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DECEMBER 2019 VOLUME 2, NUMBER 11

$11.99

HOST A WILDLIFE BANQUET PG. 20 Recipe for feasting and antics

CLEAN OUT THE TOY BOX PG. 25 Give old toys new purpose Enjoy photos, puzzles, comics, more!

DREADING HOLIDAY POUNDS? PG. 17 Tips on having fun while avoiding gain

BUSINESS MINDFULNESS PG. 19 Make stronger networking connections

A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 11 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

It Is All In How You Present It by Amy Barnes Last Christmas, I could take it no longer. Our family Christmas tree had gone undecorated for the last few years while beautiful ornaments languished in boxes. We used to decorate the tree as a family. We had cookies and hot chocolate and cider. Boxes and boxes of ornaments would be brought out and each ornament carefully hung. But one year, the entire crew rebelled. They said they were tired of the hours spent decorating the tree, they were done with the hours it took to undecorate the tree. I tried to limit the decorating to only one hour, but they were done. They graciously gave me permission to do the work on my own since I was the only one who cared, as they so kindly pointed out. It was a massive job for a crew, an impossible job for one who had other jobs to do as well. So, the tree had only twinkling lights and a few scattered ornaments on it, and I felt sadder every year. Until last year, when inspiration hit. A plan. A perfect plan. One that would give me a decorated tree AND get the crew to undecorate the tree. I hung small gifts ranging from $1 to $10 in value on the tree, hiding what I thought would be the more popular gifts deep within the tree or on the back of it, closest to the wall. Then I waited with a Grinch-like smile. I felt mom-evil and good at the same time. The crew looked at the tree. They examined the tree. They peered into the tree. They looked at me. “What is this?” the crew asked, suspiciously. My smile grew bigger. “That, my dear children, is a new part of our Christmas.” On Christmas morning, after gifts were unwrapped, each family member and guest was given a raffle ticket, thus avoiding accusations of favoritism. Once each number had been called, a picking order was established, and they went one by one in order to pick gifts off the tree until they were done. Our tree had been decorated with great fun and had been happily undecorated by my rebellious crew. We now call it the Gifting Tree, and it is our new family tradition. I hope you have the most wonderful of holiday seasons, whatever your choice of celebration and tradition. May laughter flow and eyes twinkle with the joy of love, family and friends. Happy holidays, and JOY to all!

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Robert Soroky MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

REACTING TO MOLDS by Paul McHam It is known that mold can cause serious illnesses, but how?

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THE IN BOX

AVOIDING THE SCROOGE TRAP by Steve Rak Business success can happen without the price of losing all else.

THE NETWORKER

MINDFUL NETWORKING by Bob Arnold Practicing networking mindfulness can lead to stronger connections.

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by Amy Barnes

by Robert Soroky

BOMBS AWAY! by Hunter Barnard “The Addams Family” teaches that being similar is not as much fun as being different.

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by Austin Steger Battery capacity has doubled, so why are devices still draining them? Factors to consider when deciding whether to repair or replace a device.

photos by FlashBang Photography

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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LIGHTING UP FOR YOU

CYCLING DESPITE THE SNOW by Robert Soroky

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REALITY INSTEAD OF RESTRICTION by Kelly Bailey

by Amy Barnes

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GEMS

Can you solve this month’s puzzle? Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

KIDS’ PLAY by Kent Von Der Vellen Make room for new toys by donating batteryoperated toys in good condition to be modified for use by disabled children.

Tips for enjoying holiday meals without foregoing the fun. On the front and back covers: photos by Ed Bacho Jeff and Carrie Lewis are opening their hearts and home to everyone who loves Christmas.

TUNA-AND-RICE STOVETOP CASSEROLE

JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

Great rides do not have to wait for spring.

OF MIND AND BODY

BITE ME!

If you want a quick, thrown-together meal or if you are tired of turkey and ham and would enjoy a break, this recipe is just what you need.

Find just a little of what it takes to make the Lewis Christmas Wonderland happen.

HEALTHY TRAILS

by Jerry King

TO REPLACE OR REPAIR

OH, SNAP! Whoooooom do you see?

MIRTH AND JOY FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

The shuttle crew is on its way to investigate Ringworld, and a startling discovery has been made.

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by Michelle Riley

ROLL ‘EM!

A local couple created the Lewis Christmas Wonderland four years ago to share their love of everything Christmas, and it has grown from a few decorations into a display of hundreds that inflate, move, make music, light up, and encourage giving.

RINGWORLD

WILDLIFE HOLIDAY BANQUET Making the holidays joyful for all.

FOR THE LOVE OF CHRISTMAS

THE READING NOOK

DIG IT!

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LET’S DO IT! Crafts, movies, reading to therapy dogs, bluegrass jamming, pancakes and pajamas, and it does not stop there!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

For The Love Of Christmas by Amy Barnes photos by Ed Bacho

Road in Medina. Proudly named the Lewis Christmas car slows down to a creeping crawl, Wonderland, the extensive, 2-acre outdoor and pauses, then slowly creeps away. Another car indoor display of Christmas decorations attracts slows, a horn honks a couple of times, and the fans of all ages, Jeff said. car speeds away. “I love watching the kids walk through it,” said Jeff and Carrie Lewis smile and wave. They are Jeff. used to all of the attention and enjoy the Decorations include pieces that are tall, short, enthusiasm for their huge lighted, animated Christmas display. They have seen a wide variety inflated, musical, animated, and wooden cutouts depicting various characters and Nativity scenes. of cars, including police cars, slow down so the One year, the Lewises were contacted by a tour occupants could enjoy a few moments of the company that wanted to pull into their driveway Lewises’ holiday enthusiasm. so riders could get out and enjoy the display, but The cars that honk are established fans, said the arches over the driveway were too short for Jeff, with a large smile. He said that the occupants of the cars that slow down and do not the bus. No problem for Jeff, he happily went out and made the arches taller so the bus could pull honk before the display is completely in place are probably wondering what in the world he is in. For those who want to see the entire display on up to as he decorates the house roof or straightens yet another Christmas decoration on all sides of the house, as well as inside, parking is available in the Lewises’ driveway and in the the lawn of the Lewises’ home at 3820 Granger

