__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL PG. 16 Do blue-light blocking glasses really help?

A TREAT FOR YOUR SWEET PG. 19 An exotic beauty could be just what you need.

TRIPPING ON ART PG. 24 Planning a vacation? Why not include art shows from around the country?

Brighten up gray and dreary winter days with the turn of a page! C’mon in, the reading is fine!

LEADING THE WAY Dog trainer Monica Callahan helps deaf dogs and their owners learn how to successfully live and play together. Pg 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


2

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

VOLUME 4 NUMBER 1 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

If Only by Amy Barnes When I was in journalism school, we were taught to never mention in news stories if someone had died from suicide. The prevailing thought at that time was that if it were reported, it would cause others to do the same. I never understood that reasoning. It does not make any sense, and I had more than a few arguments with editors and coworkers over it. By not including suicide in the story, it adds a layer of shame that should not exist. Learning that someone committed suicide does not make others do the same. It helps others who are suicidal know that they are not alone in how they are feeling. Mental pain and anguish are not ended by suicide. Those who commit suicide do not take the pain with them. It is left behind to settle on those whose lives were touched. Suicide is not an answer. It is a question. Every suicide I have ever known of has caused sadness, pain, grieving far beyond the scope that those who took their lives would ever have believed when alive, which is part of the tragedy. Suicide weaves a trail of pain, of guilt, of regret among those who knew the person who took his or her life. “If only,” become the words that those left behind carry for the rest of their lives. Suicide is not shameful, it is not selfish. It is a search for the end to pain, the only answer that can be seen when the

darkness is so great that no door can be seen. It is the last cry, one that will go unanswered by design. This year, more than ever, it is important to keep in contact with loved ones while we all deal with the double whammy of winter loneliness and the isolation and restrictions caused by the pandemic. It can be so very hard to have the energy to even try to reach out for help under normal circumstances, much less these. Encourage those you care about to talk to someone they feel comfortable talking to. Sometimes, all someone needs is for someone to listen. To those who are struggling: If you leave now, you leave a book partly finished. You will not get to see how the story turns out, the miracles that would have been yours to celebrate, the amazing twists that come out of nowhere and change everything for the better. Check out Kelly Bailey’s column this month for tips on battling depression. If you are feeling suicidal, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 800-273-TALK (8255). The transgender suicide hotline is 877-565-8860. For more help, go to https://bit.ly/2Y7E4HQ for a list of resources. We are rooting for you.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS Allison Waltz-Boebel FlashBang Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Kariem Farrakhan II Tyler Hatfield Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2020 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

3

HOME AND GARDEN

18

DIG IT!

FINDING HEARTS IN THE GARDEN by Michelle Riley A favorite with Victorian gardeners, this perennial hides a secret in its blooms.

19

BITE ME!

RASPBERRY BROWNIES recipe by Mark Bollinger Nothing beats the winter blues better than chocolate and fruit.

HEALTH

20

HEALTHY TRAILS

GEARS CHANGE THE RIDE by Robert Soroky Puzzled by bike gears? Here is how to make them your friends.

OF MIND AND BODY

KICK THE BLUES by Kelly Bailey Quick, low-effort ways to brighten your days.

COMMUNITY

4

4 12

by Amy Barnes Her love of Dalmatians, a breed known for a high prevalence of deafness, led dog trainer Monica Callahan to expand her skills to help those whose dogs will never hear their masters’ voices.

OH, SNAP! photos by Amy Barnes and Allison WaltzBoebel

BUSINESS FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BLOCKING THE BLUES

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

23

ROLL ’EM!

24

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

by Kariem Farrakhan II

Major art shows are ready to burst with energy and art after being forced to virtual platforms last year.

25

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

26

LET’S DO IT!

31

CELEBRATE!

CHEAPEST SHIPPING RATES

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Dog trainer Monica Callahan and her dog, a deaf Dalmatian named Quint.

by Hunter Barnard

ART WORLD IS READY

THE IN BOX If your business requires low-volume shipping, there are easy ways to save on shipping costs.

CHRISTMAS ALL YEAR

IN THE STUDIO

FINDING NETWORKING PEACE

by Amy Barnes

Read the clue, then gather and unscramble the magnifying glass letters to solve the puzzle.

Christmas movies can be fun to watch all year long, here is one of our reviewer’s favorites.

THE NETWORKER

17

by Kent von der Vellen

22

Determining if blue-light blocking glasses will work for you

Finding peace despite the changes the pandemic has forced

NURSES’ LEGACY PROVIDES FOR CHILDREN

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

by Tyler Hatfield

by Bob Arnold

GEMS When they saw families in need, they found a way to help and it is still going strong, more than 45 years later.

CONNECTING THE DOTS

During the pandemic, people have reached out to help each other with homes and supplies for those in need and by helping a microbusiness survive.

16

21

LOVE LANGUAGE Searching for ways to communicate may be easier than finding these words. Eager for events to enjoy? See what is happening in Medina County. Our clickable directory of vetted businesses who bring you Joy!


