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JANUARY 2019

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 12

DO YOU HEAR THEM? Pg. 16

MAKING UP WITH YOU NEW MAKEUP REVIEW COLUMN!

Pg. 19

BEING TOOTHFUL Pg. 19

LIVING THEIR BEST LIVES With a dash of this and a pinch of that, hope and acceptance are served at Serenite Restaurant. Pg. 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 12 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Speaking from the Grave

PUBLISHER

Blake House Publishing, LLC

by Amy Barnes President George H.W. Bush had one more lesson to teach in death. Busy working, I was half listening to the funeral for President Bush, when my brain finally took note that certain words kept being repeated by those speaking. Words that forced me to stop and listen. Nobility, honor, courage, wisdom, integrity. Over and over those who stood to speak mentioned these traits. Kindness, love of family and country, respect, leadership. Voices helping to deliver a message from a man who could no longer speak the words himself. Until those moments, it never occurred to me that someone who has passed could use a moment when others are saying goodbye as an opportunity to give one more message. In that moment of realization, as more people stood to speak and give the same

EDITOR

message, each in their own way, I also realized there could be no finer celebration of a life lived to the best of one person’s ability than this. To die and have your funeral become a message to the world. A message of encouragement mixed with humor and the faith that there would be ears that would hear it and be reminded that America is a country of so many mixes of peoples that can work together, in unity, in love, in kindness. I was not one of your fans when you were president, but I must thank you, President George H.W. Bush, and those you le behind to deliver that one last lesson that had nothing to do with politics and everything to do with greatness. A greatness that we all needed to be reminded has existed all along.

Amy Barnes

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tom Adams FlashBang Photography

ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold Katrina Barnes Danielle Litton Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an eedition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty.com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

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OH, SNAP!

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THE READING NOOK

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

photos by Tom Adams

Musicians share the bluegrass and country that is in their souls at the weekly local Bluegrass Jam Night.

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

Cam's desperate search for his sister continues despite a disastrous reunion with his mother.

DETECTIVE SKILLS CRACK CASE by Paul McHam

Exploring what causes mold in basements and why. THE NETWORKER

YOUR NETWORKING EAR by Bob Arnold

How hearing others can improve networking skills.

Jessica Hazeltine, administrative manager of the Recovery Center of Medina County, and Bradford Toth, assistant general manager of Serenite Restaurant, meet in the restaurant's kitchen to discuss the new menu selections available at the restaurant. The restaurant operates as part of the Recovery Center and is located at 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Page 4

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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BIRTHDAY BASH

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MAKING UP WITH YOU

RECOVERY ROAD by Amy Barnes

Opening minds and hearts to different steps to living the best life.

LOVE AND ACCEPTANCE

Searching for healing words for recovery. photos by FlashBang Photography

Medina closed out its bicentennial celebration with a free birthday party for an enthusiastic community.

LOVELY LASHES by Katrina Barnes

Reviewing two of the best mascaras to find one that lasts and is budget friendly. GEMS

TOOTH WISDOM

by Kent Von Der Vellen

For those who find dental care an overwhelming expense, there is help. ON THE COVER: Jessica Hazeltine's warm  personality helps everyone feel welcome at  Serenite Restaurant and the Recovery Center of  Medina County. Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free as an e-edition and in print. To subscribe to the e-edition, see past issues, and to order print issues and copies of photos, go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com. Additional features not seen in the magazine, such as Giving Hearts, also can be found on the website.

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BITE ME!

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LET'S DO IT!

JOYFUL COOKIES by Amy Barnes

As winter continues, chocolate can be a tasty companion. Dashing through the snow, into warm buildings, where activities await!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

RECOVERY ROAD Serenite Restaurant and the Recovery Center of Medina County by Amy Barnes photos by FlashBang Photography

She looks at you with sharp, inquisitive eyes, waiting for an answer, then again poses the question. “Everyone doesn’t wear the same size clothes, then why would the same recovery steps fit everyone?” Then she pauses again and smiles, her eyes sparkling, her head slightly tilted. Like an inquisitive bird that has just found a juicy worm wiggling within reach, she knows she has your attention. Jessica Hazeltine, administrative manager of the Recovery Center of Medina County, knows very well how tough the road to recovery can be. When she was 20 years old, she became a drug addict, not realizing she was self-medicating a disorder she had yet to be diagnosed with. What she knew is that she felt better using drugs. Throughout her growing-up years in Cuyahoga Falls, she had cycled through deep depressions and times of elation. She did not realize others did not go through the same cycles she experienced. She thought that she just was not handling them as well as those around her. “When you are a kid, you only know what you know. I didn’t realize I didn’t have to feel this

way.” In high school, she was a straight-A student and did not get into trouble. “I was perfect in high school,” Hazeltine said. She started college, got married by age 20, and started using street drugs in an attempt to feel better and to deal with her wild extremes of emotion. Her life began spiraling. It was a ride she could not get off. Her marriage disintegrated. Her life was in a tailspin of destruction with cocaine and crystal methamphetamine giving her a false sense of balance as she lost control. For more than two years she used illegal drugs, first with her husband, then, a er the divorce, with her boyfriend. Then her boyfriend broke up with her. Her downward spiral continued when she attempted suicide by slitting her wrists. As the blood started to pour from her selfinflicted wounds, she immediately regretted what she had done. Ironically, it was her attempt to end her life that saved it. She ended up in a dual-diagnosis treatment facility and was tranquilized. She doesn’t remember the first three days of her stay there. While in the facility, which treated drug


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

addiction and mental illness, Hazeltine was diagnosed as bipolar, which she says explains why her highs were so high. She said cocaine is known for amping bipolar highs even higher. It has been 15 years since she has used illegal street drugs. Her voice so ens as she recalls how her father was always there to support her recovery. She talks of her past openly, candidly. She has moved on, gotten married, and has two children. She said it is very freeing to feel normal a er drugs and mental illness. “You look at other people and realize everything is not as dramatic, you see how others are dealing with life. The sky is not always falling,” she says, with a smile. While Hazeltine herself is not mainstream, neither is her attitude toward her recovery. Traditionally, recovery has been looked at as complete abstinence from alcohol and drugs with 12-step programs being one of the most wellknown types of recovery. “My recovery does not include abstinence,” Hazeltine explains. She does not have patience for anyone who would shame her into believing her recovery is not “good enough.” “I certainly would never dismiss anyone’s method of recovery,” she adds. Hazeltine takes exception to the term “addictive personalities,” because, for her, an addictive personality would mean that someone could be addicted to anything. She is aware that some people can not use any addictive substance but adds that others must refrain from only certain addictive substances, which is called managed addiction. While it has been a long road and she is proud and somewhat amazed at her recovery, Hazeltine says she does not think of herself as a recovering addict.