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background photos by Annie Spratt


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

parking lot for Medina Lake Park, which is a couple of lots away at 3733 Granger Road. Carrie said it is a short walk from the park to their house. In the four years that the Lewises have created the annual display, the number of items that make up the display have climbed into the hundreds, and it continues to grow every year. Jeff regularly checks estate sales, garage sales, flea markets, the annual citywide Seville yard sale, websites, and online marketplaces for more items to add to Wonderland. Some may look at the large number of items on display and wonder where to walk, while Jeff and Carrie see spaces where more items can be added. “Jeff and I are like two little kids, we love Christmas,” Carrie said. “We change the display every year,” Jeff said. In addition to new items being added, the decorations are moved around and hold different places of honor each year. In 2016, they won first place in a light contest with Channel 3 WKYC. The prizes included a $1,500 light display kit which enabled Carrie and Jeff to add music from the Trans-Siberian Orchestra to the experience of visiting their

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display by utilizing 88.1 FM. They also won front row seats to a TSO performance. Their eyes light up when they reminisce about being so close to the performers during the TSO concert. Carrie said they were so close to the stage they could almost touch the performers. They still laugh when they recall the awkward technical difficulties during their Channel 3 onair interview that was part of their winning the light contest. Carrie said they had to be ready at their house to go on air by 4:30 a.m. and then could not hear the interviewer in the newsroom. Questions had to be relayed to them by the onsite crew. An item the Lewises currently are working on adding to the annual display is Old Man Winter, which is 46 feet long and 28 feet tall. It depicts Winter throwing snowballs through the air. There are only two such decorations in the world, Carrie said. However, in order for the decoration to light up, the Lewises will have to travel to New York to pick up a $500 power box. Until then, Winter is resting on their back lawn. They bought the decoration when the City of Lorain decided to eliminate it from the city’s display. Carrie got her deep love of Christmas from her parents, Lucy and George White. She said they

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would set up a Christmas display every year in their front yard in North Ridgeville. Since her parents have died, Carrie includes a tribute to her parents as part of the Christmas display using some of the wooden cutouts her mother made, a picture of her parents, and some of the older lights the Whites used in their displays. When the Lewises lived in Lorain, Jeff said they had a tiny front yard and would set up a Halloween display. When they moved to Medina in 2015, Carrie wanted to change the couple’s annual display to one of Christmas. “We’ve got 2 acres, let’s go crazy,” Carrie recalls saying. Carrie said that when Jeff found out she wanted Christmas instead of Halloween, his response was, “You want a lot of Christmas, then I’ll do that for you.” Jeff is just the person to create a tremendous holiday display and has a talent for turning unwanted items into Christmas decorations, Carrie said. For example, he took the outer ring of a trampoline, wrapped it in garland, added a bow and created a giant wreath. He rescued a child’s playhouse that was left on a curb for trash pickup and painted it in Christmas colors and added it to the display. “Jeff’s real creative,” said Carrie. Fifty percent of the decorations stay in place year-round, but even so it takes two months, starting at the end of September, to set up the remainder of the decorations, run the extension

cords, and figure out the strategy for plugging it all in without tripping breakers in their house’s fuse box. Jeff handles the outside decorations; Carrie handles the indoor ones. “We kind of work together on it,” Carrie said, adding, “We just have a good time.” On Christmas Eve, Jeff dresses up like Santa Claus and stands at the end of their driveway, greeting those stopping in for a tour and waving at cars driving by. The annual display costs approximately $120 to $160 in additional electricity a month, Jeff said. Carrie said they also hand out small, inexpensive toys to kids that cost a total of about $100. Attendees are asked to bring toy donations for Toys for Tots and food donations for veterans. They proudly say that their home is a designated drop-off zone for Toys for Tots. Last year, so many toys were collected that there had to be pickups at the house three different times. Neighbors do not mind the displays or the crowds, Carrie said. She said they never have had any complaints. One advantage to putting ornaments on the roof of the house, Jeff said, is that he cleans out the gutters with a leaf blower while he is up on the roof. Some may think that the Lewises go to a lot of work and expense for little return, however the Lewises do not see it that way. The annual display creates at least five ripples of holiday joy. The first is for the Lewises, who


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

greatly enjoy setting up the display and sharing their love of Christmas with visitors. The second one is for those who get to enjoy the display when driving by or walking through it. The third is to the Lewises once again when they give the food and toy donations to the appropriate agencies. The fourth ripple is the grateful groups accepting their donations. Finally, and fifth, is when those in need receive the donations given by strangers who were grateful for the chance to share Christmas. The Lewises enjoy a large family gathering at their house on December 21 when Carrie’s family arrives for festivities. Carrie has two brothers, one sister, one child, and two grandchildren. Jeff

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has a sister and two grown children who live out of state and eight grandchildren. Jeff was the manager for a 10-Minute Oil Change shop on West Market Street in Akron, but after 22 years of working there, the owner decided to sell and retire, leaving Jeff currently unemployed. He shrugs and says he will find something. Carrie works as a state-tested nursing assistant (STNA) at Copley Health Center, a skilled nursing center in Copley. Carrie and Jeff were married in 2009 and have been together for 15 years. continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

See More of the Lewis Christmas Wonderland Parking at 3820 or 3733 Granger Road Tune radios to 88.1 FM for the display’s music Open Thanksgiving night to New Year’s Day night Monday through Thursday, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Donations of toys for Toys for Tots or nonperishable food for veterans requested

