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A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 1 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

An Addict’s Story by Amy Barnes For the first time, The Reading Nook is featuring a nonfiction story. It is an important story about our times and the rabbit hole of addiction that so many of our friends, family members and coworkers have fallen down and struggled or are still struggling to crawl out of. Kevin Oney’s story is about himself, how he became an addict, the people he loved and hurt, and the process of becoming a recovering addict who has the strength to tell his story, unvarnished and stark. When Oney approached me with his story and asked if there would be an interest in publishing it, he did not know that I had been wanting to publish exactly such a story, one about addiction written from an addict’s point of view, to fulfill a promise I had made. At a place I worked at a few years ago, I overheard a conversation among coworkers who were expressing outrage that Narcan was used, sometimes repeatedly, to save the lives of overdose victims. They said addicts did not deserve reviving because they had

made the choice to use drugs. I cringed at the words that were said and even more at the tone that was used, but I also knew it was a common misperception. When trying to enlighten them failed, I promised myself that one day there would be the chance to help bring understanding that addiction is not simply a matter of choice. Oney said his hope is that his story will encourage those who are fighting addiction and maybe help warn others, so they do not fall into the trap of addiction. Perhaps his story also will educate and change the views of those who are the harshest critics of the ones trying to climb out of the rabbit hole, and maybe they will be inspired to do more and will reach out a hand to help pull someone up. Oney’s story is one of hope, finding joy and rediscovering love and the richness of life.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Kevin G. Oney MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

FINDING A CREDIBLE COMPANY by Paul McHam Tips on what to keep in mind while researching information and companies to aid with mold issues.

THE IN BOX

SKIN IN THE GAME by Steve Rak While every business suffers a downturn at some point, the dedication of the owner can depend on how much personal time and money is invested.

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GROWING THROUGH THE YEARS

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The war was in the stars, but the ending is not revealed in this column.

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Meet Tigger, Ty-grr and Binx from Save Ohio Strays, and see crafted snowflakes bigger than a child’s head.

New or old, all bikes benefit from regular maintenance that will keep them ready to hit the road when the weather is warm.

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by Kelly Bailey No matter how hard you tried, does it seem your New Year’s resolutions are already gone? Or are you struggling to keep them from slipping away? Here are some tips on how to rejuvenate them and succeed.

On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Tom James on one of his frequent visits to the Medina County Park District headquarters.

by Austin Steger

by Jerry King

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BITE ME!

SALMON PATTIES by Susan Feller Wadsworth resident Susan Feller steps up to the stove this month and shares a recipe that has won many over, even those who do not like salmon.

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

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GEMS

OF MIND AND BODY

CREATING RESOLUTION SUCCESS

CUSTOM COMPUTER CONSIDERATIONS

MIRTH AND JOY

HEALTHY TRAILS by Robert Soroky

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND Factors to consider when deciding whether a custom-built or prebuilt computer is best.

photos by FlashBang Photography

BIKE MAINTENANCE 101

by Michelle Riley

by Hunter Barnard

OH, SNAP!

Finding the words about the Medina County Park District might not be a walk in the park.

AFTERCARE FOR HOLIDAY PLANTS

FRANCHISE HAS GREAT ENDING

LIFE AND RECOVERY OF AN AMERICAN JUNKIE

A WALK IN THE PARK

DIG IT!

ROLL ’EM!

THE READING NOOK

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

by Bob Arnold

The holidays are over, life is back to its regular schedule, but now there are plants left behind in the wake and their care is a mystery. Help is here!

While neither one planned a career in parks, first Tom James and then Nate Eppink’s paths led to the leadership of the Medina County Park District, which is celebrating 55 years of creation and growth this year.

A first-person account of becoming an addict and finding the strength to travel the road to recovery.

CONNECTION PERFECTION Discovering how to use your connections to benefit others will build healthy networking relationships.

by Amy Barnes

by Kevin G. Oney

THE NETWORKER

Can you solve this month’s puzzle? Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

PROM DRESS DREAMS COME TRUE by Kent Von Der Vellen Denise Walsh and Lori Taylor decided that girls should not miss their proms because they could not afford a formal gown, so they took action.

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LET’S DO IT! Have cabin fever? Time to shake those blues by trying out some of the great events around the county.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

The Medina County Park District headquarters is located in a converted barn that once was part of the Medina County Home. The brown patches in the grass are where prairie grasses have been seeded. The front porch roof is a new addition to the building and the barn stone wall to the right recently was rebuilt. photo by Amy Barnes

Growing Through the Years by Amy Barnes

His eyes twinkle like he knows the punchline and is waiting for everyone else to figure it out. There is no question that Tom James loves nature and the Medina County Park District he was the director of for more than 25 years. He watches over them still as the secretary and treasurer for the Friends of the Parks board, despite his retirement from the district in 2018. At 69, he feels he still has work to do for the preservation of green space and the creation of parks, and he travels Ohio as a park development specialist for the Environmental Design Group, a company that plans and develops parks. “One always needs to be engaged. It’s not good to go home and sit down. I’ve retired to a slower pace of work, but I’m still engaged,” James said. James keeps his focus on preserving green space

before it disappears to the developers who are willing to offer high sums for vast farmlands, the same concerns that area people had when the Medina County Park District was created. On April 19, 1965, more than 60 people met with Medina County Probate Judge W.W. Garver to ask for the creation of the Medina County Park District, according to the district’s website. Support for the creation of the district was widespread with resolutions presented by 14 political subdivisions and 25 service clubs. “Certainly, the public opinion, and I think it remains so today, was that open space needed to be saved,” James said. “A number of people felt that open space is important.” The park district, which is celebrating its 55th anniversary this year, was launched with a donation


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of 33 acres, followed by additional donations totaling 500 acres. The donations made it possible for the park district to obtain grants to purchase additional land. The first county park, Green Leaf Park, opened in 1972. Despite the grants, the park district struggled with a lack of funding just as Medina County was beginning to quickly change from predominantly rural to suburban. Open land and farmland started being rapidly replaced with housing for the influx of people moving into the county. The disappearing open land became the incentive needed to convince residents to approve a levy in 1989 to fund the district and its operations. During his tenure as director, James added 5,300 acres to the park system. James mentions it casually and quickly and passes all credit to district staff members and those who donate to the district. James gives the impression that the thousands of acres fell into his lap, but an increase from 1,200 to 6,500 acres does not come about by accident or without some diplomatic finesse and the public’s trust. While James passes credit for the district’s success to staff members, the Medina County Sierra Club and the Medina County Historical Society have a different opinion. The Sierra Club honored James last year with the John F. Seiberling Achievement Award in recognition of his years of service to Medina County’s people and natural environment. According to the Sierra Club, when James became director of the park district in 1993, Medina County was the fastest growing county in Ohio and was losing an average of 40 acres per week to residential development. At that time, the district consisted of seven mostly small parks. The Historical Society awarded James with the continued, Page 6


