth

Before


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Stranger Connecting Methods

Bringing good people good companies

by Bob Arnold In that late 60s song, “One is the Loneliest Number” by Harry Nilsson, made famous by Three Dog Night, is the summary of networking. Except for one little thing. Two does not guarantee loneliness in networking. It actually can be a very dynamic number. I often say that in any room you walk into there is one person present who can make you very, very rich. Do not believe me? Let me ask you: Do you believe connections are important? Of course, you should believe that, it is what networking is all about. Yet, most of us walk into a room of networkers and do not act like it is true. We, instead, act like it is a bother to meet new people. We hang out with those we already know and never meet anyone new unless by accident. We treat people we do not know like they are diseased and steer away from them. It is a well-established fact that most people are very anxious about meeting strangers. To cover for that, they steer away from them. Meeting new people is the main way you can run into that one person who can connect you to a person you need in your life. That one person who needs your services in their business or life. Two ways to go about it: • Find out who will be attending. Pick five people out of the list that you want to meet. Then, attend the meeting and find them, meet them and set up a coffee time with at least two of them. • The first suggestion may be difficult, depending on your skill level in meeting people. Another way to go about it would be to pick the five you would like to meet, but instead of approaching them on your own, find a friend who can introduce you to one or more of them. Both of these methods can produce results; although, the second method has the highest chance of ensuring you will not end up being the lonely one at the event. If you would like more guidance on networking or would like to practice your networking skills over coffee, please contact me at the e-mail below. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm. More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at theNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

Whether you are looking to fill one position or several, hiring an entry level team member or senior executive, OhioMeansJobs|Medina County has a strategy to meet your immediate needs that will save you time and money. Allow OhioMeansJobs|Medina County to customize and enhance your workforce! Utilize OhioMeansJobs.com to identify top talent and post positions

Individualized support from your business service contact

Maximize On-The-Job training dollars

Facilitating recruitment events

Connect your organization with job-ready candidates

Promote your business at OhioMeansJobs|Medina County sponsored events

Contact us today to see how our free services can benefit your business. Medina County

A proud partner of the American Job Center network

72 Public Square, 1st Floor Medina, Ohio 44256 (330) 441-5341 Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM OhioMeansJobs.com/Medina

19


20

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Balance Brings Success by Shannon Davis With 2022 here, I wonder, do people still do New Year’s resolutions? Maybe I am the only one who has substituted “this year I am going to” resolutions with shorter-term, easier-tosucceed goals. Now, more than ever, it seems we are struggling with worklife balance. That term may be overused but is worth considering, especially if still working from home or a business owner. It is difficult to walk away from e-mails, phone calls and business commitments, even in the early morning or late evening. Over the past several years, there has been a plethora of training and direction on prioritizing time. If you have a mile-long list of tasks to do, try separating them into four categories such as: • Urgent and important • Important but not urgent • Urgent but not important • Neither urgent nor important From there, figure out what you want to do and what you do not want to do or what you do not like to do. What are you good at doing? What can you have someone

else do to save you time? Have you designated specific hours to work? Have you set aside time for yourself? Much to the frustration of my family members and friends, I must schedule time to get in a workout. If I do not, my head is not as clear, my day does not progress as efficiently, my eyes feel gritty, and my attitude becomes a little edgy. Procrastination stems from being overwhelmed, bored or discouraged. Procrastination also can lead to stress and anxiety. As you plan your day, week, month, or year, it is important to prioritize your health as much as your work. You will find that, when you feel better, things will start to fall into place in other areas of your life as well. Think about these questions: 1) What does avoiding this task cost me? 2) How much more can I accomplish if I have someone else do this? Those questions may lead to more questions, but ultimately will provide some clarity. May the year of 2022 be one of happiness, health and wealth. Shannon Davis is a financial advisor, entrepreneur and resident of Medina County. She is an advocate for financial literacy and education. Davis can be reached by calling or texting 303-916-3864.

BUSINESS New hires, promotions, certifications earned, and announcements

Congratulations to Ashley Knoll, Rebecca Thompson and April Blake at Landry Family Dentistry! All three recently earned their coronal polishing certifications. Thompson, a certified dental assistant, has been with the practice for two years. Knoll, a certified dental assistant and CPR instructor, has been with the practice since July 2021. Blake is an expanded functions dental assistant who has been at the practice for approximately three months. Has your business or an employee done something that should get applause or does your nonprofit have an announcement? E-mail the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put “Applause” in the subject line.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: VEGAN VITTLES

Vegan Donuts by Chris Pickens For all of the trivia buffs out there: More than 10-billion donuts are made every year in the U.S. alone. When you think about it, how often have you gone out for donuts? Not only are they yummy, but who does not simply love to use their hands to eat something? Though donuts are not generally considered healthy, these homemade donuts are not only a more economical way to go but certainly a healthier version of this delicious treat. This recipe yields six standard donuts and can be doubled if you want to make a dozen. • 1 cup all-purpose unbleached flour • ½ cup cane sugar or agave* • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder • ½ teaspoon vanilla • ¼ teaspoon salt • ¼ ground nutmeg • 1 tablespoon flaxseed • 3 tablespoons water • pinch of cinnamon

G

• 4 tablespoons vegan butter • ½ cup plant milk • ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Scoop mixture into donut baking pan, which works best with this recipe. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden brown. Favorite mix-ins can be added to the dough for a bit of variety, or they can be topped with favorite toppings after baking. The flaxseed and water are a replacement equivalent to one egg. For questions about veganism, vegan cooking or to give feedback on any of my recipes, please contact me at the e-mail below with Joy of Medina County Magazine in the subject line. *Please note that while agave is natural and vegan friendly, if you are managing blood glucose, you should avoid use of agave. For more information, please go to https://bit.ly/3Gzup0M Chris Pickens is a certified holistic nutrition coach, a health and wellness coach, a holistic health practitioner, and a holistic health coach. She has been a vegan since 2016 and enjoys sharing her recipes. She can be contacted at momof4chris@gmail.com