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

THE READING NOOK

Billy didn’t even wait to be asked to step up to the transmitter. He bolted across the room, picked up the headset, and began babbling excitedly to his father. “Hey Dad. It’s good to talk to you again. Everyone came to the center by Robert Soroky today for my birthday and we’re all excited to hear what’s been happening up there.” Chapter 3: Discovery “Well, happy birthday, son,” responded Maxwell, “and, actually, quite a bit is going on.” he cake, served on a large red, white and Jonathan Maxwell had not been able to deliver blue tray, was in the shape of a baseball. Quite appropriate, as it represented his favorite any exciting stories about the space flight to his family over the last year or so because, quite sport. The cake was set on a large conference frankly, there just weren’t any. table in front of him, candles blazing away. The journey had become, for the most part, Everyone was there; his mom, his best friend, even his teammates. Everyone, that is, except his uneventful, and was actually the big reason why most people on Earth had forgotten about them. dad. Billy Maxwell, sitting across from those blazing candles, knew exactly what he was going to wish for. ... the crew began to notice changes. It had been more than three years since the historic launch of the space shuttle Hope on its six-year journey to Ringworld. The awful truth, However, a few weeks ago, the shuttle had however, was that most people on the planet had reached the halfway point of its journey, and even all but forgotten about Hope and her seventhough they were still a good three years from person crew. Not Billy. their destination, the crew began to notice His father was commanding the crew of that changes. Changes at Ringworld. shuttle, and he missed him dearly. To ease the The Rion telescope, designed for deep space burden of separation, Billy’s father made it a viewing, was one of the many mission-specific point to contact him once a month to say hello pieces of equipment stored in Hope’s cargo bay. and fill him in on the details of the voyage. It was extracted approximately one month after This month, it was Billy’s 16th birthday, a milestone, and his family and friends decided to launch and mounted in a fixed position to the have the party at NASA’s Glenn Research Center. shuttle hull. It was pointed toward Ringworld in Thankfully, the center was only about 20 miles the hope that the shuttle’s ever-closing distance from Billy’s home, and they ended up celebrating and lack of interfering atmosphere would unveil his birthday in the same room in which Billy had details impossible to see from Earth. Unfortunately, during the first few months of watched the satellite feed of the Hope launch observation, the telescope had not revealed three years ago. anything more about Ringworld than was already Today, he would be receiving his 39th known. transmission from his father in deep space. However, over the course of the past few “Glenn, this is Hope, come in please.” Billy heard his father’s voice crackling over the weeks, very peculiar details began to show about Ringworld, and Jonathan Maxwell was excited speakers mounted in the room’s ceiling. about sharing these amazing discoveries with his “Go ahead Hope, we hear you loud and clear,” family, especially with his son, Billy. responded a mission control technician. “I’ve been hearing rumors around here all day “I understand I have a special visitor there that the Ringworld looks a lot different from today?”

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

where you’re at. Is that true?” Billy anxiously asked his father. “Yes, Billy, it looks very different from here. We’ve been flying a course that is not directly toward Ringworld. We were hoping that a different perspective view of Ringworld would reveal features we couldn’t see from Earth. We also wanted to see just how big the supposed ring around Ringworld really is. Well, what we’ve seen over the last few days has been nothing short of astonishing.” Billy was starting to get restless and wanted to hear what was so amazing. He sometimes forgot that his father was not just talking to him, but all of the NASA ground control team and, therefore, needed to be more precise with his descriptions. His father continued to talk about the shuttle trajectory and other scientific data regarding the mission, losing Billy momentarily in all the technical jargon. Soon, however, astronaut Maxwell brought the discussion back to the subject of Ringworld. “Initially, we all thought that Ringworld might have been a planet or a moon. It was certainly large enough. However, that theory was quickly abandoned due to the seemingly arbitrary movements of Ringworld across the sky.

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seeing appears to be the outer shell of this cylindrical tube. We’ve taken nearly three dozen digitals and are transmitting them back to Earth.” There was a break in the transmission as Billy’s father went to gather more technical data from the on-board computer. One of the other scientists aboard the shuttle took over the transmission and was talking with the ground crew technical team about more mundane issues like the condition of the telescope and the functional status of the shuttle itself. Sally, who had been quiet until now, made her way over to the console where Billy had just finished speaking with his father. “Wow,” she said, staring up at her best friend, “so Ringworld, really isn’t a ring world after all.” “Kind of amazing, huh?” Billy responded, a look of awe on his face. “Maybe Ringworld really is some kinda huge spaceship or a tunnel to another part of the universe. Maybe all the things that were taken from our universe: the planets, the stars, comets, …all the stuff that disappeared…is really inside the cylinder. That would be something, eh?” “Maybe we should give it a new name now,” Sally said with a smirk. “You know, maybe something like…” The control room wall speakers crackled again as shuttle commander Jonathan Maxwell “…we were forced to abandon yet returned to the transmitter. Billy sat back down at the console, inviting Sally another theory.” to join him. They both listened intently to the words from deep space, waiting to see what “Well, just yesterday, we were forced to strange new secrets Ringworld held in store for abandon yet another theory. Around 0800 hours, them now. Ringworld made a rather dramatic and wide sweeping move across the galactic plane. As a Our story continues next month! result of that shift, and in conjunction with our perpendicular approach path to Ringworld, we Robert Soroky writes the “Healthy Trails” column and is a observed, for the first time, that Ringworld is not lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long-distance charity round. It’s actually cylindrical. And it’s big! In rides and is manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. fact, our telescope couldn’t even find the point in Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com. space where the cylinder ends. Catch up on previous chapters of our story in “What we’ve been seeing from Earth all these the Joy of Medina County Magazine e-edition! years was actually the flat surface of this Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all enormous cylinder. And as for ‘the ring’ itself, of our past issues. well, there really isn’t one. The ring we were


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

Ryan Cayton and his son Mason Cayton tried their luck fishing at Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. It took only 15 minutes for Mason to land a fish! photo by FlashBang Photography

Representatives of the Medina Raptor Center brought owls to Wolf Creek Environmental Center to educate the audience about different kinds of owls. photos by FlashBang Photography Jamie Mautz cools off Juniper, a great horned owl, when the meeting room became uncomfortably warm for the owl.

Left to right, Kim Hall with barn owl Athena, Kate McNeece, Nathan Kouris, and Jame Mautz.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

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Boris, the barred owl, keeps a steadfast gaze on the audience while Kate McNeece shares his story. With the arrival of freezing rain and snow, Jill Clouse suggests curling up inside with a book. Clouse has been volunteering approximately six years with The Bookshelf, 105 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Proceeds from sales of used books benefit local literacy programs. photo by Amy Barnes

Kate McNeece introduces Ember, a screech owl.

