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FEBRUARYÂ 2019

VOLUME 2, NUMBER 1

THOSE ARE RACING WORDS Pg. 15

BETRAYAL OF THE FLOWERS Pg. 18

FACE BAKING Pg. 19


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 1 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC

Promises Kept

EDITOR

by Amy Barnes Thank you! With this issue, Joy of Medina County Magazine enters its second year of publication. Wow. It has been an amazing and quick first year. Joy has delivered stories about Medina County only and none of the stories were about advertisers, as promised from the first day of publication. Hard to believe I was told no one wanted real stories any more, is it not? Our evergrowing list of 5,039 readers just might argue otherwise. Joy tells stories, to entertain, educate and share the heartbeat of this fascinating county. Maybe that’s why we have readers all over the world. Please patronize and thank the great companies whose ads you see in Joy’s pages. Their support helps bring Joy to you. Our second year starts with three terrific additions to the staff: photographer Ed Bacho and columnists Steve Rak and Katrina Barnes. Bacho is a Medina resident who has several years of photography experience. Some of his

Amy Barnes

work is hanging on the wall at RizTech, on Medina’s Public Square. FlashBang remains as a staff photographer, as well. Unfortunately, Tom Adams could not continue as a staff photographer, and we wish him the best on his journey. Rak has joined the staff with his own special kind of quirkiness to share the knowledge he has gained by being the owner of Southwest Landscape Management and of Rak Consulting. His column is called “The In Box.” Barnes is the columnist for “Making Up With You.” The column will address bodyimage issues, makeup tips, and evaluations of various makeup items. To request a topic for “The In Box” or a specific product review in “Making Up With You,” please send your request to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with the name of the column in the subject line. Learn more about Joy’s staff at https://bit.ly/2LNPhq0 and find issues of the magazine at www.joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ed Bacho Photography FlashBang Photography

ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold Katrina Barnes Danielle Litton Paul McHam Steve Rak Kent Von Der Vellen

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an eedition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty.com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


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THE READING NOOK

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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THE IN BOX

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LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

Cam's little sister has unbelievably appeared in front of him, but their challenges have not ended yet.

GOING ROUND AND ROUND

How quickly can you find these racing words?

SKILLFUL DELEGATION by Steve Rak

One of the keys to business success is learning how to not do it all. THE NETWORKER

TRADE NUMBERS GAME FOR RESPECT by Bob Arnold

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Successful networking is not about how many business cards are handed out.

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FARNHAM FAST by Amy Barnes

At their day jobs, this father and son advise following the safe route, but a erhours their hobby is going fast.

An evening of costumes and a morning of learning.

ON THE COVER: Local son and father Formula  Vee racers, Brian, left, and Mark Farnham, at their  garage.

Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free as an e-edition and in print. To subscribe to the e-edition, see past issues, and to order print issues and copies of photos, go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com. Additional features not seen in the magazine, such as Giving Hearts, also can be found on the website.

BETRAYAL OF THE FLOWERS by Paul McHam

Feeling smug that you have eliminated all sources of basement moisture? Here is one you just might have missed. GEMS

FILLING THE HEALTH GAP by Kent Von Der Vellen

For those employed but still unable to afford medical care, Medina’s Free Clinic is just the help they need.

OH, SNAP!

photos by FlashBang Photography and Ed Bacho

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

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MAKING UP WITH YOU

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BITE ME!

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LET'S DO IT!

BAKING YOUR FACE by Katrina Barnes

If you have trouble with your foundation and concealer creasing, this may be the technique for you.

JOYFUL FUDGE by Amy Barnes

Treat a special someone to luxurious homemade fudge with nuts or an orange twist. If cabin fever is starting to make you itch, time to check out our activity list!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

FARNHAM FAST

story and photos by Amy Barnes

At their day jobs, Mark and Brian Farnham advise their clients to follow the safe route. But a erhours, when enjoying their favorite hobby, they can hit speeds up to 120 miles per hour. At their day jobs, Mark is a group health insurance salesman with Wichert Insurance, and his son, Brian, is the area manager for Enterprise, overseeing seven locations in Mansfield, Akron and Medina. Both are graduates of Medina High School. “A few years apart,” quipped Mark. Mark has a history degree from The Ohio State University, and Brian has a business management degree from the University of Mount Union. Both men live in Medina, and both are road racers. The leap into racing started in 1996, when Mark was 35 years old and he became part of a Formula Vee (FV) pit crew. It was not long before he was a driver himself. He had loved car racing since he was a kid and was thrilled to become a part of the FV road racing circuit. FV racing emphasizes driver skill, not technology, to enhance competition. According to the FV website, http://www.formulavee.us/, many

The workbench at the Farnham racing garage.

Formula 1 champions and V8 Supercar drivers started their careers in FV racing. Car specs are based on the 1963 Volkswagen Beetle with few changes in FV’s 55-year history. Controlling the addition of any technological advances makes it a more affordable racing class. A car that was raced 30 years ago can still be raced today and many times cars can be repaired with parts from junkyards. Races are held on a race track but with smaller,

The remnants of Brian's go­kart racing days.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

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lower horsepower cars than are used in such races as the Indianapolis 500. The cars weigh 1,025, including the weight of the driver, and engines are 65 horsepower. Mark’s son, Brian, had caught the racing bug by age 11 and started racing go-karts. In 2004, he won five races and was second in the championship. When he was 19 or 20, he joined his father in the VF circuit, winning third in the national championship at Indianapolis in 2017. The remnants of his go-kart are in the storage unit he and his dad use as a Mark and Brian Farnham use trolleys to ease Mark's race car into the  racing garage. They both look at the back of the garage. broken-down go-kart and discuss a season with a grin. possible use for it in the future. They muse that if Mark and Brian work on their cars eight to 12 Brian has any children, they will inherit the hours a week during the winter. During the Farnham love of speed. summer, it is 10 to 15 hours a week, working all “If he (Brian) has any kids, they’ll be starting day every Saturday in the shop. when they are younger,” said Mark. During racing season, which runs March through Their first racing garage was their garage at October, the Farnhams compete in races in West home, which put Mark’s wife, Cindy’s, car outside Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, and year-round. In exchange, Mark would scrape snow Indianapolis. and ice off her car every morning. They race simply for the love of going fast. When the hobby outgrew the family garage as “It’s a hobby, it’s an expensive hobby,” Mark the number of race cars increased, they moved said. their cars and racing equipment into a storage A good starter race car costs $6,000 to $7,000 unit. with the upper end cars costing as much as They had four race cars, but recently sold one to $20,000, said Mark, while pointing out that racing a buyer in New Jersey. They are working on is his and his son’s only hobby. selling a second one. They decided to sell two of Mark said, depending on the race, it is possible the cars so they would have more workspace in to win tires, oil or other supplies for the cars but their garage, even though they are, at the same there are not the big dollar winning purses that time, dreaming of expanding the size of the are common in bigger races. garage. Sponsors also are not as plentiful as they are for Mark’s wife, Cindy, and Brian’s girlfriend, Olivia the bigger car races. When a company wants to be Wuest, are supportive of the men’s hobby and are a sponsor, the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA), o en at races, cheering them across the finish which is the governing body, informs racers and line. the racers decide if they want to put that Both men are rather tall for the sport, each one company’s stickers on their car. Usually, in return, being more than six feet tall. Brian decided to drivers get supplies from that company, Mark build his own race car that would be better suited said. to his size. His new car will be ready for the track In addition to head and neck restraints in the this year and he is anticipating the upcoming race continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

