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AUGUST 2019 VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7

$11.99

BECOME A LETTER DETECTIVE Find and unscramble the clues, solve the puzzle!

Pg. 11 YOUNG EAGLES WERE FLYING A photo album of children taking flight.

Pg. 20 MYSTERIOUS COMMUNICATIONS Plants are talking, and people are listening.

Pg. 25 FINDING FRIENDS Sharing ice cream and smiles.

Pg. 28 More photos, stories and columns inside!

SUMMER'S WATER DIAMONDS One of the showiest and noisiest treasures of Medina County promotes skill, fun and community. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 7

JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

She Who Shall Not Be Named by Amy Barnes My 19-year-old daughter’s boyfriend is in a quandary. He has been for more than a year now and there is no end in sight. I have to admit, I am enjoying it. He does not know what to call me. I told him that I have been called many things over the years, but some of them will get him banished from seeing my daughter. Of course, that has not helped him. My daughter admits with a chuckle and slightly evil grin that she never suggested to him what to call me. However, she did tell him that I was offended when a boy she had briefly dated called me by my first name. Yes, I am old-fashioned. A er the current boyfriend and my daughter had been together for a couple of months, he admitted he was having difficulty knowing what to call me. “Mrs. Barnes” seemed too formal to him; “Amy” was too familiar; mom seemed awkward; “hey, you,” was not acceptable to either of us. I assured him that either Mrs. Barnes or Amy, whichever he preferred, was fine with

me. When they had been together six months, he still was struggling to decide what to call me. I could not help but laugh. So, I started calling myself “She Who Shall Not Be Named,” a Harry Potter reference that many will recognize. He did not find it as funny as I did. He snidely said, “You better watch out, or I will start calling you that.” Heaven forbid he should call me anything! This is where society’s flux of change has caught the young. Hold open a door for a woman? Refer to adults with the Mr. and Mrs. prefixes? And nowadays, that could be a mistake because you just do not know which will be preferred. Here is a tip: Refer to your girlfriend’s parents with the appropriate Mrs. or Mr. paired with the last name. If the person is comfortable being called by the more familiar first name, he or she will tell you. For now, She Who Shall Not Be Named is laughing.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes PHOTOGRAPHERS Ed Bacho Photography FlashBang Photography ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Paul McHam Steve Rak Michelle Riley Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes INTERN Samantha Mickowski MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com

JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an eedition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com  Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

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THE NETWORKER

PICKING MEAT AND THOSE WE MEET by Bob Arnold

Whether it is choosing dinner or people we bond with, quality is important.

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PHOTO ALBUM

OPENING HORIZONS by Amy Barnes photos by FlashBang Photography On a sunny day in Wadsworth, kids and pilots

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WITH A LEAP AND A SPLASH

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by Amy Barnes

were boarding planes for a ride into the sky.

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

ONLY A LINE AWAY by Paul McHam

Medina County, and performances are free and so is the

Water lines bring clean water, but it is only a matter of hours a er a leak that the water can become an invitation to mold.

rapid-fire time-traveling history lesson.

BITE ME!

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES CLUE BOX

by Ed Bacho

Gather the clues scatted throughout our pages and solve the puzzle! Get it right and you might be a part of next month’s Joyful Word Search!

Photographer Ed Bacho shares his drink recipe that has some of the best elements of summer.

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THE READING NOOK

by Jerry King

Ohio’s only competitive water ski show team is based in

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes Will Cam be able to find his lost sister?

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photos by Sam Mickowski A few goats, a little stretching, a rally, and a renovation, it

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HEALTHY TRAILS

by Amy Barnes

County were keeping busy.

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

Keep dry and cool while finding ex-ski-llent words about

THE IN BOX

FROM BURNOUT TO BURNING DESIRE by Steve Rak

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The Chippewa Lake Water Ski Team performs in elaborate costumes to travel through history. Making up the Egyptian pyramid are, from le , bottom row: Bryan Midlik, Bill Lee, Doug Peshina, Rich Esber, Dan Gaudet, Doug Poe. Middle row: Melissa Ford, Monica Beran, Michele Ford, Teri Fetherolf-Bailey. Top row: Grace Goldsberry, Natalie Bailey.

Did you know that trees and other plants are communicating with each other?

EXERCISE LEVELS DEPEND ON GOAL by Kelly Bailey

GEMS

TEACHING TEENS ADVANCED DRIVING by Kent Von Der Vellen

PHOTO ALBUM

BONDING WITH ICE CREAM photos by Samantha Mickowski The Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities and their clients invited the community to join them on Medina Public Square for treats and games.