4

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

There is always one in every crowd who just has to be different! Monica Callahan poses with Disco, Orio and Quint.

photos and story by Amy Barnes

In October 2019, when Zachary and Monica Callahan learned that a 4-month-old deaf Dalmatian puppy was going to be available for adoption at a local shelter, there was no hesitation. They knew they wanted him to join their family. They also knew that unless people familiar with how to handle a Dalmatian adopted him, the puppy was likely to end up back at the shelter. With two Dalmatians already at home and with Monica being an experienced dog trainer, the

Callahans were ready to face the challenges of training a deaf Dalmatian. Zachary Callahan arrived at the shelter at 5 a.m. to be first in line. Monica joined him three hours later with their children, 7-year-old Zac and 8-year-old Zoe. Others arrived and joined the line, but, to the Callahans’ surprise, no one else was in line for the little spotted puppy. The puppy soon would become known as Quint and prove that he had more than a bucketload of


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

5

Monica Callahan works with a hesitant Tater during a training class. Tater is owned by Kelly Gregoire of Seville.

personality. “He’s been wreaking havoc in our lives ever since,” Monica said, laughing. She added that the havoc is not because he is deaf but, rather, because of his personality. “He needs more eyes on him all of the time,” she said, as Quint went happily loping by with a toy in his mouth. Quint is known for his bounding energy and clownlike antics. Watch Quint for more than a

few minutes and it becomes obvious that not being able to hear has not quelled his adventurous spirit in the least. Monica begins training puppies by tethering them to a piece of furniture so their range is limited and their focus is easier to maintain. It also makes it easier to immediately reward good behavior. Most puppies are off the tether by six months old. Quint was on the tether for 14 months. continued, Page 6


6

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

graduation, things were starting to change for Monica does not hesitate to admit that training her. deaf dogs has its own unique set of challenges. It was while training her third Dalmatian puppy, Many people do not know how to work with a Doc, who is now 10 ½ years old, that Monica deaf dog, much less a breed known for having connected with dog trainer Laurie Schlossnagle high energy and being rather independent in its and Monica’s interest began to turn away from thinking, Monica said. She said that people tend veterinarian to trainer. to erroneously think deaf dogs are dumb. Having always been fascinated by the She laughs and shakes her head at people who psychology of dogs, in 2012, Monica decided to approach Quint upon learning he is deaf and join the world of dog training and felt she had start signing American Sign Language to him. found her purpose. Schlossnagle became Quint, Monica says, will just stand there and wait Monica’s mentor. for the people to stop. Schlossnagle eventually moved to Utah, but Monica’s original plan was to become a brings her beagle Emme when she stays at the veterinarian. She graduated in 2011 from the Callahan’s house when she is in town to judge University of Findlay with a pre-vet and biology rally classes and scent trials. degree with a chemistry minor, but even before A rally class involves following a trail of continued from Page 5

Metal animal sculptures outside of One Smart Dog, the training facility Monica Callahan works at in Seville.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

7

Lisa Kucharski talks to Onyx, her Aussie, in their first class with Callahan.

instructions printed on signs on the ground and successfully completing each task. Scent trials are when dogs are given a specific scent to search for, mimicking the work of professional detection dogs. Monica has loved Dalmatians since childhood and, even though deafness is prevalent in the breed, Quint is the first deaf Dalmatian she has owned. It was her love of Dalmatians that led to her developing a particular interest in working with deaf dogs and developing training techniques for them. Her background in psychology and her

dog training experience have provided a solid base to build on. While she has gently trained Quint, he has patiently educated her, too, on how to work with deaf dogs. Having been educated in the clicker method at the Karen Pryor Academy, Monica knew that method would not work with a dog who cannot hear the clicker, an essential part of the training. The method uses a clicker to make a noise when a dog does something correctly, which is then followed up with a treat. (Learn more about continued, Page 8


8

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

someone can direct a dog through hand signals. clicker training, here: https://bit.ly/3acGWZz ) She believes it is much harder to use only verbal Since a deaf dog cannot hear the clicker, it is cues. necessary to use a visual marker instead of the She said she has come to realize how much clicker, Monica explained. dogs ignore the babble of humans as humans For Quint, that visual marker is a two-thumbs tend to constantly talk to their dogs. It is up when he does something right. He responds something Monica tries to train people to stop by offering his paw to Monica. doing because it is difficult for a dog to pick out a One of the advantages to training deaf dogs is command among all of the chatter. that dogs naturally read body language, Monica So, how to get a dog’s attention when it is not said. Which is why Monica is not impressed when looking at you, and he is deaf? Stomp the floor, Monica says. The dog can feel the vibrations in the floor and will learn that those vibrations mean to look at its trainer for instructions. Quint plays just as happily with toys by himself as he does with other dogs. He can be happily playing alone one minute, then suddenly shoot across the room to tackle another dog for a romp. He surprised Monica one day on an agility course when he suddenly dove into one of the tunnels and popped out the other end, grinning. He had never shown interest in the tunnels before, but that is Quint. He got two thumbs up. Quint also is a therapy dog. “Therapy work is some of the most rewarding work,” said Monica. “I’ve enjoyed seeing people enjoying dogs.” She is a member of the Alliance of Therapy Dogs. As a child, Monica did not grow up in a household with pets. Her parents were not animal people, she said. But, while she was in high school, after many years of begging her parents for a pet, she finally was given a Dalmatian who came with the name Honda. She instantly fell in love. She met her husband, Zachary, while the two were attending Admiral King High School, now known as Lorain High School. Zachary has had a deep interest in becoming a Disco pauses to smile during a play session. Disco is a windsprite, firefighter most of his life and, as a 12-year-old, a breed related to whippets. continued from Page 7


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

9

Quint happily plays on his own while sporting a bandana printed with: “I’m not ignoring you. I’m DEAF.” He wears a collar with a GPS box so he can be tracked if he were to ever get away since he would not hear his name being called.

he often hung out at fire stations. So, it was a bit ironic that when he started dating Monica, she already had a Dalmatian, the breed known as a firehouse dog. Dalmatians originally were guard dogs for carriages and horses but are better known now as the dog portrayed riding along in fire trucks. One day, while the teenagers were talking on

the phone, Zachary suddenly noticed Honda outside his window. Monica was sure Honda was home, but as it turned out, after having been to Zachary’s house only once before, Honda had managed to find his way there again, 2 miles away. While she was in college, Monica got her second continued, Page10


10

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

with the dogs in agility contests. and third dalmatians, Delta and Doc, eventually For the past seven years, Zachary has been a getting her fourth, Orio. Brunswick police officer. He applied to be a Orio is named after Orio Palmer, the fire canine handler for the department but he was battalion chief who died in New York during the not chosen because the department already had Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack. enough handlers, Monica said. Monica said her daughter, Zoe, has been doing He served as a member of the National Guard very well working with their dogs and competing and was stationed in Kuwait, Iraq and continued from Page 9


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

Afghanistan. He has a master’s degree in psychology and is a trained paramedic. He teaches life-saving classes to doctors and nurses and helps them get certified. With all of his accomplishments, his dream job still is to be a firefighter. Focused on doing good, the Grafton residents also have raised two Labradors for Leader Dogs for the Blind, based in Rochester Hills, Michigan, which provides guide dogs for blind and blindand-deaf people. Monica said that getting the

Well, they almost all cooperated!