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cars, safety equipment includes a six-point harness; helmet; and twolayer driving suit, which includes a fire resistant under layer. Brian appreciated all of the safety equipment that is used when, during a race, his car got “knocked up on two wheels, onto its side.” His injuries were limited to feeling beat up and gaining some bruises. He said, with a slightly twisted grin, that he did not feel his injuries until he got out of the race car. That was when the pain set in. “It’s a good pain,” Mark said, with Brian eases his large frame into the car he built. His shoes are beside the  Brian nodding in agreement. car to allow him to more easily get in the car. “I just love the competition,” Mark said. “I already told Cindy I’m got his pilot’s license and started flying small racing until I’m in my 80s. My dad’s 86 and he is planes. still flying.” Some of the radio-controlled planes Edward Edward Farnham, Mark’s father, started flying flew were ones he had built himself. Mark said his radio-controlled airplanes at Sharon Center. father still has some of those planes in his When the land he was flying on was developed basement. and he could no longer fly his airplanes there, he Even though he grew up with a dad who had a The workbench at the Farnham racing garage.


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The Farnham fleet: The black car is Mark's and the car with primer (gray) is Brian's. They  recently sold the yellow­and­red car and are working on selling the maroon car in the far  back.

love of flying, Mark found he had a strong preference for cars. “The thing is, if we have mechanical problems, we’re already on the ground.” The love of racing comes from more than the love of going fast and of competing, Brian said. It also is the sense of camaraderie. He said there is an 87-year-old FV racer who is

able to get his race car to the track but is unable to unload it. When he arrives at the track, other racers stop their race preparations to help him get his car on the track and ready to race. “We’ve made a lot of friends,” Brian said, quickly adding, “It’s very competitive, but people are willing to help each other.”


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

From le , Grant Reagle, Mary Crouley and Carol Paulicka. Photo by Ed Bacho Instructor Sherri Meinke guides attendees of the Medina Public Library’s Camp Wired program. The program teaches and refreshes computer skills to those age 55 and over. Find times and hours listed in the “Let’s Do It!” section of this magazine. Photo by Ed Bacho

From le , Bonnie Tolley, Alice Metzel, Effie Coon, Concetta Behal, Sandy Cothran, Yolanda Halstead, and April Kwiecien. Photo by Ed Bacho

From le , Joyce Fike, Concetta Behal, Joan Norris, and Sandy Cothran Photo by Ed Bacho From le , Yolanda Halstead, April Kwiecien and Carlton Faughender Photo by Ed Bacho

Winning the costume contest were, from le : Noah Arntzen as the Rocketeer, third place; Olivia Vozar as TV Head, second place; and Leann Millhorn, The Furry, first place. Photo by FlashBang Photography.

It was a lively crowd at Medina Public Library’s 10th Annual Teen Mini Con. Photo by FlashBang Photography.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

Raven Crook put her own twist on Alice in Wonderland’s Mad Hatter. Photo by FlashBang Photography

Walking on stilts was Mara Smith who portrayed Wendigo, a mythical 15-foot tall maneating monster. Photo by FlashBang Photography

Loki of Asgard made an appearance thanks to Eliza Fields. Photo by FlashBang Photography

Noah Arntzen portrayed the Rocketeer in a self-made costume. Photo by FlashBang Photography.

Getting into the spirit of the night are, from le , Megan Tick as Katsuki Bakugou, Emma Anderson as Hitoshi Shinsou, Lushen Sladky as Kaminari Denki, and Kari Dunne as Kirishima EIjirou. Photo by FlashBang Photography.

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1 0 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

CHAPTER 24 THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

  Lea stood looking up at me, and I  couldn’t tell if it was real life for a  second.   All that we had been searching for,  all that we had been working for,  was this young girl who now stood  in front of us like it was nothing.    She was there.    As I stood there dumbfoundedly,  she threw her arms around me and  squeezed.    In a word, it felt like home.    “Cameron! You made it! I can’t  believe you actually made it!”    My heart pounded in my chest, but  you never would have guessed it.  Seeing my sister in real life for the  first time in ages had triggered  something deep inside me that made  me more protective of her in that  moment than I had ever been before.  She was my younger sister, and I  was her older brother, and the only  thing that mattered in that moment  was that I could keep her safe and  sound.    Hot tears started to stream from  my cheeks as I wrapped my arms  around her small frame. She  squeezed tighter and I squeezed  back, embracing both her and the  moment.    I buried my face in her hair while  she buried hers in my chest, and I  realized she was crying, too. My  knees shook slightly, but never  faltered. There was no way they  could have. I had found my sister,  and nothing in the world could keep  us apart anymore.    “I love you,” I whimpered through  my tears, rubbing my cheek on the  top of her head.    “I love you, too,” she sobbed, her  fingers grasping the back of my  shirt, making sure nothing could pull  me away.    We’d been separated by my mother  for years, but that meant nothing. 