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She said she describes herself as a mother, a wife, an artist, a nail tech, and so many other things. “I am living my best life. I’m a mom. I’m a funloving person,” she says, “I’m just Jess.” Her large, intricate tattoos show her love of artistry. When her hair is cut short in back, it is easy to see the tattoo on her head that v’s downward to her neck and looks like a chandelier. Those who know her never doubt her boldness and fierceness. She was made for battle, forged by flames from her own war, and ready to step in with the love and acceptance and the wisdom needed as the administrative manager at the Recovery Center of Medina County. Ironically enough, when it was proposed that the center, then known as Robby’s Place, be in the former Medina Steakhouse at 538 W. Liberty Street in Medina, Hazeltine was one of the first to put up a fight against it. “When I was an active addict, I know what I acted like, and I wouldn’t have wanted children around me,” Hazeltine said. She lives a couple of blocks from the center and joined with others in the Bankers Row Historic continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

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Neighborhood Association to launch an aggressive fight against its opening. Then she realized she was fighting something she had not taken the time to understand. It was her willingness to learn that opened her heart. Once you open your mind and open your heart is when you learn and can admit you were wrong, said Hazeltine. “I was wrong.” She is rueful when she talks of her public protests against Robby’s Place. “I have never done anything quiet in my life,” she says, then smiles. When she met with the original group, Robby’s Voice, that was connected to the center and listened to what they wanted to accomplish, she began to question her own position. She started gathering information and volunteering to help clean and prep the former restaurant to become Robby’s Place. However, her reaching out to the center was only a er some very deep soul searching and asking herself a couple of hard questions. “What kind of person do you want to be, what kind of an example do you want to be?” Hazeltine asked herself. It was when she started volunteering at Robby’s Place that her children, ages 9 and 12, learned of

their mother’s past. While acknowledging her past addiction, Hazeltine says the traditional 12-step programs did not fit her starting with the first step which is to say one is powerless over his or her addiction. “I’ve never been powerless over anything in my life,” Hazeltine says. It would be hard to argue with her 14 years of successful sobriety. Currently, drug courts are moving away from traditional 12-step programs and more toward harm reduction, which is meeting an addict where they are in their recovery process, Hazeltine said. Keeping addicts safe becomes the primary concern. Addicts are urged to not use drugs alone, because in the case of an overdose, they would not be able to revive themselves, and to take steps to avoid blood-borne pathogens. “You have to decide if you are worried about the drug use or the drug user,” Hazeltine said. “You can’t be judge and jury. What wellness is is different for everyone.” The hurt in her eyes is easy to see when addressing the controversy over the use of Narcan to revive overdose victims. “A dead addict can’t recover. If it is a disease, then treat it,” Hazeltine says. People who are overweight and have repeated


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

heart attacks are rescued each time, it is not debated if they are worthy of rescue. She is aware of the attitudes of some who believe that multiple applications of Narcan are too expensive to rescue those who administer drugs to themselves. According to Time.com, generic naloxone costs $20 to $40 per dose, Narcan is $130 to $140 for a kit that has two doses. Locally, Project DAWN (Deaths Avoided With Naloxone) distributes Narcan for free and operates out of the Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. The program educates the public to recognize opioid overdose, the steps to take to get help, and how to administer Narcan, which now comes in a small nasal spray bottle. Hazeltine says it is important to reduce harm and to provide security, comfort, a continuum of care, and maintain relationships with addicts so when they are ready to reach out for recovery, the path is already in place. She points out that in Europe, naloxone is administered to addicts prior to their going out to parties and bars so that if they do drugs, they won’t get high, removing the desired affect of drug use and thus any incentive to use. Now known as the Recovery Center of Medina

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County, it originally was called Robby’s Place and was partnered with the non-profit organization, Robby’s Voice. Robby’s Voice was founded by the parents of Robby Brandt a er he died of a heroin overdose. According to the Robby’s Voice website (http:// robbysvoice.com/), the Brandts want to save lives by raising awareness about drug addiction. They share information about how to spot the warning signs of substance abuse and the resources available for addicts and their families. Part of the original plan for Robby’s Place included a culinary operation and restaurant that would give recovering addicts job training and food service skills. Financing was provided through a $300,000 grant from Medina County Chief Probation Officer Veronica Perry from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation. Early last year, there was controversy at the center because, as plans finalized for the restaurant, it was decided the restaurant would serve alcohol. The decision was made by probation officer Perry and Medina County continued, Page 8

Hazeltine's bulletin board of motivation.


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Common Pleas Judges Christopher J. Collier and Joyce V. Kimbler. While they were not board members, they were the ones behind the founding of the center and securing funding for it. The decision to serve alcohol was based on the model Robby’s Place was following to develop the restaurant, named Serenite. That model was Edwins Leadership and Restaurant Institute, located in Shaker Square. Edwins was founded in 2013 by Brandon Chrostowski, who once faced a 10-year prison sentence for a drug offense. Instead of going to prison, he was given the opportunity to be mentored in a restaurant, which eventually led him to be trained at the Culinary Institute of America, and his life was changed. His experience was the incentive for him to reach out to others and li them up as he was. Hazeltine said that approximately 40 percent of inmates are in jail because of drug offenses, with 70 percent having drug problems. Edwins is staffed by former prison inmates in an effort to help them gain skills so they can go on to find employment and improve their lives. There is a 2018 Oscar-nominated documentary movie called “Knife Skills” that tells the story of Edwins. It can be viewed here: https://bit.ly/2rxHhjE

When Chrostowski lost his bid for mayor of Cleveland, he volunteered to become the managing director and consultant for Serenite. The chef is Gilbert Brenot, who is from France. Due to the success of the program at Edwins, Chrostowski announced the launch of a butcher shop in what was an empty storefront next door to Edwins last December, with future plans for a bakery on the other side of Edwins. With plans firmly in place for Serenite to serve alcohol, Rob Brandt, Robby’s Voice founder, could not accept the decision because he felt it went against the core values of his organization and family, so he resigned as president of the board. Robby’s Voice broke its connection with what then became the Recovery Center of Medina County. By February 2018, the director of the center had resigned. Hazeltine, a er fighting so hard in the beginning against allowing the center to exist in her neighborhood, became the new administrative manager. In her position with the Recovery Center and Serenite Restaurant, she smiles benignly as students and center employees and volunteers rush around her, preparing for the evening’s customers for the restaurant. Calmly answering

Ready to welcome guests to the restaurant are Serenite staff members, from left, Anna Tokarsky; Abby Cole; Bradford  Toth, assistant general manager; Kara Marcum, front­of­house staff; and Jason Terepka.