11

dogs ready for their future jobs involved caring for them, teaching them manners and getting them used to being out in public. One of the Labradors, Rizzo, worked for several years in Florida and has since died. The other one, Olive, was chosen to be a breeding mom and had three litters, Monica said. The Callahans hope to foster more dogs for the organization. “Feeling like you’re making a difference is really nice,” said Monica.


12

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

Layla Holmes starts making her unique waffle batter at 2 a.m., while her customers are still sleeping. Her career changed from nursing to cooking when she filled in as a cook at a nursing home when the chef stopped showing up. After taste-testing waffles as far away as Europe, the Medina resident developed her own European-style Liege waffles. Holmes serves approximately 15 waffle flavors to customers in her small Medina restaurant, Waffle-O-Waffle, at 799 N. Court Street, #17. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Roger Biada, center, and Zach and Caitlyn McCorel helped distribute items to those in need in January. From 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., on the first Saturday of each month, volunteers distribute personal-care and home-cleaning items at the Personal Care Pantry at Living Hope Church, 6288 Wooster Pike Road, Medina. Cost currently is $2 per family. photo by Amy Barnes


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

13

Profits from sales of building materials at the Habitat for Humanity Restore, 233 Lafayette Road, Medina, are used to build affordable housing for qualified families. Partner families must complete 250 hours of volunteer work or “sweat equity” for Habitat for Humanity, with many of those hours worked at Restore. Homes built through the program are sold at a reduced price with an interestfree 30-year mortgage to partner families.

Restore employee John King and volunteer and college student Margaret Kriebel, both of Medina, lift a chair into a customer’s vehicle. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Valerie Biro, Strongsville, and Jordan Pavlak, Parma, shop for paint and various other items at Restore. They are planning to paint and redecorate Biro’s bedroom. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel continued, Page 14


14

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

continued from Page 13

While wife Jennifer looks on, Jim Schweitzer points out a sewing machine to their daughter, Claire, and explains that her grandmother had the same model. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel

Restore sales representative Dianne Wenslow, Lafayette Township, chats with Restore volunteer Megan McKenzie, Wadsworth. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel Megan McKenzie, Wadsworth, writes up a ticket for customer Roger Young, Medina, who is buying furniture at Restore. McKenzie and her two children are a Habitat partner family. photo by Allison Waltz-Boebel


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

Medina Fiber

Blazing fast internet! Our pure fiber to the home network delivers unparalleled performance, symmetrical download and upload speeds, and game changing low latency. Sign up for service or take our survey today by pointing your phone camera at the QR code in the corner of this ad.

15


16

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

BUSINESS: FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

BUSINESS: THE NETWORKER

Blocking the Blues

Finding Networking Peace

by Tyler Hatfield

by Bob Arnold

It has become common to see blue-light blocking glasses on drug store and supermarket shelves as the world seems to agree on one thing: Blue light is harmful for eyes. But is it really all that bad? As laptops, phones, tablets, and even smart refrigerators become more common in homes, a side effect has come with them. With extended use of these devices, many people experience eye strain that can lead to headaches and eye pain. In some cases, vision becomes blurry, as well. While the pain felt from eye strain is real, it is only

I remember a day when I would gather a few things, drive to a meeting place, physically enter the meeting, and meet some people I did not know. Passing business cards was a ritual, along with exchanging a handshake and a smile. I left anticipating getting to know those I had met and had peace about how the event was handled. Peace of mind is critical when meeting people and networking. I have found that a person’s biggest fear of networking is anxiety about meeting new people. The anxiety gets in the way of conversations and the act of attending a networking event. Recently, no fewer than 10 people told me they are tired of networking online and want to get back to live networking. Half of them mentioned they have no peace about how networking is going and believe there is a conspiracy in place to keep people away from each other. Please rest assured, I am not writing about conspiracy theories. However, I do want to write about networking peace, especially considering the comments I have been receiving about the future of networking. To be fair, there are those who are enjoying some of the online networking since it solves certain issues of theirs. It is interesting that peace is brought up in networking, especially since human beings desire relationships with other humans, and it is usually found through networking. Peace is a necessary ingredient. Having peace with our surroundings and those we are networking with plays very heavily into the results realized from the interaction. The setting must feel harmonious with and have a connection to the person we are meeting. It also is important that it is within a secure and safe location. Online, every person on the screen is in a different setting and it confuses our brains, hindering the connection. Being able to talk with only one person at a time, with everyone listening while you talk, is frightening for some people. Peace of mind can be found in online meetings, but it takes acceptance that this is temporary, and we will be back to inperson networking soon.