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Northrop Award for his efforts to preserve the county’s historic natural resources. One of the remarkable things about the huge growth of the county park system is that the man largely responsible for it was not planning on a career in preservation and parks. James chuckles when he thinks about the unexpected turn his career took. It all started with a side job to earn money for college. While James was working on earning his teaching degree from Kent State University, he worked as a teacher’s aide and during summers he worked at the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District. He graduated in 1973 and taught special education in the Dover Public School system in Dover, while continuing to work part time for the watershed district during the summers. The pull of the outdoors became stronger, and every year he found what he looked forward to the most was working for the watershed. After 5 1/2 years of teaching, the pull of the outdoors won and James took a walk from the school system to working full time for the watershed. “There’s a lot of pressure in a special education classroom,” James said, adding, “It’s not that I didn’t like teaching, but when I realized how much I looked forward to working outside, I changed jobs.” Ironically, his love of the outdoors was about to

land him in a desk job. He had become familiar with Medina County when he would travel to Medina to work on color separations and printing of watershed brochures. James had worked in various positions for the watershed and Atwood Lake Park, including a stint as a ranger. When a full-time position opened at the Medina County Park District in 1993, James jumped at the chance. “It was the job that intrigued me,” said James. He moved his family to Seville. His family included his wife, Crystal, whom he has now been married to for 42 years; son, Patrick, who now works at Home Depot and plays bassoon for the Wadsworth Community Band; and daughter, Kati, who works at the Jones Day law firm in Cleveland and plays the euphonium. For three months, he worked as the capital projects coordinator and then was promoted to the directorship. Three years after he became director, River Styx Park opened. It previously had been visited by the Smithsonian while it studied the neotropical songbirds living there, underlining the importance of the preservation of the area. The biggest roadblock the park district had faced over the years was a lack of funding, but that was changing. The levy’s passage in 1989 was helpful, and more help would eventually be on the way. In 2000, there was a big boost to preservation efforts in Ohio with the creation of the Clean Ohio Fund, which was a $400-million state bond initiative to provide funding to preserve farmland, conserve green space, and clean up brownfields. As funds became available, they enabled James to purposefully acquire land rather than hope for donations. His overall plan was to expand the acreage of existing parks, rather than have numerous small parks scattered around the county. Properties rich in natural resources, such as trees, wetlands, streams, and unusual geographical features were top on his list, as well as properties


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

that were located near existing parks. His voice becomes quieter when he talks of acreage lost. He said there are always places that he wants to save, but it is not always possible. Looking back is not something James wants to spend his time on. Rather than mourn what has been lost, he pushes forward with urgency, knowing how quickly land and its resources can disappear from the landscape. Properties tend to be valued more in the future, when looking back at what was lost, than they are in the moment. “Conservation is not thinking about today, but thinking about tomorrow and the next tomorrow,” said James. He explained that it is not as important to open parks as it is to acquire land. Land can be turned into parks, but parks can exist only if the land has been preserved. Creating a park is not simply putting in a parking lot and opening the gate. It is an involved process that includes a whole laundry list of items to check off, said James. The land has to be studied to determine how to integrate the public without disturbing wildlife, native plants, and features, such as sandstone ledges. “You look at what’s there and what you don’t want to harm,” James said, adding that all of the things seen in a park have to be designed and set up. Designing parks for the district was a job done by landscape architect Richard Heaton. As part of the design work, Heaton would plan the placement of features and trails to work with the characteristics of each park. “He was the visionary in creating the parks and I was the visionary in obtaining the land,” James said, with a smile and a twinkle in his eye. After 17 years with the park district, Heaton retired in 2017. Hayley Bondi currently is working on achieving the necessary certifications to become the district’s new landscape architect. The park district’s growth has been in more than just increased acreage. Trails increased and were linked, classes and workshops offered were expanded, staff members and naturalists increased to support the expanded number of parks and park visitors.

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Through it all was James leading the way, using his deep love of nature to guide him. Ironically, the bigger James was able to grow the park district’s holdings, the more complicated things became, and the more time James had to spend in the office, away from his beloved nature. To save it, he had to spend time away from it. A few of the land donations stand out in James’ mind because he developed a connection and friendship with the donors. One of the district’s treasures that resulted partly from a donation and partly from land purchased is the Alderfer/Oenslager Wildlife Sanctuary and Wolf Creek Environmental Center, which hosts many of the district’s classes and annual nature art show, and was made possible with the help of Ruth Oenslager. She donated 104 acres to the park district with the stipulation that it was to be used for the education of children regarding the environment. James used continued, Page 8


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district funds to add additional acreage to Oenslager’s donation, bringing the total acreage to 248 acres. The sanctuary has a variety of habitats that include prairies, wetlands, mature forests, a deep-water pond, and meadows. Four acres of marsh became the Wolf Creek Educational Wetlands and a boardwalk was built to allow people to see the wildlife and study the wetland. To preserve these areas, activities such as fishing, biking and picnicking

are not allowed. One couple whom James has fond memories of were Willette and Ted Chandler, who donated Ted’s family’s farm to the park district. His family had lived on the farm since 1926. The Chandlers donated their land, which was approximately 100 acres located on Smith Road, behind the Buehler’s River Styx location on State Route 18. The farm was known by longtime Medina residents as the old pickle farm because Farm Packt Pickles were produced there. Both Chandlers have since died, Willette in 2007 and Ted in 2018, but their legacy lives on in their land. Even though the Chandlers’ land has not been developed to be a park yet, there is a trail planned that would connect Smith Road with State Route 18. James said it is supposed to open this year or in 2021. Two of the most significant land donations to the park district were Allardale Park and Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, James said. Allardale Park was the result of the donation of 125 acres donated by Stan and Esther Allard in 1992, about six months before James became director. They later donated an additional 50 acres. Another 212 acres was added to their donations through purchases by the park district. The Allards took an active role in the development of the park and advised on the best paths for trails to be established that would protect resources and make the best use of the land. They were often on the property, interacting with park visitors. During the time that the Allards owned the land, Stan planted 100,000 trees on the property in areas that were unsuitable for farming, such as inclines. “It was a good place to go if I was having a bad day,” James said, with obvious fondness for the Allards.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

photo by Amy Barnes

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The Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park was created when Beverly and Richard Mugrage made an agreement with the park district to donate their land. The donation set many wheels in motion. James has a unique talent for diplomacy and matching up needs to the benefit of all involved, and this transaction would test his skills. Located just off of Highway 18 on Windfall Road, the park was named after Richard Mugrage’s mother, who had preserved the land throughout the Depression. The land is considered by James to be the most resource-valuable piece donated to the park system. At the same time of the Mugrage’s donation, James was trying to find the funds that would enable the district to get a matching grant from the Clean Ohio Foundation so the park district could acquire 360 acres at Chippewa Lake. It was the end of a levy period, which meant funds were low and not enough to make the purchase. It so happened that at the same time, Hospice of Medina County was looking for land on which to build a facility, preferably close to a park for the stress relief of families using their services. After conferring with the Mugrages, James worked out an agreement where Hospice purchased an 8acre strip of land sandwiched between State Route 18 on one side and the park on the other. Hospice paid a lower-than-value cost for the property to help the nonprofit get what it needed, while the funds raised from the sale were enough to help the park district purchase the Chippewa Lake acreage that it was struggling to save. James said he likes to think of it as trading 8 acres (at the park) for 360 acres (Chippewa Lake). “Being able to be involved in both of those parks, it was gratifying to work with those folks so they could be a part of the planning and get to see people enjoying their gift,” said James. When the Medina United Methodist Church moved from Medina’s Public Square to Fenn Road, James was co-chair of the building committee. The development of the church’s property included installing a trail and a chapel in the woods that butt up to Lake Medina, helping to ensure more connected green space that will be safe from

development. James said that on a clear day, the lake can be seen from the chapel. While he did not make the decisions regarding the land’s management and layout, James’ eyes twinkle as he says, “I certainly encouraged it.” James said that, just like for the arts in schools, people question the economic value of supporting parks. He points out that it is impossible to prove the exact financial gain an area has from preserving land. For example, a rare bird at Allardale one year had people traveling from around the world to spot it, and those people spent money on food, lodging and more while they were here but there was no way to track it. Another example was when the Smithsonian was studying neotropical birds at River Styx Park, which not only directly helped the local economy but also gave publicity to the area. While James still keeps watch over what happens in the district and is available to help if needed, the new director, Nate Eppink, is already showing what he can do. Eppink worked with James for most of 2018 to ensure a smooth transition in the district’s leadership. “Tom was very good at leveraging tax dollars,” Eppink said, adding that James brought in a total of $8 million to restore and acquire land for preservation. He said the district’s current levy does not expire until 2026. “They (James and the park district’s board) set up this park district to succeed,” Eppink said. Even though he is in awe of what James was able to accomplish in his years with the district, Eppink said the mentoring he received from James has made him feel up to the task of building on the foundation that James laid. “I’m not the new Tom, I’m just carrying the torch,” Eppink said. Eppink, like James, also did not plan a career of working in parks, in spite of his deep love of nature and preservation. He attended Cleveland State University, earned a bachelor’s and master’s in communications, and said he planned a career working in public relations or broadcast. “I always envisioned working in radio,” he said.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