9 and the success of the programs there. Serenite Restaurant and Culinary Institute had five students graduate in its first class in late 2018, a er launching in the middle of 2018. “The pride and excitement on their faces is huge,” Hazeltine said, regarding students who have successfully completed the program. In order to graduate from the program, students have to pass tests about working in the front (the public serving area) and in the back (where the food is prepped and cooked) of the house. Each must show Waiting for their next order are, from left, Keith Wagner, a graduate of the first  proficiency working in the Serenite Restaurant and Culinary Institute class; Nick Tedesco, who is in the  restaurant. second class; and Anthony Canterbury, in the third class. They also have to pass the questions, gently reminding various people of ServSafe course, which covers such things as food details that should be attended to. safety, personal hygiene, cross-contamination, The various social activities that are held at the and allergens. Recovery Center are designed to help break down There already are two more classes of students the stigma and so people can see that addiction working toward graduating. does not look like they may think it does and to “I’m going to change the world, I just haven’t increase the comfort level for those who might yet,” Hazeltine says, with her jaw set and her eyes need help. sparkling. “You don’t have to be in recovery to be here,” Anyone who doubts her, simply has not met her Hazeltine said. yet. The center is not a rehab facility, but rather a facilitator connecting addicts and their families to For more information about the Recovery Center, go to sources of help. Programs and classes are geared https://medinarecoverycenter.org/, and for the Serenite Restaurant and Culinary Institute, go to toward recovering addicts who need support to https://www.sereniterestaurant.com/ or call 330-952-2611. maintain their sobriety. Classes and activities are held in a large room Project DAWN Clinics upstairs, while the restaurant operates in the Medina County Health Department downstairs part of the building. 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina With an end to funding looming ahead this Tuesday, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. summer, the Recovery Center approached the Medina County commissioners for further funding Wadsworth Fire Station #2 last December. 338 Weatherstone Drive, Wadsworth At press time, commissioners had made no Last Thursday of each month, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. financial commitment and had requested For further information, call 330­723­9688, documentation regarding activities at the center Extension 609. Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019


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The Brunstuckians show their picking and singing skills. From le , Brian Brown, Danny Patrick, Al Roke, Eileen Dorsey, Moe Nealeigh, and Ronnie Boettcher.

Photos by Tom Adams

On Friday nights, the halls of Lafayette United Methodist Church ring out with music from jamming bands and applause from an appreciative crowd. While most of the music is bluegrass and country, a variety of tunes can make it onto the stage. In the past, even Beach Boy tunes were performed. Musicians vary from professional to novice, with all levels of playing expertise welcomed equally. Some musicians began as audience members and were taught how to play new instruments by the more experienced musicians there.

Moe Nealeigh is known at the jam for his harmonica playing.

Eileen Dorsey and Ronnie Boettcher jam in a practice room.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

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The Backroom Boys perform some audience favorites. From le are Jim Stone, Gary Pruett, Joe Thatcher, and Mike Martin. Attendees can wander the halls and drop into practice rooms where bands are jamming and join in or just listen. In the auditorium, bands perform onstage, while dinner is served in the cafeteria. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner nights and admission information are listed in the “Let’s Do It!” section at the back of this magazine.

Gary Pruett shares his picking skills with the audience.

Jim Stone puts feeling into playing his bass.

Randy Fraley started attending the bluegrass jam as an audience member, soon finding himself mentored by other musicians. He writes and performs his own songs as well as some bluegrass classics.


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CHAPTER 22 THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

My mom walked through the  hospital doorway wearing ripped  jeans and a stained pink T­shirt.    She looked almost exactly as I  remembered her, but with deep, dark  circles beneath her eyes, a thin scar  on her left cheek, and a bandage  wrapped around her ring finger and  pinky on her left hand.    She looked like a mess.    Henry looked so proud for having  found her and presenting her though,  I had to hide my immediate disgust.    “Mom?”    “Cameron. You’re so…grown up.”    Her voice was hoarse, as if she’d  been doing a lot of yelling recently.    “I’ll let you two catch up,” Henry  said, with a wink, and he slid out the  door, closing it behind him.    I stared at my mom, and she stared  at me. At my sides, Marissa and  Devin were silent, but only for a  moment.    “Do you know what we’ve been  through?”    It took me a second to realize that  the thought that had been running  through my mind had actually been  spoken aloud by Devin.    “Excuse me?”    My mom put her hand to her chest  and frowned at him.    “We’ve been all over London  looking for you. I followed along  and watched as my best friend  slowly got more and more desperate  just to find you. It’s been years since  he’s seen you, but he was determined  to find you and Lea at any cost, and  you just sat back doing nothing until  some nurse called you in,” Devin  paused, looking her up and down,  “And for the life of me, I can’t figure  out why you bothered.”    “Devin,” Marissa whispered,  shocked.    “Devin? That’s you? It’s been so  long. I didn’t even recognize you,” 

my mom said.    “Yeah, it’s me. The one who was  there for Cam when you left him.  The one who looked after him and  made sure he was doing okay day in  and day out, the one who held him  when he cried and the one who gave  him a home when he had nowhere to  turn. That was me,” Devin said, his  voice rising as he stood and walked  towards my mother.    “I was the one doing all the  motherly things that you should’ve. I  don’t mind though, I did them of my  own volition and I wouldn’t ever  change anything I’ve done for Cam,  but you cannot deny that that was  me. And yet, all he wanted was you.  We flew to London for you. We lost  our luggage for you. We gave up  everything for you. This was all for  you! And you show up at the last  minute, looking like a homeless  woman, to try and prove it was all  worth it.”    He stopped, only a foot or so in  front of her, and spun on his heel to  face me.    “But, Cam, I hope you realize that  it wasn’t worth it. She’s not worth it.  And she never will be.”    Devin’s eyes glistened. His hands  were clenched into fists at his sides.  He looked like he was ready to fight  my mom to the death, but he just  stood there, breathing heavily  instead.    Gently, I replied, “Devin, I know.”    His eyebrows rose.    “We didn’t come here for her. She  was just another stone on the path to  Lea. I had no desire to see her, and  somewhere along the way I kind of  forgot that. I’m sorry.”    Suddenly, behind Devin, my  mother let out a loud sob. He  stepped aside so we could see her,  only to find her weeping into her  hands.    When she realized we’d gone 