temporary. The belief that eye strain caused by bright screens can leave lasting damage is not true (https://bit.ly/3qzAm62) . Eye strain can be avoided by taking breaks during use of electronics and typically lasts for approximately an hour. However, even though the pain does not last, that does not mean it should be ignored. If you are experiencing eye strain, it is time to evaluate whether blue-light blocking glasses would be of help. Some people question if blue-light blocking glasses are even doing anything, which is not helped by the fact that many of these products are filled with gimmicks and cheap marketing tricks. The good news is that some blue-light blocking glasses actually do work. Before investing in a pair, however, try this easy way to test if blue light is causing your eye strain. Enable a “night-light” or similar feature on your device. Most modern phones and tablets offer a way to make colors on the display warmer to help you settle in for bed. If this seems to help, then blue-light blocking glasses should work for you. At that point, it will come down to your preferences on looks and how they feel. While blue-blocking glasses are not a perfect solution, they do help lessen the amount of blue light that makes it to your eyes. Tyler Hatfield has a passion for technology that he would like to someday turn into his own business. He runs a small media group, hatsmediagroup.com, and works on computers on the side. He can be contacted with questions and for recommendations at hatsmediagroup@gmail.com

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at zMore networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

17

BUSINESS: THE IN BOX

Cheapest Shipping Rates by Amy Barnes Shipping seems to be the most confusing part of internet commerce for small sellers. It is not hard to do, what complicates it is all of the companies trying to grab a share of the pie. There is no need for the adhesive labels pushed by the postage companies that want you to use their special miniprinters to print out labels. Not only are the labels a more expensive option, but the postage is no bargain either. I have been shipping for 14 years and have tried a variety of shipping companies and methods. Consistently, the cheapest way to ship is with the post office and to do it through PayPal.com/shipnow. I do not endorse PayPal, but I do endorse saving money. Three things you will need are a computer, a tape measure (for measuring the package), and a scale. A printer is handy, but the label can be printed at the library or local copy shop if you download it onto a flashdrive. The postage is lower through the shipnow feature than it is by getting it directly from the post office, either on location or online. Shipping from Media Mail up to Priority can be calculated. Plus, there is no fee for using the service.

Shipping labels can be printed on regular printer paper, trimmed and attached to the shipping box. I use a glue stick on the label back and tape the edges. Avoid taping over the bar code because scanners have difficulty reading the code through the tape, which will affect package tracking. The package can be dropped off at a post office counter without standing in line or, depending on where you are, you can arrange for the package to be picked up from your office or home for free. Go to usps.com, put the cursor on “Send” at the top of the page, and click “Schedule a Pickup.” Next-day pickups have to be scheduled prior to 2 a.m. so your mail carrier will get the notice before leaving on the route. Establish an account at usps.com, and the next time you login, it will auto-fill some of the information. More shipping pointers next month!

Interested in writing this column? Contact Amy Barnes at Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Be sure to include information about your business experience and a sample column of no more than 350 words.

ZOOM EXTREMENOW AVAILABLE!

UNLIMITED DATA WITH

OUR FASTESTSPEEDS UNLIMITED DATA

ULTRA-FAST SPEEDS WHOLE HOME WI-FI

CALL TODAY! 877.277.5711 ArmstrongOneWire.com/ZOOM *Certain restrictions may apply. Call for details. Not available in all areas.


The lady in the bathtub


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

HOME AND GARDEN: BITE ME!

Raspberry Brownies recipe by Mark Bollinger Mark Bollinger, director of Bollinger Funeral Homes and baking enthusiast, firmly refuses to share any of his beloved cheesecake recipes, but he did agree to share one of his tempting brownie recipes. Read Bollinger’s story in the October 2020 issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine, https://bit.ly/2LTNkMA • • • • • • • • • •

1 cup butter 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate 2 cups sugar 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour* 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking powder 4 eggs, slightly beaten 2 teaspoons vanilla 1 12-ounce can raspberry pastry filling 1 generous cup semisweet chocolate chips

Topping 1 stick unsalted butter 12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips 1 12-ounce can raspberry pastry filling In a 2-quart saucepan, slowly melt butter and unsweetened chocolate, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat when melted. Sift together dry ingredients, and add to saucepan. Add eggs and vanilla. Mix in can of raspberry filling. Fold in chocolate chips. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until brownies pull away from pan sides. Cool. Melt butter and chocolate chips for topping. Add raspberry filling. Spread over cooled brownies. Refrigerate, serve at room temperature. *Note: Use 1 cup flour for a moister brownie.

19

Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe or one you have highly modified and thus made it your own. By submitting a recipe, you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used. This is open to anyone who would like to submit a recipe.


20

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

HEALTH: HEALTHY TRAILS

HEALTH: OF MIND AND BODY

Gears Change the Ride

Kick the Blues

by Robert Soroky

by Kelly Bailey

One of the most common questions I hear when selling bikes is, “Do I really need all those gears?” In a nutshell, yes, and the reason is simple: the more gears available, the more places you can ride. Gears are your friends. They are designed to make riding more efficient and correlate to the style of bike and type of ride. For example, a basic cruiser that would be ridden shorter distances over relatively flat terrain has one to eight gears, whereas a hybrid, mountain or road bike that is typically ridden longer distances over a wider range of elevations could have as many as 30! To understand the need for gears, it helps to know what the gears do during a ride. The lowest gears produce the fastest pedal rotation. This is called “spinning” on the pedals and is extremely helpful when riding into a strong headwind or up a steep hill. Spinning puts more of the work on the heart and less on the legs. Since the heart is a stronger muscle, it is easier to climb the hills by spinning your way up and saving the undo stress on your legs, which will tend to give out sooner than your heart. It is about endurance over power. Conversely, the highest gears produce the slowest pedal rotation, but generate more power. We call this “mashing” on the pedals and is great for those flatter stretches of road where you really want to open it up and cover a lot of ground quickly. Because you are not fighting gravity or galeforce winds, your leg muscles can easily handle the task of pushing the bike through these lower-resistance conditions. Now, power is king. Then there are the shifters themselves. There are two types, the twist or grip style and the trigger. Regardless of which one a bike has, shifting toward the lower numbers (lower gears) will make the bike easier to pedal, and shifting toward the higher numbers (higher gears) will make it harder to pedal. As you now know, easier pedaling allows for better climbing and harder pedaling makes the bike go faster. Piece of cake, right?