He completed internships for the Cleveland Lumberjacks hockey team, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the marketing departments of the Cleveland Metroparks, the Geauga County Park District, and, finally, the Summit Metro Parks. In February 2018, he heard of an opening in the Medina County Park District for a capital projects coordinator and applied. By March 2018, he had been hired and his wife, Kelly, who is studying for her real estate license, and their three children, ages 4 to 9, had moved from Akron to Montville Township. In October 2018, Eppink was promoted to being named the district’s new director. “We have really fallen in love with Medina County,” Eppink said about his family. Eppink is excited about the future of the park district. He said that last year he was able to add a total of 250 acres to the district, with 150.3 acres of that being a transfer from the Stream and Wetlands Foundation. The transferred land was a mitigation site in Granger Township that the foundation had purchased in 2006 and turned into a wetland. Eppink was able to close a deal the next day that added an additional parcel of 13.46 acres on Beachler Road to the land from the foundation. The district paid half of the parcel’s $300,000 value for the land because the owners wanted it preserved. Plans are to open the Granger Wetlands Wildlife Sanctuary to the public this fall. It will have limited infrastructure with only a parking lot, restrooms and a trail to limit the impact of the public on the wetland. Other plans for the district include using a Clean Ohio grant to close a deal on approximately 63 acres in Sharon Township in April and working with the City of Brunswick to naturalize the Brunswick Lake area so there would be less mowing, more trees, access for kayaks and fishing, and parking and restrooms on the east side of the lake.

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“Yes, it’s work, it’s not always a walk in the park,” Eppink said. Eppink said the district’s staff is “awesome,” and that they make it possible to accomplish a lot for the park district. “They make the difference,” Eppink said. Just like James before him, Eppink is keeping watch for any land adjacent to existing parks and for land that has endangered plants or unique features to become available. Ideally, the minimum stand-alone acreage would be 30 acres, but exceptions are made for land that has extraordinary resources. The smallest acquisition was 1 acre, but it was adjacent to Plum Creek Park. Eppink takes a moment to consider where he thought his path would take him compared to where he is. “I’m helping to preserve land before it’s lost forever. It’s very rewarding,” Eppink said. “You never know where life is going to take you. Say ‘yes’ to something.” Medina County Park Guide, Page 12

If interested in making a donation to the park district or for more information, call 330-722-9364 or e-mail parks@medinacountyparks.com.


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Medina County

Allardale Park, located at 401 Remsen Road, Medina, was a family farm donated by Stan and Esther Allard. Stan planted more than 100,000 trees on the land in his lifetime. photo by David Harrison


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Park Guide

Plumcreek Park North, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills, formerly was the township's landfill that was rehabilitated into a park by the park district. Starting at 30 acres, the park has grown to more than 190 acres in size. photo by David Harrison


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

Editor’s note: This is the very stark and rough true-life story of a man who became a drug addict and how he found his road to recovery, told in his own words. It may be a story that is difficult for some to read, but it needs telling because it is a story of our times. This is the first of two installments.

THE READING NOOK

Life and Recovery of an American Junkie by Kevin G. Oney

Chapter 1: The Beginning of the End

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boy pretending to be a man is a difficult act. I never really have had a positive male role model in my life. Don’t get me wrong, my parents tried their best, but becoming parents at the age of 17 in the early 1980s couldn’t have been the easiest thing to go through. I was born in 1984, shortly followed by my three younger sisters, which made it tough for my parents. My mother was one of the most loving and forgiving women I have ever met. She worked most of her life to take care of us children. My father was a very busy man. The reason I bring this up is because, at an early age, the four of us kids didn’t see our parents much. We were raised by sitters and other family members. My sisters had each other, but I was always kind of on my own. When my mother was around, she unintentionally focused more time on my sisters, and my father was never around. Before I seem like I’m shooting for a pity party, I had my grandparents and an uncle who invested a lot of time in helping raise me. Being the first boy grandchild, my grandfather spent a lot of time with me. He was the first real man to show interest in me. My uncle instilled a work ethic and basic morals in me. I wouldn’t have ever learned either of those things if it had not been for him. However,

at the time, I didn’t think his efforts were as successful as he had hoped. At least, I didn’t think so for a very long time. I was extremely spoiled by my grandparents. Out of all the grandchildren, I was given more than any of the others. My grandmother took me places, bought me things and spoiled me more than she did any of the other grandkids. She also took me to church, discussed God and tried to instill a spirituality that grew and flourished later in life. The other piece of the puzzle in my development was my uncle, a strong willed and hardworking man. He taught me that life is only as hard as we make it. He took me camping, fourwheeling, and even taught me to drive. This man was my hero at an early age. I had the time of my life as a kid, on the surface, anyway. Until I destroyed it all. My grandfather and uncle where strong role models in my life, but at the same time they were both alcoholics. I have as many horrible memories involving them when I was growing up as I do positive ones. Memories that include going to the bar to look for them because they weren’t home, and my grandmother was in tears. Other memories are of cleaning beer cans out of the ditch, where my grandfather and uncle wrecked multiple times. I watched when my grandfather was drunk and he yelled and


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

screamed at my grandmother, calling her the most awful names and slamming doors and other objects. I learned a lot of things as a child. Spirituality, love, true value of family, but also how to lie and keep secrets and how drinking is what you do when you get older. My first lie was when I was 3 or 4 years old, and I still remember it. My mother babysat three of many of my cousins. We lived in a trailer in a little trailer park outside of Shenandoah, Ohio. We were on our way to my grandmother’s, and I climbed into the car with my cousins. I was wearing a brand new pair of shoes. I told my cousin, who was only a year older than me, that I tied my own shoes. She, of course, didn’t believe me. Then I said the one thing that ended the conversation, “Ask my mom.” Something happened at that moment. She believed it! She didn’t ask my mom and instead went on to something else. At that moment, something in my brain clicked. I had told her something that wasn’t true, and she believed me. Even at that young age, I realized I could lie and get away with it. Right then and there, my life changed. I was a liar. That was the beginning, but definitely not the end.

Chapter 2: Trip and Fall Life continued, school, graduation, work, life. Then it was 2009, a year that should have been the beginning of a wonderful life. I reunited with a very wonderful woman that would later on be my wife, the mother of my child, and part of a future I would eventually throw away. I loved this woman with all my heart, and we took care of each other. Life wasn’t easy, but it was worth it.

