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DECEMBERÂ 2018

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 11

WHY BASEMENTS MOLD Pg. 14

PLUM PUDDING Pg. 16

HOLIDAY NETWORKING TECHNIQUES Pg. 18

PROTECTORS OF THE PACK

A group of local schoolgirls became champions for a muchmaligned dog breed, and their parents have found there is no curbing their enthusiasm. Pg. 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 11 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

New, New, and More New by Amy Barnes By the time this issue publishes, some of you already will have met one of the newest additions to the Joy of Medina County Magazine staff. Tom Adams has joined the staff as a photographer to help capture the wonderful features and people of Medina County, in addition to the photos that are taken by Susan Feller of FlashBang Photography. You can read more about Tom by going to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com and click on “Meet the Staff.” In addition, Joy of Medina County Magazine has introduced two new services for readers. Readers can now order copies of photos that have appeared in the magazine, either as prints or on merchandise. Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com and click on the “Buy Joy of Medina County Photos on Coffee Cups and More!” tile. There are galleries of photos for the features and folders of photos from our “Oh, Snap!” monthly photo spread. Only photos taken by Joy of Medina County Magazine

PUBLISHER

Blake House Publishing, LLC

EDITOR

photographers will be available. Take a look, you will love all of the ways to have photos delivered and they make great gi ideas! The e-edition remains free, a tile for a subscription to that also is at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com. There also is a tile for each issue of the magazine that can be clicked to see that particular e-edition issue. However, with so many requests for print copies of the magazine and them getting snapped up so quickly, I decided to offer a way for print copies to be purchased. High-quality print copies of past and present issues of the magazine now can be ordered by going to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com and clicking on the “BUY Printed Copies of Joy of Medina County Magazine” tile. I am looking forward to Joy growing by leaps and bounds in the coming year! Happy holidays and may you have a wonderful new year!

Amy Barnes

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tom Adams FlashBang Photography

ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold C. L. Gammon Danielle Litton Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an eedition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty.com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

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THE READING NOOK

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

Just as Cam realizes he has everything he needs, life takes another twisting turn.

BEING A PIT BULL

You may need the determination of a pit bull to find all of these words!

FOUNDATION OF MOLD ISSUES by Paul McHam

Exploring what causes mold in basements and why. IN DEED

A HELPING HAND by Amy Barnes

This holiday season, look for opportunities to reach out and help, no matter how small it may seem, it could be huge for the recipient.

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ADVENTURES OF DARING DANIELLE

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BICENTENNIAL BITES

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GEMS

OH, SNAP!

Little did a mom know that her own struggles would lead to her making a difference.

Decorating for the holiday, a ceremony remembering the end of WWI, and a helicopter of care.

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THE NETWORKER

Hope is a 5­month­old brindle­and­white pit bull puppy and  junior mascot of the Pitbull Protectors. More about the  group, Page 4.

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PITTIE PASSION PROJECT by Amy Barnes

Mix together an ordinary school day, an educational news program, extraordinary schoolgirls, and a cause in need of loving hearts and discover a recipe for change. photos by FlashBang Photography and Tom Adams

ON THE COVER: Being entertained by Hope trying  to hug Brody, are, left to right, back row: Haley  Madak, Madelyn Niksa, and Brooke Russo, with  Kemrey and Vayda Cerny in front. Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free as an e-edition and in print. To subscribe to the e-edition, see past issues, and to order print issues and copies of photos, go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com. Additional features not seen in the magazine, such as Giving Hearts, also can be found on the website.

LEAPING LIZARD TAIL by Danielle Litton

Danielle has become more of a challenge to find than Waldo!

PLUM PUDDING by C.L. Gammon

Our final recipe in this series as the bicentennial year comes to a close.

LEAD AND THEY WILL FOLLOW by Kent Von Der Vellen

HOLIDAY NETWORKING SUCCESS by Bob Arnold

Activities during the year can make great opportunities to connect. BITE ME!

AMBROSIA CELEBRATION by Amy Barnes

A popular holiday side dish recipe gets a few twists.

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LET'S DO IT!

Shuffle in leaves, play in the snow, time to have fun, come on, let’s go!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

PITTIE

PASSION

PROJECT by Amy Barnes photos by FlashBang Photography

t was not part of a plan. It was not what was expected at all. Yet, on a same-as-usual school day that started out being nothing of particular note, the path of five schoolgirls was changed in a way that would help change minds, rally hearts and take their families along for the ride of a lifetime. It all began with an episode of NewsDepth that focused on a pit bull ban in Lakewood and a particular pit bull The Pitbull Protectors, from left, Haley Madak, Brooke Russo, Madelyn  named Charlie. Niksa, and Kemrey and Vayda Cerny, with their junior mascot, Hope,  NewsDepth is a collection of awardowned by Brooke, and their mascot, Brody, owned by Brittany and  winning instructional multi-media Logan Cerny. productions by public television that the Charlie. This was in 2017. girls’ teacher would share with the class. Earlier this year, the ban was li ed and As pit bull bans became widespread across the Lakewood changed the wording of its Dangerous country, the story of Charlie and Lakewood’s ban and Vicious Animals law so that all dogs are on the caught the interest of NewsDepth. The story is same footing, with no breed singled out. about 20 minutes into the broadcast and can be However, while the adults in Lakewood were seen at https://bit.ly/2z34iiF arguing over the issue, the brains of the five When Charlie was a puppy, there was no schoolgirls in Buckeye Intermediate School were objection to his living in Lakewood, even though humming with ideas and their hearts were the city had a pit bull ban in place. It was not until brimming with outrage. he became an adult dog and got loose through a They knew what good pets pit bulls could be, hole in a fence, that the city of Lakewood a er all, one of the girls, Kemrey Cerny, had three demanded that Charlie leave the city limits within pit bull dogs as part of her family. 30 days. These are not girls who will sit still and allow Charlie was up against the city’s 10-year-old ban an injustice to go unaddressed or unfixed. They on pit bulls. are not girls who sit still at all. However, the city of Lakewood had Madelyn Niksa; Haley Madak; Brooke Russo; underestimated the determination of Charlie’s and Kemrey and her younger sister, Vayda Cerny owner, Jennifer Scott. already were involved in basketball and Girl She launched an energetic defense of her Scouts and dance class, but what is one more beloved pet with an “I’m With Charlie” campaign activity when it could help change the reputation that included petitions, protests, a Facebook page, of an entire breed and save dogs’ lives? and more, all in defense of and in support of