Detoxify & Renew Relax Your Body + Soul

Substitutions Chart

Substitutions for those moments when you are in a pinch! • Greek yogurt for Mayonnaise • Lemon juice for vinegar • Mustard powder or saffron for turmeric • Cinnamon or mace for cardamom • 2 cups sifted powdered sugar or ¾ cup honey for 1 cup sugar • 1 ¼ cups sugar plus ¼ cup water for 1 cup of honey • ½ cup white sugar plus 2 tablespoons of molasses=1/2 cup brown sugar • Plain yogurt for sour cream • Light cream or half-and-half for evaporated milk • 2/3 cup evaporated milk for 1 cup heavy cream (not for whipping) • 7/8 cup shortening for 1 cup butter • Keep a box of powdered milk in the freezer in case of running out of milk.

21

Call 330.576.3059 or visit botara.com now to schedule your session Offer Valid January 1-31,2022


22

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

HOME AND GARDEN: DIG IT!

Mother-in-Law to the Rescue column and photos by Michelle Riley You probably have heard it said that the winter months are a great time for reflection. Nature is resting and regenerating for a new season of growth. The snow falls again, we shovel once more. At some point through this bitter cold reality, we may ask ourselves, how much reflection does one need? The temperatures are dropping, the days are still too short, the words “cooped up” come to mind. The walls close in, the air feels stale. Would you believe the solution to breathing easier through the day is inviting the mother-in-law over? Sansevieria sp. that is, also known as mother-in-law’s tongue because of the pointed tips of the leaves resembling the sharp tongue of a mother-in-law. It also has been called the bedroom plant as it is one of the odd men out in the plant world because it converts carbon dioxide into oxygen at night. This ability grants these plants the superpower of surviving in the most hostile of environments. They enjoy typical household temperatures and a bright spot in indirect sunlight. Water when dry, no sooner, otherwise they will rot. It also can be placed in a shady corner and neglected for weeks; it will not be bothered. Shall we call it the superhero of plants? Not only will it withstand blatant neglect, but while it is being neglected, it will filter the air day and night. Sansevieria can absorb toxins such as carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, cancer-causing pollutants, and more. It is a great indoor plant for someone with allergies or sensitivity to the toxins brought indoors by paint, new furniture or construction. It has even gained recognition from NASA for how well it cleans the air. Considered a succulent of sorts, the mother-in-law’s tongue is by far one of the easiest houseplants to keep. It is said to symbolize cleanliness and tenacity while promoting prosperity and happiness. You cannot beat having cleaner air. A word of caution: Keep this plant away from pets or children who might decide to taste the leaves since it is toxic. If you have any plant or landscape questions, see my contact

information below. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is the founder of the gardening subscription service, https://theplantmall.com/; https:// michellerileyhorticulturist.com ; and https:// neohiogarden.com . She also is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. Riley can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

23

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

HOME AND GARDEN: WATCHDOG

Stuffed Artichokes

One Click to Trouble

recipe submitted by Michelle Vokac

by Amy Barnes

From the kitchen of Bill Vokac’s grandmother comes her recipe for stuffed artichokes. Regular readers of this magazine may remember Vokac as being the one whose new pet fox disappeared (see story at https://bit.ly/ 32hwgbz). Since then, Vokac and his wife, Michelle, have started a fox sanctuary, more information can be found here https://bit.ly/3e3EvL0 and here https://bit.ly/3yDrIbV . Vokac also recently started his own business, Reset Polish (https://bit.ly/3IU7WNU) , that offers mobile polishing of vehicles such as pontoon boats, trailers, RVs, and washing and polishing of semis. As many recipes from grandmothers are, because they cook by “feel,” measurements are approximate.

One of the scams running on Facebook to watch out for are those “fun” quizzes that ask your favorite color, your best friend’s name, and so on. Ever notice how those little quizzes seem to duplicate the security questions that are asked when you are setting up sensitive online accounts? Quit taking those quizzes! You are giving data to scammers.

• • • • •

4 to 6 fresh artichokes, or as many as will fit in the pot 1 to 2 cups Italian-seasoned bread crumbs ½ to 1 cup Parmesan cheese I 2 to 4 tablespoons lemon juice ½ cup olive oil

Wash artichokes, remove all discolored leaves and snip off ends. Kitchen shears will make this an easier job. Mix bread crumbs, cheese and olive oil in bowl with fork. Use spoon to stuff mixture all around the artichokes. Place in large pot with rack on the bottom. Fill with water to just cover the rack. Cover and simmer for approximately 1 ½ hours or until you can pull out an artichoke leaf easily. Important: Watch the pot and add water as needed, it steams away quickly! Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to all ages who would like to submit a recipe.

photo by Kim Daniels

Also on Facebook is the scam that happens in response to your commenting on a post. Suddenly, a celebrity has contacted you and directed you to their page because you have won their prize of the day! Once you get to celebrity’s page, they ask you to click and fill out a form with your personal information. If you really think a celebrity is just sitting around waiting for your post so they can give you a prize, check the legitimacy of the so-called celebrity profile. Google the name and see if they even spelled the celebrity’s name correctly. Then, check the url for the profile’s actual name (see “Watchdog” in the December issue, https://bit.ly/3cV1ZS5 ). Check the number of followers. It is unlikely a celebrity is going to have 11 followers. You can learn a lot by checking their friend list, scrolling down to see when they started posting, and seeing what photos are posted. Along those same lines, is the “You’ve paid your bill” scam. The way this one works is soon after the first of the month, you will get a text message thanking you for your payment. You even are being given a reward for being such a loyal and on-time paying customer! Just click the link to get your reward! Uh huh. I do not know about you, but I have never been given a legitimate prize for free from a company just for paying my bill. Keep that old saying in your head, “If It seems too good to be true, it is.” Any time you are approached, if it is an offer that gets you excited and eager to take action, always take two steps back, carefully consider the facts, and independently verify. One way to verify an offer would be to call the company’s customer service department. Ask if such a promotion is being done. Or, or you can take the easy route and simply delete the message and block the number.