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I was working in a succession of jobs, mainly because I was lazy and couldn’t keep a job. She defended me to her parents, who had seen early on that I was going to destroy this wonderful woman, but she loved me. We had amazing friends, a great spiritual connection, worked together with the youth group of our church, and even coached softball together. I married this beautiful woman. A month later, she gave me the first great miracle of my life: a healthy baby boy. While she was pregnant, though, I began the destruction of our life together. Money was a hard thing for us because I didn’t keep a job for very long. So, I developed a plan. I decided to work with a drug dealer I knew. In the beginning, I thought it was innocent enough. I only was going to be his driver for a roundtrip to Florida a few times a month for some quick cash. Take one trip, collect $750. It was easy enough drive to Florida and back. No stress, no worries. We left early on a Monday morning and arrived in Florida around noon on Tuesday, right before my associate’s 1 p.m. doctor’s appointment. Within minutes of our arrival, my new friends were discussing the appointment and the amount of money they would get for the drugs they were getting. I have to say, it really peaked my interest. Previously, I had been in a motorcycle accident that had damaged my back. In Ohio, at the time, you had to be in a serious accident to receive the type of meds that Florida was handing out for the low, low price of $250.00 a visit. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. After further discussion of my injury with my new friends, they gave me a crash course on how to fake an MRI and what exactly to tell the doctors. After getting my MRI, I met the doctor who would change my life forever. The doctor said a total of 11 words to me, starting with, “Hello, I’ll take care of you!” continued, Page 16


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

sentenced to 90 days in jail, with her serving time He shook my hand, handed me four pieces of first. paper, and said “I’ll see you next month.” She did her 90 days, and the whole time said I looked down at those papers, and all I could she still wanted to work on our marriage as long see were dollar signs. That one doctor had as I would clean up my act and stay clean. Right. written four prescriptions for me: 125 OxyContin I was too far gone by then. pills, 50 milligrams each; 180 Oxycodone pills, Her mother raised our son while my wife was in 30 milligrams each; 90 Oxycodone pills, 15 jail. My jail time had been delayed so it would milligrams each; and 90 Xanax pills, 2 milligrams start after my wife’s sentence was over. I would each. I was in heaven, or so I thought. I was have my son for a day or two, than make my going to come to realize that I had fallen face first mother-in-law take him back for weeks so I could into Hell. At the time, it seemed all I had to do do My Thing.” was go to Florida once a month and I was set. When my wife was released from jail, the judge Yeah, right. granted us one day before I went into jail so we When I started selling my pain medication to could be together. However, because she knew my drug dealing friend and abusing more and what I had been doing the while she was in jail, more, I started to spiral. she came straight home, packed some clothing, My wife supported me through all of the bad and left my life for good. decisions I was making, nursing me through That day, I lost it and started destroying our multiple sicknesses, hoping and praying each things. During the destruction, I found a list my time would be the last. wife had made the day before she went to jail. She was working to pay our bills, and I would The last line read, “Fix our Marriage.” blow her hard-earned money while she was After everything I did to her, she still loved me raising our son by herself because I was always at that point. either high or sick. I shut down emotionally for the next nine years. Then it happened. Money was tight, I couldn’t keep a job, and she Our story continues next month with Chapter 3: “Chasing Death.” was working at a drive-thru in Shelby, Ohio. I came up with a plan to save everything. I Kevin G. Oney wrote his true-life story and is convinced my wife to steal all the money from sharing it in the hope that others will be helped. her work and fund a trip to a new pain doctor in Atlanta, Georgia. It worked. Well, it worked isn’t a See his profile at https://bit.ly/2Qy88t6 good way to put it. Everything was about to fall apart. First, I came up with a bogus story about how she got robbed for her to tell the police, then we left for Georgia. A witness who disappears for days right after a so-called robbery is suspicious, and she was picked up by police immediately after we returned. I did what I thought was the noble thing at the time and told the police I did it, but we were both charged with an M1 theft charge and both continued from Page 15

photo by Adam Nieścioruk


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

From left, Tigger and Ty-grr watch for prospective adopters at the Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet at Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. SOS is at the store each Sunday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

photos by FlashBang Photography

There had not been much snow outside, so children were busy inside, creating giant snowflakes at Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina.

Save Ohio Strays volunteer Gloria Flowers cuddles Ty-grr while Tigger snoozes, and Binx watches for someone who wants to make a black cat lucky by adopting one.

Dani Bloom concentrates on following snowflake construction instructions.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

Ty-grr took a break from a busy day of looking for a new family to imitate a joey, also known as a baby kangaroo, in the pouch on Gloria Flowers' shirt.

A cat's paw high five for our photographer who managed to get all four cats looking at the camera at once! In the top cage is Scotty, Tigger is on the left, then it is Ty-grr in the middle, and black cat Binx on the right.

From left, Vini, Sami and Jacob Sturgill are hard at work building snowflakes.

Alison O'Bryant, a Highland Library associate, assists Claire Krystowski.

Sydney Kehrt pauses her snowflake work to listen intently.

Proudly displaying the giant snowflakes they crafted are, from left to right, Claire Krystowski, Lilly Bloom and Maeve Krystowski.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

Joyful Word Search A Walk in the Park

HEALTHY TRAILS

Bike Maintenance 101 by Robert Soroky

FORESTS TRAILS PLAYGROUNDS FARMS EDUCATION

ACREAGE OBSERVATORY ANNIVERSARY WILDLIFE WETLANDS

LAKES MEADOWS SONGBIRDS FISHING PICNIC

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Shots and Sutures

The holiday season is over, and you are stoked because Santa got you a sweet new bike tricked out with all the latest cycling accessories. Unfortunately, the weather is keeping you inside (which is why we discussed indoor trainers in December, https://bit.ly/2N6PfLA ), but it is never too early to think about bike care and maintenance. Preventative maintenance will ensure your bike is running at peak efficiency, and it does not require any technical experience or know-how. The most important of these are proper tire pressure and a clean drive train. One of the many reasons bikes get flat tires is improper tire pressure. Bike tires lose air over time, so it is important to check tire pressure and inflate them on a weekly basis. Most bicycle pumps have built-in gauges, as well as the ability to inflate French, or mountain bike, valves that have an outer valve stem and inner valve body, and pneumatic valves, the type commonly found on motor vehicles. Recommended pressures are printed on every tire. Except for tubeless tires and off-road riding, tires should be inflated to the maximum pressure. Tires inflated below the recommended pressure have less resistance to big hits, increasing the chance of pinch flats against the wheel rim. Plus, low pressure means more tire material on the road, translating to more drag. The other important step is keeping the chain, rear gears (cassette) and front chain rings clean and lubricated. Lubrication allows parts to interact smoothly, but oil on the chain can collect dirt and grime over time, gradually wearing down the gears and resulting in increasingly poor shifting performance. Clean the chain and gears with degreaser on a rag, followed by light lubrication on the chain every few months to help ensure longevity of the drivetrain. The best thing for bike maintenance is a yearly tune-up. Tune-ups address the entire bike, including the adjustment of brakes, shifters, bottom brackets, crank arms, headsets, wheels, spokes, and hubs, as well as the preventative items mentioned above. Take care of your bike, and it will take care of you! Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

OF MIND AND BODY

Creating Resolution Success by Kelly Bailey Studies have shown that 80 percent of people fail in their New Year’s resolutions by February. Here are some tips you can use to successfully keep your resolutions. Do not be afraid to start over. Again and again and again. We humans seem to have this crazy idea that there exists a specific plan or formula that will help us reach our goals quickly and without fail. The diet, supplement and fitness industry makes money on this weakness. The truth is, to reach your health goals, you will fail. Maybe many times. The key to long-term success is course-correcting instead of giving up. Stronger together. Humans are social animals. In fact, we are biologically wired to do things that keep us in the good graces of those in our close social network. That is powerful motivation. Find a workout buddy, start a meal planning club, or get involved at a gym that promotes a team-style atmosphere. You will keep moving forward because you will not want to let your teammates down! Just do it, even if you do not feel like it. Want to know a secret that 90 percent of fitness pros will not tell you? You are never going to “feel like it.” You are never going to feel like getting out of bed to exercise at 5 a.m. You will never feel like planning meals and prepping food. Stop waiting to feel like it because, most of the time, you probably will not! Make the right choice easy, and the wrong choice difficult. Nothing prompts me to skip an early morning workout faster than the thought of searching through a pile of laundry to locate clothes. That is why I set them out the night before. If the potato chips are sitting front and center on the counter, I am more likely to eat them. That is why I keep them in a high cabinet. Set yourself up for success by creating an environment that encourages you to make the right choice. Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