Sure, I like the first snow. It is pretty. Bonus! We had a white Christmas! Pretty cool! As much as I like that first snow, as winter drags on with endless cold, snow and gray, I start to feel a little bummed out. Many people report similar feelings during winter when the days are short, cold and cloudy. In some cases, the depression can be serious enough that a doctor will make a diagnosis of Seasonal Affective Disorder. But there are things you can do to combat the winter blues and stay healthy until warmer, sunnier weather arrives: Wear bright-colored clothing. Science shows that colors

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

affect our mood. When I feel down, I put on bright colors or even look at colorful photographs. It really does help! Get some houseplants. Put them on the coffee table, dining-room table, or wherever you spend the most time. Plants will provide that pop of green that will brighten your day. They also purify indoor air, an important perk with homes being closed up against the weather. Eat comfort food. Feeling extra hungry? You are not imagining it. Humans are biologically wired to eat more when it is cold and dark. You can feed this need in a healthy way by making warm and nourishing soups. Move your body. Exercise can be as effective as medication for reducing depression and anxiety. As few as 10 minutes of walking can boost your mood. Get up, and do something! Dress for the weather and go outside. Sure, it is cold, but you can still walk, hike and run. Get adventurous and try a winter sport like skiing or snowboarding. If you are struggling with anxiety, bad moods or depression that will not seem to quit, see a doctor, no matter what time of year. As a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach, Kelly Baily owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog, visit the Food Freedom page, and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

N


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

21

COMMUNITY: GEMS

Nurses’ Legacy Provides for Children by Kent Von der Vellen In 1976, Medina Hospital nurses became concerned when they noticed infants leaving the hospital with families who could not afford the supplies needed for their newborns. The nurses decided to help by founding Birthcare. Since its founding, Birthcare has worked to ensure the safety, warmth and health of children from newborns up to 5-year-olds To get assistance, it takes only a photo ID to verify Medina County residency, no financial information is required. A few voluntary demographic questions are asked for the Birthcare database and to aid in applying for grants. Though diapers, wipes and baby clothes are consistently the highest in-demand items, Executive Director Barb McCoy said there is a need for the larger-sized diapers, trainers and toddlersized clothing. During winter months, warm toddler-size clothing also is needed. In addition to everyday items like clothing and diapers, Birthcare provides formula, baby food, hygiene items, wash cloths and related items, cribs, and car seats. Due to insurance regulations, they cannot accept used cribs or car seats and ask donors to instead make a cash donation to allow them to buy new ones. Appointments are not needed, and parents or guardians can pick up needed items once a month through curbside service by calling the organization’s number upon arrival. A volunteer will deliver requested items to the car. Distribution hours are Monday and Tuesday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, noon to 2 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. to noon. A scholarship endowment fund was created in 1997 to help Birthcare clients. The scholarship is meant to help clients earn certification for work or to attend a trade school or college. Birthcare has awarded 76 scholarships including two totaling $4,000 for 2020. Birthcare operates with 60 volunteers and a board of directors. McCoy began as a volunteer in 1989 and became executive director in 2010. McCoy said that one of their challenges is finding funding for

upgrading to new technology. They still do a lot with paper records and would like to update their website. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3olFvNC or https:// bit.ly/2M1WBmf, call 330.722.1190, or e-mail birthcaremedina@aol.com. Editor’s note: Information is from the nonprofit’s most recent filings with the Ohio attorney general.

Birthcare of Medina County, Inc. 620 E. Smith Road, Unit E-5A Medina, Oh. 44256 330-722-1190 www.birthcaremedina.org Date of formation: 07/04/1976 Organization type: 501(c)(3) Description of organization’s purpose: We provide emergency assistance with basic needs for families with young children: diapers, formula, baby food, car seats, cribs, clothing, etc. Reporting Year: 2019 Reporting Start Date: 1/1/2019 Reporting End Date: 12/31/2019 Total Revenue: $96,960.00 Total Expenses: $58,509.00 Total Program Expenses: $36,236.00 Percent of Total Expenses: 62% Total Assets: $308,537.00 Director or Board member List (10): Meg Benninger Sally C. Pap Joanne Weiler Marie Mirro Edmonds Michele Fusillo Sandra Bevec Mary Kase Diane Bugner Barbara McCoy Mary Corall

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions Club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing Gems@BlakeHousePublishing.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area nonprofits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com.


22

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

Want more Joy? Subscribe to our e-edition and get Joy no matter where you go! Use this link https://bit.ly/30duSlB to start your subscription. Want to read Joy in print? Visit Medina County libraries where you can find Joy of Medina County Magazine as an official, cataloged publication in the Periodicals section of the library. Joy also can be found in the Medina Library’s Historic Archives! For more information about Joy of Medina County Magazine, visit our website: https://bit.ly/38WotiH


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: ROLL ’EM!

Christmas All Year by Hunter Barnard I watched a lot of Christmas movies in December, and one of my favorites is the new “Christmas Chronicles 2.” My favorite character is Santa, he is very cool because he sings and dances, and he seems very nice. In the movie, Santa has to save Christmas again, but this time he is saving it from a bad guy named Belsnickel. The first movie had a girl named Katie in it. She is a true believer, which means she has always really believed Santa was real, more than most people. She and her new stepbrother get tricked by Belsnickel, and they end up being sent to the North Pole, where they get lost. Santa comes to rescue them, and that is when they realize they were tricked. Belsnickel just needed them to get them to the North Pole as a trap for Santa. Eventually, we find out that Belsnickel used to live at the North Pole, and he was mad at Santa for not believing in his inventions. I do not think Santa meant to hurt his feelings, but Belsnickel did not think Santa liked him anymore. This movie was very cool because Mrs. Claus was in it more. Even the whole village at the North Pole was in it, too. They even had a shop where the elves made video games, and I thought that was really cool. Christmas movies are my favorite kind of movie, and I liked this one because it had a good ending. The movie was happy, and it was all about the Christmas spirit. I think everyone should watch it!