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

The first thing the girls tried was making small posters of drawings of pit bulls with positive quotes about the breed. When they asked their school’s principal to allow them to hang the posters in the school, they were told no. This, however, did not slow down or stop the girls. Without a word to their parents, Brooke and Kemrey busied themselves making drawings and more posters with more quotes to sell. They made lists of what they saw as the steps to success and a flyer to advertise a lemonade stand they were planning to have. They filled binders with their plans and drawings. By the time parents caught wind of what the girls were doing, the girls were handing out fliers to friends and using permanent markers to write slogans on white T-shirts to sell. “We don’t even know where they got the Tshirts from,” said Brittany Cerny, mother of Kemrey and Vayda. The girls were not admitting for a minute where the shirts came from, they just smiled and remained silent, suddenly interested in digging through a notebook or playing with the dogs. Cerny was laughing as she related how amazed she was when she discovered the girls’ work and their notes on how to change people’s minds about pit bulls. Mike Russo, Brooke‘s father, was laughing, too, thinking back on how surprised the parents were to find out what the girls were spending all of their spare time on. It was not video games or texting, it was much deeper and more personal than that. Every night the girls did not have homework, they spent hours pouring through endless sources of information researching all of the facts they could find about pit bulls. When Cerny and Russo compared what they had found in their daughters’ bedrooms, they realized how important it was to the girls and were flabbergasted at all of the work the girls had done and how organized they were with no

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outside help. They decided that such determination and effort should be rewarded. Since Kemrey, Brooke and Haley all had birthdays in March, it seemed a no-brainer to the parents to get the girls rather unusual presents: a website for their group and professionally printed shirts and merchandise for the girls to sell. “We went from a lemonade stand to a website,” said Brooke, with a proud smile. Then the parents took it a step further and turned the Pitbull Protectors into a real, honest to goodness, non-profit organization. The girls beam when they listen to the story and chime in all at once, like puppies tumbling over each other. They point out that a different dog breed is singled out as vicious every decade. It bothers them that in the 70s it was Dobermans, in the 80s it was German shepherds, in the 90s it was Rottweilers, and, now, it is pit bulls. They question why certain breeds are singled out and ask when humans will be blamed instead. It is their frustration with what they label as unwarranted discrimination that gave rise to the numerous slogans they use on their posters and merchandise. Their slogans include: “Judge the deed, not the breed;” “Love is the way to win;” “Was never loved, was never hugged;” and “I am a pit bull, and you shouldn’t be a pit bully.” The American Veterinary Medical Association, in its article “Dog Bite Risk and Prevention: The Role of Breed,” states that “owners of pit bull-type dogs deal with a strong breed stigma, however controlled studies have not identified this breed group as disproportionately dangerous.” The article can be found at https://bit.ly/1jrLz5n “A dog isn’t going to be mean unless you teach it,” said Madelyn, adding, “cause it’s all about the environment they’re raised in.” Her thinking that environment helps to shape a dog’s behavior is backed up by the paper “Vicious Dogs Part 2: Criminal Thinking, continued, Page 6


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

continued from Page 5

Callousness, and Personality Styles of Their Owners,” published on PubMed.gov of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22074409 and in the “Journal of Forensic Sciences” on November 10, 2011. According to the paper, “Vicious dog owners reported significantly higher criminal thinking, entitlement, sentimentality, and super-optimism tendencies. Vicious dog owners were arrested, engaged in physical fights, and used marijuana significantly more than other dog owners.” The girls know that one of the things the dogs are used for is illegal dog fighting. “It makes me sick pit bull lives are at risk just for human entertainment,” Madelyn said. The Pitbull Protectors group has had booths at local events to distribute information about pit bulls and to raise funds to help save them. When Lily Pozderac started making special headbands for the girls to sell, she was welcomed to the pack with open arms and they became six members strong. In the beginning, the girls were donating the funds they raised to other animal charities. Then they decided they could be more effective with a facility of their own to rehab and rehome pit bulls. The more they thought about a pit bull-only facility, the more they realized there was a flaw in

their plan. “It was kind of hypocritical to make a shelter only for pit bulls and discriminate against others (breeds),” said Haley. Now, funds raised are being saved toward the goal of one day opening a new facility for all dog breeds. Funds are raised through donations and sales of merchandise at event booths and on their website. Merchandise includes sweatshirts, T-shirts, hoodies, long-sleeved T-shirts, headbands, bandannas, dog blankets, and dog toys. Some of the merchandise is made by the girls, some of it is designed and purchased specifically for their fundraising efforts. While the girls are fully aware they are dealing with very serious issues regarding pit bull rescue, they bubble over with an engaging mix of energy, giggles and determination with senses of humor always at the ready. What is it called when a dog starts running around for no reason at all? “A case of the zoomies,” Madelyn says, chuckling. To donate or to learn more about the Pitbull Protectors, visit their website at https://pitbullprotectors.com/ , their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pitbullprotectors/, and their Instagram page at https://www.instagram.com/pitbullprotectors/


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 Sharing a laugh during the welcome event for the newly installed Cleveland Clinic critical care transport helicopter and team at Wadsworth Municipal Airport are, from le , Captain VFR Paul Paskert and Kristen, Blaise, Jace, Garan, and Je Highland. Within the first five days of operation, the critical care transport team had responded to more than 20 calls. Photo by FlashBang Photography.

From le , local historian James Banks, Giselle Todd, Jaclyn Dacey, Bicentennial Committee chairman Roger Smalley, and Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell. Photo by Tom Adams Approximately 20 people attended a ceremony on Medina Public Square for the Medina Bicentennial Committee's ceremony commemorating the day and time of the end of World War I, November 11, 1918 at 11 a.m.

