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JANUARY 2020 VOLUME 2, NUMBER 12

A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism

$11.99


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 12 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

The Proof is in the Publication by Amy Barnes Over the last year, as other publications experienced declining readership, Joy of Medina County Magazine tripled its number of subscribers. The number of readers also came close to tripling. The number of readers is significant because that is not the number of people the magazine was delivered to but the number of people who actually read the magazine. Amazing when you consider that this past year also saw the Youngstown Vindicator newspaper cease publication, Family Circle magazine cease publication in December 2019, and Rachael Ray Every Day magazine dropping its publication from 10 times a year down to quarterly and available only on newsstands. Yet, Joy of Medina County Magazine continues to rise. I have to smile every time someone approaches me, mentions they have seen the magazine, and then says, “It’s a REAL magazine with real stories! I love it!” Many express amazement that the magazine exists and say that they did not think they would ever see such a publication again. Thank our loyal advertisers who make it possible to bring the magazine to readers for free. Let them know how much you enjoy the magazine, and click on their ads in the eedition, visit their websites, and shop with them. Please tell them how much you appreciate their dedication to community and to quality stories. Another of the magazine’s biggest assets is the talented staff members who believe in it. Each of Joy’s staff members knows he or she was chosen for the integrity and dedication they have in their field, and they know that only quality work is acceptable. Each one is available to readers for questions and consulting, which is why there is contact information below each of their columns. At the annual staff holiday party, it was wonderful to watch and listen as everyone bounced ideas and thoughts off of each

other for future column ideas and for marketing each other’s businesses. The energy and camaraderie in the room were overwhelmingly impressive. Over the last year, the magazine added a business section and a health-and-fitness section and became an official, cataloged publication in the Medina County Library, with issues being added to the Medina County Historic Archive. We started the year with five columnists and are closing our publishing year, which runs February to January, with nine columnists and the addition of a cartoonist who once worked at Disney and Playboy. The funniest moment of the staff party was when Jerry King mentioned he once worked as a Playboy cartoonist, and Bob Soroky, who came to the party dressed as Jack Sparrow, exclaimed, “Wait, you mean all of those women are DRAWN?!! They aren’t real ?!!!” Thank you, staff, you are an amazing team. With the next issue, we will start our third year of publication. I am proud to be the creator and publisher of the very best publication in Medina County and one of the most innovative publications in the country, one that is read worldwide. Not bad for a woman who was told repeatedly she did not know what she was talking about and that no one wanted real stories any more. I get to start every day bringing Joy to people around the world, and there truly is no better job than that. If you are not yet a subscriber, now is the time to grab your free subscription! Go to: https://bit.ly/36jNpON Company owners who would like to join in bringing Joy to Medina County, please contact me at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com or call 330-461-0589. Thank you for being a part of Joy!

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Robert Soroky MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

ODOR MAY LEAVE BUT MOLD STAYS by Paul McHam If you have noticed a decrease in musty odors, it does not mean the mold has left, it may mean the mold is only waiting for moisture to return.

THE IN BOX

TICK-TOCK TIME by Steve Rak Take a time-traveling journey to discover what is needed for your business to thrive in the coming year.

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THE NETWORKER

SETTING NEW YEAR NETWORKING GOALS by Bob Arnold Now is the time to create a plan to maximize the benefits of your networking efforts.

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MESSAGES FROM “FROZEN 2”

by Amy Barnes

by Hunter Barnard

Creating a whole new low-cost vet clinic from scratch is not easy, but Lisa and Mike Taylor took on the challenge and proved the Mission Possible.

RINGWORLD by Robert Soroky

While some parents have voiced concerns over “Frozen 2,” this is what our movie reviewer learned.

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OH, SNAP!

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

SHOTS AND SUTURES

BIKE BLING BONANZA by Robert Soroky Ideas for tricking out your cycling experience.

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OF MIND AND BODY

THREE WAYS TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE by Kelly Bailey Feeling overwhelmed and in need of life changes but think you do not have time to make them? Here are three steps that can make a difference.

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Lisa and Mike Taylor were ready for a flurry of furry customers on Mission Possible’s first day of business.

by Austin Steger

by Jerry King

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BITE ME!

CAPTIVATING CORN FRITTERS by Amy Barnes A great, tasty side dish alternative that also can be the main dish.

Find the words that made Mission Possible.

HEALTHY TRAILS

SAFER BATTERY ON HORIZON

MIRTH AND JOY

photos by FlashBang Photography and Amy Barnes A feast, some snow and heroes.

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Lithium-ion batteries may soon be replaced by a battery that could change multiple industries and how often phones have to be charged.

The final chapter, will the crew make it to Ringworld in time?

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by Michelle Riley

ROLL ’EM!

ANSWERING THE CALL

THE READING NOOK

PROTECTING THE EVERGREEN Learning how to protect evergreens, such as rhododendrons, from being harmed by the loss of leaf moisture due to winter’s icy winds.

Mission Possible volunteer Angel Reep weighs Boo.

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DIG IT!

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

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GEMS

Can you solve this month’s puzzle? Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

HELP TRANSITIONING TO CIVILIAN LIFE by Kent Von Der Vellen A local Marine veteran took action to help other veterans when he learned how difficult the path is when transitioning to civilian life.

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LET’S DO IT! There are so many activities in Medina County, it is as hard to decide on what to do as it is for winter to decide between rain, sun or snow.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

Traveling through the snow to volunteer at Mission Possible on opening day were, from left: Emma Bonfiglio from Cuyahoga Falls; Haley Wood from Nova; Mary Muller from Homerville; Chris Newton from Grafton; Angel Reep from Medina; and Heather Wolf from Valley City. story and pictures by Amy Barnes

open at 8 a.m. sharp to greet patients, proving from day one the name of the new clinic was appropriate: he calls started coming in at all hours of the Mission Possible. day and night, starting as early as 2 a.m., as word Lisa spent opening day pacing around the clinic spread that a new low-cost pet veterinarian clinic excitedly, would soon open in Medina. pitching in Lisa and Mike Taylor had signed a lease a couple of where weeks prior, and by early October 2019, had to have additional help phone lines installed in the not-yet-opened clinic in was needed, order to help handle the flood of calls. consulting with On their first day of business, there were 35 staff members, surgeries scheduled. November 12, 2019, also was greeting the day that featured the first slippery snowfall of the arrivals, and season. smiling, while While cars slid off roads and numerous accidents still being a were reported, volunteers from surrounding areas; little anxious Lisa; and veterinarian Dr. Melania Gharakhanian with that everything her loyal dog, Joey, made their way to the clinic to go all right for

T


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

Katie Diltz assists her father, Dr. Phil Diltz, during a surgery at Mission Possible. Katie is working on earning a veterinarian degree.