THE IN BOX

Finding a Credible Company

Skin in the Game

by Paul McHam

by Steve Rak

Any company that serves the public can expect to get questions. Questions are good, as they ensure that educational territory is covered that might have been missed during general conversation. What is not helpful is the client who spends weeks combing the internet and picking up a world of opinions, including some that are incorrect or not helpful. When searching the web, it is important to keep in mind that there are articles written by folks who have their own special interests in mind. Do not assume that everything you read is right, as it most likely is not and could be the exact wrong thing to do. Before believing what you read, check the writer’s credentials or find a local certified source for information. Once you have the right person, you can ask questions that apply specifically to your situation and get answers that can be verified. A good source for recommendations is the Better Business Bureau. Look at a company’s history and how long it has been in business. Keep in mind that some of the best folks to answer your questions may not be local but will travel quite a distance to help someone. Hiring a consultant is a good choice, as they have fewer dollars at stake, but will help you ensure the job is done right. It is said that 80 percent of all human ailment is caused by the environment they live in. Let us make 2020 the year we stop suffering.

Business is like everything else in life, you get what you give. If you have a business, then you know what I am talking about. There are two primary things you have to give when running a business: time and money. When you primarily use both your time and your money in your business, that is when you have the most skin in the game. I bring this up because I recently had to reorganize my company, and with that reorganization I had to make some serious decisions. These decisions included how much of my time and money would be invested in the reorganization.

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt

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There is a big difference between pulling personal resources versus company resources to restructure a company. After a business matures and becomes self-sustaining, resources are generated by the clients (cash) and staff (time). The owner then does not have to wear all of the hats or use personal finances to fund the business. Theoretically, this frees up the owner’s time and lightens the load of personal responsibility regarding debt since the company is making a profit, creating jobs and providing a product or service. Until the business hits a downturn, this is great, but all businesses have a downturn at some point. This is where my reorganization story picks up again. A few years ago, my company hit a pretty substantial downturn. I had a choice: either close shop or get down in the dirt and fix it. I chose the latter. Since that time, I have had to decrease the number of staff members and take on those jobs myself. I also had to invest personal money. What I have learned is that, when you have skin in the game, you watch things a lot closer, ensure things are happening the way you want, and work harder to ensure a successful outcome. Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

THE NETWORKER

Connection Perfection by Bob Arnold When you network, do you walk in with a clear mind and purpose or do you sneeze and cough your way through? Networking affects a lot of areas in your life, and it is wise to take a few minutes to consider how. This was made clear to me this past summer when, in my capacity as an architect, I was called out to a house that had a tree fall on it during a strong wind storm. The tree had landed in a bedroom, in between two other bedrooms. The middle bedroom had damage to the ceiling and one outside wall. The two adjacent bedrooms did not appear to be damaged at all, until we removed the ceiling drywall and examined the structure above. At first, I did not see them, but upon closer inspection, I found hairline fractures in the wood trusses above these bedrooms. I see networking in the same way. We meet someone and assume they are not able to be of any help to us for whatever reason. When I have done this with someone, I have found out later that they know someone whom I could have used an introduction to. It is uncanny to me how connected we are, and we do not even know it. Worse yet, we do not know how to use our connections to help other people. A part of our networking health is related to our having connections. Yet, we have something blocking us from seeing how to connect someone with others who could benefit them or whom they could benefit. One day, I stumbled upon a connection for a friend. The person I referred went on to do more than $500,000 of business with my friend. I introduced another connection to another friend who received several contracts from the referral and who then passed on the referral to friends of his who have hired him for some of their needs. Those have been healthy networking relationships. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

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(When considering trying out for a play):

“I don’t know how to act! I just want to be a tree!”

Why are you so sure he is coming today? “He said yesterday that he would definitely want to come and hang out tomorrow, and today is yesterday’s tomorrow.”

Regarding a crowd randomly gathered outside of public bathrooms: “Just choose one, and go pee!” exclaimed an exasperated teen, adding she did not care which bathroom anyone used, she just wanted everyone out of her way so she could go.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

DIG IT!

ROLL ’EM!

Aftercare for Holiday Plants

Franchise Has Great Ending

by Michelle Riley

by Hunter Barnard

While some traces of the holidays may still be clinging to your home and décor, do not forget to care for your holiday plants, such as the Christmas cactus. Or is it a Thanksgiving cactus? We may never know, unless we actually keep this one alive. Maybe it is an Easter cactus. There are many varieties of this cactus, typically falling into three major groups, with each blooming around the holiday of its namesake. If that were not enough mystery, it is not really a cactus. It is a succulent, an epiphyte found living in tree branches in the rainforest of Brazil. Water it when the top inch of soil becomes dry. Feed every two weeks while flowering with a balanced houseplant fertilizer, offering it at least four to six hours of indirect sunlight. Continue feeding once a month after it has finished flowering. Poinsettias can be cared for in the same way as a Christmas cactus. However, a Norfolk pine may need a little extra tender loving care. Use a balanced houseplant fertilizer for the Norfolk pine (which is not truly a pine), fertilizing only in the spring and summer. They prefer several hours of direct sunlight, a south-facing window is best. Water when the top of the soil feels dry, but remove any remaining water, as Norfolk pines are susceptible to fungus and mold. They are tropical plants and like high humidity. Keep all three of these plants away from cold or hot drafts and be sure to keep the room temperature at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit or above, although poinsettias prefer no higher than 70. Another holiday plant is the amaryllis. Once an amaryllis has finished flowering, snip off the flower stem 1 inch from the bulb and place in a sunny spot. Water when the top of the soil is dry and feed a balanced houseplant food to encourage new leaves to nourish the bulb, which is the first step to a new bloom. For more information and tips, watch the video at https://bit.ly/2QSsNab

“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker,” the newest Star Wars movie, was so cool. It had lots of flying ships and lightsabers. The ships were able to go so fast, and they all looked really cool. One ship was even able to go faster than light, and that is just so fast. The lightsabers were really cool because they make cool noises, are really bright colors, and are just like swords. My favorite character is the bad guy, Kylo Ren. He has a really cool mask that looks like Darth Vader’s and his lightsaber is different and way better than everyone

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

else’s. The bad guy is also really tall and scary, and that is what bad guys are supposed to be like. I really liked seeing Chewie again, I know he does not really talk, but you can tell he is being really funny. My favorite part of the movie was at the end, it is a secret what happens, but it was really good. I think I like the good guys more than the bad guys because they have some cool things. The bad guys have cool things, too, but they do not look as fun. There was a lot of stuff that happened in this movie, and I liked how the good guys and the bad guys were easy to figure out. It made the movie way better. The movie was really, really good. There was a lot of fighting and a lot of lightsabers, and there were a lot of cool different things that have not been seen in the other movies. I’m not sure I learned anything from the movie, but I do know that I really liked the lightsabers a lot, especially because I have one just like the bad guy does. It was a really, really good movie. Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