From le , Giselle Todd and Jaclyn Dacey ring a 1930s fire truck bell at 11 a.m. to commemorate the end of WWI. Photo by Tom Adams

Brian Feron, Medina County Historical Society president, shared his grandfather's photo and dog tags from WWI. Photo by Tom Adams


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

Matt Wiederhold, director of Main Street Medina, said there was a total of 80 volunteers, including Medina High School students and members of the Breakfast Kiwanis. They were moving as fast as Christmas elves, with decorations seeming to pop up on their own all around the square. Photos by Tom Adams

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1 0 Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

CHAPTER 20 THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

  I must have read Marissa’s poem  on that receipt a hundred times,  sitting in the bathroom stall in the  London police station, crying so  hard that I thought my lungs would  fill with tears. She might have had a  rough life at home, but at least she  had parents.    Filled with frustration, I threw the  receipt in the toilet and flushed it  away. It was the most beautiful poem  I’d ever read, and I hated it with  every ounce of my being.    I hated the poem, I hated my  situation, I hated my loneliness, and,  in that moment, I even hated  Marissa.    I reached back into my pocket and  found my old apartment key. It was  rigid and irregularly shaped, but it  was dull. This didn’t bother me. I  dug it into my forearm so hard and  so deeply that it drew blood.    As soon as I saw the crimson  liquid oozing out, I felt a rush of  relief. All my pain and frustration  was pouring out with that cut and  dripping down my arm into the  toilet. It felt so good, in fact, that I  did it a second time and a third and a  fourth.    It must have taken me quite a  while to accomplish this, because  suddenly an officer was banging on  the stall’s door asking what I was  doing in there.    I panicked, grabbed the toilet paper  at my side and took a long strip of it,  wrapping it around my bleeding arm  in one motion.    “I’m fine! Just a stomachache,  gimme’ a minute!”    “I’ll wait.”    The officer stayed motionless,  standing just outside the stall door.    How was I supposed to explain the  cuts on my arm? This was a disaster.  I started trying to figure out how to  hide it from him but then realized 

something even worse.    The bleeding wasn’t stopping.    The cuts on my arm weren’t  clotting, and my arm was slowly  being soaked in red.    Of course, this just made me panic  more, causing my heart to race even  harder, which made the cuts bleed  worse.    Between my panic and the sudden,  steady loss of blood, I passed out.    The last thing I remember is falling  forward and giving my head a solid  smack against the stall door, then  hearing the officer on the other side  shout something incoherent.    I could see the crumpled Impala,  with my dead dad inside. He was  cold and motionless.    I could see Marissa’s secret room  in the bowling alley, hiding all her  pain and suffering just like she did  every day.    I could see the airport as we  touched down in London, beginning  our search for the remainder of my  family.    I could see the world from the top  of Big Ben, stretching out into  eternity, until the horizon broke the  sky and ground.    I could see all of the things I  hadn’t been looking for: tragedy,  safety, opportunity, beauty.    The only thing I couldn’t see was  what I had been looking for: family.    My eyes flickered open to a bright  light. It seemed somewhat familiar.  A minute later I realized it was the  same kind of light that had lit my  hospital room the night after the car  crash.    I lifted my head and glanced  around.    Sure enough, I found myself in  another hospital room. To my side,  Devin and Marissa sat in separate  chairs, leaning against each other,  sound asleep. There was a tray of  half­eaten food on the bedside table, 


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

and I discovered my head and arm     He stopped talking, but I stayed  both wrapped in gauzy bandages. silent and motionless. “Did those     About a foot away, a heart rate  two know before this?” monitor beeped steadily. I stared at  it, caught up in the physical  representation of my heartbeat, my  “Did those two know before this?” pulse, my life.    Suddenly, a nurse walked in,  smiled at me, and said, “Good to see     “Yeah.” you’re awake!”    “Mhmm,” I hummed in agreement.    I finally broke my bout of silence,  mostly because I knew he thought it     The nurse looked me over, then  turned the monitor toward himself to  was a secret to them and I wanted to  prove him wrong. check my vitals.    “It looks like you’re feeling much     “Good. And you three help each  other, then. Since you all do it.” better now,” he said, jovially.    It wasn’t a question, it was a     “I guess.” statement. An unarguable fact that     “Well, now I’m questioning my  judgment. You look better, but you  hung in the air, waiting for my  response. don’t sound any better,” he said  gently, pulling a rolling chair over     I wanted to ask him how he knew,  I wanted to get mad at him for  and sitting down next to me. I turned to look over at Marissa and  airing our dirty laundry so  nonchalantly, I wanted to do or say  Devin, but they were still asleep. a lot of different things, but I didn’t     “I’m fine.”    “Physically, sure. But that’s not the  do any of them. I just gave him the  response he was looking for. whole story, now is it?”    “Yes.”    Who the heck is this guy? I     “Good. Now, I wish I could just  thought to myself. I leaned in and  read his nametag: Henry A. Mersz. A  let you three go, but the officer  nobody. Some nurse who had made  made us agree that we contact your  his way through medical school just  parents to tell them what you’ve  been up to. And then you’re to  to deal with a moody teenager. I  return to the U.S. tomorrow  didn’t want to be the reason he  morning. I don’t have to tell your  wasn’t out saving lives, because I  was even more of a nobody than he  parents about where the cuts on  your arm came from, but I want you  was.    “It’s fine, you don’t have to worry  to do so. Understand?” about me. Thanks, though.” I rolled  Holding back a chuckle,  over to signal I was done talking to  considering I didn’t even have  him, but then I felt a hand rest on my  parents, I nodded.    “Okay, now we should give your  shoulder. parents a call. What’s the number?”    “It’s Cameron, right?”    “I don’t have any,” I told him,     I didn’t respond.    “You were brought in here by an  matter of factly, as if I’d just pulled  officer with a pretty terrible bump on  off an impressive magic trick.    “Parents? Um…who’s your  your head and an arm full of cuts.  The bump was an incident, but those  guardian then?” He stammered, and  again I had to refrain from laughing  cuts were not, were they? Those  at him. were self­inflicted.” 