24

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Don Barnett’s guitar stand photo provided

M Don Barnett’s bike pump lamp and gear sprocket Christmas tree photo provided

Robert Soroky’s Advent wheeth, if you look closely, you will see the Joy ornament mentioned in the column. Robert Soroky’s traditional Christmas wheeth


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

25

That conquered, it was time to step up my wheeth building game, so the next project was an Advent wheeth. For this, I used Spare Part-y a 26-inch wheel and decorated it with similar evergreen photos and column by Robert Soroky branches, pine cones and holly berries. Thought we would have a little fun this month. Next, I needed four candle holders, so I found four old wheel Let us suppose you have an old, rusty bike taking up space in hubs, tore out their axles and bearings, soaked them in a the garage and you are not quite sure what to do with it. cleaning solution, and polished them to get a high, clean shine. Unfortunately, it is too much of a train wreck to hand off to I wrapped each hub in red ribbon and, laying the decorated anyone you would call a friend, but you also do not want to just wheeth flat, placed them within the spokes of the wheel. Three throw it away as the parts might be useful for something. of the hubs had purple candles, and the remaining hub, which Well, if you have a few creative bones in your body, there is a would represent the third week and halfway point of Advent, good chance you could turn parts of that junk bike into had the traditional pink candle. Since the pink candle also is beautiful works of art! known as the Candle of Joy or the Joy Candle, a joy ornament Don Barnett, a bike shop co-worker, has been doing this for was interlaced with that hub. years. The old saying holds true that “one man’s trash is another With a vast collection of old bike parts at his disposal, Barnett man’s treasure.” has made everything from desk lamps out of floor pumps and What can you create from old bicycle parts? guitar stands from bike frames to little Christmas trees out of Please contact me if you have any questions about creating gear sprockets and wind chimes from chain rings. bicycle part art, would like to share your creations, or have any His coolest creation, though, is the Christmas “wheeth.” questions about biking. Simply put, this is a bicycle wheel that has been cleaned up and decorated to look like an actual wreath. One look at these Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist who regularly participates in clever designs was all it took to get my creative wheels turning. I long-distance charity rides and is the manager of the Century decided to build my own wheeth, but with a twist. Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at First, I made a traditional-type holiday wheeth from a 700 robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further series, 28-inch wheel, decorated with evergreen branches, pine information or to chat about bikes. cones, ribbons, holly leaves, and lights. It came out great.

READY

UNLIMITED DATA

ULTRA-FAST SPEEDS

WHOLE-HOME WI-FI

As connectivity becomes even more important, our continued investment into our fiber network has allowed us to not only meet our current customer needs but stay well ahead of future demand.

Keeping Medina connected.

ArmstrongOneWire.com 1.877.277.5711


26

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

Eating to 100 Years Old by Kelly Bailey Eating for longevity (living a long, happy, healthy life) has a lot to do with what you eat. Consuming more vegetables and fruits and fewer chips and cookies is just common sense. But we often forget that how we eat also is incredibly important. The following powerful practices can help you eat less, lose excess weight and live longer. 1. Make food and dining sacred. Food is meant to nourish the body, but also the soul. I hear so many people proclaim that they LOVE food. If so, why do we not give it the time and attention it deserves? When we rush around, eat low-quality fast food in our cars and always dine alone, we disrespect ourselves and the food we eat. Treat food like a lover by giving it full attention and ample time to enjoy. Set aside 15 minutes to eat meals distractionfree. Remember to pause for a moment of gratitude prior to eating. 2. Follow the 80/20 rule. Most people think that means to eat healthy 80 percent of the time with 20 percent being recreational. While this is a great practice to live by, I am talking about an 80/20 rule you can practice at every meal. Eat to only 80 percent full, then wait 20 minutes. It takes about 20 minutes for the brain to register fullness. Most of us eat so fast that we end up blowing way past comfortably full. Using this strategy, you will enjoy food without feeling like you need a stretcher to leave the table. 3. Cook at home. One habit healthy people the world over have in common: They eat at home. When you dine out, you have little control over ingredients and portions. Studies show that people who eat out consume nearly 300 more calories per day. That can add up to a 20-pound weight gain in one year. Commit to eating out only once or twice per week. Plan, plan, plan for the rest...or starve. A certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Bailey owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Find her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/ Following any recommendations are solely at your discretion and responsibility. Consult your medical professional prior to undertaking any suggested diet, lifestyle or exercise change or routine.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

COMMUNITY: IN DEED

Visitor Saves Man’s Life

COMMUNITY

by Amy Barnes What may have seemed like a simple decision for Dr. Don Hudak, whose specialty is facial plastics, and his extended family to go out for a midday meal ended up turning into a lifesaving decision for a fellow diner. As Hudak, who was visiting from Cincinnati, and his family were relaxing at a Medina restaurant, two tables away, an elderly man suddenly started choking. It became obvious that he was not going to be able to clear his airway himself. Quickly taking action, Hudak stepped in and performed the Heimlich maneuver on the older man, so quietly and smoothly that many in the restaurant did not have time to realize what was happening. For his quick action and willingness to help, Hudak is receiving a gift certificate to The BookShelf, which has three locations: 831 Pearl Road, Brunswick; 105 W. Liberty Street, Medina; and 130 Main Street, Wadsworth. Proceeds from the bookstores benefit Project: LEARN, an adult literacy program. A special thank you to waitress Gina, who helped gather the information for this story.