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

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quiet, she looked up through her  way about him. He’s my brother and  beautiful mind of hers. tears and glared at me. my best friend and one of the only     Henry frowned at her slightly.    “You don’t want me? That’s fine!  two people in this world that I can     “Well, nothing illegal,” he said,  But you won’t get to Lea then, I can  trust fully. I’m not in love with him,  laughing awkwardly.    “What about giving us Lilith’s  promise you that,” she spat at us  but I do care about him, and he  address?” she asked with a flutter of  before running out of the room. knows that.”     Luckily, Henry was long gone, so     I never took my eyes off Devin,  her eyelashes. we were left alone once again. replying to Marissa, but speaking to     “Hmm, promise you won’t egg her  house?”    Devin’s anger had fallen away, and  him. Every line, every sentence,  he looked at me like a scared rabbit  every word, went right to his heart,     “Promise!”    He sighed as his shoulders sank. I  caught in a trap. because it was true, and I needed  think he knew it wasn’t a good idea     “Cam, I didn’t mean to – I mean,  him to know that beyond any  to give us the address, but at the  I’m sorry I – I mean…” shadow of a doubt. same time, he saw something in us     “Devin, it’s OK. It’s not your fault.     He sighed. that most other adults didn’t. She wouldn’t have brought me to     Marissa chuckled.    To this day, I’m not sure what it  Lea anyway. She’s never given me     I smiled softly. was about us that made him give us  what I wanted.”    Henry returned to the room. that address, but the fact that he did     I took Devin’s hand and pulled him    “I, uh, couldn’t help but notice  back down to my side. Lilith storming out. Are you guys all  changed my life forever, and I am  grateful.    He laid his head on my shoulder  right?” Henry asked genuinely. and apologized again, holding my     Devin stood, and brushed himself     If I ever meet Henry A. Mersz  again, I will greet him like an old  hand all the while. off a bit. friend, and thank him profusely.    An unexpected revelation was    “We’re good, thanks.” slowly forming in my brain,     Henry slid into the room and shut     After all, he was the person to  connect me with my sister. thoughts running around and  the door behind him. connecting the pieces that had been     “Not the reunion you were hoping  CHAPTER 23 there all along, when Marissa  for?” he asked gently.    We left the hospital in a hurry. squeezed my hand and paused my     It was about 6 a.m. by the time we  progress. walked out the doors, and our flight     “Devin’s in love with you,  “Things don’t always go the left at 9 a.m. Three hours wasn’t  Cameron.” way we plan.” much time, but luckily, we didn’t     The rest of my revelation was  have to do any more helpless  formed instantly, as if a bolt of  searching. lightning had just played connect­    “No,” I answered.    We snagged a map of London from  the­dots.    “Things don’t always go the way  the front desk and used the first rays     “Marissa!” Devin shouted,  we plan. I’m sure things will turn  of sunlight to navigate to where the  whipping his head up and staring at  out alright for you three though.  Collettes lived. It was about an hour  her as if she’d just shot him. You’re very strong and determined.  away on foot, and we definitely     He let go of my hand instantly, and  I think you all will go far.”  didn’t have enough money for a cab.  shied away, crossing his arms.    Henry smiled at each of us in turn,  An hour walk wouldn’t be that bad if     I looked at him with my mouth  waiting for us each to make eye  it wasn’t another hour and a half  open for a moment, then closed it  contact before he moved on to the  from the Collettes to the airport. and smiled gently. next one.    Travel time alone left us with     “Of course, he is. No one else     “Thank you,” Devin said  fewer than 30 minutes to see Lea. would put up with me for this long,”  respectfully.    I thought of how futile it was, how  I replied, still staring at him.    “I mean it. In fact, is there  many millions of things could go     “Don’t act like you knew,” Marissa  anything I can do for you three?  wrong to prevent me from ever  interjected, lightheartedly. Anything at all, I’d love to help.” meeting her, and how giving up     “No, but it doesn’t change     “Anything?” Marissa asked, some  would be so easy. anything. He knows I don’t feel that  wild idea already brewing in that  continued, Page 14


1 4 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019 continued from Page 13

  Then I thought of how Henry  had called us determined, I  thought of how devoted Devin  was to this search, I thought of  Marissa’s unending support, and  I thought of what my dad would  have said at such a crossroads.    I’m not certain, but I believe  he would’ve said something like,  “You’ll never know until you  try” or “You’ve already  come this far, what’s a  little farther?”    Even though I didn’t  know what his exact  words would have been,  I’m absolutely positive  that they would have had  a bit of truth to them. He  was always good at  reassuring me by simply  pointing out facts.    “Well, Cam? Are we  doing it?” Devin asked,  finally.    “If your dad finds out,  he’ll kill you,” I replied.    “Yeah, well, we’ll just  have to make sure he  doesn’t find out then.”    “Let’s go!” Marissa shouted,  taking off running down the  sidewalk.    “I guess that settles it then,” I  laughed, running after her.    “I guess so,” Devin said just  loud enough for me to hear  before he followed behind us.    We ran for about a minute  before we got tired and slowed  to a walk. It’s not like we ran  track, and we had a long way to  go anyway.    The three of us walked side by  side by side on our way to the  end of the road.    The sun poked out from the  horizon as we journeyed on,  something that doesn’t happen  every day in London due to 

heavy clouds. It seemed like a  sign that we were on the right  track. The only thing that would  have been better is if there had  been a rainbow that led right to  the Collettes. Although, rain was  necessary for that to be the case,  and thankfully there wasn’t any  since we didn’t have any  umbrellas with us or even a 

change of clothes.    We walked down the street as it  slowly, but surely, got busier.  Cars sped past and cyclists  shouted which side they were  coming up in their British accents  so we could jump out of their  way.    Finally, after what seemed like  much longer than an hour, we  saw the house we’d been looking  for.    We approached the front door,  and I raised my hand to knock  but stopped. My heart was  beating a million beats per  minute, and I began to wonder if  this was the right place.    Like I said, there were so many  variables that could have caused  us problems, there was no telling 

who was going to answer the door  after my knock.    Luckily, I didn’t have to knock.    Devin grabbed my shoulder,  stepped up, and pounded on the  door with three solid knocks.    There were voices on the other  side of the door, but we couldn’t  make out what they were saying.    Then the voices stopped, but the  door didn’t open. My  heart began to slide down  my esophagus and into  my stomach but had  stopped and lodged itself  halfway down when the  doorknob jiggled.    Just as the doorknob  was turning, Marissa  poked me and pointed  down the street to where  a payphone sat quietly.  Seeing that got my hopes  up, until the woman that  answered the door asked  who we were.    “Um, my name is, uh,  Cameron, and I’m  looking for Lea? Lea  Collette? Does she live here?”    “Oh. No, she does not. I kicked  her and her freeloading mother out  a few months ago. She didn’t pay  rent for five months, and that killed  any sympathy I had for them.”    My heart finished sinking like a  cannonball into my stomach acid. It  burned like a raging inferno.    “Any idea where they are now?”  Devin asked for me.    “Nope. Couldn’t care less. Sorry,”  said the woman, already shutting  the door in our faces.    Another setback. But this time,  there wasn’t anything else we could  do. We had maybe 20 minutes  before we needed to head to the  airport and with the last of our leads  and the last of our hopes fizzling  out, there was nothing left.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