Kim Hall with barn owl Athena

Athena stands proud for the crowd.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

Joyful Word Search Lighting up for You

HEALTHY TRAILS

Cycling Despite the Snow by Robert Soroky

WONDERLAND WINTER FUSES TOYS OUTSIDE REINDEER ELECTRICITY LIGHTS INSIDE VETERANS SANTA CUTOUTS FAMILY EXTENSION CORDS CHARACTERS

Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Looking Sharpe

When the snow is flying, the avid cyclist is suddenly trapped indoors, sipping spiked mochas and anxiously dreaming of spring. Of course, the true die-hard cyclist likely owns a fat-tire bike and is easily plowing through that winter wonderland with a hearty smile. If you are a "solar-powered" cyclist who needs sun and warm temperatures, you are probably wondering how to satisfy that craving to ride. Luckily, there are several indoor options to keep the legs spinning and blood pumped. The most popular is, of course, the spin class. For a nominal fee, you can join dozens of stationary riders in a group sweat fest, cranking out rpms to the beat of contemporary dance music while hopping in and out of the saddle to the spirited commands of an endlessly energetic instructor. Of course, if you prefer the comfort of your own personal tricked-out basement gym, then an exercise bike may be the answer. You can pedal away at your own pace, day or night, all while reading a book or watching TV. Many of the fancier exercise bikes are set up to work both upper and lower body or come with preloaded training courses to recreate the intensity of a spin class. However, unlike a spin class, you are on your own, so motivation can come only from within. Then there is the smart trainer. What makes this method a game changer is that you are using your personal bike for the workouts. Mount your bike to the variable resistance trainer unit, download one of the many ride programs on your smart phone, laptop or smart TV, and then ride through all kinds of fun and exciting virtual worlds. As the elevation changes along a given route, the trainer's resistance mechanism will adjust accordingly, allowing you to accurately experience climbs and descents. Plus, with features like timed sprints, dozens of personal workout programs, a customizable rider avatar and the ability to interact in real time with thousands of other riders across the globe, the smart trainer option is a realistic, selfmotivating and cost-effective indoor ride experience. Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

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OF MIND AND BODY

Reality Instead of Restriction by Kelly Bailey The holidays are meant to be enjoyed, and food is a part of that enjoyment. What if we turned the whole paradigm of restriction-as-solution on its head and got more realistic? Here are my suggestions to do just that. Ask yourself this before every meal: What would it be like if I left this meal comfortably full, instead of painfully stuffed? Being overfull, bloating, gas, reflux, fatigue, and stomach cramps are not fun. Asking this simple question will remind you that you can choose how you want to feel when you leave the table. Eat whatever you want, but only if it is worth it. You love your mom’s mashed potatoes and only get them once a year. So why munch on chips and salsa when you could eat them any day of the year? Eat it only if it is worth it, Part Two. Do not eat food that is only so-so. Why are you eating pumpkin pie if you do not like pumpkin pie? Eat dessert first or whatever food is your favorite. You are going to end up eating your favorite food anyway, so why fill up on other stuff you do not really want? By eating what you really want first, the food will taste better and you will be more satisfied. Sit down, slow down. We claim to love food, so why do we eat so fast? Put your fork down a few times during the meal. Savor the flavor. When you indulge in the experience of eating, you may become satisfied sooner. Go to parties hungry, not starving. If you are ravenous at a holiday party, you likely will overeat. If you are mildly hungry, you will enjoy the food with less risk of losing control. After a large meal, take a walk instead of a nap. Did you know that taking a 15- or 20-minute walk after a meal can lower insulin response to that meal by up to 40 percent? (https://bit.ly/32PAJO6) Insulin tells your body to store calories as fat. Control your insulin, and you can control your weight. Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Reacting to Molds by Paul McHam

“Why is there a tour bus in Ohio? Oh, it must be leaving Ohio.”

“If a black hole is just condensed matter, then there has to be a chicken nugget somewhere in there, right?”

“She was really nice to me in middle school, but, wait, she might have been trying to sell me drugs.”

The human body is a complex mechanism that responds to many things in many ways, and its response to mold can be complex. Mold can be described as a particle and just as dust can cause a reaction, so can mold. Specific molds have characteristics that can cause an allergic reaction, and it has other facets that make it a bit tricky. Mold spores are everywhere, and they float around looking for food and water. The food source can vary, but it is mostly dead organic materials, like building materials in a home, mostly cellulose products like wood or drywall; leather shoes; food; and other dead organic materials. When water is present as puddling or relative humidity higher than 50 percent, mold begins to grow. Spores use subsurface or vertical hyphae in a surface as roots. It then grows vertical hyphae, which become the plant itself, and sporangia, that produce spores. As spores grow, they generate naturally made allergens and chemicals, also known as mycotoxins. Many people may respond to the allergens, some may never respond. Some may respond to the mycotoxins, while others may not becoming sensitized to them. When a breeze hits the mold growth, the mold spores, pieces of hyphae, their allergens, and their mycotoxins can become airborne. When you walk into that affected area, it is very likely that you will carry some of it out with you. Some mold spores are as small as one micron or even smaller. A few others are as large as 100 microns, or so. Keep in mind that a micron is .00004 inches. A human red blood cell is about five microns in size. A mold spore is not easily visible, as the human eye cannot see anything smaller than about 50 microns. A mold colony is visible because there are likely thousands to millions of spores in that colony. If you see it or smell it, it already is a problem. The musty odor you might smell, especially in warmer months, is microbial volatile organic compounds (m-vocs) from the mold’s metabolism. When it eats, it produces the odor. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt


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THE IN BOX

THE NETWORKER

Avoiding the Scrooge Trap

Mindful Networking

by Steve Rak

by Bob Arnold

Ebenezer Scrooge was a ruthless man of business, aside from his being a rather miserable miser until that massive change of heart. He never treated his employees like human beings and, therefore, had only Bob Cratchit left. Ah, but Scrooge was a good man of business, and this you must understand or nothing good will come of this column. You see, Scrooge was so ruthless at business that he amassed a fortune in money and real estate. He was said to be the meanest landlord in town, and he did not suffer fools. His friends drifted away as his business success and greed grew. He became a slave to money, hard work and business.