She was my sister, I was her brother,  and we had an unbreakable bond that  could stand any length of time, no  matter who or what got in the way.    “They’re so cute,” I heard Marissa  whisper from a few feet away.    Then I heard something I was  really hoping to avoid, though I  knew it had to come at some point.    “What are you people doing with  my child?!” My mother screamed at  us from the alleyway nearby.    “Oh, no,” Lea whispered, her tears  ceasing instantly, “Cameron…” She  tilted her head up to me and our eyes  met. She was so beautiful.     “Cam! What do we do?” Marissa  asked from behind me, undoubtedly  with my mother not too far away,  barreling towards us like a freight  train. I had my back to her, but I no  longer had to look at her to know  that she trusted me.    I looked deep into Lea’s eyes and  knew I couldn’t let go of her. I  smiled gently, much to Lea’s  confusion, and simply said, “Run.”    And with that, I took Lea’s hand,  and we sprinted off in the direction  I’d been facing, not even turning  around to check if Devin and  Marissa were following us, much  less our mother. They were all  following. I was sure of it.    “Cameron, what are we doing?”  Lea panted between our pounding  footsteps.    “Running,” I panted back, “From  mom.”    She didn’t reply, but she didn’t  stop. I had no idea what her  relationship was with Lilith Collette  when she first called, but I was  starting to figure it out.    She’d called from that payphone  we’d been at, but no longer lived in  the building nearby. Both she and  my mother had come out of the  alleyway next to that building, only  moments after each other. And it was 


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clear by their outfits that they were  much as we wanted. So, she listened,  feeling an oddly familiar sensation  down on their luck to say the least. and then a couple weeks later, that  deep in my gut.    Without even slowing down, I  guy disappeared. Rumor is he’s     “Now I’m thinking about it  squeezed Lea’s hand and asked,  dead, and that he was selling drugs  though, and she and I are a team.  “Are you and mom…homeless?” from his bar and some deal went  We’ve had each other’s backs for as     No reply. sour, but those are just rumors.  long as I’ve been able to walk and     Which meant yes. Either way, mom couldn’t get her job nothing in the world can pull us     I saw a tiny side street up ahead  back, and she’s been desperately  apart. So, having a half­brother who  and ducked into it unexpectedly,  trying to find ways to get us food  hates her might not be the best thing  pulling Lea with me. As soon as we  and shelter for the past couple  for me.” were out of sight, I dove into the first weeks. So, don’t blame her for this,     “But…Lea…” yard I saw with a line of hedges, still  you can blame her for anything and     “I’m sorry, Cameron.” dragging poor Lea behind me. I  everything she’s done to you, but     Without another word, she turned  pushed her down and we ducked  don’t blame her for this. She’s done  and walked back out onto the street,  behind the bushes, breathing hard. her best for me.” and headed down the sidewalk.    I heard Marissa and Devin’s voices     My little sister, whom I’d been  pass overhead, slowing down, then  searching for and getting into trouble  I couldn't believe Lea was heard my mother’s as she came  for, was just walking away from me. defending her. around the corner.    “No!” I shouted at her. “No! You     “You two! What have you done  don’t get to walk away from me like  with my child?” She screamed like      I couldn’t believe Lea was  this! Do you know what I’ve been  she was being stabbed in the gut. defending her. This woman who had  through? Do you know how hard     “Go, go, go!” Devin whispered to  ruined my life and had ruined her  I’ve been working to find you?” Marissa, only a few feet away from  life, and she still cared for her. It     She continued walking, ignoring  us before they continued off down  seemed impossible. every word I said. the street. My mother followed. Lea     “Look, I don’t want to talk about     “Lea! Get back here! I love you!” and I lay motionless next to the  mom, because clearly you two have     Nothing. shrubbery, covering our mouths and  your own problems, but we don’t,     My heart felt like it was trying to  trying to stay as silent as possible.  right?” She looked at me so  break my ribs from the inside with  We stayed there for several solid  innocently and hopefully, I almost  how hard it was beating. Imagine  minutes before we felt safe again. melted. working for months on a final paper     “Cameron, you’re insane!” Lea     “No, Lea, we don’t. I didn’t come  for school that you slaved over  immediately announced, standing up  here for her anyway, I came here for  tirelessly, only to have it shredded  and brushing her pants free of dirt  you.” I reached down and grabbed  before your very eyes, then multiply  and grass. her hands in mine, holding both of  that feeling by 20. That’s how it felt     “I couldn’t give you up,” I told her  them while we stood in some  to watch Lea walk away. as I, too, stood and brushed myself  stranger’s front yard in London.    I was broken and desperate, and I  off.    The wind blew her long brown hair  felt more alone than I had when I     “I know. I didn’t want to give you  into our faces, and she had to let go  woke up in a hospital bed with no  up either, but you can’t just kidnap  of my hands to pull it back and tuck  family left. me. Mom isn’t perfect, but she cares  it behind her ears.    “Lea, get back here! Lea  about me.”    She didn’t put her hands back in  Kizinsky!”    She reached out and touched my  mine.    She stopped, frozen in place down  arm, almost comfortingly.    “Well, I love mom, whether you do  the block.    “If she cared about you, you would  or not, so maybe coming here wasn’t     “Lea?” I said, just loud enough for  have a place to live,” I argued. the best idea,” she said softly, after a  her to hear, confused as to why she’d     “That’s not fair. She was dating  moment of silence. stopped. I hadn’t meant to use my  this guy who owned a bar across     “You just said she doesn’t have to  last name, but it was a heat­of­the­ town and told her to quit her job  have anything to do with our  moment kind of thing. because he would pamper us as  relationship,” I shot back, suddenly     Then she turned around. continued, Page 12


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CHAPTER 25   “Don’t you ever call me that,”  she shouted back at me,  approaching me once again.    “What? Kizinsky? Why not?  Are you ashamed that your  beloved mother has such a dark  past? Do you feel guilty for what  she put me through? Do you  care about me at all?” I shot at  her like a machine gun,  relentlessly.    “No! Because that man hurt  my mom more than you  could ever know!”    “Your mom? Your mom?  You mean our mom? Did  you forget who you’re  talking to? We’re related,  no matter how badly you  may want to be her only  child, you aren’t!”    “Yeah? Well, neither are  you, idiot. You’re not even  your dad’s only child!  You’re just the firstborn,  so you just repressed any  memories you had, didn’t  you?”    “What in the world are you  talking about? You’re crazy, just  as crazy as your mother,” I spat  back, realizing I was clenching  my fists at my sides. By this  point, Lea was right in front of  me, and we were fuming at each  other, still shouting even though  we were only a couple feet apart.    “Oh, so now she is my  mother? Good, because your  father is a horrible person!”    “No, he isn’t!” I screamed into  her face.    “Yes, yes he is!”    “He can’t be a horrible person,  because he’s dead!”    “Good!” She tried to cut  herself short, but the word had  already left her lips.