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 7-year-old who attends Berea City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mother, Jessica Rapenchuk.

A

“Wait, so I’m getting all of your non-preaccepted gifts?!”

“I understand highheeled boots even less than I understand high-heeled shoes. It defeats one of the purposes of boots! And they’re usually made of thinner material, which defeats the only other purpose of a boot!”

“I feel like this movie is just a mid-life crisis.” comment about Pixar’s movie “Soul’’

23


24

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

MIRTH AND JOY

ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT: IN THE STUDIO

by Jerry King

Art World is Ready by Kariem Farrakhan II The arts were hit especially hard by the pandemic in 2020 with fairs, festivals and exhibitions being nixed. The cancellations have made artists and art lovers even more excited to get out and experience the art revival that will inevitably take place. Try to fit at least one of these events on your to-do list to support the arts community. It will be a triumphant return, even more so if you are a part of it. Below is a list of major art events to visit when they return. SCAD Sidewalk Chalk Arts Festival (April/May) Did you think sidewalk chalk could not be fine art? Every year, Savannah College of Art & Design in Georgia hosts the nation’s grandest sidewalk chalk art competition. In 2020, it was done as a digital competition and show. Students and college alumni create vibrant chalk art in Forsyth Park, 2 W. Gaston Street, Savannah, Georgia, while visitors watch art being created and view the stunning results. Plenty of artists take this competition very seriously, so be ready to be awed. https://bit.ly/3nZ6dLN Affordable Fall Art Fair (May and September) In New York City, thousands of affordable contemporary artworks are showcased twice a year at the Affordable Art Fair. The artwork is remarkably diverse and carefully curated. It is a great opportunity to see what the art world is producing and maybe even discover a great piece of art for yourself. https://bit.ly/2KtMhml Columbus Arts Festival (June) The Columbus Arts Festival is arguably the largest art festival in the state, exhibiting the art of 260 to more than 300 artists by the riverfront. In addition to the art village and juried shows, there are hands-on activities and workshops and five stages holding musical and theater performances. https://bit.ly/3nY6sqj Art Basel Week (December) Art Basel Week is one of the largest, most important art events in the country. Artists, gallerists, collectors, and patrons come to Miami Beach from all over the world for art installations, forums and networking. It is a spectacular event for anyone interested in the world of fine art. https://bit.ly/2M5CeEF Kariem Farrakhan II is a Wadsworth artist who has experience creating art using a variety of media and enjoys sharing his knowledge, while continuing to learn. He is the art director for The Spirited Palette, https://thespiritedpalette.com/, and maintains his own solo platform at The Indigo Kid, https:// theindigokid.com/. He can be reached at kariem@thespiritedpalette.com or by calling 330-3293930.


Joyful Word Search Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021 February 2021 Joyful Word Search Love Language Language Love

E O B E D I E N C E T R

S G N I N I A R T B E R

N D A R Y S Q T L K D Y

A C L U D T H Y R Y G V

I T L N G E I A Y O M T

T P A I R N M L L D H K

HANDS DALMATIANS HANDS TRAINING DALMATIANS DEAF TRAINING THERAPY DEAF CLICKER VISUAL MARKER THERAPY DOGS

CLICKER VISUAL MARKER DOGS

A H M A C L A O I U B B

M B P O A K H L M G A Z

L Y L U T C E B Y B A L

A B S Q Y S S R B D D W

D I J S K U Q L F R O M

V W P M P M E P A A G B

R Z Q J L D J X E U S Z

GUARD GUARD PSYCHOLOGY AGILITY PSYCHOLOGY OBEDIENCE AGILITY THUMBS UP OBEDIENCE BABBLE BODY LANGUAGE THUMBS UP STOMP

BABBLE BODY LANGUAGE STOMP

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Hanging Out

N Y V J V J L D D G B J

25


26

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

February 2021 Nonprofit Calendar All Month: Seedling Sales, through April 2, sponsored by the Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District, 6090 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Sold in packets of 10 tree seedlings, $12. For ordering form and more information, go to: https://bit.ly/39wfQNP or call 330-722-9322.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Sunday, February 7 National Periodic Table Day https://bit.ly/2NOCFUx Well, who wouldn’t celebrate this one! And Wave All Your Fingers at Your A Neighbor Day https://bit.ly/3oCHxJ0 Certainly a nicer idea than Monday, February 1 waving only one! No Politics Day https://bit.ly/39ARm6k Yay! Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Tuesday, February 2 Play Your Ukulele Day https://bit.ly/2MlOEIT Entertain your Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All neighbors! ages. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Love is in the Air, 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, February 3 National Tater Tot Day https://bit.ly/2MLgaPJ Anyone who has to 6 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Through Feb 21. Valentine’s Day-themed hike is PG-13, had a school lunch never forgets the tater tots! Create!: Art With Sharpie, 4 to 4:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by for ages 7 to adult. Signs along the nature trail examines wildlife mating practices with one sign having a code word to list on Wadsworth Library. View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Thursday, February 4 National Create a Vacuum Day https://bit.ly/2Mmy3EH There’s an App for That!, 10 a.m., virtual class teaches how to Monday, February 8 download apps on your phone. Sponsored by the Medina County Laugh and Get Rich Day https://bit.ly/2MdrSTG Office for Older Adults. For more information, call 330-723-9514. Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why Friday, February 5 Work Naked Day https://bit.ly/2Mj7O1W and National Shower every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All With a Friend Day https://bit.ly/36qhajm We’ll leave you to your ages. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Cleveland own thoughts on this one. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, February 6 National Chopsticks Day https://bit.ly/36tzBUy and American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. International Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day https://bit.ly/3cu8gp0 For a real exercise in patience, celebrate https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United both at once! Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why Art in the Afternoon: Pop Art, 4 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn about pop art and get inspired to create. View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC ages. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Love is in the Air, 7:30 a.m. Monday Night Intrigue: “The Falcon Thief,” 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., to 6 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, virtual. Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Pursue a man Medina. Through Feb 21. Valentine’s Day-themed hike is PG-13, determined to own the world’s most beautiful creatures. Part for ages 7 to adult. Signs along the nature trail examines wildlife true-crime narrative, part epic adventure. Register for link at mating practices with one sign having a code word to list on https://bit.ly/3pCphRz Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021 Tuesday, February 9 National Pizza Day https://bit.ly/3ctWPNN Great day to have pizza delivered to the employees of your favorite retail store! Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All ages. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Alphabet Adventure: V is for Violin, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn about musical instruments that start with V. Crafts, Materials pickup available at library with registration at https://bit.ly/3j6P81i View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Wednesday, February 10 National Umbrella Day https://bit.ly/2MHNszu