Custom Computer Considerations

MIRTH AND JOY

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by Jerry King

by Austin Steger Understanding the pros and cons of custom-built computers versus prebuilt computers is important in deciding which is best and cost effective for you. A custom-built computer is a computer that was not preassembled by a manufacturer or company. It involves choosing the parts, as opposed to buying a computer with the parts already chosen and installed. This also means that you either have to assemble the computer yourself or have someone else do it for you. The advantages of a custom-built computer include the ability to upgrade and customize it, as well as longer warranties and, sometimes, price. Upgradability is the biggest factor with a custom computer. When you select the parts, you are can choose ones with the best ability to be upgraded in the future. Some prebuilt computers will use older parts that can limit upgrade potential. Customization is another big factor. For example, a custom computer case can allow for extra fans, lights and viewing windows. Pre-assembled machines often come with only a one-year warranty, however, when you order parts individually, there often is the option for extended warranties. Price tends to be a common motivator in the desire for a custom-built personal computer. When ordering and building the computer yourself, price tends to be lower than a prebuilt one Custom computers have their disadvantages as well. The major disadvantage is compatibility. Computer parts are not universally compatible with one another, and it is important to verify that the parts for your custom personal computer are compatible.There are online resources for checking this, as well as local shops or consultants. Another disadvantage to these machines is the lack of an all-encompassing warranty. If something goes wrong, you will have to diagnose the issue before getting a warranty return for the faulty part, as opposed to an allencompassing warranty on a prebuilt computer. The last major disadvantage is the price, if you do not build it yourself. Labor for building a pc can be expensive, and when factoring that into the final cost, it often makes it more expensive than one that is prebuilt. If you have the capability, building a computer yourself saves money. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

“We don’t live in a cabin, and you don’t have a fever. Mom saying you have ‘cabin fever’ was a misdiagnosis.”

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

BITE ME!

Salmon Patties by Susan Feller I do not know anyone who does not like this recipe. It is acceptable for kids of all ages, and I have cooked for some really picky eaters! This recipe makes eight patties. I double the recipe and have enough to feed five adults and two small children. I make my salmon patties in smaller balls because I have young grandchildren. Also, it is easier to keep the small patties from falling apart when flipping them. I skip the extra breading because I want less gluten in our diet. Frying in butter leaves a nice crisp brown coating, so I do not miss the extra bread coating. • • • • • • • • • •

1 pound frozen, skinless salmon fillets ¼ cup finely chopped red pepper ¼ cup finely chopped green onion ¼ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon lemon juice ½ teaspoon seasoned salt or Old Bay seasoning 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional) 1 large egg, beaten 4 tablespoons Italian-seasoned dry bread crumbs 3 tablespoons butter

Cook salmon in skillet until done and flaky. There is no need to use oil if using nonstick cookware. Drain juices, and transfer salmon to bowl to cool. Gently flake salmon. In a separate bowl, combine chopped pepper, green onion, mayonnaise, lemon juice, seasoned salt, and cayenne pepper. Stir in egg and bread crumbs, then add salmon. Scoop with cookie dough scoop to make 1-inch balls and drop into buttered frying pan. Flatten a little as they are frying. Optional method: Divide and form into eight balls. Place ½ cup dry bread crumbs on a plate, roll balls in bread crumbs and flatten into cakes about 1/2 inch thick. In a lightly buttered skillet over medium heat, fry cakes until golden brown on both sides. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Susan Feller is a resident of Wadsworth.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Dentist

Armstrong

Landry Family Dentistry

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

Mold Remediation

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/

The Place

AirXperts

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

GEMS

Prom Dress Dreams Come True by Kent Von Der Vellen Clothes are a big part of prom night, and for some girls the cost of a formal dress keeps them from attending prom. In 2017, Denise Walsh and Lori Taylor attended a Ready Dress Go event in Akron. The organization provides formal clothes to those in need. Walsh and Taylor were motivated to create a similar program in Medina, and G2K was created. At G2K’s annual two-day All Dressed Up event, girls get free prom dresses. The event is as much about the experience as it is about getting a dress. When a girl arrives for her appointment, she is greeted with a flourish by a doorman. At the registration table, she meets her dedicated personal shopper who escorts her to a personal dressing room where she will choose from more than 500 dresses. G2K Director Heidi Dyke said no men are allowed past the registration desk so the girls will feel safe and comfortable as they choose a dress. After a dress has been chosen, the next step is picking out a pair of shoes, followed by choosing jewelry, handbags, shawls, gloves, makeup, and nail polish. Once a girl is dressed in her entire ensemble, she walks down a red carpet to cheers and applause. At the end of the carpet, a professional photographer takes a full-length portrait. Finally, while the dress is being steamed and bagged, the girl joins her family members, friends and volunteers for a meal in the cafeteria. G2K can make some alterations onsite. Each girl receives a gift bag that includes a gift card to a local salon and other trinkets. Girls also get a chance to win one of five large gift baskets donated by individuals and businesses in Medina. This year, All Dressed Up will be March 13 and 14, at Harvest Presbyterian Church, 1095 E. Reagan Parkway, Medina. To view a video, go to https://bit.ly/30hewIA. To make an appointment, go to https://bit.ly/2R9jdA5, and click “register.” Due to space and time restrictions, only 44 appointments will be accepted. Dresses and accessories are donated by the community. If interested in volunteering or in making a donation, send an email to info@g2kministry.com. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

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February 2020 Non-Profit Calendar Saturday, February 1 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Hinckley Fire Department, 1616 Ridge Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp No Politics Day https://bit.ly/38ZdtB2 and International Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day https://bit.ly/2PHZQhX A great combination! Best way to start the day, ice cream and no politics. A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m, Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Monthly vigorous 3to 5-mile hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10 to adult. Free. Self-Care Saturday, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Enjoy crafts, snacks, activities, visit with therapy dog. Grades 4 to 12. Pinterest Projects: Owl Dream Catcher, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Make an owl dream catcher. Materials provided. Ages 13 and up. Register by January 30 at https://bit.ly/2QHNeYC

Sunday, February 2

National Tater Tot Day and Groundhog Day https://bit.ly/35F7Khw Wonder if tater tots would tempt a groundhog out of his burrow. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS

Monday, February 3

Feed the Birds Day https://bit.ly/35HWPDH AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Monday Movie Matinee: “The Peanut Butter Falcon” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. A man with Down syndrome runs away from a nursing home to pursue his dream of becoming a pro wrestler. He becomes friends with an outlaw who becomes his coach and ally. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513. Maker Mondays, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Challenge building skills, be creative with Maker Space stations and activities. Grades 3 and up. Roblox Speed Run Competition, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Race to see who will be first to the final level. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2Tf0Iwu

Tuesday, February 4

Get the stuffed mushrooms ready for your mail carrier! It is Stuffed Mushroom Day https://bit.ly/2Sdvg1m and Thank a Mailman Day https://bit.ly/34HkIKk AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room,

Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. ZenTeen: Make a Mobile, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use old paint chip cards to make a mobile. Register at https://bit.ly/2NArfkz Sit, Stay, Read, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolf Road, Medina. Practice reading with a furry friend. Grades 1 to 4. Gearheads: Robotics Challenge, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Four-week workshop where teens learn to problem solve while creating robots to complete challenging tasks. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/381fj2Y Medieval Defense, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Build castle, then defend it by engineering catapults and cannons. Grades 4 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2NjJXN2 WAITING LIST Valentine Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Enjoy Valentine’s stories, play games, make a buddy, more. Register at https://bit.ly/35NK1La

Wednesday, February 5

National Shower With a Friend Day AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Hidden Hollow Camp-Day Use, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/36y9rNW for more details. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Snuggle Up and Read, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Help match snuggly pajamas with great books for area children. Grades 6 to 12. Harry Potter Club: Care of Magical Creatures, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street Wadsworth. Akron Zoo shares information about the care of owls, snakes, spiders, more. Register at https://bit.ly/2uE0XqF Empower Parent Workshop: The Anxious Child, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Education Room, Summa Health Medical Building, 3780 Medina Road, Medina (enter in the Emergency Room doors). Tips on understanding how anxiety affects behavior and ways to cope. To register, contact Jennifer Gannon at jgannon@medinaesc.org or at 330-723-6393, Ext. 125. Exploring Windows 10, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Beginner’s hands-on class. Register at https://bit.ly/2RnMhUD Third Annual Four Chaplains Remembrance Service, 7 p.m., St. Francis Xavier Church, 606 E. Washington Street, Medina. Sponsored by the Medina American Legion Post 202. Honoring four Army chaplains who gave their lives for others in WWII. Presentation by Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell, solo performances by Marian Vogel and Tom Bonezzi.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020 Free, public invited.