Giving kudos to those who are providing great service at area businesses

Heather Lemmer gives a shout out to Toni at Buehler's River Styx bakery for being so helpful and kind. Here is what Lemmer had to say: “I must have looked a little lost, she came to the rescue and helped me order the perfect cupcake cake for my daughter's birthday. She was smiling, helpful and such a sweet person. Thank you for taking the time to explain everything to me!” Has an employee at a local store made your day? Gone that extra mile to help? Send your name, the employee’s name, place of employment, date of occurrence, and what made your experience special to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Recognition limited to those employed within Medina County.

C

27


28

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Foundation was Child’s Dream by Kent Von Der Vellen Cassidy Jackson was diagnosed with anaplastic ependymoma, a rapidly growing cancer, when she was 10 years old. She spent the next two years fighting for her life and receiving treatment at Akron Children’s Hospital. When Jackson was at the hospital, her mom, Pam Czech, would sleep in the room with her and wash in the bathroom down the hall. Czech would even color her hair in the bathroom sink so she could be near Jackson during her stays in the hospital. Jackson’s brother and sisters would visit regularly and celebrated birthdays there. To get Jackson out of her room, Czech would push Jackson’s wheelchair through the hospital’s halls. Czech said Jackson was concerned that so many of the children at the hospital were alone. Czech explained to her that most families could not be at the hospital because they were at work so they could cover expenses. Jackson told Czech that when she got better, she was going to do something to help those families cover expenses so they could be with their children. Jackson would not live long enough to fulfill her goal, she died April 29, 2006. Czech would be unable to watch Jackson grow older and achieve major milestones such as going to prom, graduating high school, or getting married, but she could make Jackson’s dream come true. This led to the creation of Cassidy’s Hope Foundation. While Czech was staying at Akron Children’s Hospital, she became close with another mom who also had a daughter receiving treatment. From talking with her, she learned how difficult it was for her family to juggle financial obligations, work and the need to be with their daughter. Czech reached out to family and friends, and they organized their first poker run to raise funds to help the family with their bills and other expenses. Cassidy’s Hope Foundation had helped its first family only months after Jackson died. The foundation has grown and now helps families through three different programs, Cassidy’s Hope Child, Love Cassidy and From the Heart. Cassidy’s Hope Child helps a family every year that has been referred to them by Akron Children’s Hospital. The Love Cassidy program purchases items for family members staying on the oncology floor at Akron Children’s. Some of the things of need they have purchased are a coffee maker, television, game consuls, bath necessities, and gift certificates.

Cassidy’s Hope 6908 County View Drive Valley City, Ohio 44280 216-571-2119 Web address: www.cassidyshopefoundation.org Date of formation: 07/04/2006 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of Organization’s Purpose: Advance knowledge and help cancer patients Is the organization's registration status current? No If the answer is no, a representative of the organization should immediately log into the system to take care of the filing deficiency or contact the Ohio Attorney General's Office right away with questions. If the answer is yes, this report serves as verification that the named organization is in compliance with its registration requirements. The financial information below is from the organization’s most recent filing within the on-line system. If the items below are blank, the organization has not yet filed information on-line or they may be exempt from filing an annual report.

Reporting Year: 2018 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2018 Reporting End Date: 12/31/2018 Total Revenue: $31,023.00 Total Expenses: $35,375.00 Total Program Expenses: $0.00 Percent of Total Expenses: 0% Total Assets: $13,239.00 Director or Board member List (8): Ryan Stewart Sharyl Gangle Scott Parker Jenniver Dixon Debbie Gabel Janice Baumann Melvin Czech Pamela Czech From the Heart is a program that delivers gift baskets to the children staying at Akron Children’s. These are for the children receiving treatment, as well as their siblings. The baskets may include coloring books, toys and other items. Volunteers set up lighted Christmas trees in the rooms and find ways to help the kids and families celebrate other holidays during the year. The foundation holds a few fundraisers each year, including poker runs, which fund Cassidy’s Hope Child, and golf outings and casino trips, which fund the From the Heart and Love Cassidy programs. To donate, volunteer or learn more about Cassidy’s Hope Foundation, visit https://bit.ly/30lGrvo or go to https://bit.ly/ 3Gz8WoL. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts under the Help tab at https:// www.joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH

29


30

Joyful Word Search January Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022 2022

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

Joyful Word Search Show Time Show Time

N O I T S R E C V P M N O G V Y L L N S UWO D N C I C T O A T E K H M E MW A R L R L S D Y L M V E W W T D Z

A U Y O U N R A O E E Z G D

C D C T H O O B L V R O M I

U D O R S M O S WM P E R O I S I T S E V H A T N S T W

E P D Q P M I R R A E O C X

INTERVIEW COMMUNITY INTERVIEW COMMUNITY TELEVISION TELEVISION WADSWORTH WADSWORTHEDUCATION EDUCATION STATIONS STATIONS CAMERAS CAMERAS SETS SETS

S W A T Z A P G R N O T U M N N C V R I T L I S W R L S

J L E B Y E B I I B M X D G

From the holiday dinner table: “So, this year, Mom’s the conservative family member, you are the weird Southern family member, and I am the normal one.”

G Z B T G W R P T K Y Z B Q

PRODUCERS MICROPHONE PRODUCERS LOCAL SHOWS MICROPHONE VOLUNTEERS LOCALSHOWS VOLUNTEERS PUBLIC PUBLIC CLAPPERBOARD CLAPPERBOARD GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT STUDIO STUDIO

T

“If I wasn’t whining, I s�ll wouldn’t know what I was doing.”