Mindful networking can give you awareness with your new friend. I say “with” for a reason. Networking is an exercise of attention and connecting, so being in a mindful state only improves networking. Mindfulness is about paying attention to experiences as they happen around you, without judgment or the conscience positioning of a right or wrong way regarding issues. Internal mindfulness is not judging your own feelings or thoughts. In a networking setting, you should strive for a mindfulness that surpasses your normal workday needs. You should be accepting of people, especially as you get to know them. It is OK to disagree on a topic, but when you are mindful with someone, you will find that discussing a topic is much better and less stressful than debating it. Do not get me wrong, I am not asking you to put your beliefs or positions aside. I am mindful that you have worked very long and hard to come to those beliefs or positions. Instead, I am asking you to get to know the person in front of you and get the mirror off of yourself. Take a long, hard look at the person you are conversing with. You will find yourself liking some of them and desiring more time to talk to them. I can say there are people I meet who do not believe the same things I do or have the same positions on issues. Mindful networking brings with it the risk that someone will expose to you how they really feel about something. If that happens, you can be assured they feel comfortable and safe with you. My main point is: Remember that all of the people you meet are human beings and thus, must be treated as such. Mindfulness in your networking will help you search for the real bonds between you and your new friend. This month, try this: When you go to any type of gathering, set your mind to not judge your own or your new friend’s thoughts and feelings. I would love to hear from you on how it went.

When his fiancé left him, he became colder and meaner. He shut out the world, his business became his empire, and he belittled the everyday man as poor and weak. Scrooge could be seen in his office late at night and first thing in the morning. He spent every waking moment growing his business, making money, and finding ways to get things from his vendors and employees for nothing. He was not a man of high ethics and would negotiate for hours over a mere pittance until he won. His fortune went largely unused, he had a mansion and a housekeeper, but he was a cheap miser and would not spend a penny if he did not absolutely have to. Yes, Scrooge was a miserable miser until one Christmas Eve when it all changed. Some say it was the ale he drank that night. I think it was because he finally realized that while building a business is great, there are other things in life that are more important, such as family, friends, charity, giving back, the well-being of community members, and taking the time to enjoy being alive in this crazy, wonderful world. We, as business owners, need to remind ourselves of this from time to time, lest we end up a miserable old miser being haunted by ghosts in the night. Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

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Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

DIG IT!

ROLL ‘EM!

Wildlife Holiday Banquet

Bombs Away!

by Michelle Riley

by Hunter Barnard

While making lists and gathering holiday decorations, why not give local wildlife a winter to remember, too? Making a holiday wildlife tree can be a fun activity for the entire family. This also is a great way to give Christmas trees a second life once festivities end. You may find as much joy as my family has while watching a squirrel grab a pine cone, hold it above his head like an Olympian with a trophy, kicking up snow behind him, as he scurried across the yard.

I liked “The Addams Family” movie a lot! The movie was very funny because Pugsly used lots of bombs and even blew up a bathtub! The house they lived in was a little creepy, but it still looked cool. It was so big, and it had lots of dust in it, and it even talked. There was lots of stuff outside the house, too. I would love a tree that lifts me up just like the Addams family has! They had a ton of room outside to set off lots of bombs and run around, and I thought that was really funny. I like Wednesday because she got a chance to go to school just like I do. She scared away a girl but it is OK because she was just standing up for her friends so the girl wouldn't be a bully to them anymore. The mean girl was not very nice to the other girls, so Wednesday did a good job. Pugsly was my favorite because he sets off bombs and is really funny. He even used his bombs for good sometimes to blow up rocks and help his family, and I think that was really nice. Pugsly used a really cool slingshot and it made me want to learn how to use one, too! There was a town in the movie where all the people look the same and everything looked the same, even the houses. They did not let anyone live in the town who was different and I thought that was really mean and boring. I think the Addams family house was cooler because it was different and had more cool stuff in it. I liked the movie because it taught everyone that it is OK to be different because everyone is different.

To create a beautiful winter banquet for critters, you will need: Peanut butter Oranges (clementine also will work) Plain peanuts in the shell (not salted or spiced) Cranberries Plain popcorn kernels Birdseed Large grapes Natural pine cones (not treated with scents, sprays, glitter, etc.) Yarn, twine or string made of natural fibers such as raw cotton, hemp, sisal or wool Small tapestry needle or large sewing needle Wax paper Baking sheet I Large microwaveable bowl Large bowl Cover baking sheet with wax paper. Dump birdseed into large bowl. Put peanut butter in the large microwaveable bowl, and heat in microwave long enough to create a slurry. Coat pine cones by rolling one at a time in the melted peanut butter, then in birdseed. Place cones on baking sheet, and put baking sheet in freezer. Cut the oranges into round slices, a quarter-inch thick or thicker, thread each with yarn or twine, and tie a knot to create a loop for hanging. Pop the popcorn and cool. Use needle and string to create garlands of popcorn, peanuts, cranberries, and grapes, either separately or together in a medley. Remove the hardened pine cones from the freezer, and tie yarn or twine to the top of each. Decorate a tree outside with your wildlife banquet. Let the fun begin. Many visitors will enjoy the holiday feast and will use the strings for nesting. The natural fibers will not retain water in nests, will deteriorate naturally, and are similar to the fibers that birds would find naturally. Happy holidays to you and your wildlife! Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

MIRTH AND JOY

To Replace or Repair

by Jerry King

by Austin Steger Battery capacity has doubled in smartphones and tablets, but why does it not feel like it? While battery capacity has more than doubled in many devices, the number of features that devices are capable of also has more than doubled, which drains batteries. One of those features is cameras that take higher-quality pictures and videos, increasing usage of them. Those same cameras also are used for facial recognition, one of the most popular ways to unlock devices. The main concern I hear from people debating whether to buy a new device or repair their old one is how much longer the old device will last. Most devices use a lithium-ion battery, and, over time, the chemical reactions taking place inside those batteries lower the amount of charge they can hold. A typical battery in a phone or tablet will start to degrade after two years or roughly 500 to 1,000 charge cycles. A charge cycle is when a battery dies down from 100 percent to 1 percent and is charged back to 100 percent. Once the battery starts to degrade, the device still can be used, however there will be faster battery drain and potentially random shutoffs. Premium device manufacturers may include a battery health test in the battery submenu of the settings menu. If a battery test is not included, a repair shop can test it. It is recommended to replace the battery when the capacity tests below 80 percent. Not all devices are cost effective to fix. If the device costs less than $100, repairs would not be cost effective, however, it may be worth replacing the battery if you do it yourself. Devices costing more than $100 are usually cost effective to repair, with some exceptions, such as if the repair is exceptionally difficult and time consuming or when the parts are very expensive. Researching a device online to see if other users preferred to upgrade or repair can help in making a decision, as well as getting the opinion of a professional technician. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

MIRTH AND JOY by Jerry King

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

BITE ME!