27

animals are connected. All ages welcome. Event link will be sent upon registration. Register at https://bit.ly/2MLiupS Friday, February 12 National Lost Penny Day https://bit.ly/36uo2wb Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All ages. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs!, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through February 13. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is love bugs. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/39yiGlq Saturday, February 13 World Radio Day https://bit.ly/39xRmUw Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All ages. Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Love is in the Air, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Through Feb 21. Valentine’s Day-themed hike is PG-13, for ages 7 to adult. Signs along the nature trail examines wildlife mating practices with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Monthly Makers: Love Bugs!, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, last day. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is love bugs. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/39yiGlq

Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All ages. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs!, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday, through February 13. Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. This month is love bugs. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/39yiGlq Self-Guided Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Seasonal Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina Marsh, 4266 Fenn Road, Medina. An easy walk to enjoy nature. Naturalist will initial your Natural Discoveries form at the end. For more information on the Natural Discoveries series, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Advanced registration is required due to COVID-19 restrictions. Register by February 8 at https://bit.ly/3rlFwD9 WAITING LIST American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Navigating Facebook, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Event link will be sent upon registration. Register Sunday, February 14 at https://bit.ly/3rfdPMd Library Lovers Day https://bit.ly/2MCBlUe If you love the smell of books, this is the day for you! Thursday, February 11 Make a Friend Day https://bit.ly/3argonE What a difference it Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. can make in a day! Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why ages. every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, ages. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs!, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick through Saturday, through February 13. Wolf Creek Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Registered Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Love is in the Air, 7:30 a.m. households are provided outdoor space each month to set up to 6 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, displays according to that month’s theme. This month is love Medina. Through Feb 21. Valentine’s Day-themed hike is PG-13, bugs. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. For more for ages 7 to adult. Signs along the nature trail examines wildlife mating practices with one sign having a code word to list on information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/39yiGlq American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Zoo School With Akron Zoo, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., virtual. ORMACO Sunday Live Stream Concerts: Dane Vannatter: Come Hosted by Medina Library. Learn about the food web and how all to the Cabaret, 2 p.m. Featuring romantic songs of Cole Porter,


28

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

George and Ira Gershwin, and more. Joe Hunter accompanies on National Battery Day https://bit.ly/3cubmt8 piano. To stream live, go to: https://bit.ly/3cyKzvP Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Monday, February 15 Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Singles Awareness Day https://bit.ly/39BkWbH This one has us Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. scratching our heads. If you are single, are you not already aware Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday of that? through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Every Bird Counts: Great Backyard Bird Count, 6 a.m. to dark, Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Red Trail, River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Through February 15. Self-guided walk, follow signs to learn why Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. every bird counts and how to participate in the bird count. All Registered households are provided outdoor space each month ages. to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, information. Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Mark Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. Let’s Explore: The Science of Hot Chocolate, 6:30 p.m. to 7 https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Public Library. Experiment Tween Scene: Melted Crayon T-Shirt, 4 p.m. to 4:20 p.m., with hot chocolate, learn how to make hot chocolate cloud virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Library. Learn how to transfer dough, a marshmallow catapult. Materials pickup available at designs made with a crayon onto a T-shirt. Register at library with registration at https://bit.ly/3cuxrYq View program https://bit.ly/3oz5b9y at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC OSU Good Agricultural Practices, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., virtual. Covers water quality, produce safety, worker training and health, Tuesday, February 16 manure and compost handling, animals, storage, transport. Do a Grouch a Favor Day https://bit.ly/3pAeMOI Certificate of completion at end of training. Free. Register at Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, https://producesafety.osu.edu/events Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Explorastory: I Spy on the Farm, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., virtual. Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Sponsored by Wadsworth Library. Book “I Spy” is read, sing Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. songs, learn rhymes. Play a farm scavenger hunt, Learn how to Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday make a simple cow puppet and a rooster. Materials pickup through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek available at library with registration at https://bit.ly/2NU0z12 Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the View program at https://bit.ly/3nWWoPC Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Great Lakes Island Adventures, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn about geology and studies for Registered households are provided outdoor space each month each Great Lake from author Loreen Niewenhuis. Register at to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable https://bit.ly/3j2s1oV restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Friday, February 19 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., The National Lash Day https://bit.ly/3rct2xc A day to celebrate Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, eyelashes?! Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Medina Ice Festival, enjoy the ice sculpture garden on Medina Pet Show and Tell, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Public Square. No carving contests or demonstrations this year Medina Library. Show off pets and share their antics. No pets? due to COVID-19 restrictions. Masks are to be worn at all times. Share a stuffed animal or toy. For children in grades Leashed pets welcome. Free. Kindergarten through 5th. Event link sent upon registration. Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Register at: https://bit.ly/2MIaPsJ Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Wednesday, February 17 Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Random Act of Kindness Day https://bit.ly/3td7oe5 One of our Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday favorite days! through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the information. Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Fish Fry, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Drive-through event. Fried fish or Registered households are provided outdoor space each month shrimp, cheesy potatoes, coleslaw for $8 while supplies last. to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more Saturday, February 20 information. National Love Your Pet Day https://bit.ly/3coZBEh Medina Ice Festival, enjoy the ice sculpture garden on Medina Thursday, February 18 Public Square. No carving contests or demonstrations this year