C K B S N R E L U T Y Q N Z

Joyful Word Search December 2021 Answer Key for Last Month’s Search Into Battle Into Battle L A R P T F P Y R A E W T B S D O Q O J W T L T V M

C Z S R E I D L O S H P E

I P Z D I L N B M T L L M

R P N P K E A T N O B Q T

O O H B R T N E E I L O L

T K D A T E T D T D Y D Y

S Y S L N S C C S L Q M S

I H E E D D E I Y L E T J

H T S L N L M D S T Z A D

B A K E L E I A A I D Q D

R C B O L X C H D R O P G

D B C N L L T S C E T N L


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

ENTERTAINMENT: GETTING REEL

Journey to Elfhelm

Dueling With Multiple Versions

by Hunter Barnard Movie: “A Boy Called Christmas” Viewed: at home Joy Birds: I watched a really fun and good movie called “A Boy Called Christmas” on Netflix. It was kind of about how Santa Claus got his job. It was a really good story. There were lots of things in it that should be in Christmas movies. There were elves who taught Nikolas (that is Santa's real name) how to make toys and a magical place where they live called Elfhelm. There was a lot of snow and, of course, a reindeer. In the movie, Nikolas' mom had passed away, and it made him really sad so he would think of an old story where a little girl found a magical place called Elfhelm. The elves lived there, and she was allowed to stay for a while. But the king where Nikolas lives knows that story, too, and he makes people search for it. One of the people he made leave to look for it was Nikolas' dad, and that is how he found out there was a map that led to the real Elfhelm. Nikolas leaves to go find it and the movie is all about his trip there and how he has to find it and rescue his dad with the help of a reindeer and a pet mouse. My favorite character was Nikolas, and not just because he ends up being Santa, but that was a big reason, too. He is really smart and tries to be helpful to everybody and I think he is a really cool character. Christmas movies are my favorite, so I knew I would like this one right away. There are not too many sad parts, but the ones that are end pretty fast. I think Nikolas learns a little bit from the things that happen, too, and they help make him a better Santa. This is an awesome movie and a really good one to watch! Hunter Barnard is an energetic 8-year-old who is a former Brunswick resident who now attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

O

31

by Amy Barnes Movie: “The Last Duel” Seen: in theater Rating: It would have been helpful to know, prior to viewing “The Last Duel,” that the same story would be told three times: once from the husband’s point of view; once from the accused rapist’s point of view; and finally, from the accuser’s point of view. As it was, the movie was tedious and exhausting. The only reason this movie gets as high a score as it does is because the performances were exacting, powerful and absorbing throughout the film, never once wavering from their complex, multi-layered characters. While it is important to hear all sides to a story, there could have been a way to make it less tedious. Story version one finishes, and a viewer would understandably expect to next proceed to trial. By the time the movie got to version two and I realized there was yet another version following the second, I was sighing. Admittedly, knowing ahead of time that I would be watching the same thing three times would have been at least helpful. Watching a rape scene once is difficult enough. Seeing how the rapist uses the same words, methods and justifications for each rape he commits (we see two, one with a drunken woman and one with the main character, that is the rape that viewers see twice), was entirely realistic. But some of the nudity, full and partial, and even having to watch a rape multiple times seemed to be aimed at titillating and it started to feel just plain creepy to be staying to watch the rest of the movie. For anyone who is not educated on how women were viewed in the 1300s, women were owned by their fathers and husbands and attacking or raping them was equated to having livestock or other property attacked. It was not expected for a woman to speak up for herself any more than they expected a cow to do so. According to an article in Variety, the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network and the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media provided feedback for the movie on the affects of rape, both on the victims and on those around them. The portrayals of the characters and their reactions to the attack are remarkably impressive and give a starkly honest narrative. Multiple connections to present-day mindsets and attitudes were made, underlining how much advancement has been made and how far we still have to go. Seven hundred years later, among many examples, in present-day Ohio, married couples still can legally rape their spouses. In China, tennis star Peng Shuai was still missing at press time after accusing a former senior Communist Party leader of sexual assault.


32

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

It was reported that 160 children took part in this year’s Shop With a Cop, which involved officers and first responders from all over Medina County.

Vehicles of all shapes and sizes were used.

Shop With a Cop In December, local police officers and first responders from across Medina County joined together to take disadvantaged area children on a shopping trip for Christmas. The trip is funded each year through donations and fundraisers. The children were treated to breakfast and riding in a parade in emergency and police vehicles through Medina Public Square to Walmart, where they then shopped with the help of their assigned officer and store employees. After the shopping trip, they were treated to lunch and playtime. For more information about the program and how to donate, go to https://bit.ly/31OpvOX photos by Amy Barnes Out of respect for the children’s privacy, Joy of Medina County Magazine refrained from taking any photos of the children’s faces or of their shopping adventure.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Moments before the Shop With a Cop parade arrived with sirens and horns blaring, an Amish buggy went past the destination parking lot. The horse and buggy pulled into the Medina County Health Department parking lot, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina, just as the first cars were arriving.

33

Two Secret Service vehicles and the agents, who can be seen on the right, escorted Santa safely into the store, as the vehicles with the children filled nearby parking spots.

While the children shopped, a Cleveland Clinic Helicopter touched down in the parking lot.

continued, Page 34


34

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

continued from Page 33

Impawsible Mutts Dog Rescue Fundraiser A recent fundraiser in Medina to benefit Impawsible Mutts Dog Rescue included photos with Santa Claus and a toy for every dog attending. The event was hosted by Angela Nicholson with Top Flite Financial and Robert Andrews with Re/Max Crossroad, with treats provided by Bil-Jac. photos by FlashBang Photography

Matthew Steinbrink, left, and Tyler Steinbrink were serving up hot dogs.

From left, Nick Jacobs, Alex Horton, Bryce Becker, and Paul Turner

Tyler Steinbrink tries to get Jimmy Duffy to listen to what is on his wish list.

Chris Naysmith and his son, 5year-old Wyatt Naysmith, took part in the fundraiser with Cookie, a 3month-old beagle.

B


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

35

Boy Scout Troop 511 helped at the Impawsible Mutts Dog Rescue fundraiser. From left, Gavin Kennedy; James Kelley (in back); Lizzie Noall; Will Sollenberger; Paul Turner; Sherri Buck, assistant scoutmaster; Kirk Jacobs, assistant scoutmaster; Bryce Becker, Matthew Steinbrink; Nick Jacobs; Alex Horton; Tyler Steinbrink (kneeling); and Jimmy Duffy (who has found something on the ground to be fascinated by!).