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neuters and well-care visits for their dogs and cats. The closure also ended the low-cost option for surgically controlling the feral cat population. Numerous posts popped up on social media as people scrambled to try to help each other locate other low-cost options, none of which were close by. One option some desperate pet owners chose was traveling to a clinic in Loudonville, Ohio, approximately an hour away, which was being operated by Lisa, a former Quick Fix volunteer. Lisa had opened the Loudonville clinic a year earlier. She had used money from a small inheritance from her mother to fund the clinic. Veterinarian Dr. Phil Diltz was instrumental in the opening of the Loudonville clinic and had approached Lisa with the idea. Diltz wanted the clinic started because he saw a need for it in the community, and he also agreed to be a vet at the clinic. However, after a year of operation, the Loudonville clinic was having trouble getting additional veterinarians and was able to be open continued, Page 6

the clinic. “I’m so excited! I couldn’t sleep last night,” Lisa said. Her husband, Mike, arrived a little later in the morning, after he had cared for the couple’s goats. As soon as he arrived, he quickly jumped in, moving the clinic’s small outdoor sign so it could be better seen in the snow and helping with anything the staff needed. He has been a supporter and participant in Lisa’s dream to help animals since they married 10 years ago, and he beams with pride when he looks at Lisa and what they have accomplished together. Lisa looks back at Mike, smiles and says, “I couldn’t have done it without him. He’s my financial backer.” Whereupon, Mike spends a few minutes grinning and playfully swaggering around the clinic, while calling himself a financial backer. Lisa just shakes her head, rolls her eyes, and goes back to the business at hand. When Medina’s previous clinic, Quick Fix, closed suddenly and unexpectedly in mid-2019, it left area pet owners without a local low-cost option for spays, Calm wisdom while waiting for surgery.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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While waiting for surgery, a cat practices its laser focus.

only one day a week. The closure of Quick Fix inspired Lisa to begin exploring the option of moving the Loudonville clinic to Medina. Based on her past experience in Medina, she had reason to believe she would find volunteers and veterinarians more plentiful. By Mission Possible’s first day of business, it already had two vets hired: Diltz and Gharakhanian. “Medina is a great community, and it needed something like this,” said Gharakhanian. Lisa also believed that moving the clinic would enable them to help a larger number of animals than they were able to in Loudonville. “I just wanted to fill the void,” Lisa said, adding that she never would have moved the Loudonville clinic to Medina if the previous clinic had not closed. When the Taylors started exploring the logistics of moving the clinic to Medina, they were slowed


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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"Shhhh! I'm hiding!"

down by the rent prices. They looked at several possible locations, but the rent was too high, ranging from $3,000 to $5,000 a month, Lisa said. Just as the Taylors were starting to lose hope of finding the right location to move the clinic to, Shawn Ritchie, the owner of the building at 910 Lake Road, Medina, told the Taylors he would be willing to give them a good deal on rent to enable them to open the clinic. They were delighted and grabbed at the chance to make Mission Possible. The 910 Lake Road building had been occupied previously by Kitten Krazy, which was affiliated with Quick Fix. After the clinic’s closure, Kitten Krazy moved around the corner to the clinic’s former location at 930 Lafayette Road. The creation of Mission Possible and Lisa working with animals would be no surprise to those who knew her as a child, because she was known for bringing home animals of all kinds to care for and love.

“I brought home anything I could,” she said, laughing. Lisa has worked at various veterinary clinics over the last 30 years, including 18 years for an Oberlin veterinary hospital; was the court-appointed humane officer for Lorain County for eight years; and was a volunteer at the Lorain County Animal Protective League, now known as the Friendship Animal Protective League. Mike has no shortage of love for animals, too, and he rode with a pet raccoon in his 18-wheeler for 17 years. He owns Taylor Trucking in Nova, Ohio, and is a hauling contractor for Unimark in Springfield, Ohio. Currently, Lisa and Mike have goats, horses and dogs. Veterinarians at the clinic are paid and support staff positions are being filled by volunteers. Mission Possible currently is not a nonprofit because the need was so urgent for a clinic to open continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

prices low. However, in the future, as prices for the in Medina, Lisa did not want to delay the opening by medicines and vaccines increase, so will the prices adding to the timeline the extensive effort of trying for them at the clinic. to gain nonprofit status for the clinic. Mission Possible is equipped to offer basic pet care Even without the nonprofit status, Mission such as spays, neuters, and wellness shots. It is not Possible’s prices are comparable to Medina’s able to provide a diagnosis or perform complicated previous clinic, Lisa said. surgeries. She said that because the clinic does not have To make an appointment for pet care or for further overhead such as testing equipment and staff, like a information, call 330-952-1800 or 440-222-5244. typical veterinarian office does, they are able to keep Pricing for services can be found on the clinic’s continued from Page 7

Emma Bonfiglio tenderly comforts a dog recovering from surgery.


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The lobby of Mission Possible

The surgery room at Mission Possible continued, Page 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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Mission Possible's first patient was Pumpkin Kiser, owned by 9-year-old Emily Kiser.

Facebook page at https://bit.ly/2OMgmwK Mission Possible donations can be made at https://bit.ly/33LfBbz . Funds are used for equipment and to provide services, and to help keep fees low. While donations currently are not tax deductible, Lisa said future plans include exploring the option of becoming a nonprofit once the clinic is firmly established. Donations of blankets, towels, crates of all sizes, and rice-filled socks (which are heated and then used to comfort pets after surgery) can be dropped off at the clinic from 9 a.m. to 4:30 pm., Tuesday through Thursday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the second and fourth Saturday of each month.

Mission Possible is not affiliated in any way with Kitten Krazy or the former Quick Fix, so it does not have any access to the closed clinic’s records. Pet owners who are need of those records should contact Kitten Krazy by e-mailing wynnek@kittenkrazy.org or by calling 440-465-9654.


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Pumpkin Kiser is carefully examined and prepped for surgery by assistant Heather Wolf and Dr. Melania Gharakhanian.

The weather outside was frightful, but the staff and patients still came for Mission Possible's first day of business. Lisa Taylor listens as Angel Reep fills her in on the background of the kitten, Boo, she is holding and the gray kitten in the carrier, Ladybug, who were brought in by Linda Warrington from Creston, Ohio.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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Michaela Gadoury fills out paperwork for her 10year-old Morkie, Bear, whom she brought in for shots and a nail trim.