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  “My dad was all I had, and he  recently passed in a car crash. I don’t  have anyone.”    I could almost hear his heart  breaking as his voice cracked, “A­ and your m­mum?”    “I­ ,” suddenly, it was my turn to  stammer.    I was lying there, in a hospital in  London, and they were asking who  my mom was. My mom, who  supposedly lived in London. They  should know who she was!    “Cameron, are you alright?”    My heart was racing a million  miles a minute as I pushed myself up  in the bed and smiled at him, my  eyes bright with renewed hope.    “My mom lives here, actually.”    “What? In London?”    “In London!”

CHAPTER 21   I explained to nurse Henry A.  Mersz the situation with my parents,  and why my friends and I had come  to London in the first place.    He listened intently and patiently  as I spilled the beans on everything.  At the end of it all, I told him to  check for a Lilith Collette, or maybe,  just maybe, Kizinsky. He agreed and  left the room.    At some point in my explanation,  Devin and Marissa had woken up  and they took turns hugging me after  Henry left.    “Do you think they’ll find her?”  Marissa asked, hopefully.    “I have no idea. But it seems like  my last shot.”    “Don’t say that,” Devin chimed in,  but even he knew I was right.    He told me that we had tickets  back to America on a flight that  boarded in just six short hours, and  that wasn’t even enough time to take  a tour of London after we got out of  the hospital.     We’d have to get to the airport in  continued, Page 12


1 2 Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 continued from Page 11

five hours, and it would  probably be another hour before  we left. That left four hours on  our own with no leads to find  my mom and sister, which was  looking all but hopeless.    “This better work then,”  Marissa said, sliding her hand  into mine and squeezing tightly.    “It will.” Devin smiled and  took my other hand in his.    I laid back down in my  hospital bed and sighed.    The clouds parted outside,  letting a moonbeam shine into  the room through the window,  lighting up the far wall. Seconds  later, it faded away.    “I love you,” I whispered, with  my eyes shut.    “We love you too, Cam,”  Devin said.    “Very, very much,” Marissa  added.    It was in that moment,  bandaged up in a London  hospital, holding the hands of  the two people in my life that I  could trust wholeheartedly, that I  realized how little I needed my  mom.    It’s funny how some species  like orangutans have moms that  stay with them for six to seven  years, raising and nurturing them  until they’re ready to venture off 

on their own, while others, like  hamsters, sometimes eat their  babies. Still other species, like  scorpions, have babies who gang  up on their mother and eat her.    Some people, too, need their  moms for well into their  lifetimes, while others don’t even  need them from birth, and still  others who are negatively  impacted if their mom is around.    My whole life, I’d told myself I  didn’t need my mom because I  had my dad. Good old, trusty  dad, he who could never fail me.  Now, without my dad, I  discovered I didn’t need her  because I was better off without  her.    I didn’t need her because there  was no love there.    I didn’t need her because I had  Devin and Marissa.    I didn’t need her because I had  made it all these years without  her.    I didn’t need her because I had  survived a car crash, found a  secret room in a ventilation shaft,  discovered hope, made my way  to London, lost all hope, and then  found exactly what I was looking  for.    I didn’t need her, because my  family was already with me.  Holding my hands.

  “Devin, Marissa, I’d like to say  something, but I’m not sure how to  put it,” I said, finally opening my  eyes and looking at them each in  turn.    “Oh yeah?” Devin chuckled,  “Well, we can help you find the  words then.”    Marissa nodded, her hair  bouncing all over the place.    “Let’s start with what it’s about,”  said Devin, never letting go of my  hand.    “It’s about you two, actually,” I  replied, slightly smiling.    “Aww, what about us?” Marissa  asked.    “How much I care about you  guys. And how, I think I’m starting  to realize, that the two of you mean  more to me than I thought.”    Marissa’s smile lit up the room,  and Devin’s smile reflected it. Just  before I told them they were my  family, there was a knock at the  door and Henry marched in like  he’d just won a championship.    “I, Henry Mersz, now present to  you: Lilith Collette!”    My heart dropped and my eyes  widened. I knew the two people  holding my hands had similar  reactions.    Then, Henry stepped aside, and  my heart completely stopped.    “Mom?” Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December2018

Joyful Word Search It is a Pittie!

PIT BULL PUPPY RESCUE DOG BREED BEHAVIOR TRAINING GIRLS LEMONADE

BANNED T-SHIRTS HOODIES SLOGANS ARTWORK PITTIE LOVE EXPERIENCE DEEDS

Answer Key for Last Month's Search Turkey Farm Trot

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1 4 Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

IN DEED

Foundation of Mold Issues

A Helping Hand

by Paul McHam

by Amy Barnes

In the last article, I promised to discuss why mold is so common in basements. The overarching reason is, of course, water. Keep in mind that, of all home building materials, cement likely sucks up water the quickest and releases it the slowest. This stands to reason since a hole is dug in the cold, wet ground and cement is poured to form a foundation. Then it is topped with dead organic material (trees), also known as lumber or “food for mold.” Of course, we apply waterproofing materials and systems, but they last only so long and that assumes they were applied properly in the beginning. I know many technicians who do things the way “Uncle Johnny used to do it,” only 40 to 60 years ago. Even if Johnny were ahead of his time with his Old-World perfection, the technical advancements in materials are amazing. It is time to upgrade and modernize. Doing things the way Uncle Johnny used to may well be the most common reason why mold appears in basements. Most foundations are built out of some form of block, either terracotta tile in old buildings, cement block in middle-aged homes, poured cement in newer homes, or a combination of them all. Each has its own way of separating, cracking and allowing leaks, and each has its own repair method. For example, terracotta tile has cells in the block that are normally horizontal, unlike cement block whose cells are vertical. Perforating the bottom row of block just above the footer will help drain water from cement block but will not do much for the terracotta tile. Yet, I wish I had 10 bucks for every time I have seen drip holes in the bottom row of terracotta tile. Next time, we will get into the myriad other reasons water and mold appear in basements.