  The world was silent.    Both Lea and I realized the  exchange we’d had at the same  moment, but it left us both  speechless.    “W­w­wait…Cameron, I didn’t… I mean, I didn’t,” she stuttered,  “N­no, I didn’t mean…I don’t  mean…”    My teeth were quickly grinding  into dust.    I wanted to slit my wrists. I  wanted to cry into Marissa’s  shoulder. I wanted to brawl with  Devin again. I wanted to force 

Lea to switch places with me. I  wanted to stand there and scream  until I suffocated.    Instead, I stood there  motionless and silent while Lea  attempted to stutter out some sort  of awkward and desperate  apology.    “Please say something,” she  begged.    My fingernails were digging  into my palms so hard that I  started to bleed. I didn’t feel it  until it started to drip down my  hands. Then, I dug in harder.    “Oh, my god, Cameron, stop!”  Lea cried out when the blood  splattered onto the pavement. She  grasped at my hands hopelessly, 

like I was a statue.    “Cameron, please stop! Please,  please, please!” She desperately  tried to pull my fingers out and stop  the bleeding, but I wouldn’t give.    “There they are!” Marissa  shouted from behind me, where she  and Devin had continued running  after Lea and I dove into the  bushes.    A moment passed where Marissa  must have slowly realized what was  going on, and then she started  shouting at me, too. Something  about not hurting myself and a  promise, and blah, blah, blah.    Devin came around the corner  and joined them in frantically  trying to stop me.    Then my mother found us. I was  barely aware of what was going  on around me, the frozen image of  the crumpled Impala stuck in my  mind, until she popped up in my  field of view. She stepped  between Lea and I, facing me and  screaming something straight into  my face.    As I was barely aware of  anything, I have to trust what  Devin told me about what  happened next.    Supposedly, I grinned maniacally,  almost creepily, before taking my  already clenched fist and smashing  it into the side of my mother’s head.  Blood exploded from my hand and  her ear, spraying all five of us to  some degree, and then my mother  hit the ground, hard.    Immediately afterward, Devin  tackled me back into the bushes,  scratching the both of us from head  to toe, and I gagged a couple times  before puking onto the nicely cut  lawn.     Once the vomit was out, the  acidic odor stung my nostrils,  clearing the haze and the image of  the crushed Impala from my mind. I 


13   Unfortunately, with this being such a last­minute  gagged once more, mostly at the smell, and then  flight, our seats weren’t together, but Marissa made  rolled over, facing away from the others to lie in my  sure she was in the one a few rows behind mine so  shame solitarily. she could keep an eye on me while Devin was on     I could hear Lea crying nearby, but then Marissa’s  the opposite side of the plane. face filled my vision with a worried, but gentle     Feeling safe and secure with my family nearby, I  smile on her face. finally exhaled, and wondered for a moment how     “Cam, we’ve got to get to the airport,” she  long I’d been holding my breath. whispered.    Then the steward positioned himself in front of     Suddenly I remembered the whole situation I was  all of us and began his speech about safety and  in. Lea and my mother could be left in London,  what steps to take to pretend like you could survive  they were nothing to me anyway. I had to get to the  if the plane were to go down. airport and back to the states.    A man nearby popped a few anti­anxiety pills,     When it came down to it, Marissa and Devin were  and I found it amusing. Not out of cruelty, but out  more my family than Lea or Lilith ever had been.  of the thought that a plane crash would be the  They say blood is thicker than water, but they  perfectly horrible ending to this perfectly horrible  haven’t seen how thin my blood is. journey I’d been on.    “Let’s go,” I said, wiping the last of the vomit     Ever since that truck smashed my dad’s Impala,  from my lower lip and pushing myself off the  I’d been on a collision course with disaster, and I  ground. I felt Devin’s arms  didn’t know how to get off. come behind me and help lift  me to my feet, and then  I made sure not to look back at    Yet, somehow, with all these awful  thoughts plaguing the front of my mind,  Marissa wrapping bits of  Lea or Lilith. once the plane took off, I was still able  cloth around my palms. It  to drift peacefully off to sleep. turned out she had ripped the  sleeves from her own shirt so she could cover my  Our story continues next month! wounds.    I chuckled to myself, knowing without any  Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/ shadow of doubt that I was making the right  Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. decision. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at    “You good?” Devin asked from behind my ear. http://cbthesurvivor.com    I took a few deep breaths, staring into Marissa’s  eyes the whole time.    “Good enough to get to the airport. Which way?”    Devin laid out a quick route for us, and then the  three of us took off.    I made sure not to look back at Lea or Lilith.    We ran through the streets of London, Marissa  and Devin both periodically checking up on me as  we neared the airport.    Somehow, I made it all the way there, only  having to stop and catch my breath twice. The  moment we arrived, Devin took charge and led us  through all the hurdles that airports have nowadays.    The next thing I knew, we were rushing off to our  gate as we heard the announcement on the intercom  overhead that our flight was boarding. We arrived  with the line still shuffling through the doors to get  onto the plane and slid into the back of the line  seamlessly.    In another 15 minutes, we were aboard the plane,  searching for our seats. Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019


1 4 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

Joyful Word Search Going Round and Round

FATHER SON RACING FUEL CARS ENGINES FORMULA VEE FLAG CUSTOM

TIRES SPONSORS TRACKS FLYING AIRPLANES LOCAL FARNHAM GO-KART CHAMPIONSHIP

Answer Key for Last Month's Search

Love and Acceptance

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1 6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

17

THE IN BOX

THE NETWORKER

Skillful Delegation

Trade Numbers Game for Respect

by Steve Rak

by Bob Arnold

Do you delegate? Just answer yes or no. Next question: Do you delegate enough? That is a bit harder to answer, is it not? I would venture to guess that the answer to the first question is yes and the second is no. As business owners, I believe we do not delegate enough. There are various reasons for that, but the primary reason is because we think we are the only ones who can do it right, and when I say “it” that means everything! How can you start delegating more? By realizing that you are not able to do everything. Believe it or not, you are not good at everything. Please take a moment to acknowledge that, I will wait. How can we fix this problem? Try this exercise. Write down a list of all of your responsibilities for your business. This list may be several pages long, and you can break it up by the following topics: Administration, Operations, Sales and Human Resources, feel free to add addition topics. Under each topic, list everything you do. For example, under Administration, you would have: billing, paying bills, doing spreadsheets, etc. A er you have compiled your list, be honest with yourself, and start crossing off the things you are not very good at and do not like to do. Ask yourself which crossed-out items can be delegated. Can they be delegated to someone who already is working for you, or will you have to hire someone to take over these tasks? The idea of letting go can be scary but think of all of the things you will be able to accomplish when you do. For example, if you are a person who does not enjoy things like billing, spreadsheets and filing and you eliminate those tasks from your daily routine, then you can spend that extra time growing your business by doing the things you are good at and enjoy.