Dr. Melania Gharakhanian waits for surgery prep work to be completed by Emma Bonfiglio and Heather Wolf.

Joey, veterinarian Dr. Melania Gharakhanian's dog, kept a close watch on every detail at Mission Possible on opening day.

Lisa Taylor holds her beloved hairless cat, Smeagol, who was there for the opening day of Mission Possible.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

THE READING NOOK

by Robert Soroky

Chapter 4: Reality

“W

hat do you think, Remi?” her father asked, now standing behind her in line next to Remi’s mother. “Should we maybe come back tomorrow and see if there are less people?” “No way!” Remi replied incredulously. “I can’t wait that long. We’re staying!” “She’s right, Ran,” Remi’s mother added. “The project is only going to be here for one more week before it travels to another city, remember? And today is also the only day the artist himself is going to be here, so we need to stay.” “Okay, you guys win,” said Remi’s father in mock defeat. “At least the line seems to be moving pretty quick.” An hour and a half later, Remi and her parents had finally entered the exhibit room and it was about time, too, as the museum would be closing soon. Although the room was quite large, the museum staff was letting only a few people in at a time for optimal viewing. Then Remi saw it: The Project. It was laid out on a long, ornate table in the exact center of the room. It was magnificent. And it was complete, just as advertised. She counted to make sure. Yep, there were nine of them. Nine perfectly square boxes all placed equally apart from each other along the length of the table. They were constructed completely of black glass and stood almost as tall as Remi herself. The craftsmanship was incredible, but it was the mysterious objects suspended within the boxes that everyone had come to see. Remi concluded, almost immediately, that these objects were the most beautiful pieces of art she had ever seen in her short lifetime. She started viewing the exhibit from the back, where most of the bigger objects were situated.

After about an hour of perusing the exhibit, she had only made it through half the display. Her father approached her from behind and asked, “So, was it worth the wait?” “Oh, absolutely!” replied Remi gleefully. “It’s incredible. I can’t imagine where in the world the artist ever found pieces as magnificently beautiful as these! Some of them are so small and delicate, too.” “Well,” her father replied, “I overheard the artist telling some folks that he had to travel pretty far to find these gems.”

“…he had to travel pretty far to find these gems.” At that moment, Remi’s mother, standing toward the front of the exhibit, waved back to her daughter, signaling her to come up and join her. “Before we leave,” Remi’s mother said, “I wanted to make sure you saw this one in particular.” Remi walked up to the glass box. It was the third one in line on the table. She looked inside. The beautifully colored orb suspended within was located, as were all the other orbs, in the exact center of its box. This one was rather small, about one-tenth the size of a curled fist. What she still couldn’t understand, though, was how all these objects were able to remain suspended inside their boxes. There were no visible supports holding them up. They just floated in their own personal space, ever so peacefully. Some, like this one, even had smaller orbs circling around them. How did they do that, she wondered? Oh well, she thought to herself, I guess that’s why they call it art. “This one is kinda pretty,” she finally said to her mother. “I like the blue and green colors. They’re so vibrant.” Not seeing anything else interesting on the inside, she backed away from the box and happened to notice something very peculiar on the outside. “Oh, what’s this supposed to be?”


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

“It’s a viewing scope,” replied Remi’s mother. “So you can get a closer look at the object inside.” “Really? That’s odd. How come none of the other boxes have one of these viewing scopes?” “Well, the artist said this piece was special, and if you look through the scope, you’ll see why.” Remi leaned forward and grabbed the small end of the scope that was protruding through her side of the glass. The other end of the scope, nearly half the length of her own arm, extended into the box and was pointed directly at the floating object inside. She placed her free hand on the glass box for support and immediately pulled it back in shock. “Wow. The glass is warm. I mean, like, really warm.” “Do you see that small light up in the corner of the box?” her mother asked. “Yes.” Remi replied. “All the boxes have one.” “Not like this one. In addition to being a light source, this one also generates a lot of heat.” “Why?” “You really need to look through the scope and see for yourself.” Remi leaned forward again and peered into the scope. What she saw made her mouth fall open.

“Oh, my! It’s alive!” “Oh my! It’s alive!” “Very much so,” her mother said, smiling. Remi moved the scope from side to side, scanning the surface of the object with a sense of awe. “There’s just so much detail. So much, life. Are any of the other ones like this? I mean, alive?” “No. This is the only one.” “Amazing. How something so small can have so much, oh, wait a minute. There’s something else. It looks like there’s, yes, something is floating up from the object. It doesn’t look like anything else I’ve seen so far, and it’s so tiny! Actually, it kinda looks like it’s coming right towards me.”

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“I saw that, too,” said Remi’s mother. “In fact, I asked the artist about it and he said that it’s not uncommon to see stuff floating up from certain orbs. Probably just debris or waste or something like that. He also said that even though most of the stuff drifting up is very small, it can build up pretty quickly, so he has to very carefully vacuum the inside of the boxes from time to time to keep his art pieces clean. I guess this one is about due for a cleaning.” Remi continued to gaze in wonder at the amazing living object when, suddenly, the exhibit room’s public address system buzzed to life. “Attention please. The museum will be closing in a few moments. All patrons in the gift shop, please pay for your items at this time.” Remi and her parents collected themselves, exited the exhibition room, and headed down the long main hall toward the museum exit. “So, Remi,” her father asked, as he lifted her up onto his shoulders for the remainder of the walk, “which one was your favorite?” “Well,‘’ Remi responded excitedly, “I liked the really big one with the stripes, and the one with the rings was kinda cool, but my favorite one was the small one up front, in the third box. You know, the living one.” “I liked that one, too,” her mother said. “Do you remember what it was called?” “Are you kidding, Mom? I’ll never forget the name of that one. It was called Earth!”

Robert Soroky writes the “Healthy Trails” column and is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long-distance charity rides and is manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com. A new story begins next month!

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy of Medina County Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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The Medina area's first snowfall was a mere dusting, but on November 12 it was a little more impressive. Early morning roads were slippery and numerous accidents were reported. photos by Amy Barnes

Brandy Hughes takes a look at the recent local heroes photo display at the Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center. Hughes is the wife of Brad Hughes, a Brunswick police officer. photo by Amy Barnes Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center had a display in the front lobby honoring active and retired servicepeople. photo by Amy Barnes

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It was time for a feast hosted by Buckeye Library as part of its Teen Territory, a Wednesday after-school program. photos by Amy Barnes

Rachelle Reitzel, Buckeye Library page, watches as librarian Catie Taylor readies food for the feast. Isabelle Pritchard, left, joined Becca Taylor for the feast.