Medina’s Public Square will sparkle with lights. Churches will have an abundance of people attending ceremonies. Parties will fill homes and offices. People will rush from sale to sale trying to fulfill wish lists, dream lists, and I-do-not-know-what-to-get-them lists. Somewhere, as you bustle through the holiday season, you will pass by someone who is hurting, who needs just a moment of caring, someone who needs just one reason to continue through a season where everyone else looks happy. Stop. Take a moment. Reach out your hand and offer kindness. Help with a package. A ride to see the Christmas lights at the fairgrounds. A plate of cookies. A bag of groceries with a gi card. An invitation to join you at your holiday meal. You may be amazed at how much more the holidays begin to mean to you. What to you may seem the tiniest of efforts, can be the moment that saves a life or gives hope where there is none. Many years ago, when things were very tough and I did not know how we would get through the evening, much less the week, I took the kids to McDonald’s as a big treat for them and to distract me from overwhelming problems. I was hoping that watching the kids happily play would recharge my battery and help give me the encouragement and strength I needed to continue. While I was dividing the rather sparse order between the kids, one suddenly began wailing. One of the younger ones was upset over what I had gotten her. As her agitation grew and she increased her howling, the youngest child joined in. They knew better and normally did not act like this but, of course, this night when I was clinging to my last nerve and shred of hope was when the two had to melt down. It was more than I could take. I choked back tears. There was no more money, and I was not going to give into such behavior. Hopelessness and frustration overwhelmed me. There were three other women, each with kids of their own, in Playland that night. I was so embarrassed as I vainly tried to calm the kids and quiet them. As the older kids tried to help calm their siblings, I explained in a very quiet whisper that we had to make do with what was on the tray. I pointed out how very lucky we were to be able to have dinner there and enjoy a great place to play. The younger ones calmed down, slowly, over many agonizing minutes. That was when, as if on cue, a McDonald’s employee came into Playland with a tray of food, looking for the family who had ordered it. “Ma’am? Here’s your food.” I assured him there had been a mistake and it was not mine. A er all, could he not see the tray already on our table? “Oh, no, this is yours. Someone paid for it and said to be sure you got it.” He set the tray on the table. Stunned, the kids and I stared continued on Page 16

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-6582600.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

15

ADVENTURES OF DARING DANIELLE

Leaping Lizard Tail by Danielle Litton

Our apologies to fans of Danielle’s column. At press time, we were not too sure where she was but know she has only brief moments of Internet connection. Check out her Instagram account (see below) for the most recent pictures available of her and her traveling companion, Larry the Lizard. We hope she will have a better Internet connection for next month’s column. Danielle Litton has an energetic, adventurous spirit and is always ready to jump into her next escapade. Friends know she will be ready to hit the road with them within minutes of their call. To see more of her travel pictures, please go to https://www.instagram.com/dani_litton Following any or all of the suggestions made in this column is done so at your own risk.

Advertising once is like expecting to win a marathon with one step. It takes consistent, repeated advertising with a variety of ads to win the race.


1 6 Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

Plum Pudding by C.L. Gammon Photo by  unsplash.com/@amianyuhua

In honor of Medina and Medina County’s bicentennials, Joy Magazine has published a recipe each month based on recipes from the same approximate period as when the two were founded. We hope you have enjoyed this special feature, this will be the last recipe in our series as this is also the end of the bicentennial year. Early on, plums (sometimes spelled plumbs) referred to raisins or other fruits. Thus, plum puddings seldom included plums. In honor of that fact, my recipe for plumb pudding does not include plums either. •2 cups flour •2 teaspoons cinnamon •1 cup raisins •1 cup buttermilk •1 ½ cups sugar •1 teaspoon nutmeg •¾ cup butter •2 eggs Mix all ingredients except raisins until smooth. Stir in raisins and pour into greased 9-inch-by-13-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees until firm. Filling ingredients •¾ cup butter •¾ cup buttermilk •1 ½ cups sugar

In Deed, continued from Page 14 at the overflowing tray. I asked who had done this amazing thing. He said they wanted to remain anonymous. The kids sat, ready to pounce the food that was the exact order they had wanted, smiles spreading across each of their faces. Still stunned, I realized there was a folded $20 bill in the middle of the tray. I pointed out that money had accidentally been le on the tray. He said no, the person wanted me to have that, too. He smiled and walked away, saying, “Enjoy!” Through my tears of gratitude, I could hear, “Mom, mom! Who gave this to us? Can we eat? Why are you crying?” Oh, yes, you can eat. There was even a meal for me. As the kids happily enjoyed their food and toys, I dried my grateful tears while trying to explain what happy tears are. I sneaked looks around the room at the three women, trying to figure out who it was so I could say thank you and see what a real angel looked like. Not one of the women looked at me. Not one gave even the slightest hint she was the one. Each one acted as if nothing had happened. So, I did the only thing I could. I told the children how lucky we were to have an angel, making sure to talk just loud enough that the other women could hear, just in case. To this day, I have never known who threw that lifeline of caring, who understood so well my heartbreak and embarrassment. The only clue I ever had was that when one of the women le , as she got in her vehicle, she turned and looked at me through the Playland window and smiled. Then she was gone. It could have been her, or it could be she just smiled that she had seen someone made so happy. If the person who reached out that night is reading this, I hope she knows she made a huge difference that evening. Through that one act, she gave me the love and strength that night to keep going, and she renewed my faith that ordinary humans make wonderful angels. I hope you will look for opportunities to be an angel for someone this holiday season and year round, I know I will. Happy holidays, and to all a good night. If you have a good deed you would like recognized, please send information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com. Please include names, specifics, and contact information to enable verification of the good deed.

Mix over moderate heat, then add 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Pour over warm cake.