  Both Marissa and Devin tried to talk to me, tried  to comfort me, but I couldn’t hear a word they were  saying. I was staring off into space with a blank  mind, until I realized I was staring at the payphone.    I mindlessly walked toward it, with my friends  still tugging at me and trying to talk to me, but in  that moment, they barely even existed.    I walked right up to the payphone as if I was  going to make a call, took the phone off its receiver,  and stared down at it.    This probably wasn’t even the phone that Lea had  used to call me, but then again, maybe it was. There  was no way of knowing for sure, all I could do was  imagine.    Slowly, the world came back into existence  around me.    “–get going to the airport. We’ll just have to drag  him with us,” Devin’s voice entered my ears.    “Yeah, he seems kind of out of it. But you can’t  blame him. He’s been through a lot, just for this to  happen at the last second.”    Marissa too, still right next to me through all of  this.    “Cameron? Is that you?” Even Lea’s voice was  poking through the hustle and bustle of what was  becoming the morning traffic in London.    I was surprised that they all came through so  clearly even as I was coming back down to earth  from the shock and heartbreak I’d just experienced.    I turned around to thank them all for sticking it  out with me, only to find Lea standing right in front  of me, about a foot shorter than me, staring up at  me with big brown eyes that looked like they were  seeing an angel descend from the heavens right in  that moment.    “Cameron?”    “Cam? You there?”    “Cam, we did it.”    Lea. Lea Collette. My sister. We’d found her. Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/ Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com

“I guess one person can make a difference.” --Stan Lee, 1922-2018

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1 6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019 TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Detective Skills Crack Case by Paul McHam I promised to discuss more of the many causes of basement mold, and all of them require water. Recently, I ran into one of those many reasons. Around the basement perimeter, on top of the sill plate, which sits on top of the foundation wall, runs the rim joist. The ends of the floor joists also rest upon the sill plate and butt up against the rim joists. This forms a pocket of wood at the end of the floor joists known as the rim-joist cavity. This cavity usually has batt insulation applied against it because the rim joist is only 1 ½ inches thick and gets very cold in the winter, providing the perfect surface for condensation. I spent a good bit of time looking for mold in a home’s basement but did not find enough mold to account for the mold doctors had found in the children’s blood. That is, I did not find it until I moved the insulation in the rim-joist cavity and found the insulation soaked by a river of condensation and growing a generous pile of mold. Had there been a dehumidifier present, it may have offset the condensation. The lack of a $220 dehumidifier likely will cost this homeowner $4,000 to $5,000 in mold remediation. Moisture problems in a basement certainly do not stop here. Chimney structural problems or the lack of a proper chimney cap can bring water into the upstairs or basement, if that is where the chimney foundation and chimney cleanout are. Keep an eye out for black sooty water on the basement floor. Window wells below ground level can be another problem. Usually, window wells have a piped drain that runs into the downspouts runout or gravel that allows drainage to the footer drain. Sometimes, the gravel or piped-in drain will get plugged by soil and silt, thereby rendering them useless. A blocked piped-in drain can cause blocked water to buildup and overflow. Of the many hundreds of window wells I have seen, most were filled with sticks and leaves that blocked the drainage systems and provided similar results to the other methods of blocking them. Next time, I will share other ways water can collect and grow mold in a basement. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-6582600.

THE NETWORKER

Photo by rawpixel

Your Networking Ear by Bob Arnold Well, well, well! I hear the New Year is near! Three words in the last sentence have the word ‘ear’ in them. *You need to be “near” to hear. *You hear the New “Year” is approaching or here already. *But, do you hear that “hearing” is critical to your future? The art of hearing is just that—a critical skill! Hearing or listening to someone you just met is a critical part of getting to know them. The only way to get to know if someone is a good networking partner is to listen to them. By listening to them, you can learn a lot about a person’s life. People do not just have jobs, careers, or professions. They have likes, dislikes, good times, bad times, and many of them are interesting. You will find someone who has a similar or exact interest that you have. That person is a great one to get to know better. There is no substitute for a person you can talk shop with, even if it is about baking, cra s, cars, or space travel. Those people tend to think about you when they hear about someone else’s needs and refer you. So, listen up to those you meet this month. You are going to find yourself meeting some interesting people. As you listen up, be sure to open up about how your life overlaps theirs in some unique ways; they will feel an affinity with you when you do. The main point is to share your life, not just your career! Share your likes, interests and joys with those you cross paths with as you start off a New Year. You just may find your attitude starting off the year in a good way. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http:// onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

Joyful Word Search Love and Acceptance

RECOVERY COURAGE RESTAURANT NOBILITY LIFE COMMUNITY KINDNESS LOVE ACCEPTANCE

FAMILY REHABILITATION HOODIES SKILLS SPARKLING LEADER HOPE INSPIRATION HOME

Answer Key for Last Month's Search

It is a Pittie!

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1 8 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

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MAKING UP WITH YOU

GEMS

Lovely Lashes

Tooth Wisdom

by Katrina Barnes

by Kent Von Der Vellen

Mascara is a staple for any makeup look, but it is difficult to find the best one for every look. Most people believe a good mascara must be a highend one that costs around $30. However, this is not the case. The best mascaras can be found in drugstores for as little as $9. Two of the best mascaras are L’Oréal’s Lash Paradise and Maybelline’s Total Temptation. L’Oréal’s Lash Paradise is sold at drugstores for around $10 and you get 0.28 fluid ounces. This mascara is available in waterproof and nonwaterproof. It has two color options, black and blackest black. Lash Paradise gives the lashes a fuller, more voluminous look rather than making lashes look longer. It lasts around 12 hours without any fallout. However, if you are looking for the cheapest option that will truly enhance your lashes, Lash Paradise would not be a good choice. The tube lasts approximately one month and quickly dries out. If you do not mind purchasing a new bottle every month and you are looking for a mascara that will create a thicker volume, then Lash Paradise would be a good fit. Maybelline’s Total Temptation mascara is sold for around $8 and you get 0.27 fluid ounces. Total Temptation is available in waterproof and nonwaterproof. It comes in the colors brownish black, black, and blackest black. It stays put for up to 12 hours. This mascara is different and better than others because it is made with coconut oil, which nourishes lashes and helps them grow. It does not feel thick and chunky a er applying, but instead feels almost as if nothing is being worn at all. It gives a more separated, lengthy look to lashes, and it does not dry out quickly. It takes about 4 months for the tube to dry out. If you are looking for the cheapest mascara that enhances your lashes and gives them a longer look, go with Maybelline’s Total Temptation. Overall, both L’Oréal’s Lash Paradise and Maybelline’s Total Temptation mascaras are great options that are much cheaper than high end mascaras and improve the overall look of your lashes.