Tuna-and-Rice Stovetop Casserole by Amy Barnes Ever wondered what to do with leftover cooked rice? This recipe is a great way to use it in a tasty dish that makes a stick-to-the-ribs kind of meal that is great on cold days. • 2 cups water • ½ cup milk • 1 can cream of mushroom soup • 1 teaspoon dill weed • ¼ teaspoon salt • 1 ½ cups cooked rice* • 2 cans tuna, drained • 8 slices of American cheese In medium saucepan, bring water, milk, soup, dill, and salt to a boil. Add rice, and heat to a boil again. Keep a close watch on the pot because the milk can cause the mixture to boil over rather suddenly. Lower burner heat. Add tuna and cheese, stirring constantly, being sure to scrape the bottom and sides of the pan to keep cheese from sticking and burning. Stir until well combined and liquid has been absorbed. Remove from heat and serve. *Can use instant rice in place of the cooked rice.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

The Place

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Dentist

Landry Family Dentistry

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Mold Remediation

AirXperts

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/ Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589. photo by: Mike Enerio

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

GEMS

Kids’ Play by Kent Von Der Vellen There were broken toys that needed repair. But these were not just any toys. These toys were made for disabled nonverbal children to help them communicate by squeezing, pushing or blowing on an activator. Because the toys often cost twice as much as regular toys, finding someone to repair them was essential. At the same time, Bill Memberg was employed in Case Western Reserve University’s engineering department and had spare time on his hands after working while earning his biomedical engineering degree from Case. Memberg discovered that many of the toys needed a simple fix, such as a wire reattached. His Case Western colleagues also joined in the effort to provide repairs for free. Ten years later, in 1999, Memberg created RePlay for Kids, a 501c3 nonprofit organization. Then Memberg expanded his efforts by adapting regular toys to accomplish the same goals as the specialty toys. Adapted toys give disabled children inclusion because they have the same toys as their friends but modified for their specialized use. Memberg said he once modified a toy car to communicate for a child instead of making a noise like a siren. The students in the class were excited to see their disabled classmate had the same toy they did. At RePlay for Kids workshops, RePlay provides the equipment and toys, and local organizations or businesses provide volunteers who are taught how to modify or fix the toys. Two local organizations that host workshops are the Medina Kiwanis and the Medina County Career Center. Every December, RePlay hosts an adaptive toy giveaway and invites area agencies to pick toys for children they serve. One organization RePlay has helped for 20 years is the Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities Windfall School. Teachers and therapists can contact Natalie Wardega, RePlay’s assistant director, about the RePlay@Home program that provides adapted toys for home use. For more information, to donate toys or to host a workshop, e-mail info@replayforkids.org or call 330-7218281. To learn more about RePlay for Kids and upcoming events, visit the organization’s Facebook page at https://bit.ly/2Nx7JVf or the website at https://bit.ly/2N1vaH5 . Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

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December 2019 Non-Profit Calendar Sunday, December 1 National Pie Day https://bit.ly/35WMK6s Pinterest Projects: Paper Beads, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Make paper beads for jewelry or tree garland. Supplies provided. Ages 12 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2JSBw9I Maker Mondays, 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Challenge building skills, be creative with Maker Space stations and activities. Grades 3 and up. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Monday, December 2 National Fritters Day https://bit.ly/2iOI2Ug Monday Movie Matinee, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, December 3 International Day of Persons With Disabilities https://bit.ly/341lNNn and Make a Gift Day https://bit.ly/2zVzfmW Combine the two and make a gift for a disabled person! Holiday Movie Trivia, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Test movie knowledge, enjoy refreshments. Register at https://bit.ly/2pPxGqx Zen Teen: Candle Making, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make a candle, pick color and fragrance. Keep or give as a gift. Ages 12 to 18. Register at https://bit.ly/2ofKR3S Cork Succulent Planters, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create succulent planter. Register at https://bit.ly/2W5ndDG Polar Express Party, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Listen to story, sip cocoa and nibble cookies; make ornaments; play games. Pajamas are encouraged. Register at https://bit.ly/2N7kxkF Wednesday, December 4 Wear Brown Shoes Day https://bit.ly/1w3LOZM Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2Nieawc for more

details. Poetry Reading, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Poets and poetry lovers are invited to attend. Thursday, December 5 National Bathtub Party Day https://bit.ly/18o61sa and Day of the Ninja https://bit.ly/2hqPOjK Be sure to invite ninjas to your party! Please do not practice your ninja skills in the bathtub, though. Denim and Diamonds Holiday Social, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., The Blair Center, 9079 S. Leroy Road, Westfield Center. Benefits Leadership Medina County’s Junior Leadership Program. Wear anything from denim to diamonds. Tickets $50 at https://bit.ly/34zOWzg Ice Fishing Workshop, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about proper clothing, ice safety, equipment, best baits, use of an ice shanty, more. Ages 17 and up. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2WVCaZz Ornament Painting, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Listen to story, make an ornament. Register at https://bit.ly/2W5nwOQ Local Author: Tim Carroll, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Discussion of Pearl Harbor. Friday, December 6 Put on Your Own Shoes Day https://bit.ly/1PW4zXW Perhaps after walking a mile in someone else’s shoes (to gain understanding)? First Friday: Candlelight Walk, 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., downtown Wadsworth. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Family Fun Night: “The Grinch,” 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. Crafts, food, movie, visit from Santa. Per MCRC member family, $5; per non-member family, $10. Pre-registration is required. Register at recreation center or at https://bit.ly/2Q6hufJ Click Online Program Registration, then: Register for an Activity, Fall Session, Events, Family Fun Night. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Stuff the Escalade, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Plum Creek, 891 Marks Road, Brunswick. Hosted by Hands Foundation and Plum Creek Senior