Tanner Cuson enjoys the feast while Claire Haney and Kyle Shellenbarger talk.

Filling their plates are Trinity Park, Becca Taylor and Cara Huba.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

From left, Carter Scerca, Angela Kopec and Madeline Nalepa.

On left, front to back, is Alli Zerr and Merry Moya. On the right, front to back, is Jade Ames, Jayden Jones and Kiera Grisanti.

Brunswick Library hosted a Fandom Art night where those in Grades 6 to 12 were invited to make various pieces of art based on their favorite characters. photos by FlashBang Photography

Eleanor Gulliford concentrates on creating an origami Pokemon Exploring the magic of making Harry Potter wands are, bookmark. from left, Natalie Myers; Bridget Sutter, librarian; and Yolismar Negroni Perez.

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Joyful Word Search Shots and Sutures

HEALTHY TRAILS

Bike Bling Bonanza by Robert Soroky

VOLUNTEERS CATS SYRINGES DOGS VACCINATIONS

WELL CARE SPAY NEUTER VETERINARIANS CLIPBOARDS

HELP CARING MISSION NEW SMILES

Y Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Lighting up for You

In my past columns, there have been tips to help you discover the type of bike rider you are as well as the style of bike that best fits your cycling goals. Hopefully, you have now made your move and picked out that magical, two-wheeled machine of your dreams. So, what is next? It is time to trick out that new ride with some sweet bike bling. Accessories are a big part of any bike purchase. As an avid cyclist, there are several items I recommend to ensure a safe, fun and efficient day on a bike. First, there is safety. Whether you are a casual rider or seasoned racer, the potential for a serious accident is just a pedal stroke away. Wearing the proper protective gear and being as visible as possible should be priority one. Helmets should comply with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) safety standard for bicycle helmets and be properly fitted to your head. Newer helmets are equipped with a multi-directional impact protection system (MIPS) feature for added safety. For added visibility, wear brightly colored or reflective jerseys and jackets and install head and tail lights on your bike. These extra steps will help you stand out to cars, pedestrians and other cyclists. You also will want to be prepared for mishaps along the way. No one wants to get a flat tire or a broken chain, but ride long enough and these things eventually will happen. Having a small pouch on your bike to carry simple tools like hex keys, tire levers, a spare inner tube, and a pump will enable you or someone to help you make repairs. Finally, there are the convenience and comfort items that might not be in your first round of purchases and would include things like water bottles, padded gloves and shorts for comfort, clipless pedals and shoes for more efficient and productive riding, and cycling computers to track mileage and other ride data. Overwhelmed? Do not be. Buy the basics to start, then let experience be your guide on what accessories make sense down the road. Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

OF MIND AND BODY

Three Ways to Change Your Life by Kelly Bailey Here are three New Year’s resolutions that will change your life this year. Resolve to quit dieting forever. Diets do not work. Ninetyseven percent of dieters regain the weight (https://bit.ly/2OD7pFU). In fact, going on a diet predicts you will be heavier in the long term (https://bit.ly/2q65gsW). Pretty dismal odds considering the amount of suffering we endure on restrictive diets. What to do instead? Learn to eat when you are hungry and stop when you are comfortably full. You were born with this intrinsic ability. Most of us have simply forgotten how to listen to our bodies. Re-learn to honor your body’s signals and this becomes an incredibly simple and effective way to manage your weight and your health. Resolve to spend five minutes every day being mindful. Yes, just five minutes a day can have a life-altering impact on your stress levels and overall happiness. Mindfulness is nothing more than bringing your attention to the present moment and the experience of your body in that moment. How to do it? Focus on your big toe. I bet you could not feel it a second ago, right? But now that you are focused on it, suddenly it is there. You have a big toe! How does your big toe feel? Wiggle it around. Press it into the ground. Observe how that feels. Something as simple and silly as thinking about your big toe can bring you directly into the present so that you can experience this very moment in time. Resolve to get your finances under control. Money is not everything, but when you live paycheck to paycheck, it can certainly cause stress and unhappiness. The first step is to figure out where your money goes. Print off your bank and credit card statements. I knew I was spending a little money at Target, but until I printed off the bank statements, I did not realize it was in the hundreds of dollars every month. It is painful to learn these things, but the awareness is extremely effective at creating behavior change. Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

THE IN BOX

Odor May Leave but Mold Stays

Tick-Tock Time

by Paul McHam

by Steve Rak

Have you ever walked into a home and thought, “I smell mold?” You know, that musty odor that fills your nose and alerts your senses that something is out of place and may end with negative results. Sometimes, it can even make your skin burn and cause your lungs to automatically seize up, in a kind of warning, after just one whiff. It may be you have had that experience in your own home, but now that odor seems to be getting less and less. You ask, “Is my mold going away on its own?” The answer is: No! Once mold appears, it does not disappear on its own. Your nose is not deceiving you; mold’s odor can lessen. The odor you are noticing, as with most odors, comes from a volatile organic compound, better known as a VOC. Mold produces it as a by-product of its metabolism. When the temperature outside drops enough, the air dries out. As you might remember from past science classes, cold air cannot hold as much moisture as warm air, therefore, we have relative humidity. When the air dries out enough, the existing mold may go dormant. Often, there is enough moisture coming in to keep mold active. We commonly have snow melt and even rain or freezing rain to help keep things wet. Water can flow down the basement wall and reach warmer temperatures below the frost line. Leaking pipes may well still leak and cause a mold problem. The water table can rise and provide enough water for mold growth. Mold is a tough little critter and will survive anywhere its living conditions exist. Remember, mold spores are floating everywhere, even during the winter. In either case, you should get a valid assessment of your home’s environmental status. Remember, it is said that 80 percent of all human ailments come from our environment.