Very few people like to see the dentist, even though a lack of regular dental care can lead to pain and serious health problems. Senior citizens, low-income earners, the uninsured, and the underinsured may delay visiting the dentist over money concerns such as inability to pay for a visit or how to cover deductibles and copays. Dental care is not covered by Medicare, requiring many senior citizens to pay out of pocket. This can lead to those on fixed incomes to delay needed dental work. Even with funds received from the county health levy and support from the state and federal government, it still may cost $600 for dentures at the dental office at the Medina County Health Department. The health department uses a sliding-fee scale based on income and can set up payment plans to help. In addition, the Medina County Oral Health Coalition works closely with the health department to help cover costs when a Medina County resident lacks the means to pay for dental care. Bev Kreiner, Clinical Dental Services director, tells of a young girl whose caps on her teeth were knocked out, and Medicaid refused to pay to replace them. Working with Dr. Kathy Brisley-Sedon and the coalition, the costs were covered so the girl could get her teeth fixed. The coalition also provides dental education through visits to local libraries and schools. It teaches proper tooth care and the importance of regular exams and cleanings. Sometimes the Tooth Fairy visits, too. Breakfast with the Tooth Fairy will be Saturday, February 23, at the Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Children will be served breakfast and local dentists will give children free dental checkups. While there, children will learn tooth care, play games and have a picture taken with the Tooth Fairy. The Medina County Oral Health Coalition became a 501(c)3 in 2005 with a mission to educate the community about dental care and to help with the associated costs for Medina County residents. To learn more or to support the coalition, call founding members Bev Kreiner, 330-441-2731, or Dr. Kathy Brisley-Sedon, 330-416-6558. The coalition is currently in need of volunteers and a new board member.

Katrina Barnes has done hundreds of hours of research on makeup and the best ways to apply it. She is in much demand at performances such as Medina High School’s Showtime for applying performers’ makeup. If you would like to request a review of a specific product, please send your request to Joy@MedinaCountyMagazine.com with “Making Up With You” in the subject line. Find a reason to say "thank you," to someone.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


2 0 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

BITE ME! Joyful Cookies by Amy Barnes Any flavor of cake mix can be used for this recipe. I like using German chocolate because it is chocolate but a little less sweet, which makes for a nicer balance with everything else in this cookie being sweet. A brick of cream cheese can be substituted for the cream cheese spread, but it will need additional beating to make it smooth and creamy before adding the powdered sugar. It also will need additional powdered sugar. A er the first 3 cups of powdered sugar, add additional powdered sugar by the quarter cup, blending well a er each addition, until the consistency of a slightly stiff icing. •1 German chocolate cake mix •½ cup flour •1/3 cup vegetable oil •1 cup water •3 large eggs •1 8-ounce tub of cream cheese spread or brick of cream cheese (see above) •3 cups powdered sugar •1 large bag of chocolate melting wafers or 2 bags of chocolate chips Oven: Preheat to 350 degrees F. Line baking sheets with foil and spray with cooking spray. Mix together cake mix and flour in large mixing bowl. Add oil and water, beat until well combined. Beat in eggs until batter is smooth. Beat for an additional three minutes. Scoop batter onto prepared baking sheets by heaping teaspoon, spacing about 1 inch apart. Bake approximately six to eight minutes, check at six minutes. They are done, same as a regular cake, when top springs back when touched on

top. Leave on pan or, if in need of pan, carefully take sheet of foil with cookies still on it and set aside to cool. Beat cream cheese, gradually adding powdered sugar until well combined. Cover to keep from drying out and set aside. When cookies are cooled, melt chocolate in double boiler, stirring to keep from sticking and to melt evenly. Using a metal tableware tablespoon, carefully spoon chocolate over each cookie, covering completely. Be aware the thicker the chocolate coating, the harder the finished cookie will be. Place in refrigerator to set chocolate. When set, in approximately 15 minutes, remove from refrigerator. Remove cookies from pan, spread cream cheese filling on one half, place another half (chocolate side out) on top of the filling. If desired, you can melt additional chocolate to seal the sides, then cool in refrigerator until chocolate is set on sides. Place in air-tight container and refrigerate until ready to serve. Can separate layers with waxed paper or plastic wrap to keep chocolate coating unscarred. You can assemble the cookie sandwiches first and then coat with chocolate, but the cookies tend to be very sticky to handle, making them difficult to coat. Dipping them into the chocolate is ill advised as they will fall apart in the chocolate.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

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January 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Tuesday, January 1 All libraries closed.

Wednesday, January 2 Run Up the Flagpole and See if Anyone Salutes Day https://bit.ly/2B7TL4H and Science Fiction Day https://bit.ly/2zWwvIg 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Introduction to iPads for Senior Citizens; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Eagle Scout Andrew Ziogas will present and answer questions. Register at https://bit.ly/2EnaqWi 6 p.m. Movie Sing-a-Long: “The Greatest Showman;” Brunswick Library,3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Light refreshments. Register at https://bit.ly/2UJMphU

1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Montville Township Police Department, 6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Friday, January 4

1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component.

Thursday, January 3 Fruitcake Toss Day bit.ly/2iJWfN5 a er all of that heavy tossing, it is time for the Festival of Sleep bit.ly/2RrBeYM 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina.

National Spaghetti Day bit.ly/2DfE78E

1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Bingo for Children; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Win candy. Ages 5 and up. 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 6:30 p.m. Hide and Seek in the Library; Brunswick Library, 3649

Center Road, Brunswick. Grades 3 to 5. Adults wait in meeting room. Register at https://bit.ly/2Liwumf

Saturday, January 5 National Bird Day https://bit.ly/1wIvwE5 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Medina County Park District: Hiking for the Health of It; Chippewa Inlet Trail North, 5801 Lafayette Road, Medina. Four- to fivemile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the weather, wear appropriate footwear. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville.