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019 Assisted Living Community. Bring nonperishable food item to donate to Medina United Methodist Church. Raffle, prizes, crafts, games, appetizers, desserts, drinks, Santa. A Christmas Story The Musical, 7:30 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Tickets are adults, $15, and senior citizens and students, $12. Tickets on sale at Buehler’s starting November 25, at the door one hour before show. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2K1d2LF Saturday, December 7 National Cotton Candy Day https://bit.ly/2BdJIP2 and Letter Writing Day https://bit.ly/2MEjGZO Write a letter, then reward yourself with cotton candy! A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Lake Medina, 3749 Medina Road, Medina. Monthly vigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10 to adult. Paper Snowflakes, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Come any time during program hours, make one or more snowflakes using templates. Free. Winter Wonderland, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Visit from Santa and reindeer, horse-drawn wagon rides, crafts, stories, bonfire, treats, more. Sponsored by Lodi Library, Lodi Village, Lodi-Harrisville Historical Society, and Lodi Railroad Museum. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road.

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A Christmas Story The Musical, 7:30 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Tickets are adults, $15, and senior citizens and students, $12. Tickets on sale at Buehler’s starting November 25, at the door one hour before show. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2K1d2LF Sunday, December 8 Pretend to be a Time Traveler Day https://bit.ly/2lz2cmh Christmas in the Valley 5k and 1-mile Fun Run/Dog Walk, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Mill Stream Park, 1250 Maple Street, Valley City. Early deadlines for entry. For prices and registration, go to https://bit.ly/337uxS4 Also enjoy Christmas in the Valley chili cook off, cookie decorating, market, activities, more. Parade at noon. Medina County Home Tour, noon to 6 p.m., starts at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 317 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Shuttle provided from noon to 4 p.m. Benefits the Medina County Historical Society. Tickets are $20 before the tour, $25 the day of the tour. Home for the Holidays, 2 p.m., Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Sponsored by ORMACO. Concert with singer Emily Aleta Dorland and keyboardist Duane Carlson. Free. A Christmas Story: The Musical, 2 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Tickets are adults, $15, and senior citizens and students, $12. Tickets on sale at Buehler’s starting November 25, at the door one hour before show. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2K1d2LF Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off

Buy Your Christmas Tree Today!

photo by Tyler Delgado


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

Smith Road. Monday, December 9 Weary Willie Day https://bit.ly/32G89yV American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the Afternoon: Paper Lanterns, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Celebrate With Little Blue Truck, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Holiday activities, Buckeye High School choir performs, Santa visits. Register at https://bit.ly/35ZDONS Card Making, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2N7ETuk Tuesday, December 10 National Dewey Decimal System Day https://bit.ly/2T54N3M Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Handmade Gifts for the Holidays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Variety of makeand-take projects. Supplies provided. Free, but accepting donations of nonperishable food, paper products or toiletry items for St. Paul Lutheran Church Food Pantry. Register at https://bit.ly/2oOsLGk American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp An Evening With Santa, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Santa and Mrs. Claus visit. Crafts, snacks. Bring wish list. Register at https://bit.ly/2JhmTfK Alphabet Adventure: H is for Hot Chocolate, 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Wadsworth. Explore the letter H with marshmallows, hot chocolate modeling dough, games. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2W9yzXq Merry Grinch-mas, 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Enjoy story, games, crafts. Register at https://bit.ly/33WDJsa L Wednesday, December 11 National Noodle Ring Day https://bit.ly/2hsBTcV Hot Cocoa Spoons, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make spoon to go with cup of cocoa. Grades 6 to 12. Thursday, December 12 National Ding-a-Ling Day https://bit.ly/1ArVI4I Can You Escape? Elf in a Box, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ella the Elf tried to play a prank and lock decorations into a box and accidentally locked herself in instead. Clues around the room will free Ella so she can report to Santa on time. Come help rescue her! Register at https://bit.ly/2W9818y Tween Scene: A Heap ‘o Holiday Cheer, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Choose a holiday name for fun, make holiday crafts. Register at https://bit.ly/2PcDQvJ Deck the Halls Flower Arranging, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Seville Flower and Gift, 4 E. Main Street, Seville. Sponsored by the Seville Library. Make flower arrangement for holidays. Bring sharp scissors. Supply fee: $30. Register for 6 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2p9Ftj3 and for 7 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2pbp2Tx Frosty Fest, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Winter fun and cookie decorating. Friday, December 13 Official Lost and Found Day https://bit.ly/2z0N4U7 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Free Sensory-Friendly Haircuts, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Catalyst Farms, 1021 Ridgewood Road, Wadsworth. Free haircuts by stylists with therapists on hand to give haircuts to children on the autism spectrum or with sensory difficulties. Half-hour appointments. Register by calling 234206-0815 or e-mailing info@catalystfarm.com. Registered children receive a story created by a therapist to help prepare for haircut day. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Mini-Con Otaku, 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Cosplay contest, gaming, Artist’s Alley, more. Permission slip required for this afterhours event. Register at https://bit.ly/34zpQkc Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. A Christmas Story The Musical, 7:30 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Tickets are adults, $15, and senior citizens and students, $12. Tickets on sale at Buehler’s starting November 25, at the door one hour before show. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2K1d2LF Saturday, December 14 Roast Chestnuts Day https://bit.ly/2gYvtFo K-9 Kapers, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Lester Rail Trail-Lester Road, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8foot non-retractable leash and be accompanied by an adult. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs. Holiday Tree Ornaments, 11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make ornaments while enjoying cocoa and cookies. Grades 3 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2N5sPcR A Jedi Holiday, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Intergalactic activities, games, crafts. Free. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. A Christmas Story The Musical, 7:30 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Tickets are adults, $15, and senior citizens and students, $12. Tickets on sale at Buehler’s starting November 25, at the door one hour before show. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2K1d2LF Sunday, December 15 National Cat Herder’s Day https://bit.ly/2Ra4y6I and National Wear Your Pearls Day https://bit.ly/2AFumzT Although, we really do not think the cats would care if you wear your pearls.