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therapy dogs. Bored Games, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 National Chopsticks Day https://bit.ly/2SgOm6D Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Beat cabin fever at the nature center AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and by playing board and card games. Materials provided. Register at South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina https://bit.ly/35KCwog County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Puppet Show: Animal Olympics 2020, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 4 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Fictitious Animal Olympics features Timmy Turtle on his comic journey Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. to discover his adaptations and best contest. Craft follows. Children 26th Auditor Kovack’s Annual Great Medina County Chili Cook Off, 5 must be accompanied by adult. Interest level is 4 to 10. Free. No p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Eagles, 696 Lafayette Road, Medina. Benefits registration. local charities. Sample chilis, desserts, silent auctions, entertainment, Excel Basics, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina cash bar. Tickets: adults, $20; students, $5. Winner’s favorite charity Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Introduction to Microsoft gets $1,000. Tickets at the door. Excel. Register at https://bit.ly/3a6qqJw Heart to Heart: Making Better Diet Decisions, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday, February 9 Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Recipes, National Pizza Day https://bit.ly/36TetVl and Toothache Day samples, heart health information. Register at https://bit.ly/384jMC1 https://bit.ly/2ECcc4M Enjoy a pizza while reviewing the best dental Meet Marie LaVeau, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and care habits and avoid a toothache! South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Sherri Tolliver Bored Games, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 of Women in History Ohio portrays voodoo queen Marie Laveau. Adults Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Beat cabin fever at the nature center only. Register at https://bit.ly/2QL74lG by playing board and card games. Materials provided. Register at Friday, February 7 https://bit.ly/35KCwog Wave all of Your Fingers at Your Neighbor Day https://bit.ly/34Kv24a Digital Photography Basics, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Participants 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp should have taken previous Basics class or have moderate experience First Friday Downtown Date Night and Candyland Scavenger Hunt, 5 with digital cameras. Learn about exposure, composition, shutter p.m. to 9 p.m., downtown Wadsworth. For more information, go to speed, more. Bring digital camera with manual. Cost $25 per person. https://bit.ly/2tEYwnm Register at https://bit.ly/309K8zN Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Travel Back 200, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., The Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 Road, Medina. Celebrate the 200th anniversary of Granger township. p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional Interactive games, activities, crafts, more. donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country Monday, February 10 bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Clean Out Your Computer Day https://bit.ly/2ScLxUf and Umbrella Wine and Canvas, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Day https://bit.ly/2MhQdo5 Road, Medina. Bring wine, snacks, take your original painting home. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Fee due to presenter at event, $15. Must be 21 or older to attend. Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Register at https://bit.ly/30c3Z1g Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Saturday, February 8 AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Kite Flying Day https://bit.ly/2EFf15i Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, Books and Barks, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi 330-723-9514, for appointment. Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Storytime with Griffin, the therapy American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station dog. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina Fire Station Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with No. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. By appointment only, call 330-

Thursday, February 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

Free Kindergarten Readiness Events February 17-21 All day. Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult February 24-28 All day. Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, and Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. February 27 Ready for Kindergarten Night, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Story and activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. Ages 4 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2tPgR1h WAITING LIST photo by La Rel Easter

723-9688. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High St., Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the Afternoon: Zentangle, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children will practice making zentangle designs and use new skill to make pictures. No registration. Massage Techniques for Relaxation, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn to relieve stress, bring partner to practice with. Register at https://bit.ly/35PEq7c Monday Night Intrigue: The Poisoner’s Handbook, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. In early 20th century New York, poisons were an easy path to the perfect crime until a new chief medical examiner and toxicologist changer forensic science.

Tuesday, February 11

National Lost Penny Day https://bit.ly/2sOd8Am AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Snacks and Studying, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Enjoy snacks and a quite space to study. Grades 6 10 12. Writer Series: Writing and Publishing for Young Readers, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. From idea to writing and revision with emphasis on fictional picture books, chapter books and middle grade. Register at https://bit.ly/2uGlHy5 Wadsworth Area Historical Society: 100th Birthday of Grace Lutheran Church, Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Join tom Ries in marking the church’s centennial.

National Make a Friend Day https://bit.ly/2SomKgb and National Shut-In Visitation Day What a perfect combination! AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Preschoolers in the Garden: Let’s Go Deep Seed Exploring!, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Krabill Shelter, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina. Explore how a seed can become a 50-foot tree with OSU Master Gardeners. Stories, art, hand-on stations. Dress for outdoors and mess.Cost $5 per person. Register at https://bit.ly/2QL0KuD Tech Tuesdays, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library. Orientation to the new makerspace, including an equipment overview. Adults. Forensics Lab, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. See if you can solve the mystery by matching and identifying prints, finding clues and hidden messages. Meet everyday mystery solvers and see what they do. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2uKaaOr WAITING LIST Alphabet Adventure: A is for Astronaut, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make a name rocket, sample space food, make the letter A into an astronaut, enjoy mission control dramatic play. Register at https://bit.ly/2tSPCmt The Arts Series: Writing as a Craft, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Local author Seth Borgen helps give your writing a boost. Register at https://bit.ly/2QMrL0t

Get a Different Name Day https://bit.ly/2rVQ1E5 If you do, be sure to keep the paperwork! You will need it for getting a compliant driver’s license. AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Breastfeeding Basics Class, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Can You Escape? Mystery Valentine, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Your Valentine has been locked in a box by its mystery sender. Figure out who sent it and breakout your Valentine. Register at https://bit.ly/2t3xINQ Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Conference Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. For the Love of Tea: A Downton Abbey Tea Party, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Enjoy a proper English tea. Adults only. Register at https://bit.ly/2FK0HJ8

Wednesday, February 12

Thursday, February 13

Friday, February 14


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020 What better day to celebrate National Organ Donor Day https://bit.ly/35Lo9RB than Valentine’s Day https://bit.ly/2s95aSj , when we give our hearts away? American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 4:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 26th Annual Medina Ice Festival, 5:30 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Speed carving competition at 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Lighting of the Fire and Ice Tower, 7 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Special Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, February 15

Singles Awareness Day https://bit.ly/2PKwZJP Are there that many breakups after Valentine’s Day? Movie Marathon: “A Star is Born,” 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. All three versions will be shown, from 1954 to 1976 to 2018. K-9 Kapers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Plum Creek Park North Open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages, must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration. Winter Bird Hike, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Look for winter birds in fields and forests for the Great Backyard Bird Count. Dress for weather, bring binoculars if you have them. Free. Adapted Storytime, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Designed for children with autism or sensory integration challenges. All ages, but best for children ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2NiGSN2 Art in Action, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Talk with local artists, learn techniques, create art. Bored Games, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Beat cabin fever at the nature center by playing board and card games. Materials provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2taoizR 26th Annual Medina Ice Festival, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Individual ice carving competition. Fiddle Fest, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m, Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Songs and folk music history. All ages. Sweetheart Hike, 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Enjoy a self-guided romantic

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stroll around Brunswick Lake, then settle into the center for hot beverages, treats and a cozy fire. Adults only. No registration required.