Sarah Herman takes a photo of Captain Fluffy posing with Santa (otherwise known as Robert Andrews and event cohost) and Alyssa Sedlak. continued, Page 36


36

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

continued from Page 35

Angie Sollenberger; Trudi the greyhound; Mark Sollenberger; Angie Nicholson, fundraiser organizer; Jessica Grimes; and photographer Sarah Herman

T h a n k s to a l l o u r f i r e p l ac e d r aw i n g e n t r a n t s ! Ashley from Brunswick “Hi, I’m Ashley, and I won the fireplace drawing. I updated the old wood-burning fireplace that I barely used with this beautiful new top-of-the-line gas insert with firebrick. Then I found out I won the drawing, making it even better.”

Fireplace makeovers that fit your home, personal taste, and family lifestyle! Eight certified hearth specialists keep you safe and create beautiful fireplaces for your home.

330-239-4000

2377 Medina Road, Medina YourPlace4.com Come in or go online to learn more YourPlace4.com/Fireplaces-and-Hearth


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Brenda Staufer keeps a firm grip on the leashes of (from left) Freddie, Stella and Hayden.

Angie Nicholson, fundraiser organizer

N

James Kelly, left, and Nalee Xiong look happy about getting pictures with Santa, but Oscar does not look as happy!

37


38

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

January 2022 Nonprofit Calendar

All Month:

Wadsworth. Co-sponsored by Soprema Senior Center. The story of Enzo the dog who wants to be reincarnated into a human. To reserve a space, Writer Series: Flash Fiction Contest, ends February 20, 2022. Write a call Soprema at 330-335-1513. 1,000 word or less story and submit it by February 20, 2022, with name, category (Grades 6-16; or Adult), and contact information to me- American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United reference.br@mcdl.info Community will pick favorites and stories will Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. be shared in March. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

G

Saturday, January 1

Tuesday, January 4

New Year’s Day

World Braille Day

Libraries closed.

Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads along the trail.

Gingerbread Journey; 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., through January 2; Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Follow trail with gingerbread people along the way. Learn how gingerbread is made. Sledding hill available. All ages.

Create! Stained Glass Jars, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create faux stained Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 glass. Materials provided, bring creativity. Register at Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads https://bit.ly/3FsYuiE along the trail. Mindful Eating Habits in the New Year, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Sunday, January 2 Learn why fad diets do not work and what tools help achieve optimal Run It up the Flagpole and See if Anyone Salutes it Day health. Interactive discussion about health, body positivity and nutrition. Register at https://bit.ly/3EgNPpP Medina County District Libraries closed. Gingerbread Journey; 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., last day; Hubbard Valley Park, Demystifying the Mediterranean Diet, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Follow trail with gingerbread people A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Get information, along the way. Learn how gingerbread is made. Sledding hill available. cooking tips and recipes. Register at All ages. https://bit.ly/3yUr3CT Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Wednesday, January 5 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads National Bird Day along the trail. Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Holidays at Hambley, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Visit and enjoy the holiday Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads decorations. All ages. along the trail. Monthly Makers: Trees, noon to 5 p.m., Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Last day. View installations by area residents Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. along Monthly Maker Trail. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg

Monday, January 3 Festival of Sleep Day https://bit.ly/3J9Dsry Medina County District Libraries closed.

Snack Taste Test, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 6 through 12. See which snacks your taste buds prefer and which ones they do not.

Instant Pot 101, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn tips, tricks, and Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 put it to use. Register at https://bit.ly/3z5PpKh Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads along the trail. Thursday, January 6 Monday Movie Matinee: “The Art of Racing in the Rain,” 1 p.m. to 3:30 National Cuddle Up Day and National Technology Day p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

39

Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., International Take the High Road Day Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Cooking Series: Kids in the Kitchen, all day, Medina Library, 210 S. Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads Broadway Street, Medina. Kids and families pick up cooking kits and along the trail. cook recipes together. Kits are provided but do not include ingredients Doll’s Day at the Library, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center for recipes. Register at https://bit.ly/3sumAWA Street, Seville. Bring doll to the library to sign her/him up for a library American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station card, check out doll-sized books, and take home a new tote bag you 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg design. Crafts are for 18-inch dolls but all sizes and shapes are American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United welcomed. Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Camp Wired: Word Processing 101, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn Word basics, https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg creating a document, learn to save and save as, more. Register at https:/ Makerspace Mondays: Circut Demo, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Family His/bit.ly/32cKTxz tory and Learning Center, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, MedTween Thursday: Desktop Basketball Game, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Chil- ina. See a demonstration of how to use new equipment in the Makdren’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. erspace. Register at https://bit.ly/3yQ78oA Ages 9 to 14. Art in the Afternoon: Illuminated Letters on Foil, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., ChilLegal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina dren’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers Use painter’s tape and paint to make fall art. Ages 5 to 12. No registrahelp those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first tion required. served. Masks required. Cryptozoology Lab, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye LiVision Boards and Bullet Journaling, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore brary, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about cryptids and build a habiRooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road. Learn tat for them. Grades 3 thorough 5. Register at https://bit.ly/3yQ7AmM about bullet journaling and create a vision board. Register at Intro to Gun Ownership, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Basics of identifying and purchasing a handgun, as well https://bit.ly/3yRLr7K as safety, storage, handling, and more. Ongoing training and pros and photoLed by Tejas Prajapati cons of a concealed carry license will be discussed. by Chad Wilson, Friday, January 7 Engage Virtual Range. Register at https://bit.ly/3JcAmD3 Old Rock Day https://bit.ly/3pidOJe Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., Tuesday, January 11 Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 National Step in the Puddle and Splash Your Friends Day And then Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads see how many friends are left! along the trail. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Master eMedia, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn about what eMedia has to offer and how to Saturday, January 8 use it. Register at https://bit.ly/3eilsgd National Snuggle a Chicken Day Expect some squawking! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The Chapel A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., River Styx Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth Park, 8200 River Styx Road. Vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist, https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg dress for weather, wear appropriate footwear, bring own water. Ages 10 Gearheads: Light Art, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Liand up. No registration, free. brary, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Use phone or supplied device to Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., create art using light and an app that simulates a slow shutter speed Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 camera. Register at Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads Alphabet Adventure: R is for Red, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Acalong the trail. tivity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Story, Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, make red book out of variety of materials, sort pompoms, make red Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Therapy dogs visit bracelets, practice color mixing. Ages 2 through 6. Register at the children’s area to be read to. https://bit.ly/3JdXLnJ Giant Candyland, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Play life-size game where you are the game Wednesday, January 12 piece. National Pharmacist Day Do not be a pill! Wish your pharmacist a happy day! Sunday, January 9 National Static Electricity Day Dare we say you will get a charge from Monthly Makers: Cardinals, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Registered this day? households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays Yule Lads, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m., according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, Sunday; through January 9; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 go to https://bit.ly/3q9VZLy Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Final day. Seek 13 mischievous yule lads Natural Discoveries Hiking Series, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Princess Ledges along the trail. Nature Preserve, 4361 Spruce Avenue, Brunswick Hills. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. Ages 7 to adult. For more information, go to Monday, January 10 https://bit.ly/3egtk1S