Sunday, January 6 Bean Day https://bit.ly/2BGQ6f0 and Cuddle Up Day bit.ly/1NYB7xm Noon to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component.

Monday, January 7 Old Rock Day https://bit.ly/22N5ui0 11 a.m. to noon. Exploring Windows 10; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit.ly/2Eo27tq 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Scrapbooking; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create four pages. Supply fee: $8. Bring adhesives. Register at


2 2 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019 https://bit.ly/2CglenG

Tuesday, January 8 Earth’s Rotation Day https://bit.ly/2SP9NIV and Bubble Bath Day http://bit.ly/2CKd8RJ 10 a.m. to noon. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register by January 7. Register at https://bit.ly/2QSy6bR for 10 a.m.; https://bit.ly/2EyJPqm for 1 p.m. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities Achievement Center, 4691 Windfall Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. A er-School Movie Matinee; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Snacks and a movie. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Terrific Tuesdays: Optical Illusions ; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn about and make optical illusions. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Anatomy of Peace; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2rB8tOp Part 1 of 4. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Meet Your Financial Goals; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn importance of creating and using a budget. Register at https://bit.ly/2CeYgNH

Wednesday, January 9 Static Electricity Day https://bit.ly/2F8AVwC and Word Nerd Day https://bit.ly/2PEGtCV 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program; Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

2:15 p.m. A New You; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Look inside to improve the outside. Grades 6 to 12.

scheduled.

Thursday, January 10

Feast of Fabulous Wild Men Day http://bit.ly/2BNSIul

Peculiar People Day http://bit.ly/2kPIQWg and Houseplant Appreciation Day http://bit.ly/1aaRh0K

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. K-9 Kapers; Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration.

9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 7 p.m. Brewing Kombucha; Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to make Kombucha with experts from Vine N Hop. Register at https://bit.ly/2Aa9QIL

Friday, January 11 Step in a Puddle and Splash Your Friends Day http://bit.ly/2kt9Z1J and Learn Your Name in Morse Code Day https://bit.ly/2zXhaHd 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Summa Health Center at Wadsworth-Rittman, 195 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Lit Up Happy Hour: New Year, New Books, New Night; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Non-alcoholic cocktails and appetizers, bring own wine. Must be 21 years old and older. Register at bit.ly/2QTrl9D 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

Saturday, January 12

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Granger United Methodist Church, 1235 Granger Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Writer Series: Surviving the First Year as a Published Author; Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Vivien Chien shares insights and what she wishes she had known for her first year as a St. Martin’s Press author. Register at https://bit.ly/2S5VqA8 11 a.m. to noon. Dinosaur Day; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Prehistoric play and games. Grades kindergarten through 3. https://bit.ly/2PFBnXk 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Noon to 5 p.m. Winter Re-Tweet; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Cra s, games displays. All ages. Free. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. 1 p.m. Inside My Favorite Box; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Hear story of boy’s adventures in a box, read by the author, Dan Sammon, and illustrator, Kelly Nyomo. Then create adventure using boxes. Ages 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2Qxh7fK 2 p.m. Pinterest Projects: Knapping for Adults; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn the art of flint knapping, pressure flaking to shape flint into tools. Materials provided. Ages 15 and up. Register by January 11 at bit.ly/2PH9GNF


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

Sunday, January 13 Make Your Dreams Come True Day https://bit.ly/2QWaCCD and if your dreams do not come true or you doubt they will, today is still for you since it’s also International Skeptics Day http://bit.ly/2ktZpYq Noon to 5 p.m. Winter Re-Tweet; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Cra s, games displays. All ages. Free.

Monday, January 14 Dress Up Your Pet Day http://bit.ly/2DfY0N2 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Digital Photography Basics; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn techniques for digital camera use. Bring digital camera with manual. Cost $25 per person. Register at https://bit.ly/2ST0pV0 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Fun With LittleBits; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn electronics basics, STEAM principles, develop critical thinking. Mike Gemmer leads twopart series. Grades 4 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2QU62Vh 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Recycled Book Art; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Use old books to create art. Register at https://bit.ly/2GjtDee 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Meditation Practices; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2UNdSPR

Tuesday, January 15 National Hat Day http://bit.ly/1wFL2Ao One of our editor’s favorite days! 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Preschoolers in the Garden: Let’s Grow Plants: A Look at Seeds; Krabill Shelter, 75 97

23

Ballash Road, Medina. First in series of three following the growth of plants from seed to seedling. Indoors and outdoors, dress accordingly. Led by OSU master gardeners. Cost $5 per person. Register at https://bit.ly/2Bq8ZDz

Oiled Life; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about essential oils. Register at https://bit.ly/2EkbJVQ

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Kid Inventors Day https://bit.ly/2zUnLlZ and Ditch New Year’s Resolutions Day http://bit.ly/1fFzOVT

6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tap Into Oils With The Olive Tap; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Enhance culinary skills with olive oils and balsamic vinegars. Register at https://bit.ly/2STgmuh 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Anatomy of Peace; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2Evnbiz Part 2 of 4.

Wednesday, January 16 Appreciate a Dragon Day http://bit.ly/2B9rVFh and National Nothing Day http://bit.ly/2B8yvvn 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Kidder Elementary School, 3650 Gra on Road, Brunswick. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Mehndi Mania; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn art of temporary henna tattoos and taste Middle Eastern food. Grades 6 to 12. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Cookies and Canvas; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Draw favorite movie poster. Grades 6 to 12. Register at bit.ly/2EAlPTA 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Living a Well-

Thursday, January 17

9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Pay-It-Forward for the New Year; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Create fleece blankets for animal shelters. Grades 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2GsbuLo 7 p.m. Wellness Yoga; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn basics of gentle, wellness yoga. Register at https://bit.ly/2UK5T6d

Friday, January 18 Thesaurus Day http://bit.ly/2BGiCNV and Winnie the Pooh Day (A.A. Milne’s birthday) http://bit.ly/1fs5yK6 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Winnie the Pooh Party; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Celebrate Winnie’s birthday. Read stories, play games. Ages 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2LjsMca 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina.


2 4 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019 Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wine and Canvas Night; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring wine, go home with painting. Supply fee $15, cash or check. Register at https://bit.ly/2S3p0q5

1:30 p.m. Animal Signs in Winter; Sycamore Room North and South; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about tracks, other signs of animals. Ages 4 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2QUCerz 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Moon Hike; Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Brunswick. All ages. Naturalist will lead walk to experience night sights and sounds and learn about moon and night vision.