It is the year 2020, how did that just happen? I guess time waits for no one, so on that note let us all fast forward to December 31, 2020. Whoa, that really went by fast! So here we are, ready to ring in 2021, and what was different this year? Did you hit all of those goals you had for your company? Are you sitting on a load of cash, or are you still in debt up to your eyeballs? Did you get rid of that employee who was a cancer on your company, or will he or she still be there after the break, hung over and crabby as usual? My point is that, right now, we have an opportunity to

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt

change the narrative of that conversation on New Year’s Eve 2020, if we just do some serious planning and doing throughout the year. It is not always easy to face the future head-on but all of that optimism we have right now, this very minute, needs to be capitalized on. It is tick-tock time and pretending the whole year has gone by is a good way to add some motivation to your routine. Think about it, how many times have you said to yourself or someone else that time goes by so fast? The reality is that it does go by fast. Use it to your advantage and fast forward, then look back at this year ahead. Yes, I said look back at the year ahead. Is it everything you wanted it to be, and, if not, what are you going to do about it? The reality is that you know right now what will happen this year if you do not decide to act on your dreams and goals. You will be looking back at 2020, shaking your head, and lamenting how fast time flies. They say hindsight is 20/20, so get after it so you do not have to look back with regret. Happy New Year! Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

THE NETWORKER

Setting New Year Networking Goals

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by Bob Arnold As we start off the new year, it is important to have a networking plan in place in order to make new friends and learn how we can help them and ourselves make progress on goals for the new year. Speaking of goals, what are yours regarding networking for the New Year? Do you have an idea of the best type of networking group or event to be involved with? Do you know the type of person you are looking to meet? How much of your weekly and monthly time will you devote to networking? As each year is about to start, I have a practice of sitting down and digging into my current contacts to see if there are ways of engaging better with them. For example, one year, I devised a system to randomly pick 24 of my current LinkedIn contacts and schedule a one-toone meeting with one of them a month, with a backup if that meeting fell through. Other years, I schedule two new networking events each month. Other people I know took one month and attended one networking event per day. This gets a little hectic, but they told me the results were phenomenal. The one-a-day system is not a sustainable one for most of us, but there is merit to regularly attending two networking events per week throughout the year. I can guarantee that if you keep it up, there would be more revenue for you at the end of the year than if you went about business as usual. In my groups, I have attendees reach out to a certain type of person in their contact base over the next two weeks with certain topics to discuss. The results not only change the members’ businesses, but their lives, also. I have been quite surprised at the results some people get. What can you do to spur some activity in your business through networking? Make a networking plan and sincerely try to hold to it. I would love to hear your results. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

“They won’t care if you have makeup on if there’s an actual emergency, they won’t care what you look like, they’ll just be like, ‘OK, where’s her other leg?’ ”

“I quit wondering, I started explaining.”

“I think I’m getting taller because the floor keeps seeming farther away. Now when I trip and fall, it will be more noticeable because there is more of me (to fall).”

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

DIG IT!

ROLL ’EM!

Protecting the Evergreen

Messages From “Frozen 2”

by Michelle Riley

by Hunter Barnard

Something very few know about me, I have a tendency to name my plants. Robert is one plant in particular that I am very fond of. Robert arrived in my garden by means of the “misfit plant association,” also known as the place where unwanted plants go. Robert was one such plant and was rejected for having hot pink buds which opened to a white flower with a soft blush. He is a Yaku Prince rhododendron and a lovely addition to my garden. I visit Robert often to check in and see how he is feeling. On colder days, I can see Robert curling his leaves as he seems to be shivering under the north wind’s icy blows.

I love the new “Frozen” movie! It had Elsa, Anna, Olaf, Sven, and Kristoff all back again. Olaf is my favorite character because he is a snowman, and I really like to build snowmen. He asks a lot of questions, just like me, and he is really funny. The best part about Olaf is his arms and nose come off, and he can move them around. I wish all snowmen would never melt like Olaf. The funniest part of the movie was when Olaf was in a forest and a lizard sneaked under him and scared him so much that he jumped up in the air and landed on top of the lizard, and the lizard ran away. Elsa and Anna worked together a lot and that was cool because sometimes it is easier when you work together and not separately. Because they worked together, they saved the world and stopped everyone from fighting, and that made me happy because we should not fight other people. Eventually everyone had to learn to live together, and they even worked together, just like Anna and Elsa did. That was nice because I do not like it when everyone is fighting. There were a lot of pretty trees in the movie, and it looked like fall all of the time. There is a huge forest outside of the castle Anna and Elsa live in. It has all sorts of people and leaves, and even the wind has a name. There are rock men that live in the forest, too, and they look like giants, that means they are really tall and big. When they walk, they can take steps as far apart as the couches in my living room. They had a party at the end of the movie, and everyone was invited and allowed to dress up. They were all friends and good at the end of the movie which was good because that meant everyone learned how to work together. I thought “Frozen 2” was a really good movie. I think I liked it better than the first one, it had more good guys and more Olaf.

These brutal days of winter are when Robert will need some extra special care. I like to give him a nice bath in a good antitranspirant. Transpiration in plants is very similar to a human’s perspiration. Plants have tiny pores on the leaf surface called stoma. When the temperatures drop and the winds are blowing, moisture escapes from the plant’s leaves via the stoma. This is the cause of winter desiccation in many evergreen plants such as rhododendron, azalea, Pieris, Kalmia, as well as others. If you find you have a tender evergreen in your landscape that may need a little tender loving care to help it through the winter, try an antitranspirant. The optimum time to spray was November 15. If you missed that window, all is not lost. The next best time to spray is January 15. Make sure the temperatures have been 40 or above for a week and will remain 40 or above for the following week after you spray. Be sure to spray the underside of the leaves, as well as the top, and cover every inch of the leaf’s surface. Antitranspirants are safe for the environment. They are a soluble, waxy substance used to coat the tissue of the plant and protect the stoma from releasing moisture, making for a very happy Robert. Do you name your plants? Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

MIRTH AND JOY

Safer Battery on Horizon

by Jerry King

by Austin Steger It is an exciting time of year, and it is always thrilling to discuss what might be next for technology in the coming year. Many wonder what improvements might be coming out in next year's devices. Well, it seems like the next big innovation for our electronics may be a whole new kind of battery tech. A trio of scientists have published their research into what they call the "solid-state battery." Traditional batteries are made up of an anode, cathode and an electrolyte. The most common type of battery used today is a lithium-ion battery. These batteries can be found in smart phones, tablets, computers, and smart watches. Unfortunately, due to the electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries being a liquid or gel, they form imperfections, called dendrites. Dendrites shorten the lifespan of the battery and can even cause it to explode in some cases. The lithium-ion battery was invented in 1978 by John B. Goodenough. Surprisingly, 97-year-old Goodenough is one of the three scientists responsible for the solid-state battery, as well. In the solid-state battery, the electrolyte is made out of a crystal rather than a liquid or gel, so it does not form dendrites, making the battery safer and longer lasting. Manufacturing of these types of batteries would be cheaper and more commercially viable. Lab tests show these batteries store 2.2 to five times as much energy as lithiumion batteries. The crystals can be made with earth-friendly sodium instead of lithium. These batteries would be a huge deal for many different industries. Electric cars would become vastly better and more economical. Phones and laptops could work for days or weeks without needing charging. Smart glasses and smart watches would become more widely available. Medical devices would be able to become smaller, safer and longer lasting. The advantages for this type of battery are nearly endless. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

BITE ME!