40

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, Lip Balm Lab, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 623 School Drive, Wadsworth https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg S. Broadway Street, Medina. Create own custom lip balm. Register at https://bit.ly/3qkCFve Glass Magnet Design, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Teens can drop in to use paint and glitter to create Saturday, January 15 artistic magnets. Setting Financial Goals, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and Soup Swap Day But only good soups. South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Help financial Monthly Makers: Cardinals, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, planning for big life events. Register at https://bit.ly/3mrwV1F Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Registered Backyard Conservation: Starting a Garden by Seed, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Med- according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, ina. Learn how to prep garden soil and ways to start vegetable seeds go to https://bit.ly/3q9VZLy from Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District. Register at K-9 Kapers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Allardale West Parking Lot, 401 Remsen https://bit.ly/3pk0gwC Road, Medina. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot nonWadsworth Historical Society: History of Bricks Around Wadsworth, retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 ages, children must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration. Broad Street, Wadsworth. Presentation about several small brick manu- Current COVID precautions will be taken. facturers that existed in Wadsworth in the 1800s and provided bricks for Meet Delrita the Elephant, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., virtual. Hosted by schools, buildings and homes. Medina Library and Endangered Ark Foundation. Join in to learn about elephants, ask questions. All ages. Get link after registering at

Thursday, January 13

https://bit.ly/3mqMXsF International Skeptics Day and Make Your Dream Come True Day I Tree-mendous Trees, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, think there is a bit of a conflict here! 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Visit for indoor activities and to Monthly Makers: Cardinals, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, walk the nature trail to learn more tree facts posted along the way. Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays Sunday, January 16 according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, Appreciate a Dragon Day Always, otherwise it might snap! go to https://bit.ly/3q9VZLy Camp Wired: Word Processing 201, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Monthly Makers: Cardinals, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Advanced Word skills: Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Registered change page margins, add borders and shading, copy and past, format households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, text, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3JbKhbZ go to https://bit.ly/3q9VZLy American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, Tree-mendous Trees, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Visit for indoor activities and to Tween Thursday: Make a Hologram, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activ- walk the nature trail to learn more tree facts posted along the way. ity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create crafts, build gadgets, crack codes, play games, more. Ages 9 to 14. Regis- ORMACO Live at the Library: Scott Schlegel: A Taste of Classical Guitar, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 ter at https://bit.ly/3Elqm6H Broad Street, Wadsworth. Reserve space by calling 419-853-6016 Writing Active Hooks, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Avoid story sagging middles by building hooks. Mary Buckham Monday, January 17 shares 10 hooks and how to use them. Get link after registering at International We Are Not Broken Day https://bit.ly/32aaoQ4 https://bit.ly/3sosVCN American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Chair Yoga, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at Paw Patrol Academy, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center https://bit.ly/3H9KwSS Street, Seville. Join in the mission, save the day and earn a badge. Ages History of Jazz in Cleveland, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina 4 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/3yPNucz Library and the Medina Diversity Project. Lecture-discussion on the con- Let’s Explore: Science of Magnetism, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Actributions to jazz of Cleveland natives and other musicians who spent tivity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Experitime in Cleveland. Link sent after registration at ments with magnets, race magnetic-powered cars, make a magnetic https://bit.ly/30QEdnR

maze, paint with magnets. All ages. Register at

Friday, January 14

https://bit.ly/3pjWDqv

Dress Up Your Pet Day Whhhhhhyyyyyyy? Monthly Makers: Cardinals, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through October 10, Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3q9VZLy

Tuesday, January 18 Thesaurus Day We are at a loss for words! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail.

Couponing With Rachel, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn basics of couponing, Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. how to get things for free, more. Register at https://bit.ly/3Ha1JMh https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Geronimo Stilton Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Enjoy a


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

41

cheese-tastic time celebrating a mouse journalist. Make mouse puppets, newspaper hats, and cheese bookmarks. Play Geronimo games. Register at https://bit.ly/3H8jMT8

Wednesday, January 19 Tin Can Day Well, that is something to kick around! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Celebrate National Popcorn Day! 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create popcorn crafts, enjoy treats, learn popcorn’s history. Grades 6 through 12. Discover Espresso, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn history, how to make, and taste espresso. Register at https://bit.ly/3pmVM8J No-Sew Snowman, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make a snowman from a sock. Register at https://bit.ly/3Fllvnt MCDL Celebrates 40 Years, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about the Medina County Library’s history. Register at https://bit.ly/3Jctt4z

Thursday, January 20 Get to Know Your Customers Day But do not follow them home! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Hibernation Hike, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Allardale West Parking Lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Bundle up and join in on a hike to learn about how animals are adapted to survive cold weather. All ages, no registration.