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A Jedi Holiday, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Intergalactic activities, games, crafts. Free. A Christmas Story The Musical, 2 p.m., Haddad Theater, Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina. Tickets are adults, $15, and senior citizens and students, $12. Tickets on sale at Buehler’s starting November 25, at the door one hour before show. Tickets available online at https://bit.ly/2K1d2LF Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Winter Weeds 101, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk among the weeds and identify them. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2Nieawc for more details. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Monday, December 16 National Barbie and Barney Backlash Day https://bit.ly/32IEJA3 and National Chocolate-Covered Anything Day https://bit.ly/2JedBBc This is now our new favorite day of the year! Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Tuesday, December 17 National Maple Syrup Day https://bit.ly/Jv3INS Holiday Stories and More, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Sing holiday songs, listen to stories with movements and activities. Brown Bag Concert, noon to 1 p.m., St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 317 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Lempner Jazz Duo performs. Coffee and tea provided. Bring lunch or buy one for $5. Call at least 48 hours ahead to reserve a lunch, 330-725-4131. Gingerbread Houses, 2 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring candy and snacks to share for decorating gingerbread houses. Register at https://bit.ly/32IBSXI Polymer Clay Creations, Activity Room, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Craft with polymer clay. All supplies and snacks provided. Grades 4 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2MJSI3b 3D Snowflake Engineering, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Build a giant snowflake for display at home. Grades 2 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2nCXu8z Wednesday, December 18 National Answer the Telephone Like Buddy the Elf Day https://bit.ly/2yWHvmr American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Christmas Cookies Yum, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Decorate Christmas cookie. Grades 6 to 12. FUSE: Smart or Strange? Design a Tiny House, 4 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn basics of tiny house design, creative use of space, why live in a tiny house. Create a blueprint. Register at https://bit.ly/2PcxSLp Thursday, December 19


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

Look for an Evergreen Day https://bit.ly/2fxWwBC American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Medina County Government Academy: The Constitution and Criminal Procedure, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., University of Akron, Medina County University Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ Explorastory: Library Gingerbread Man, 6:30 p.m. to 7:05 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Listen to stories, try easy science experiment with a cookie, make a Gingerbread Man ornament, more. Register at https://bit.ly/2MHkNYT Friday, December 20 Underdog Day https://bit.ly/2xGTLXw American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Saturday, December 21 International Dalek Remembrance Day https://bit.ly/2A1sxMZ , Look on the Bright Side Day https://bit.ly/2hrN5X9 and National Flashlight Day https://bit.ly/2gQKeq8 Use your flashlight to look on the bright side of Daleks, if you can! A Jedi Holiday, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Intergalactic activities, games, crafts. Free. Celebrate the Winter Solstice! 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Celebrate the longest night of the year. Crafts, activities, hot beverages, treats, Celtic folk music, and meander self-guided luminary-lit trail through wetland and forest. Dress for weather. Free. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Brass Band of the Western Reserve: A Celebration of Christmas, 7 p.m., Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets at the door, adults, $15; senior citizens, $12; and students, no charge. Sunday, December 22 National Date Nut Bread Day https://bit.ly/2yilpyz A Jedi Holiday, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Intergalactic activities, games, crafts.

Free. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Monday, December 23 National Roots Day https://bit.ly/32GXmnV Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/32IdjKB Tuesday, December 24 National Eggnog Day https://bit.ly/2z2p8Ny and National Chocolate Day https://bit.ly/2z1zsWc Add a blanket and movie streaming and it is the perfect day. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Wednesday, December 25 N A’phabet Day or No “L” Day https://bit.ly/2z7nD34 Thursday, December 26 National Whiner’s Day https://bit.ly/35XPm41 and for those who want to celebrate gratitude National Thank You Note Day https://bit.ly/2MFRhT5 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Friday, December 27 National Fruitcake Day https://bit.ly/1cbnYe0, Make Cut Out Snowflakes Day https://bit.ly/1xXGrLR and No Interruptions Day


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2019

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A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Folk Spirit Through December 1, 2019 Art from recycled material by Elizabeth Gierosky Medina Library 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina

Medina County Auditor’s Office 144 N. Broadway Street, Medina

Cliffside Artists Collaborative: Cathy Welner Through December 31, Faces of Sacrifice: 2019 Images Honoring Works in watercolors Those Who Served Through December 6, 2019 Highland Library Gallery Photos of local veterans by 4160 Ridge Road, Medina Nick Hoeller https://bit.ly/2DuPyJ5 Tell the kids to make snowflakes and to not interrupt your peace and quiet or you will make them eat fruitcake! American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Saturday, December 28

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Card Playing Day https://bit.ly/2iPdQIu Pancakes and Pajamas, 11 a.m. to noon, Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Wear pajamas and enjoy pancakes, cartoons, games, stories, crafts. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2Jh9dSd A Jedi Holiday, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Intergalactic activities, games, crafts. Free. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Sunday, December 29 Tick Tock Day https://bit.ly/2kCp94n A Jedi Holiday, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Intergalactic activities, games, crafts. Free. Holiday Lights Drive Thru, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., Medina County Fairgrounds, 720 W. Smith Road, Medina. $8 per car, $20 per 15passenger van, $50 per bus, cash or check only. Enter at Fair Road off Smith Road. Monday, December 30 Bacon Day https://bit.ly/2gZVd4q and National Bicarbonate of Soda Day https://bit.ly/2iRB0xV If you eat enough bacon, you can celebrate both days within hours. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, December 31 Make Up Your Mind Day https://bit.ly/2z1OgnX Wadsworth Library closes 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp New Year’s Party, 11 a.m. to noon, Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ring in the New Year with silly dances, games, life-sized Scrabble, crafts, and more. Balloon drop while counting down to noon. Register at https://bit.ly/2BBCYcb


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Joy of Medina County Magazine December 2019  

An expression of love, realistic eating strategies for holiday meals, tips to avoid being a business Scrooge, puzzles to solve, sci fi to re...

Joy of Medina County Magazine December 2019  

An expression of love, realistic eating strategies for holiday meals, tips to avoid being a business Scrooge, puzzles to solve, sci fi to re...