Captivating Corn Fritters by Amy Barnes Pooped with potatoes, fried, mashed, boiled, and baked? Sick of stuffing? No longer revved for rice? Try this recipe for captivating corn fritters. These fritters can be a meal alone or used as a great side dish. • • • • • • • • • •

1 cup flour 1 cup yellow corn meal 4 teaspoons baking powder ½ cup sugar ½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup butter or margarine, melted 1 egg 1 can creamed corn approximately 1 cup milk butter or margarine for frying

In a large bowl, stir together, using a fork or balloon whisk, the flour, corn meal, baking powder, sugar, and salt until well combined. Add butter, egg and creamed corn. Stir with fork until combined. Gradually add milk, while stirring, until batter is consistency of pancake batter. Heat griddle or frying pan, melt butter in pan and cook fritters like pancakes. Serve plain or with butter and syrup. If you have leftovers, they will save well in refrigerator and reheat easily in a microwave. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Dentist

Armstrong

Landry Family Dentistry

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

Mold Remediation

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/

The Place

AirXperts

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

GEMS

Help Transitioning to Civilian Life by Kent Von Der Vellen Like many disabled combat veterans, Steven J. Shields initially refused to utilize the services available to him until a friend convinced him to go to the Veterans Administration. While Shields discovered the VA had programs to help him, he also discovered great difficulty and complexity in navigating the process of getting assistance. He decided there was a way he could help fellow veterans. As a lifelong Medina County resident, the only time Shields has lived outside of the county was during his time in the Marines and when he was earning his undergraduate degree. As a veteran, Shields has connections to several organizations, including the Marine Corps League, Toys for Tots, Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), and Newbridge Place (see the feature story “Finding Home� at https://bit.ly/2LrlxjT ). Combining his newfound knowledge on navigating the VA maze with his local connections and his membership in veterans’ groups gave Shields the tools he needed to start helping others. As his connections and expertise grew, Shields was able to establish a network of businesses, organizations and government agencies in order to aid his fellow veterans. When Shields approached area businesses about joining in his effort, he found they were willing to help. Shields then looked for ways to get them involved and to promote their community service efforts. What started 10 years ago as sharing information with individuals has grown into MilShields. Shields describes MilShields as a giant referral network for veterans to find information on the many nonprofits and government agencies assisting military veterans. It also brings together the many businesses and individuals in the county who want to participate in the effort. Although the primary focus is military veterans, nonveterans also may get assistance from MilShields. Last fall, Shields launched the MilShields website, R https://bit.ly/2s2BOoc, and Facebook page, https://bit.ly/33VZWGu . Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

January 2020 Non-Profit Calendar Wednesday, January 1 New Year’s Day https://bit.ly/38zLmYU and Polar Bear Plunge Day Lewis Christmas Wonderland, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., 3820 Granger Road, Medina. Park at 3820 or 3733 Granger Road. Indoor and outdoor Christmas display. Bring donation for Toys for Tots and/or food for veterans.

Thursday, January 2 Science Fiction Day Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Reformed Church, 3535 Grafton Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sharon Township Administration Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon Center. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

Friday, January 3 Festival of Sleep Day https://bit.ly/2skpoZ9 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Lit Up Library Happy Hour, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Mock-tails, appetizers, ring in roaring 20’s while discussing books to read. Ages teen and adult. Register at https://bit.ly/34j9QSX

Saturday, January 4 Trivia Day https://bit.ly/2PegA00 A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Chippewa Inlet Trail North, Route 42, Lafayette Road. Monthly vigorous 3- to 5mile hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10 to adult. Moose Tracks, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Highland Community Room, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Crafts, games, hands-on activities. Ages 2 to 3. Register at https://bit.ly/2RQi8Pm Sit, Stay, Read, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Practice reading with Milo, a furry friend who loves to be read to. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2YV6Vih

Searching for Bigfoot, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Marc Dewerth from the Ohio Bigfoot Organization will give a presentation.

Sunday, January 5 National Bird Day https://bit.ly/38wHIid Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Empower Parent Workshop: Potty Training, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Education Room, Summa Health Medical Building, 3780 Medina Road, Medina (enter in the Emergency Room doors). Tips on behavior-based tips, tricks and strategies. To register, contact Jennifer Gannon at jgannon@medinaesc.org or at 330-723-6393, Ext. 125.

Monday, January 6 Bean Day https://bit.ly/2E9RSr5 and Cuddle Up Day https://bit.ly/2RJ9a6q Ummm, am I the only one who sees a problem with this? American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Monday Movie Matinee: “Won’t You be my Neighbor?” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513. Maker Mondays, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Explore and create in the Maker Space stations. Grades 3 and up.

Tuesday, January 7 Old Rock Day https://bit.ly/38Aecbk Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register for 10 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2YOVPLp and for 1 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2EqQalD Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities Achievement Center, 4691 Windfall Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Sit, Stay, Read, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolf Road, Medina. Practice reading with a furry friend. Grades 1 to 4. Zen Teen: Super Snowflakes, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make large, intricate three-dimensional snowflakes. Ages 12 to 18. Register at


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020 https://bit.ly/2EeSz2H Cupcake Decorating, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Grades 4 to 12. Practice decorating skills, then eat results. Register at https://bit.ly/2M79CrR WAITING LIST

Wednesday, January 8 Bubble Bath Day https://bit.ly/36v14Tb , which you will need if you celebrate this next one a lot! National Take the Stairs Day https://bit.ly/34faQXZ Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Awardbased hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/36y9rNW for more details. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Orangetheory Fitness, 1120 N. Court Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Exploring Windows 10, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginner, hands-on class. Bring laptop if want to. Register at https://bit.ly/2RPc9KB Perler Bead Keychains, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make creation using melting beads. Grades 6 to 12. Create a Vision Board, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Use images from magazines on own board to show what you want to be, do or have. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2PL9H58 Painting With Light, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create photos that capture light trails invisible to the naked eye. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/38BfjYw Wadsworth Area Historical Society: The Giants of Seville, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn about Seville’s giants, Capt. Martin Van Buren and Anna Bates.