Sunday, February 16

Do a Grouch a Favor Day https://bit.ly/2EFjODO American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., St. Martin of Tours, 1800 Station Road, Valley City. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bored Games, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Beat cabin fever at the nature center by playing board and card games. Materials provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2taoizR 26th Annual Medina Ice Festival, noon to 4 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Team ice carving competition.

Monday, February 17

Random Acts of Kindness Day https://bit.ly/2Q7r7cE Brunswick City Schools closed. Wadsworth Library closed. AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Mason Jar Science, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Complete three experiments, bring own Mason jar. Register at https://bit.ly/2FKRtMM American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Wadsworth United Methodist Church, 195 Broad Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Hour of Code, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Games and activities to use coding knowledge and learn new skills. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2Tfl5JY Mad Science Monday, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Observe and participate in simple science experiments using household items. Grades pre-kindergarten to 4. Register for only one session. Register for the 4 p.m. session at https://bit.ly/35P5wva Register for the 6 p.m. session at https://bit.ly/2Rf7oYU

Tuesday, February 18

National Battery Day https://bit.ly/34H4CR3 Read about a new battery being developed: https://bit.ly/2Mgod4i AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2020

Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Breastfeeding Basics Class, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Sit, Stay, Read, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolf Road, Medina. Practice reading with a furry friend. Grades 1 to 4.

Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free. No registration.

Friday, February 21

Card Reading Day https://bit.ly/2Q50Xaq Bluegrass Jam and Baked Potato Bar Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, February 22

International World Thinking Day https://bit.ly/2raK59E and Walking the Dog Day https://bit.ly/35KVGv8 The dog is thinking he would like Wednesday, February 19 to be walked! National Chocolate Mint Day https://bit.ly/2s6F16N Breakfast With the Tooth Fairy, Medina County Health Department, AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Light breakfast, photos, games, Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, activities, dental exams. All free. 330-723-9514, for appointment. Your Yard in Living Color, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Life-size Battleship, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Lafayette Road, Medina. OSU Extension and Master Gardener Wolff Road, Medina. Players become the ships in this version of volunteers present gardening workshop. Early registration, $45 per Battleship. Grades 6 to 12. person, after February 1, $55. Call 330-725-4911, Ext. 106, to register. FUSE: Mirror, Mirror, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth More information at https://bit.ly/2K1hRo1 Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at Explorastory Series: The Popcorn Book, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., https://bit.ly/37Ydgwv Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Enjoy Leadership Medina County Program Preview Party, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 story then explore it through crafts, games, and hands-on activities. p.m., Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Learn more Popcorn will be served. Grades kindergarten through 5. Register at about Leadership Medina County. Party registration is $25 at https://bit.ly/2QNvUS0 https://bit.ly/2QBRB65 Dungeons and Dragons Mini Campaign, noon to 3 p.m., Story HourHistory Series: Tim Carroll, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Afternoon of Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Stories of Akron during WWII. adventure through a short Dungeons and Dragons campaign using preAdult Winter Reading event. made characters. Teens and adults. Register at https://bit.ly/30gQRrq Plant Based Eating and Cooking, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Scraping the Sky, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Room, Highland. Learn how diet affects heart disease. Register at Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Investigate skyscraper https://bit.ly/2FKTOr2 construction basics using a variety of materials. Test skyscraper Thursday, February 20 against a powerful wind storm. Grades 1 to 5. Register at National Whistleblower Reward Day https://bit.ly/2sTkbrp and https://bit.ly/35LCtsB Hoodie-Hoo Day https://bit.ly/2rVSBKh Casino Night, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., The Galaxy Restaurant, 201 Park AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and Center Drive, Wadsworth. Benefits the Scholarship Foundation of South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina Wadsworth. Texas Hold ‘Em tournament. Doors open 6 p.m., food County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. served 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., casino games, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets $50 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, each or $500 for 10-guest table. Price includes food and casino money. 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Information and tickets at https://bit.ly/2EsKTda Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Sunday, February 23 Explorastory: How Do Dinosaurs…, 6:30 p.m. to 7:05 p.m., Children’s International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2PH14Kc A Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. great follow-up to all of the walking yesterday! Exploring dinosaurs through silly stories and songs. Ages 2 to 6. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Register at https://bit.ly/30mGxOY Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. Heart Healthy Meals, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn steps to eating a heart- Monday, February 24 healthy diet and share meal ideas. Register at https://bit.ly/2tUe1b0 National Tortilla Chip Day https://bit.ly/35JbUVv Movie Screening: “Terror in the Skies,” 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Baby Footprint Art, 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Paint a rocket with your baby. Children ages birth to 24 years old. Register at https://bit.ly/35K0tvZ American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those


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with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/2NlmlaZ Out of Africa, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road. Debbie and Phil Socha give a presentation about their trip to Tanzania. Register at https://bit.ly/2RcapJr G

Tuesday, February 25

National Chocolate-Covered Nut Day AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Grades 6 to 12. Crock Pot Chili, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Learn new recipes. Samples provided. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/38bdkJB Crazy for Comics, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Activity Room, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Draw, chat, share comics. Snacks and supplies provided. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2FHMQ65 Mercy Watson, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Games, scavenger hunt, dress Mercy the pic in disguises, toss popcorn, make a Mercy crown and pig snouts, and more. Register at https://bit.ly/2uDLirq Recycling 101, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. County solidwaste facility representative will speak. Hands-on participation. Register at https://bit.ly/35NuE5E Tech Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Medina Library. Orientation to the new makerspace, including an equipment overview. Adults.

Wednesday, February 26

National Tell a Fairy Tale Day https://bit.ly/2QcUFFU AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. The Money Game, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn how to manage money. Grades 6 to 12. Teen Taste Test, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Can you taste if it is generic or name brand? Trying out different snacks to see which we like better. Grades 6 10 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2FKcYxc Stuffed Animal Slumber Party, 6 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring a stuffed animal and tuck it in to spend the night alone at the library. Come back the next day to pick them up and see what they were up to while you were sleeping. Ages 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2Thlewx The Blockbusters of Puccini: Love, Death, Passion, and Violence, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Cleveland Opera Theater members will discuss Puccini operas and what makes them timeless. Register at https://bit.ly/30eT0UE

Thursday, February 27

No Brainer Day https://bit.ly/38Xu5Je and National Polar Bear Day https://bit.ly/2s72qVG AARP Tax Preparation, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina.

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Aquarius Show Through March 1, 2020 Annual show of Medina County Art League members’ work. B. Smith Gallery, third floor, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Pointillistic Art of Darrell Kent Through April 7, 2020 Kent uses colored marks to create works in pointillism. Marie’s Café 117 Public Square, Medina

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

Friday, February 28

Public Sleeping Day https://bit.ly/2SbFPSn American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Dancing With the Medina Stars 2020, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits Faith in Action. Local couples compete for People’s Choice and Mirror Ball Trophies. Funds support transportation for senior citizens, the homebound and people with disabilities. Tickets $75 at https://bit.ly/2NfhBmX

Saturday, February 29

Leap Day https://bit.ly/2Mg3dul An extra day to make sure the month ends on a wonderfully positive note! Dog and Cat Party, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create petthemed crafts and make toys for pets in need. Register at https://bit.ly/2NAno75 Submitting Calendar Events Listings in the calendar must be events, festivals or fairs hosted by or benefitting a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Information is not accepted by phone. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com on the Events: Let’s Do It! tab at the top of the page or in the drop-down menu on mobile devices, where it is regularly updated.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2020  

Choosing a prebuilt or custom-built computer, free prom dresses, bringing up a business, rescuing resolutions, the stories of the county pa...

Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2020  

Choosing a prebuilt or custom-built computer, free prom dresses, bringing up a business, rescuing resolutions, the stories of the county pa...