Recipes are reproduced with permission from “A Revolutionary War Cookbook (and More)” by C.L. Gammon, an award-winning and internationally known bestselling author. To see Gammon’s books, go to https://amzn.to/2ITqTBx

If a service dog approaches  you alone, call 911 and  follow the dog. Service dogs  are trained to go for help  when their people are down  and need assistance.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

GEMS Lead and They Will Follow by Kent Von Der Vellen Poverty, its causes, and ideas on how to break it are common discussions. What is not common is when someone finds a way to give impoverished children guidance to achieve a better life. Nineteen years ago, Michelle Powell and her two children were trapped in a cycle of poverty and were in the process of being evicted from Union Square Apartments in Medina. They had only four hotdogs in the refrigerator to eat. Refusing to be defeated, Powell grabbed the hot dogs and a kickball and told her children to invite their friends to come play in the park with them. Every day, the Powell family would go to the park, and every day more children joined them. Little did any of them know that this would be the beginning of the Let’s Make a Difference summer program. The first year, there were more than 60 participants. Over the years, more than 200 children have gone through the program. Geared toward children ages 5 to 12, the group meets three hours a day, three days a week, and lasts for seven weeks. Each day the children do activities that are designed to be fun and educational either at Ray Mellert Park in Medina or in the Union Square Apartments community room. This year they created a new program where children over age 12 can help as junior leaders. The success of Let’s Make a Difference led to an anonymous donation in 2007, which funded the creation of an a er-school mentoring and tutoring program called ACE at Claggett Middle School. One of the ACE success stories comes from when a student was not turning in homework and was habitually late or absent from school. A deal was made with the student to improve attendance and turn in homework in exchange for a McDonald’s coupon. Powell was soon able to award the coupon and congratulate the student for dramatically improving. The student has continued to regularly attend school and turn in homework on time. To learn more, visit https://www.lmadmedina.org or https://www.facebook.com/LMADMedina/ Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by emailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com Want to know what area charities  need, other than volunteers and  money? Click on Giving Hearts at  JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com

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1 8 Joy of Medina County Magazine | Deceember 2018 THE NETWORKER

Holiday Networking Success by Bob Arnold

BITE ME!

Photo by Pineapple Supply Co.

Ambrosia Celebration by Amy Barnes One of my favorite things about this ambrosia recipe is that it has a lot less whipped topping and more fruit than other ambrosia recipes. Plus, the protein and tang from the cottage cheese help to balance the amount of sweet from the fruit. In the middle of a busy holiday day, I have found this gives me just the boost I need, in addition to it being a colorful side dish with the main meal and great for making ahead. •2 20-ounce cans crushed pineapple •2 11-ounce cans mandarin oranges •2 small boxes pistachio pudding •1 cup shredded coconut •1 cup mini marshmallows •24 ounces small curd cottage cheese •8 ounces non-dairy whipped topping, thawed Dump pineapple into large bowl. Sprinkle pudding on top and mix. Let sit for 3 minutes. Add other ingredients, except for whipped topping, and fold until well combined. Fold in whipped topping. Refrigerate until needed.

It is the time of the year with holiday cheer abounding, and everyone seems both in a hurry and ready to help. You will be meeting new people everywhere: in the toy aisle, in the baked goods line, or in the mob fighting for a store’s popular sale item. The question is: Are you ready to? Or do you even want to? This time of year, with its cheer, can bring special rewards for the astute networker. Even though it is easier to say, “hi,” to someone you do not know, the rules of effective networking still come into play. What are they? 1. Treat each person you meet as a person. Do not diminish them; engage with them about their holiday. Smile as you say, “hi,” and exude kindness. Maybe make a comment on an item they are purchasing, such as, “For a special youngster, I presume?” This leaves the conversation open for them to respond. 2. However, avoid the phenomenon I call: Networking in the Mirror! It is one of the most dangerous mistakes networkers can make. It sends the message that we care more about ourselves then we do about them. We turn our attention back on ourselves and think about what we are going to say next. 3. With the “mirror,” comes the practice of not listening to the person you just met. When you do not listen to them, you can not get to know them or respond to what they just revealed about themselves. It is important to listen during a conversation, if you care to get to know them at all. The main point is to share the joy! Open up and get to know those you cross paths with during this joyous season. I hope you can share a little bit of your life with some new friends this holiday season!

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018

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December 2018 Non­Profit Calendar Saturday, December 1

opportunity. https://bit.ly/2Dwh8d5

Eat a Red Apple Day https://bit.ly/2zW13r0

1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast

9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Medina County Park District: Hiking for the Health of It; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Four to five mile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the weather. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hospice of the Western Reserve Warehouse Sale; Hospice of the Western Reserve headquarters, 17876 St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. Second of two days. Gently used home furnishings, artwork, lamps, dishes, jewelry, more. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Trim a Tree With Nature Make and Take; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Make handmade ornaments with natural items. All supplies provided. Free, but nonperishable food item or paper product donation for St. Paul Lutheran Church food pantry requested. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Winter Wonderland; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Santa, reindeer, horse-drawn wagon rides, face painting, cra s, stories, bonfire, treats.

Sunday, December 2 Fritters Day https://bit.ly/2iOI2Ug

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Robotics 101: Lego Mindstorms; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Coding and construction. Grades 4 to 8. Two-part series, second session December 17. Register at https://bit.ly/2DwtwK1 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Getting on Track; United Way of Medina County, 728 E. Smith Road, Medina. Addresses common money-related challenges and teaches how to work toward financial stability. Free. Call 330-7253926 to register.

Tuesday, December 4 Santa’s List Day https://bit.ly/1TnQeCe 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. A Charlie Brown Christmas; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Join Charlie Brown and learn the true meaning of Christmas. Make a blanket, decorate a dog house, have a treat. Register at https://bit.ly/2RI9qPU

1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Trim a Tree With Nature Make and Take; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Make handmade ornaments with natural items. All supplies provided. Free, but nonperishable food item or paper product donation for St. Paul Lutheran Church food pantry requested.