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021 due to COVID-19 restrictions. Masks are to be worn at all times. Leashed pets welcome. Free. Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Love is in the Air, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Through Feb 21. Valentine’s Day-themed hike is PG-13, for ages 7 to adult. Signs along the nature trail examines wildlife mating practices with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71 Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Old Fire Station, 1410 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp So You Want to be a Zookeeper? 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn what it takes to become a zookeeper and to start preparing now. Children of all ages welcome. Register for event link. Register at https://bit.ly/36thkGN Medina County Trivia, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Join in on a trivia game about Medina County. One registration per household, event link will be sent. Register at https://bit.ly/3oyM13l Sunday, February 21 Card Reading Day https://bit.ly/39Alkr1 Before you throw those holiday or Valentine’s cards away, read them one more time and enjoy the love and kindness people sent to you. Medina Ice Festival, enjoy the ice sculpture garden on Medina Public Square. No carving contests or demonstrations this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Masks are to be worn at all times. Leashed pets welcome. Free. Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Love is in the Air, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Through Feb 21. Valentine’s Day-themed hike is PG-13, for ages 7 to adult. Signs along the nature trail examines wildlife mating practices with one sign having a code word to list on Natural Discoveries form. Counts toward Natural Discoveries award. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/3pD5P71

29

Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Virtual Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., with Wadsworth Library. Designed for children on the autism spectrum or sensory integration challenges and their families and caregivers. View at https://bit.ly/2NWQDnD Tuesday, February 23 World Spay Day https://bit.ly/3ctnBpJ and International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2NWBYZD If a dog has to participate in the first one, she better get to enjoy the second! Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Virtual Nature Break: Animal Adaptations, 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Learn how animals have adapted to survive Ohio winters. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3oB3JTV Virtual Otaku Tuesdays, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. A discussion of all things anime, for Grades 6 through 12. Register for required meeting link at https://bit.ly/2MopNnR Bullet Journaling, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Introduction to bullet journaling to record and organize what is important to you. Event link sent upon registration. Register at https://bit.ly/2NTXHRO Finding Your Family in the News, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Medina Library. Learn how to use historic newspapers and a new library database to get family story details. Event link sent upon registration. Register at https://bit.ly/36qxv7G Wednesday, February 24 National Tortilla Chip Day https://bit.ly/3j2OQsx Pass the salsa! Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information.

Monday, February 22 International World Thinking Day https://bit.ly/36uWl6j Take some time to clear the clutter in your brain! Medina Ice Festival, final day, enjoy the ice sculpture garden on Medina Public Square. No carving contests or demonstrations this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Masks are to be worn at all times. Leashed pets welcome. Free. Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Thursday, February 25 Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, National Chocolate-Covered Nut Day


30

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Aquarius Exhibition Through February 28 B. Smith Gallery third floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway, Medina Art in Action February 12 through February 28 Watch virtually as local

artists demonstrate techniques and share their work. Print off an oversized puzzle piece to decorate and turn in at the library or e-mail it to ebey@mcdl.info for the Community Creates Art Puzzle Project. Call 330725-0588 for more information.

Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.

Virtual Nature Break: Animal Adaptations, 3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., virtual. Learn how animals have adapted to survive Ohio winters. For more information and to register, go to https://bit.ly/3cu5wYK Virtual Escape Room: Candy Conundrum, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., virtual with Wadsworth Library. Candy shop has orders to be completed and delivered quickly, solve the mystery of the orders in time for Valentine’s Day! Register to receive link and instructions. No download or special software needed. See tutorial at https://bit.ly/345sWiL Register at https://bit.ly/3j35zMl Yes, You Can Garden! , 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., virtual. Hosted by Wadsworth Public Library. Learn how to prep for this year’s garden and gain new gardening skills. Register for event link. Registration is at https://bit.ly/3j3k6Yc Friday, February 26 Tell a Fairy Tale Day https://bit.ly/3oBEh0K Want your story published? Write it down and send it to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, through February 27, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Mark Lutheran Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, February 27 No Brainer Day https://bit.ly/3oFj85z Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, through February 28, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way. Monthly Makers: Love Bugs! Walk, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday, last day, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk the Monthly Maker trail to view love bugs created by local families. Get inspired and consider becoming a Monthly Maker family. Registered households are provided outdoor space each month to set up displays according to that month’s theme. Portable restroom is available in parking lot. Call 330-722-9364, for more information. Sunday, February 28 Floral Design Day https://bit.ly/2MdzWUs Beat the winter blues with a beautiful, fragrant bouquet! Sweetheart Hike, 6 a.m. to park close, last day, Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic stroll around Brunswick Lake with Valentine facts and trivia along the way.

K


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2021

31

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Medical Massage

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

238 S. Elmwood Avenue, Medina (Inside GotMilt Health and Fitness) Phone: 330-461-0769 Website: www.KnotYourself.com

Dentist

Allison Waltz Photography

Armstrong

Knot Yourself

Photographer

Landry Family Dentistry 5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Phone: 567-203-2287 Website: https://www.allisonwaltz.com/

FlashBang Photography/ Videography Phone: 440-263-4502 Website: https://www.flashbangfoto.com/

Renovations

North Shore Renovations Phone: 216-676-4700 Renovations and 24-hour emergency service Website: https://nsr911.com/

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio


Click on “follow” below so you don’t miss a single edition of Joy of Medina County Magazine! Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2021