The majority of networkers believe effective networking is a numbers game: - The more I tell someone about me, the more likely they will remember me. - The more hands I get my card into, the better it is for me. - The more people I meet, the better. Networking has never been nor should it ever be a numbers game. It should be a respect principle. This is essential for effective networking. Respect means having a deep admiration for someone. That admiration comes from what you know about someone’s abilities, qualities, or achievements. It would seem from that definition that you need to express your abilities, qualities, or achievements as much as you can and to as many as you can. Turns out, the most effective way of building this respect is through simple action and listening. If you are someone people respect, others will spread the word about you. When you meet someone new, you need to put your respect principle into action, that is, respect the other person’s character and qualities first, then seek to find out their abilities and accomplishments. They will then want to know more about you and that puts you into a relationship with them where they are eager to listen to you, not dreading the moment they said ‘hello’ to you. Respect is earned! That means it is a result of actions Let your actions this month show you respect others’ presence, then watch to see if they come to respect you enough to learn about you. If they do not, they are someone you do not need to try to convince. Fill your life and networking with respect. You will be glad you le the numbers game behind!

Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an award-winning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, hwww.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

Treat yourself like someone you love. ­­ Adam Roa

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


1 8 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019 TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR GEMS

Betrayal of the Flowers

Filling the Health Gap

by Paul McHam

by Kent Von Der Vellen

The basement can be the No. 1 place to find mold in a home, with attics being a close second. This is because of the many ways water can enter the picture. It is important to understand that water can show up as relative humidity in the air, as puddling on the floor, or just as the level of saturation in the floor joists, the sill plate, the rim joists or even in the foundation’s surface. It does not matter whether the surface is terra-cotta tile block, cement block, or a solid poured-cement wall. The level of moisture in these basement areas is known as surface water activity.

While working in a Parma emergency room, Dr. Kim Bowen discovered many patients had jobs but no insurance and a neighbor was unable to get needed blood pressure medicine because he did not have insurance. This led Dr. Bowen to create the Parma Health Ministry. A er moving to Medina, he once again discovered the cost of medical care was keeping people from seeing doctors and getting prescriptions. He approached others with the idea of opening a clinic in Medina like the Parma one. Two men, Dr. John Surso and Phil Brewer, joined the effort and became board members. In 2004, the Medina Health Ministry opened its doors and began providing care to county residents. The name was changed to the Free Clinic of Medina County in early 2018 to better communicate the services provided. Twenty-four doctors and nurses volunteer at the clinic. A majority of the clinic’s patients get free diagnostic testing through Cleveland Clinic and free prescriptions through pharmaceutical company programs. Nancy Peacock, clinic executive director, works with area employers to ensure new hires who do not qualify for medical insurance are aware of the services the free clinic offers. Those eligible for services must be employed Medina County residents between the ages of 18 and 64, not be on Medicaid or Medicare, and have an income within 250 percent of the poverty level. In 2018, incomes qualifying for service ranged from a family of four with an income under $62,750 to a single person with an income under $30,350. The long-term goal for the clinic is to add locations in Brunswick and Wadsworth, in addition to the clinic’s existing locations at Cleveland Clinic Medina General and Cleveland Clinic Lodi Hospital. Hours are by appointment only, which can be made by calling 330764-9300 or e-mailing info@FCOMC.org. An annual August pig roast is the clinic’s main fundraiser. More information and tickets for the roast are available at https://bit.ly/2QrWVqA. Volunteers with office, administrative, or medical experience are needed. To volunteer or to make a donation and learn about the Logsdon Family Foundation $25,000 matching pledge, go to www.FCOMC.org.

Water can leak into the basement through step cracks or horizontal cracks in the mortar between the blocks. Blocks even can crack through the middle, with large enough cracks that you can look through and see your car in the driveway. A block foundation wall can withstand about 650 pounds of horizontal pressure before it will break and crack. Without proper drainage, about ¼ inch per foot for a minimum of 10 feet from the foundation, water can freeze against the foundation. As water freezes, it can generate up to 27,000 pounds of pressure per square inch. With this in mind, look at your flower bed against the house. You might think, “Oh yes, I have plenty of slope away from the house, I can tell by the mulch.” The problem is that water permeates the mulch and is held there so foliage can use the moisture. If you dig down to the clay, you will o en find the clay has a reverse slope against the house. So the water runs through the mulch and back against the house on top of the near-impermeable clay. When reviewing basement problem areas, keep in mind that the foundation likely was installed all at the same time. Whatever is happening in one part of the basement is likely to soon spread throughout the basement. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

MAKING UP WITH YOU Baking Your Face by Katrina Barnes When someone first hears the term “baking,” they typically associate it with food. However, baking also is a very useful makeup technique. The main reason to start baking your face is to keep the concealer from creasing, especially under your eyes. It also is not expensive and uses only one product that should be in everyone’s makeup collection. This product is loose powder. Baking is super easy to do and is highly beneficial for any makeup look. It gives your face a much smoother appearance. In order to bake, you must first apply foundation and then a concealer. Once you have done that, lightly apply a loose powder all over your face; a transparent powder works best. In places such as under the eyes, apply a heavier amount of loose powder. Next, let your face set for 10 to 15 minutes. While you are waiting, you could apply your eye makeup. When the time is up, brush away the loose powder under your eyes. You will have a foundation and concealer that are creaseless and do not look cakey. Pressed powder would not work as well as loose powder for baking because you will not be able to layer enough product on your face efficiently. It is useful to have loose powder in your makeup collection for several reasons. Not only does it work best for baking and can be used on your entire face, but when you purchase loose powder you get more product than when you purchase pressed powder. Loose powder also lasts longer throughout the day than pressed powder does, and it is easier to apply an even coat over your face than pressed powder is. Katrina Barnes has done hundreds of hours of research on makeup and the best ways to apply it. She is in much demand at performances such as Medina High School’s Showtime for applying performers’ makeup. If you would like to request a review of a specific product, please send your request to Joy@MedinaCountyMagazine.com with “Making Up With You” in the subject line. Want to know what area charities  need, other than volunteers and  money? Click on Giving Hearts at  JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com

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2 0 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

BITE ME!

Joyful Fudge by Amy Barnes Please note that the chocolate chips are measured in pounds, not bags of chips. Milk chocolate chips will make a lighter fudge, while dark chocolate chips will make a darker fudge. I like to use half of each. The chocolate-orange fudge tastes much like the chocolate oranges popular at Christmas time that you bang on a tabletop to break apart.

sticking. Boil 5 minutes, decreasing heat as needed to keep from boiling over. Remove from heat.

Line a 11x17 jelly roll pan (cookie sheet with sides) with heavy-duty foil. Apply margarine or butter to foil so the foil is completely and lightly covered.