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Lessons in Colored Pencil Through January 9, 2022 B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina Paintings and Purses: A Collection of the Past, Present and Future January 5, 2022 through February 28, 2022 Highland Library 4160 Ridge Road, Medina 18th Annual Aquarius Exhibition Medina County Art League members exhibit two works each. January 31, 2022 through March 6, 2022 B. Smith Gallery Third Floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Camp Wired: PowerPoint 101, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about creating a slide presentation using a variety of options, saving and printing it, viewing it. Register at https://bit.ly/3mqdGW2 Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; DIY Bath Bombs, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Story Hour/Activity Room, Highland Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/3qlVMoq Tween Thursday: Dino-Mite! Make a Dinosaur Habit, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create crafts, build gadgets, crack codes, play games, more. Ages 9 to 14.

Nature Ice Art, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Use natural materials to make ornaments. Kindergarten through Grade 2. Register at https://bit.ly/3EpvSVY

Medina County Local History Fair, noon to 4 p.m., Community Rooms Explorastory: “Minerva Louise,” 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Ac- A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Local history tivity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make and genealogical societies showcase collections, answer questions. crafts, read story, sing songs with egg shakers, more. Register at Tree-mendous Trees, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Visit for indoor activities and to https://bit.ly/3H20j6k walk the nature trail to learn more tree facts posted along the way.

Friday, January 21

Sunday, January 23

National Hug Day and Squirrel Appreciation Day We want to see the Measure Your Feet Day Guess the length, and if you are right, you person who tries to combine the two! nailed it! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View instal- Monthly Makers: Cardinals; noon. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. lations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Meeting Room A, Tree-mendous Trees, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Visit for indoor activities and to walk the nature trail to learn more tree facts posted along the way.

Saturday, January 22

Answer Your Cat’s Questions Day Good luck with that!

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Birds, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall, Medina. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. Ages 7 to adult. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3egtk1S


42

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

Monday, January 24 National Compliment Day How nice!

Tween Thursday: Collage Cats, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Create crafts, build gadgets, crack codes, play games, more. Ages 9 to 14.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United DIY Crystal-Infused Lip Gloss, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 CenMethodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville ter Street, Seville. Create stress-relieving lip gloss with calming properties of amethyst. Register at https://bit.ly/3yS4gHZ https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Choosing a Daycare, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Wellness Yoga, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Library and OSU Extension. Get link for meeting after registering at http- Brunswick Library, 3640 Center Road, Brunswick. Play Bingo, win books. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/3qipJpz s://bit.ly/3qj6uw3 Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or with sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/3H8zKfE

Tuesday, January 25

Loop Yarn Winter Scarves, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Bring 15 yards (one to 2 skeins) of loop yarn, create scarf. Register at https://bit.ly/3sHLQZB The Akron Vulcans Football Team, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Hear the story of Akron’s Continental Football League team that lasted four games in 1967. Register at https://bit.ly/3FlSnwt

National Day Opposite, wait, National Opposite Day, yeah, that is Friday, January 28 right! National Kazoo Day Play a kazoo and get a buzz from celebrating! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View instal- Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. lations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Saturday, January 29 Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Root Candles, 640 National Seed Swap Day Be careful if you are given giant beanstalk seeds! Liberty Street, Medina. https://rcblood.org/32i1sbg Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Do geekcrafts, learn about Japanese culture, cosplay welcome! Register at https://bit.ly/3JdVhFA

Wednesday, January 26

Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Jewelry Holder, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Design a marbled porcelain jewelry holder. For tweens and teens. Register at https://bit.ly/3mMT2jl

National Green Juice Day and National Spouses Day We are not too sure you want to celebrate by giving your spouse green juice, especially Sunday, January 30 if it is supposed to be orange juice! National Croissant Day Sounds flaky to me! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Monthly Makers: Cardinals; noon to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View instal- Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. lations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Emoji Guessing Game, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Monday, January 31 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 6 through 12. Windows 11 Sneak Peak, 6:30 pm. to 7:30 p.m., Conference Rooms 2A Inspire Your Heart With Art Day and 2B, second floor, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Toddler Art, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Register at https://bit.ly/32xRv9y Ridge Road, Medina. Messy art for toddlers, wear clothing that can get messy. Register at https://bit.ly/3FmLElQ WAITING LIST

Thursday, January 27

Chocolate Cake Day To test your New Year’s resolution! Monthly Makers: Cardinals; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; through January 22, 2022; Oenslager Nature Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Center. View installations by area residents along Monthly Maker Trail. Camp Wired: Social Media 101, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn the differences between different ones and how to utilize them to keep in contact. Ohio Means Jobs Workshop, 11 a.m. to noon, Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Lean how to use Canva and more to increase LinkedIn engagement. Register at https://bit.ly/3pkRT48 Book Bingo, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3640 Center Road, Brunswick. Play Bingo, win books. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/3qipJpz


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2022

43

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you! Cable, Internet, Phone

Armstrong

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

Dentist

Insurance

Thomas Muntean Agency/ American Family Insurance 451 W. Liberty Street, Medina Contact: Thomas Muntean 330-721-7716 Website: https://bit.ly/2ZtscEb

Job Services

Landry Family Dentistry

Ohio Means Jobs

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

72 Public Square, First Floor, Medina 330-441-5341 Website: https://medinacountyworks.com/

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

FlashBang Photography/ Videography

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

Furniture

620 Ridgewood Crossing Drive, Suite E, Akron Phone: 330-576-3059 Website: https://botara.com/

The Place

Wallace Home Furnishings 883 N. Court Street, Medina Contact: Richard Wallace

Photographer

Spa

Botara Euro Spa

Owner

Phone: 330-723-3006 Website: https://bit.ly/30hZFl1

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


Scan code for free digital subscription!

Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589