Wednesday, December 5

Monday, December 3

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Nature Through the Seasons; Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Easy

Make a Gi Day https://bit.ly/2zVzfmW 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Santa Stories; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Discover Santa’s favorite book, see his reindeer photos, share your wish list with him. Photo

Day of the Ninja https://bit.ly/ 2hqPOjK and Bathtub Party Day https://bit.ly/ 18o61sa

walks, part of award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Ornament Your Holidays; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create ornament. Grades 6 through 12. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Alcohol Ink Ornament; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Use alcohol ink to make plain plastic ornaments into jewel-toned works of art. Register at https://bit.ly/2JWl3jq

Thursday, December 6 Put on Your Own Shoes Day https://bit.ly/1PW4zXW (Always the best choice!) and Microwave Oven Day https://bit.ly/2QtrKMu and Mitten Tree Day https://bit.ly/2RO8Lwy 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family


2 0 Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Velveteen Rabbit Performance; Seville Library, 45 Center Center Street, Seville. Seville Theatre Players perform classic story. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Holidays Around the World; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Buckeye High School Choir performs. Visits with Santa. Register at https://bit.ly/2zJcIex 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Community Readers Theater; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. https://bit.ly/2JUYoUF

Friday, December 7 Letter Writing Day https://bit.ly/ 2sO8CN6 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Master Gardener Coffee Chat: Bringing in the Greens; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. Make-and-take workshop, create a swag or table décor. $15 For more information and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw

Saturday, December 8 Pretend to be a Time Traveler Day https://bit.ly/2lz2cmh Noon. Christmas in the Valley Movie; Liverpool Township Community Center, 6801 School Street, Valley City. Register for Reindeer Dash Fun Run and Walk. Bring blankets, pillows, holiday spirit. Chair, refreshments available. Movie begins 1 p.m.

Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free. 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Medina County Historical Society Christmas Tea; St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 317 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Lunch and performance by soprano Kimberly States and five of her students. Door prizes. Santa Shop starts at 11:30 a.m. Tickets $25 adults, $20 children. Contact Mary Jane Brewer for tickets, 330-722-1386. Prepaid reservations required. 12:30 p.m. ORMACO No-Frills Bus Trip: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical; bus leaves from Montville Police Station, 6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina. Tickets $40, plus credit card fees. Tickets at www.ormaco.org or call 330-7222541. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Cra It Forward: NoSew Pillows; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Register at https://bit.ly/2DdUV2k 6 p.m. Christmas in the Valley Singa-Long; Zion Lutheran Church, 2233 Abbeyville Road, Valley City. Concert, refreshments.

Sunday, December 9 National Pastry Day https://bit.ly/2gQWvuD 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Christmas in the Valley. Registration for Reindeer Dash Fun Run and Walk at Mill Stream Park, 1200 Maple Street, Valley City. Creativity and costumes, prizes. Run starts at 11 a.m. Chili cook off, cookie decorating, train display, food, Santa, Buckeye marching band. https://bit.ly/2A8w79Y Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free.

Monday, December 10

Dewey Decimal System Day https://bit.ly/2T54N3M and Jane Addams Day https://bit.ly/2z1qMPG 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Santa Stories; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Discover Santa’s favorite book, see reindeer photos, share your wish list. Photo opportunity. Register at https://bit.ly/2AZytsf 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Recycled Book Art; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Give discarded book second life. Register at https://bit.ly/2DyoooD 6:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Crochet a Hat; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginner or intermediate, basic crochet skills a must. Supply list and registration at https://bit.ly/2JTCiC1

Tuesday, December 11 Noodle Ring Day https://bit.ly/2fFjg6E 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Root Candles, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. An Evening With Santa; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Santa and Mrs. Claus come to town for cra s, snacks, listen to your list. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2OD6273 6:30 p.m. Crazy for Kuchen; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Get 100-year-old recipe, learn secrets, enjoy samples. https://bit.ly/2zc6eFF

Submitting Calendar Events Events listed in the calendar must be a festival or fair or hosted by or bene a nonprofit organization in Medina County. Send submissions to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com and put CALENDAR in the subject line. Event information is not accepted by phone. The calendar is also available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional event information.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Make a Candy Cane Wreath; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make wreath, enjoy hot cocoa and cookies. Register at https://bit.ly/2Plh5qT

Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Let’s Make a Gingerbread House; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring candy, snacks to share to decorate houses. Ages 5 and up. https://bit.ly/2OBSBUI

3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. DIY Hot Chocolate Gi Bags; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2qEFCrW

Wednesday, December 12 Gingerbread House Day https://bit.ly/2z03Z9o and National Ding-a-Ling Day https://bit.ly/1ArVI4I 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Danbury Senior Living Brunswick, 3430 Brunswick Lake Parkway, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Sno-Day! Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make sno-cones and build delicious snowmen. Grades 6-12. Free.

Thursday, December 13 Violin Day https://bit.ly/2z0bD3w and National Ice Cream Day https://bit.ly/2Desd1a (Just do not celebrate both at the same time or you will ruin your violin!) All day. Guac to End Alzheimer’s; all Chipotle locations in Ohio, Michigan and Virginia. Mention the Alzheimer’s Association at checkout and 33 percent of your purchase will support the Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Online sales and catering orders not included. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PhqIqg 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired;

4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Hot Cocoa Bar and Ornament Decorating; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. While supplies last. Grades 6 to 12. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Deck the Halls Flower Arranging; Seville Flower and Gi , 4 E. Main Street, Seville. Make holiday arrangement. Bring sharp scissors, $25 supply fee. Register for 6 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2z4spNX or for 7 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2T3Td95

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3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. 10th Annual MiniCon; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fun, fandom, all things Anime. Features K-pop performance by Pandora Dances and O’Nite Vibes, cosplay contest, artist’s alley. Live action Pokemon Go, button making, Pokeball Terrariums, more. Permission slip required. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2DcUUvE

Saturday, December 15

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Holiday Hoopla; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Balloon art, live music, games, visitor from North Pole. All ages.

National Lemon Cupcake Day https://bit.ly/2zm0L0p

Friday, December 14

National Day of Remembrance and Wreath Laying; Western Reserve National Cemetery, 10175 Rawiga Road, Rittman. Volunteers and donations needed to place 30,000 wreaths. Each wreath costs $15. For more information, go to http://www.wrcwreaths.org/

International Monkey Day https://bit.ly/2zlNll9 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gingerbread House Contest; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Visit library for rules. Build a gingerbread house and enter. Register at https://bit.ly/2QvmGHv 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Monkey Storytime; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Stories, songs, rhymes, cra s to celebrate Monkey Day. Register at https://bit.ly/2DwypTn 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Holy Martyrs Church,

Approximately 9:45 a.m. Shop With Cops Parade through Medina Public Square.