Variations: For chocolate-nut fudge, add 2 pounds walnuts, either chopped or broken into pieces. For chocolate-orange fudge, add 2 fluid drams of orange oil, usually found in candy-making supply sections.

In a 4 ½-quart pan, over medium heat, combine: •6 cups sugar •3 sticks margarine or butter •1 1/3 cup evaporated milk (a little less than a 12-ounce can) Heat to a rolling boil, stirring until wellcombined, then occasionally to keep from

Stir in: •3 cups marshmallow cream (2 7-ounce jars) •2 pounds chocolate chips •2 tablespoons vanilla

Pour fudge onto prepared pan and quickly spread evenly across pan. Allow to cool and set. When set, carefully li foil from pan and place on flat surface. Fold foil down to ease cutting. Cut and package in air-tight containers.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

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February 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Friday, February 1 Work Naked Day https://bit.ly/2RKkvE0 and Bubble Gum Day https://bit.ly/2CO3ayS It may not be a good idea to celebrate both at the same time! 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, February 2 International Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day https://bit.ly/1DbqmRr and Play Your Ukulele Day https://bit.ly/2RLYKUl 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Medina County Park District: Hiking for the Health of It; Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Four to five-mile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the weather. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beginning Beekeeping; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Art of Quilting; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about hand quilting, needlework, design techniques, embellishments, quilting history. Supplies provided. Grades 8 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2snvZi6 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Can You See Your Shadow? Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Celebrate groundhogs and shadows,

story time, music, fun. Register at https://bit.ly/2H6wLdG 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Book Lovers Luncheon; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring appetizer to share. Register at https://bit.ly/2SQRqUF 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Board Gamers United; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Try strategy, war, or other games.

Sunday, February 3 Feed the Birds Day https://bit.ly/2BnhjXd 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Annual Pancake Breakfast; Lafayette Township Fire Station 2, 5834 Heather Hedge Drive, Chippewa Lake. Benefits Lafayette Township Firefighters Association. Pancakes, sausage, eggs, bacon, sausage gravy and biscuits, strawberry crepes, coffee, juice. Adults, $12; senior citizens, veterans with ID and ages 6 to 12, $8; ages 5 and under, free. Pre-sale tickets available, contact dyoung@lafayettetwpfire.com or Awinter@lafayettetwpfire.com. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. 2 p.m. A Winter Wander; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Naturalist-led wander through the woods to see what is happening during the winter. Free.

Monday, February 4 Create a Vacuum Day https://bit.ly/2sljcNq Thank a Mailman Day https://bit.ly/2EEy11G Thank you, Medina Mailman Grant! All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, and Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax

Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. One District, One Book: Family Cartooning Night; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Cartoonist Jeff Nicholas shares art and fun. Register at https://bit.ly/2RMwctA

Tuesday, February 5 National Weatherman’s Day  https://bit.ly/2ktx4l6 and Chinese New Years https://bit.ly/2ktAXXe All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina, and Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 10 a.m. Internet Scams and Prevention; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2CgQMZs FULL 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Sharon Township Administration Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon Center. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Teen Art Night: DIY Foam Paint; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Mix foam paint, create canvas. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2TLvudw 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Gearheads: Rocket Launch; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Four-week workshop, other dates are February 12, 19, 26. Kerbal Space Program,


2 2 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019 learn to build spacecra . Register at https://bit.ly/2TNQeBw 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Ice Fishing 2-Day Workshop; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about proper clothing, ice safety, equipment, best baits, use of an ice shanty, more. Second day: Thursday, February 7, 2019, when skills will be tested on ice. Ages 16 and up. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2Fpwtga 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Herbalist Garden; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Introduction to herb care and distilling oils. Register at https://bit.ly/2RMxpB8

Wednesday, February 6 Lame Duck Day https://bit.ly/2CZJZF7 All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, and Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1472 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. 2:15 p.m. Volunteens: Snuggle Up and Read PJ Day; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Match snuggly pajamas with great books for children. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Auditor Kovack’s 25th Annual Great Medina County Chili Cook Off; Fraternal Order of Eagles 2224, 696 Lafayette Road, Medina. Sample chilis from 10 competitors, enjoy desserts, auctions, cash bar. Ticket $20, student ticket $10. Winner’s favorite charity gets $1,000. Tickets at the door. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Alcohol Ink Invasion; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn tips to creating art with alcohol ink. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2QJLhYg 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Creative Journaling; Sycamore Rooms North

and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Use images and words to start a journal to express ideas, feelings, wishes, attitudes, beliefs. Bring blank journal or notebook, lined or unlined. Register at https://bit.ly/2FuCszz

Thursday, February 7 e-Day (mathematical constant e) https://bit.ly/2TFn2fF and Send a Card to a Friend Day https://bit.ly/2RedCLx and Wave All Your Fingers at Your Neighbor Day https://bit.ly/2BPE9WT All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, and Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Library Online Resources; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how library online resources can provide range of information and help. Bring own device or just listen to the lecture. Register at https://bit.ly/2AI7nVT 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Board Game Night; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Bring favorite game to share or play one there. Popcorn and hot chocolate. All ages. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Sweet Science of Chemistry; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Candy chemistry activities, play with food while learning science. Parents are needed to assist with tables. Grades 3 and up. Snow date: Tuesday, February 12, 6:30 p.m. Register at https://bit.ly/2ACBDld

you will be laughing at those trying to fly a kite! All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, and Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, February 9 Toothache Day https://bit.ly/2luBS8M and National Pizza Day https://bit.ly/2z5z9Is Hopefully, the pizza does not cause the toothache! All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beginning Beekeeping; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Winter Bird Hike; Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Look for winter birds in fields and forests. Dress for weather, bring binoculars if you have them. Free. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Art of Quilting; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about hand quilting, needlework, design techniques, embellishments, quilting history. Supplies provided. Grades 8 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2RoZGyw

Friday, February 8

10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Mandala Playshop for Adults; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Mandala creation with introduction to types of mandalas and an exercise to prepare. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2AHFVYu

Laugh and Get Rich Day https://bit.ly/2saxljb and Kite Flying Day https://bit.ly/2CMYaKG Perhaps

Noon to 5 p.m. Be My Valentine; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019 Valentine-themed cra s and DIY gi s. Free. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Fiddle Fest; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Songs and folk music history. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2FqTOy4

Sunday, February 10 Umbrella Day https://bit.ly/2H1st7r 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Annual Pancake Breakfast; Lafayette Township Fire Station 2, 5834 Heather Hedge Drive, Chippewa Lake. Benefits Lafayette Township Firefighters Association. Pancakes, sausage, eggs, bacon, sausage gravy and biscuits, strawberry crepes, coffee, juice. Adults, $12; senior citizens, veterans with ID and ages 6 to 12, $8; ages 5 and under, free. Pre-sale tickets available, contact dyoung@lafayettetwpfire.com or Awinter@lafayettetwpfire.com. 9 a.m. to 1 pm. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Martin of Tours, 1800 Station Road, Valley City. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Noon to 5 p.m. Be My Valentine; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Valentine-themed cra s and DIY gi s. Free. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pinterest Project: Love Birds on a Wire Canvas; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Make 16x20 canvas art piece with fabric bird silhouettes on a wire. Bring 2-inch paint brush, sharp scissors for cutting fabric and paper, all other supplies provided. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2AJQTww 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. K-9 Kapers; Plum Creek Park North enclosed and open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot nonretractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages, must have accompanying adult. Free. No registration.