Thursday, January 9 Static Electricity Day Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Can You Escape? Snowman Party, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Bring Chromebooks, tablet or use a library laptop. Help Frosty and friends prepare for a Winter Wonderland party in time for Christmas. Ages 12 to 18. Register at https://bit.ly/35idlKE Cocoa, Cookies and Hidden Gems of the Library, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Enjoy snacks, learn what the library has to offer. Soups and Stews, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn how to can soups and stews, avoid spoilage, and tips for canning and freezing. Recipes will be available. Dressed to Kill: The American Doughboy in WWI, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Original and reproduction uniforms and field gear will be available at this overview of what life was like for the doughboys. Presented by Eric Rivet, chief curator at the Western Reserve Historical Society.

Friday, January 10 Houseplant Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/35r0E0d Our gardening

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columnist will love this day! and Peculiar People Day https://bit.ly/2RL3OYs American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Full Moon Hike, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Naturalist-led walk, experience nighttime sights and sounds while learning about night vision and the moon. Free.

Saturday, January 11 Learn Your Name in Morse Code Day Use the link to find a Morse code chart. https://bit.ly/2t7zRHK American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Granger United Methodist Church, 1225 Granger Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Storytime with Griffin, the therapy dog. Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs. Winter Re-Tweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Crafts, games, displays. All ages. Free. Digital Photography Basics, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn techniques for digital camera use. Bring digital camera with manual. Cost $25 per person. Register at https://bit.ly/34iG3JZ Diversity and Inclusion Series, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Discussion of the history of bias in America, how to avoid bias in the future. Presented in conjunction with the Medina Diversity Project. Digestive Health, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about the relationship between gut bacteria and health. Register at https://bit.ly/2stI0G3

Sunday, January 12 Marzipan Day Yum! Winter Re-Tweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Crafts, games, displays. All ages. Free. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Live at the Library: Bob Sammon, Songs and Stories, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Original songs that explore adventure, joy, frustration, fun of creating music and sharing it with others. The Notable Nuthatch, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about their chattering call, their upside-down tree climbing, and take a hike to look for the bird that does things in its own way. All Ages. Free.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

Monday, January 13 International Skeptics Day https://bit.ly/2tdHLiX and Make Your Dream Come True Day https://bit.ly/2EobyId You would think the two would cancel each other out! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Princess Ledges Nature Preserve, 4361 Spruce Avenue, Brunswick Hills. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Art in the Afternoon: Three-Dimensional Snowmen, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make two different snowmen. Ages 5 to 10. Ask a Psychic, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Presentation followed by questions and answers. Register at https://bit.ly/2qSZv2k Monday Night Intrigue: “The Mothman Prophecies,” Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. A story of how a West Virginian town in 1966 is terrorized for months by the possible existence of Mothman.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Snacks and Studying, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Enjoy snacks and a quite space to study. Grades 6 10 12. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Kidder Elementary School, 3650 Grafton Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp FUSE: Hack Your Games, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Combine games that are missing pieces to create a new game. Register at https://bit.ly/34lmT6i Teen Chopped, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Compete to create dishes using supplied mystery ingredients. Teen Advisory Group will judge. Register at https://bit.ly/34juvGm Hat-titude, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Wear your favorite hat and celebrate National Hat Day. Stories, activities. Grades kindergarten through 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2YJ1suy Teen Meditation, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to use meditation to achieve balance and harmony. Register at https://bit.ly/2YJl2XP

Tuesday, January 14

Thursday, January 16

Organize Your Home Day Preschoolers in the Garden: Let’s Get Our Hands Dirty! 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Krabill Lodge, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina. A look at soil and the cirtters that live there. Make decorative mud pie. Stories, art, hands-on stations. Outdoors, dress for mess and weather. Led by OSU master gardeners. Ages 3 to 8. Cost $5 per person, pay at the door. Register at https://bit.ly/36yujEQ Tech Tuesdays, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library. Orientation to the new makerspace, including an equipment overview. Adults. Create a Vision Board, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Start journal and vision board to express feelings and beliefs. Bring blank journal. Teens. Register at https://bit.ly/34htkHA Gearheads: Tinkering, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S.Broadway Street, medina. Teens learn about technology through tinkering with old electronic devices. Tools provided. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2YJgMYl Master the Minute, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Compete in STEM-based games, win rewards. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/34hfYef Alphabet Adventure: K is for Kangaroo, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make the letter K look like a kangaroo, jump like a kangaroo, play Kick the Cup, make kangaroo headbands, more. Register at https://bit.ly/2qV5m7m Instant Pot 101, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Tips and tricks, learn how the pot works presented by OSU Extension Office. Register at https://bit.ly/2qTcjWu

Appreciate a Dragon Day https://bit.ly/2slqrbg YES! Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Western Reserve Masonic Community, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Willetts Middle School, 1045 Hadcock Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Life Skills: Interviewing, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn valuable interviewing skills. Register at https://bit.ly/2PkMSXi Cocoa, Cookies and Hidden Gems of the Library, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Enjoy snacks, learn what the library has to offer. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Cargo Ship Spirituality: Three Months on the Sea, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Rev. Carol Vaccariello’s tales from a transatlantic cargo ship journey across the north Atlantic, into all five of the Great Lakes, to France and back. Register at https://bit.ly/2PGMEJ0 You Belong at the Library: Winter Fun, 6:30 pm. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Program prepared for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/36J8IJZ

Wednesday, January 15

Friday, January 17

National Hat Day https://bit.ly/2rws9Xv Our editor loves this day! Wonder why?

Kid Inventors Day American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020 Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Wine and Canvas, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring wine, snacks, take your original painting home. Fee due to presenter at event, $15. Must be 21 or older to attend. Register at https://bit.ly/34kjlkL Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Escape Room: Cabin Fever, 6 pm. to 7 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Solve puzzles to escape. Participants must be gathered in Teen Room prior to library closing. Register at https://bit.ly/2PJgxZ1

Saturday, January 18 Thesaurus Day https://bit.ly/2YJLkt2 Photo Scavenger Hunt, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Bring camera or phone to find and photograph list of items throughout the nature center and park. Receive a prize for completing the hunt, while supplies last. Inside and outside, dress for the weather. All ages. Free. Ask an Author, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Award-winning writer shares what it takes to become a published author, from finding an agent to creating a presence. Register at https://bit.ly/2rKPHYr Popcorn Party, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about popcorn, read, do crafts. Grades kindergarten through 2. Register at https://bit.ly/2ssKwMI Tent and Read, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring small tent or fort-making materials. Listen to story, then build reading nook. Grades kindergarten through 5. Winter Re-Tweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Crafts, games, displays. All ages. Free. Puppet Show: Martha Moth’s Mission, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Martha discovers metamorphosis is hard work, can she go the distance? Told with humor. Craft afterward. Interest level, ages 4 to 10. Children must be accompanied by adult. Free. 80th Anniversary of “Gone With the Wind,” 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth.