Saturday, January 19

Sunday, January 20

National Tin Can Day http://bit.ly/2z6le4Z and National Popcorn Day http://bit.ly/2BHEFUE

Penguin Awareness Day http://bit.ly/1kzPhJj

9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Noon to 5 p.m. Winter Re-Tweet; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Cra s, games displays. All ages. Free.

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Let’s Make Cheese! Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. See making of ricotta cheese, learn composing a cheese plate, sample tasting. Register at https://bit.ly/2ElYCDG 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Noon to 5 p.m. Winter Re-Tweet; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Information on best bird feeders, bird seed, birds that visit. Cra s, games displays. All ages. Free. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville.

3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Winter Tree ID; Allardale West Parking Lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Learn to identify trees by bark and twig. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

Monday, January 21 Brunswick City Schools closed. National Hugging Day http://bit.ly/2Dg0UkU and Squirrel Appreciation Day http://bit.ly/2CKiqg3 11 a.m. to noon. Using the Internet; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635

Wooster Street, Lodi. Introductory class to the Internet. Register at bit.ly/2PG1VHI 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 1:30 p.m. Canvas and Cupcakes; Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Paint turtle, enjoy cupcake. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2EpdilF 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. DIY Clothespin Coaster; Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Hot drink coaster. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2UHtoN0 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Super Smash Bros. Tournament; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Winner gets prize. Register at https://bit.ly/2LleIid

Tuesday, January 22 Hot Sauce Day https://bit.ly/2j1g3Oj and National Blonde Brownie Day http://bit.ly/2ktaJ70 We do not recommend combining the two! 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Health Screening; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Blood pressure and glucose screening. 10 a.m. to noon. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners


welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Cocoa Mania; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Hot cocoa tasting. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2ExLvjS 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Anatomy of Peace; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2R2ah1r Part 3 of 4. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Daily Energy Routines; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about nine energy systems that help keep mind and body in harmony. Techniques to keep systems in balance. Register at https://bit.ly/2A1REkm

Wednesday, January 23 Measure Your Feet Day http://bit.ly/2oXJupT and National Pie Day http://bit.ly/2DgVs16 Does the one with the biggest feet win a pie? 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. A ernoon at the Cinema; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call for title, 330-273-4150. 1:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; A.I. Root Middle School, 333 W. Sturbridge, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Meet Rocky the Therapy Dog; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wol Road, Medina. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Pizza and a Movie; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2Gga5qY

Thursday, January 24 Compliment Day http://bit.ly/1dAOBtu You are a great reader! 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019 2 5 330-725-0588. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Movie Matinee 2:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. American Red Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Cross Blood Drive; Medina County Street, Seville. AMVETS Post 1990, 620 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Noon to 4 p.m. Medina County Local rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp History Fair; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Medina County 7 p.m. Wellness Yoga; Sycamore historical societies and genealogical Room North and South, Brunswick societies showcase their collections and Library, 3649 Center Road, answer questions about history of Medina Brunswick. Learn basics of gentle, County. wellness yoga. Register at https://bit.ly/2rA43aw 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Movie Matinee Saturdays; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Friday, January 25 Opposite Day http://bit.ly/2DgnjOZ It could be a very confusing day! 10:30 a.m. Fancy Nancy Storytime; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Ages 3 and up. Dress in fanciest ensemble and enjoy stories and a cra . Register at https://bit.ly/2Cg1xMK 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, January 26 Spouses Day http://bit.ly/1GINBs2 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Snowy Scavenger Hunts; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6 100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Stop in for an inside and outside scavenger hunt.

2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Puppet Show: Chelsey Chipmunk Finds a Flower; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Cra a er show. Ages 4 to 10. Children must have adult with them. All attendees must register at https://bit.ly/2zYzeRu

Sunday, January 27 Punch the Clock Day http://bit.ly/2B9EOiD and Chocolate Cake Day http://bit.ly/1hFw3gg Noon to 5 p.m. Snowy Scavenger Hunts; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6 100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Stop in for an inside and outside scavenger hunt.


2 6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | January 2019

Monday, January 28 Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2BowVtG, Fun at Work Day http://bit.ly/1lADyKv and National Kazoo Day bit.ly/1zqsN5c We think combining all three could make for a great day!

Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2UMa8Oy Part 4 of 4.

Wednesday, January 30 National Inane Answering Message Day http://bit.ly/2z6pfq5

Noon to 5 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Silent Library; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Challenges, prizes, laughs. Grades 6 to 12.

2:15 p.m. to 4 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 6 and up. Free. No registration.

3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. T.A.G. Winter Meeting; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Teen Advisory Group works to make library teen friendly. Grades 6 to 12 invited to attend and give input.

5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Fun With LittleBits; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn electronics basics, STEAM principles, develop critical thinking. Mike Gemmer leads twopart series. Grades 4 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2QYulkU

Tuesday, January 29 National Corn Chip Day https://bit.ly/2PHrwA6 and National Puzzle Day http://bit.ly/1Lkxei8 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Chair Yoga; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Sit on chair or use chair for support with this gentle yoga. Register at bit.ly/2S4I8Uo 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Grace Baptist Church, 3480 Laurel Road, Brunswick. rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Anatomy of Peace; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge

5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Table Top RPG Night; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring Magic: The Gathering cards to battle with, have an adventure, or bring new game to share. Teens welcome. Register at bit.ly/2EqSOIW 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Mail Art with Jane Wetzel; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Create unique mailable art. Glue, stamp, embellish. Bring ephemeral items you want to include. Register at https://bit.ly/2GkTX7P

Thursday, January 31 Backward Day http://bit.ly/2z6vEl4 and Inspire Your Heart With Art Day http://bit.ly/1DaI8Eu 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55

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plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Animal Signs in Winter; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about tracks, other signs of animals. Ages 4 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2Em1eBu 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tap Into Oils With The Olive Tap; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Enhance culinary skills with olive oils and balsamic vinegars. Register at https://bit.ly/2GhYN5r 7 p.m. Wellness Yoga; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn basics of gentle, wellness yoga. Register at https://bit.ly/2PDXhdy

Submitting Calendar Events

Events listed in the calendar must be a festival or fair or hosted by or bene a non-profit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Event information is not accepted by phone. The calendar is also available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional event information.


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Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine January 2019  

Recovery Road from drug addiction, musicians doing the Bluegrass Jam, the challenge to finding mold, learning to listen, a city’s birthday b...

Joy of Medina County Magazine January 2019  

Recovery Road from drug addiction, musicians doing the Bluegrass Jam, the challenge to finding mold, learning to listen, a city’s birthday b...