Monday, February 11 Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Day https://bit.ly/2TG7dWq and Make a Friend Day https://bit.ly/1AclH27 and National Inventors Day https://bit.ly/2CMz0vO 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Tuesday, February 12 National Lost Penny Day https://bit.ly/2BnRAOz and Plum Pudding Day https://bit.ly/2BEtuvV Plum Pudding recipe: https://bit.ly/2RlJKgr 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Mobile App Basics; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about downloading, uninstalling, killing apps, more. Bring own device for hands-on lesson or attend for lecture. Register at https://bit.ly/2Mbbajm FULL. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Preschoolers in the Garden: Let’s Do Some Transplanting, Examining Roots and Shoots; Krabill Shelter, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina. Time to transplant seedlings started last month. OSU master gardeners lead second in series of three programs. Dress for weather. Fee $5. Register at https://bit.ly/2so9Kc3 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cooperative Community Services: Networking Workshop; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Free. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Coded Quilts of the Civil War; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Stories about role of quilts in the Underground Railroad and the Civil War. Register at https://bit.ly/ 2RPOB8O

Wednesday, February 13 World Radio Day https://bit.ly/ 2TIrzhL and Get a Different Name Day https://bit.ly/ 2BIlXMv Be careful! If you get a different name, you will need extra documentation when you renew your driver’s

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license. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Anti-Valentine’s Day; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Treat self with self-care snacks and cra s. Grades 6 to 12. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Google Docs; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to create and share documents and how to use them for collaborative projects. Bring device and your G-mail login to access the program during class. Register at https://bit.ly/2D7fIE8

Thursday, February 14 Ferris Wheel Day https://bit.ly/2SLRdlF and Library Lovers Day https://bit.ly/2M3h8Ct 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-7239514, for appointment. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 3:30 p.m. Emoji Rice Krispies Art; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2AH5R6E 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Not Another Valentine’s Day Party; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Enjoy an evening of friendship instead of


2 4 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019 courtship. Snacks, cra s, movie. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2Frr34u

weather. Free.

by adult.

Sunday, February 17

Friday, February 15

Random Act of Kindness Day https://bit.ly/2Pm6rez

All day. Medina Ice Fest; Medina Public Square. Ice carvings on display.

Singles Awareness Day https://bit.ly/2M17CQv and National Gumdrop Day https://bit.ly/2RhSvrz 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. Medina Ice Fest; Medina Public Square. Speed Carving Contest, 5:30 pm., 6 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Fire and Ice Tower, 7 p.m. 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, February 16 Do a Grouch a Favor Day https://bit.ly/2p0uMyz 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hospice of the Western Reserve Warehouse Sale; Hospice of the Western Reserve headquarters, 17876 St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. First of two days. Gently used home furnishings, artwork, lamps, dishes, jewelry, more. 10:30 a.m.to 11 a.m. Sensory Storytime; Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with autism, sensory integration challenges, or who have difficulty sitting still or focusing. Ages 2 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2SPGruA 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Art in Action; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Talk with local artists, learn techniques, create art. Noon to 5 p.m. Be My Valentine; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Valentine-themed cra s and DIY gi s. Free. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Medina Ice Fest; Medina Public Square. Individual ice carving competition. 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sweetheart Hike; Susan Hambley Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Romantic stroll along snow-covered trails at Brunswick Lake. Followed by hot beverages, treats, cozy fire. Adults only. Hike is self-guided, dress for

8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hospice of the Western Reserve Warehouse Sale; Hospice of the Western Reserve headquarters, 17876 St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. Second of two days. Gently used home furnishings, artwork, lamps, dishes, jewelry, more. Noon to 4 p.m. Medina Ice Fest; Medina Public Square. Team ice carving competition.

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 10:30 a.m. Let’s Have a Story; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Highly interactive Affrilachian folktales about animals like Rabbit, Turtle, Fox, more. Register at https://bit.ly/2FxOZCF

8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Annual Pancake Breakfast; Lafayette Township Fire Station 2, 5834 Heather Hedge Drive, Chippewa Lake. Benefits Lafayette Township Firefighters Association. Pancakes, sausage, eggs, bacon, sausage gravy and biscuits, strawberry crepes, coffee, juice. Adults, $12; senior citizens, veterans with ID and ages 6 to 12, $8; ages 5 and under, free. Pre-sale tickets available, contact dyoung@lafayettetwpfire.com or Awinter@lafayettetwpfire.com.

1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth United Methodist Church, 195 Broad Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Noon to 5 p.m. Be My Valentine; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Valentine-themed cra s and DIY gi s. Free.

5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mug Cake and Movie; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bake own cake in microwave, enjoy with movie. Register at https://bit.ly/2FyIcIX

1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth.

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Card Making; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2D61rYD

1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Digital Photography: Beyond the Basics; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about exposure, composition, shutter speed, more. Bring digital camera and user manual. Must have moderate prior experience or taken previously offered Basics class. Fee $35. Register at https://bit.ly/2FnpGnw 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Rocks and Fossils of Medina County; Princess Ledges Nature Preserve, 4361 Spruce Avenue, Brunswick Hills. Learn about Ohio’s geologic history, from ancient sea to massive glaciers, and about prehistoric animals that lived here. All ages. No registration. Free.

1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Turtle-Shell Tales; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. African and African-American tales of the tortoise. Register at https://bit.ly/2SS6WQ2

Tuesday, February 19 Chocolate Mint Day https://bit.ly/2DfZ4R1 All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult.

National Battery Day https://bit.ly/2B9Ghp7

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-7239514, for appointment.

All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Connect With Family and Friends: Social Media; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to use Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram. Bring log-in information or

Monday, February 18


listen to lecture. Register at https://bit.ly/2Fn0H3D WAITING LIST 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Beginning Beekeeping; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265.