11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious Saturday; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Celebrate release of the new movie. Grades 1 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2AXVCex Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal


2 2 Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free. 7 p.m. Brass Band of the Western Reserve: A Celebration of Christmas; Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets at the door. Adults, $12; senior citizens, $10; students, $6.

Sunday, December 16 National Chocolate-Covered Anything Day https://bit.ly/1A4qZg8 Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. K-9 Kapers; Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley road, Seville. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot nonretractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Winter Birds; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Easy walks, part of award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

Monday, December 17 National Maple Syrup Day https://bit.ly/Jv3INS and Wright Brothers Day https://bit.ly/2gY6eTH 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 7 and up. Free. No registration. 4:30 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Snack Attack; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Quick, easy recipes. Grades 3 and up. Register at https:// bit.ly/2Fhlqqq 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Card Making; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. Supply fee, $10, to presenter. Bring adhesive. Register at https://bit.ly/2AXa6LQ 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Quilting for Warm Up Medina County; Sew Much Happens, 445 W. Liberty Street, Suite 223, Medina. Bring 100-percent cotton fabric. Bring machine, if possible. Learn how to sew for free while making quilts for those in need. For more information, call 330-648-

3335.

Tuesday, December 18 Bake Cookies Day https://bit.ly/ 18Olv9b 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast

Wednesday, December 19 Underdog Day https://bit.ly/2xGTLXw 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Life Care Center of Medina, 2400 Columbia Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Holiday Make and Take for Teens; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make buckeyes and decorate cut-out cookies. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2QAZXtM

Thursday, December 20 Go Caroling Day https://bit.ly/22kYOYi 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Medina Library: Legal Resource Center; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Volunteers offer guidance through legal system. First come, first served. Call 330-722-4257 for further information. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sensory-Friendly Santa; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with special needs, autism, and/or sensory integration challenges. Register at library, 330-273-4150.

Friday, December 21 Look on the Bright Side Day https://bit.ly/2hrN5X9 and National Flashlight Day

https://bit.ly/2gQKeq8 (Great combination!) 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cozy Winter Movie Day; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades 4 to 12. Wear comfy clothes, drink hot cocoa, have snack while binge watching classic winter movies. Register at https://bit.ly/2z4wj9z 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road Parkway, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast

Saturday, December 22 Date Nut Bread Day https://bit.ly/2ngoSZ8 Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free. 7 p.m. Rick and Jim’s Big Inconvenient Christmas Show; Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Benefits Medina Personal Care Pantry. Admission $10 at the door, $5 with personal care item donation.

Sunday, December 23 Roots Day https://bit.ly/2htqTKj Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free.

Monday, December 24 National Chocolate Day https://bit.ly/2z1zsWc Medina County Libraries closed. 7 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast

Tuesday, December 25 National Pumpkin Pie Day https://bit.ly/2hqUwxX and A’phabet Day (No “L” Day) https://bit.ly/2z7nD34 and Grav Mass Day https://bit.ly/2htaebX Medina County Libraries closed.

Wednesday, December 26 Thank you Note Day https://bit.ly/2AZyWuJ 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf


Joy of Medina County Magazine | December 2018 Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component.

Friday, December 28

Noon to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component.

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; E & H Ace Hardware, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast

Thursday, December 27 No Interruptions Day https://bit.ly/2DuPyJ5 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Pawjama Party; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring plush dog or cuddle with therapy dog while watching movie about dogs. Paw-peroni pizza provided. All ages. https://bit.ly/ 2DfZ8mk

Card Playing Day https://bit.ly/ 2iPdQIu

11:30 a.m. to noon. Noon Year’s Eve Party; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Ages 3 and up. For little ones who can’t stay away until midnight. Music, dancing, countdown to noon with balloon drop. Register at https://bit.ly/2PqqkG3

Saturday, December 29 Pepper Pot Day https://bit.ly/2zTUbdW 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component. 11:30 a.m. to noon. Noon Year’s Eve Party; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Ages 3 and up. For little ones who can’t stay away until midnight. Music, dancing, countdown to noon with balloon drop. Register at https://bit.ly/2qNhnYV

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Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free.

Sunday, December 30 International Bacon Day https://bit.ly/2gZVd4q and Bicarbonate of Soda Day https://bit.ly/2ROlors (Well, if you eat too much bacon, then you can celebrate the other holiday with bicarbonate of soda.) 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the Ice Age; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ice Age animal re-creations, cra s, activities, with outdoor component. Noon to 5 p.m. Wild About Winter; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Follow tracks through center to learn about animal winter preparation strategies. All ages. Drop-in program, free.

Monday, December 31 Make Up Your Mind Day https://bit.ly/2ATJNDH and Unlucky Day https://bit.ly/2gYauT5 Medina County Libraries closed.

BU ZZED D RI VI N G I S D RU N K D RI VI N G. •Plan a safe way to get home before attending a party. Alcohol impairs judgment, as well as

reaction time. If you are drunk, you are more likely to choose to drive drunk. •Designate a sober driver, use a car service, or call a sober friend or family member to get home. •Walking while impaired can be just as dangerous as drunk driving. Designate a sober friend to walk you home. •If you see a drunk driver on the road, contact local law enforcement when it is safe to do so. •If you believe someone is going to drive while impaired, take away his or her car keys and provide safe transportation. -from the Medina County Health Department


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Joy of Medina County Magazine December 2018  

Pitbull Protectors; square decorating; WWI ceremony; next chapters of “Little Truths;” a fun word search; looking for basement trouble; plum...

Joy of Medina County Magazine December 2018  

Pitbull Protectors; square decorating; WWI ceremony; next chapters of “Little Truths;” a fun word search; looking for basement trouble; plum...