Sunday, January 19 National Tin Can Day https://bit.ly/2LOcucQ Photo Scavenger Hunt, noon to 5 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Bring camera or phone to find and photograph list of items throughout the nature center and park. Receive a prize for completing the hunt, while supplies last. Inside and outside, dress for the weather. All ages. Free. Winter Re-Tweet, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Crafts, games, displays. All ages. Free. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams

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Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Natural Discoveries Program: Surviving Winter, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Awardbased hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/35hP1IE for more details.

Monday, January 20 Penguin Awareness Day https://bit.ly/2EeikzT Brunswick City Schools closed. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Scrapbooking, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create four scrapbook pages. Supply fee, $8, payable to presenter. Bring own adhesive. Register at https://bit.ly/2RP8dK4 Canvas and Cookies, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Paint, eat, repeat. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/36whfQc Let’s Explore: Science of Snow, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make fizzing snowman, identify snowflakes, play with snow dough, make a snow blizzard, measure how much water is in snow, and make a snowflake suncatcher. Register at https://bit.ly/38FZWhE The Year of the Rat Storytime, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Stories, craft. Learn about the Chinese New Year. Ages 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2rzTVCr

Tuesday, January 21 National Hugging Day https://bit.ly/2sli1AR and Squirrel Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/35iLWIl Hammy the hugging squirrel from “Over the Hedge” is probably going crazy celebrating today! Smartphones and Tablets 101, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Lodi. Learn basic functions, apps. Bring device. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Sit, Stay, Read, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolf Road, Medina. Practice reading with a furry friend. Grades 1 to 4.

Wednesday, January 22 Hot Sauce Day Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. Snowy Days, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Snowy stories, treat. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2PmMuYl Meet Charlie, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Meet Charlie, a golden retriever, who loves his work as a therapy dog. Grades 6 to 12. Photo Management, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to download, save, organize, edit photos. Register at https://bit.ly/34eBLTL ABC’s of Book Collecting, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learns what makes a book a collectible, terms, and anatomy. Register at https://bit.ly/2PGLvRE


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

Thursday, January 23 Measure Your Feet Day https://bit.ly/2rEFk8w Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Cocoa, Cookies and Hidden Gems of the Library, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Enjoy snacks, learn what the library has to offer. Explorastory: Polar Bear, Polar Bear, 6:30 p.m. to 7:05 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Read book, do crafts based on book, conduct an ice experiment, more. https://bit.ly/2spg0nf Cleveland Clinic Allergies, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recognizing and treating food allergies. Register at https://bit.ly/36rNvDY

Friday, January 24 Compliment Day https://bit.ly/2LOGDZz and Global Belly Laugh Day https://bit.ly/34iP9X0 So, be sure to compliment someone’s belly laugh today! Doodlebugs Art, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about squares, triangles, create snowy scene. Ages 2 to 5, with adult. Register at https://bit.ly/34eXFGJ WAITING LIST Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Painting Party, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring own refreshments, paint painting to take home. Bring $15 cash or check made payable to Artists Uncorkd. Alcohol-free event. Register at https://bit.ly/36viP4M

Saturday, January 25 National Seed Swap Day https://bit.ly/2PeKily Another day that is sure to be a favorite with our gardening columnist! Polar Bear Jump and 5k Run and Walk, 10 a.m., Chippewa Lake Beach, corner of Longacre and Beachside Boulevard, Chippewa Lake. Benefits local charities. Registration begins at 10 at The Village Inn, 5875 Longacre Lane, Chippewa, or register online. Run and walk begin at noon, Polar Bear Jump begins at 1:15 p.m. For more information, call Alan Robbins, 330-701-7879. Registration and other forms online at https://bit.ly/2JZgyG7 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Pals and Pastries, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring favorite grown-up for breakfast and photo op. All ages. Medina County History Fair, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 21 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Various county historical groups open the door to unique people, places and events in

the county.

Sunday, January 26

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Spouse’s Day https://bit.ly/2rwSN2r Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS

Monday, January 27 Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2LMXvzG American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Library Lounge-About, noon to 3 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Spend no-school day at library. Crafts, games, snacks, more. Grades 4 to 12. Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/2EeH2Ah Mead Making, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn mead making basics with complete information on how to make mead at home. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2qTojHw

Tuesday, January 28 National Kazoo Day https://bit.ly/2t55OjV Tech Tuesdays, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library. Orientation to the new makerspace, including an equipment overview. Adults. Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Grades 6 to 12. Fun With Cupcakes! 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, games, crafts, decorate cupcake. Register at https://bit.ly/38EBMDS Russian Nesting Dolls, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn about history, categories, artistry, and view collection of Russian nesting dolls.

Wednesday, January 29 National Puzzle Day https://bit.ly/2t8eXYZ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Avenue Care and Rehabilitation Center, 699 E. Smith Road, Medina.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2020

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Card Making, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2PGodvb

Thursday, January 30

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Folk Spirit Through December 1, 2019 Art from recycled material by Elizabeth Gierosky Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Medina County Auditor’s Office 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina

Cliffside Artists Collaborative: Cathy Welner Through December 31, Faces of Sacrifice: 2019 Images Honoring Works in watercolors Those Who Served Through December 6, 2019 Highland Library Gallery Photos of local veterans by 4160 Ridge Road, Medina Nick Hoeller https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., A.I. Root Middle School, 333 W. Sturbridge, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Dress Up Your Dog, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Pick your favorite hot dog toppings, everything is provided. Grades 6 to 12. Stupid Human Trick Olympics, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Complete obstacle course and get a piece of pizza. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2rKV0Hl

National Inane Answering Message Day https://bit.ly/35hw7BQ Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Cocoa, Cookies and Hidden Gems of the Library, 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Enjoy snacks, learn what the library has to offer. Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Save Money Using Apps, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring device to learn about shopping apps or just attend lecture. Register at https://bit.ly/2YPrFIa

Friday, January 31 Backward Day https://bit.ly/2PdxBHz and Inspire Your Heart With Art Day https://bit.ly/38yl5tM Combining these two could lead to all kinds of fun. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.

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Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine January 2020  

When the phone keeps ringing, sometimes it’s a message you need, a new year begins with a mission of love; a review of “Frozen 2;” a new, sa...

Joy of Medina County Magazine January 2020  

When the phone keeps ringing, sometimes it’s a message you need, a new year begins with a mission of love; a review of “Frozen 2;” a new, sa...