Wednesday, February 20 Hoodie-Hoo Day https://bit.ly/1dRCU6I and Love Your Pet Day https://bit.ly/1d70Mzo All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Winter Bird Hike; Plum Creek Park North enclosed and open, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Look for winter birds in fields and forests. Dress for weather, bring binoculars if you have them. Free. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Hooray for Giraffes; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Songs, stories, rhymes about giraffes. Register at https://bit.ly/2sn7hP1 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. History Series: Life of Lincoln Part 2; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit.ly/2QJaDWi 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Affrilachian Folk Tales; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. African-American folktales from Appalachia. Register at https://bit.ly/2FxOZCF

Thursday, February 21 Card Reading Day https://bit.ly/2BI1dVk All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library,

Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019 2 5 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gardening at Your 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Doorstep: Simplifying Your Garden; Medina County Office for Older Building C, Williams on the Lake, 787 Adults, 330-723-9514, for Lafayette Road, Medina. Doors open at appointment. 9:30 a.m. Pre-registration required. Fee before February 1, $45; a er February 1, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; $55. Register at https://bit.ly/2QJjabY Medina Computer Lab, Medina Deadline is February 15. Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer 11 a.m. to noon. Dress for the Season; skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. 330-725-0588. Learn how animals and students gear up for the different seasons. Presented by 6:30 p.m. Advanced Care Planning Akron Zoo. Ages 3 to 5. Register at and End of Life Care; Brunswick https://bit.ly/2TLInUW Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn how to 11 a.m. to noon. Unicorn Party; Medina communicate end-of-life wishes. Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://cle.clinic/2Fy3TZg Celebrate unicorns with stories, games, cra s. Ages 5 and up. Register at Friday, February 22 https://bit.ly/2SSPevC Single Tasking Day Noon to 5 p.m. Be My Valentine; Susan https://bit.ly/2rV3DyA and Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen International World Thinking Day Boulevard, Brunswick. Valentine-themed https://bit.ly/2SNiVy7 cra s and DIY gi s. Free. All day. Kindergarten Readiness 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Garrett Morgan: Week; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Cleveland’s Civic-Minded Inventor; Road, Medina. Activities to prepare Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, preschoolers for transition to Medina. Learn the story of Morgan, the kindergarten. Must be accompanied son of slaves who became a self-made by adult. business man in Cleveland, and of his inventions. Register at 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross https://bit.ly/2H8Lhlh Blood Drive; Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Puppet Show: Martha https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Moth’s Mission; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam Wadsworth. Martha discovers and Dinner; Lafayette United metamorphosis is hard work, can she go Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette the distance? Told with humor. Interest Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 level ages 4 to 10. Free. Register at p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation https://bit.ly/2smsTLr admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. St. Francis Xavier dessert to share. Bluegrass bands Casino Night; Weymouth Country Club, welcome, arrive early to be 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits scheduled. St. Francis Xavier School in Medina. Buffet, dessert table, drink, photo booth Saturday, February 23 with props, blackjack, poker roulette, craps, raffle baskets. Casino tables open International Dog Biscuit at 7:15 p.m. Chips sold in $1, $3, $5 Appreciation Day increments. Tickets $50 at https://bit.ly/1tHwj9j and World https://bit.ly/2BsPH01 Sword Swallowers Day https://bit.ly/2Ds9Frr 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Casino Night; Galaxy Restaurant and Banquet Center; 201 Park All day. Kindergarten Readiness Center Drive, Wadsworth. Benefits the Week; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Scholarship Foundation of Wadsworth. Road, Medina. Activities to prepare Food served till 7 p.m.; casino games 7 preschoolers for transition to p.m. to 10 p.m. Texas Holdem tournament kindergarten. Must be accompanied with prizes. Cocktails, cash bar. Tickets by adult. $50. Information and tickets at https://bit.ly/2SREC07 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Art of Quilting; Community Room, Highland Library, Sunday, February 24 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about hand quilting, needlework, National Tortilla Chip Day design techniques, embellishments, https://bit.ly/1eqqA9o quilting history. Supplies provided. Grades 8 to 12. Register at 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Annual Pancake https://bit.ly/2RoP5DB Breakfast; Lafayette Township Fire Station 2, 5834 Heather Hedge Drive,


2 6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2019

27

Chippewa Lake. Benefits Lafayette Township Firefighters Association. Pancakes, sausage, eggs, bacon, sausage gravy and biscuits, strawberry crepes, coffee, juice. Adults, $12; senior citizens, veterans with ID and ages 6 to 12, $8; ages 5 and under, free. Pre-sale tickets available, contact dyoung@lafayettetwpfire.com or Awinter@lafayettetwpfire.com.

Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment.

Noon to 5 p.m. Be My Valentine; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Valentine-themed cra s and DIY gi s. Free.

5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more.

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth.

6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Beginning Beekeeping; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fee $85 single, $100 family, includes book, more. Register at https://medinabeekeepers.com/ or call 330-723-6265.

5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

Monday, February 25 All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, and Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 2:15 p.m. to 4 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 6 and up. Free. No registration. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Getting on Track: Working Toward Financial Stability; United Way of Medina County, 728 E. Smith Road, Medina. Learn debt strategies, debt collection rights, resource management, more. Call 330-725-3926, Ext. 229, to register by Friday, February 22. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Pokemon Club; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Meet other trainers, trade, share tips.

Tuesday, February 26 Carnival Day https://bit.ly/2D1Qes5 and Tell a Fairy Tale Day https://bit.ly/2B8T774 All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, and Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Using YouTube to DIY; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to utilize YouTube, bring device. Register at https://bit.ly/2TLJfsG

6:30 p.m. Harlem Renaissance; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Explore music, poetry, understand historical context. Register at https://bit.ly/2TFfREm

Wednesday, February 27 No Brainer Day https://bit.ly/2ktM4zs All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, and Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. A ernoon at the Cinema; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call for title, 330-2734150. 2:15 p.m. Share the Love; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create items to share with others. Grades 6 to 12.

Thursday, February 28 Public Sleeping Day https://bit.ly/2RKpp3S All day. Kindergarten Readiness Week; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick, and Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Activities to prepare preschoolers for transition to kindergarten. Must be accompanied by adult.

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330723-9514, for appointment. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

Submitting Calendar Events

Events listed in the calendar must be a festival or fair or hosted by or bene a non-profit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Event information is not accepted by phone. The calendar is also available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional event information.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2019  

A father and son racing team, our new business column, what flowers can hide, filling the health care gap, an evening of costumes, a morning...

Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2019  

A father and son racing team, our new business column, what flowers can hide, filling the health care gap, an evening of costumes, a morning...