Do you know how to solve feeling burned out? Our columnist shares how he found his way back to his passion.

On the Cover: photo by Sam Mickowski

by Michelle Riley

A er losing their teens in car accidents, local families and community members took action and created free Take Control driving classes.

TIME TRAVELING SKIS the Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team.

BETWEEN THE TREES

Taking advantage of summer’s health benefits in delicious and fun ways.

A POOL OF GRATITUDE storm drain to save a kitten, the giving hearts of Medina

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DIG IT!

IN DEED

From answering a 12-year-old dream to plunging into a

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MIRTH AND JOY

OH, SNAP! has been busy in Medina County!

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SHANDY BEACHES

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LET'S DO IT!

Summer is in full swing, and it is time to soak up the sun and have some fun before the first day of school reminds us that fall is not far away.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

WITH A LEAP AND A SPLASH

by Amy Barnes photos by FlashBang Photography and Samantha Mickowski

W

From left,  bottom  row:  Doug  Poe,  Rich  Esber,  Nick  Bailey,  Doug  Peshina,  Bill  Lee,  Doug  Ribley,  Dan  Gaudet,  Mark Ford, Brian Kelly, Ryan Peshina. Middle row: Andrea  Sudia,  Melissa  Ford,  Corrine  Midlik,  Monica  Beran,  Sara  Horning,  Katie  Fritts.  Top  row:  Brook  Lee,  Grace  Goldsberry, Christina Beran, Samantha Beran  Photo by FlashBang Photography

flag streams in the air above a boat as it skims across the water and the entire crowd joins in singing the ater glistens and sparkles as the sun starts National Anthem under a bright blue sky. its evening descent to meet the western horizon. For the next hour, the audience is treated to a In the background, race cars can be heard growling narrated professional performance of jumps, closer and then farther away as they speed around splashes, stunts, and a wide variety of skiing styles, the Barberton Speedway. including barefoot and board skiing. Narrators Boats and their crews wait patiently on the water weave a story linking all of the stunts into a story while skiers chatter in the curtained-off backstage while directing the audience’s attention to different area. Costumes and smiles are scattered throughout parts of the lake so they do not miss any of the the area as the Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team action. gets ready for its first performance of the season as This year’s show theme is “Bill and Ted’s Ex-skithe audience arrives with lawn chairs and blankets. llent Adventure.” It includes a time machine, a Performers are happily greeted as they walk caveman and dinosaur, pyramids, and much more as through the audience area, greeting family and the team travels across the water and through time. friends and sharing a smile with newcomers. Rain does not stop a performance, but lightning Children look up in awe, their attention caught by does, said Paula Midlik, team representative. Severe the colorful costumes of skiers who are willing to storms caused the cancellation of the team’s first take the time to kneel down and answer their show of the season at the beginning of June. A week questions. later, the team was back on schedule and, a er When it is time for the show to start, an American dealing with some last-minute boat motor issues,


5 traffic and other uncontrollable factors. Practices for both teams during the winter months are held at the Cleveland Clinic Akron General Health and Wellness Center, Bath at 4125 Medina Road, Akron. The team holds a Learn to Water Ski and Open House each year where free skiing instruction, picnic lunches and information about joining the team are provided. The 100-member team accepts want-to-be skiers of all ages and levels of experience. Each year, the team participates in three competitions, which cost between $350 to $500 per tournament to compete. Donations are collected at each show to cover expenses such as equipment, insurance, promotion, and fuel. The team also hosts an annual steak dinner fundraiser. This year the fundraiser is 5 p.m., July 24, at Emerald Lake.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

the show went on. Originally founded in 1969, the Chippewa Lake Water Ski Team, Ohio’s only Division I show ski team, disbanded in the early seventies, but then re-formed in 1997. Photo by Sam Mickowski By 2004, the team had won the Division II National Championship and more awards followed. The team is broken down into two teams, a competitive team and a development team, much like there are the majors and minors in baseball. During the summer months, developmental team members hone their skills at Chippewa Lake, while the competitive team practices and performs at privately owned Emerald Lake, 3196 Clark Mill Road, Norton. Emerald Lake also is where the competitive team gives free public performances at 7 p.m., every Wednesday, June through August. Midlik said that the competitive team performs some of the most difficult and advanced skiing in the world. To ensure safety, a controlled environment is necessary. Being able to practice on a private lake means the team does not have to watch out for boat

For more information about the team, how to hire them for a performance, to make a donation, or get tickets for the steak dinner, go to https://chippewaskiteam.com/about-us/ The team is a 501c3 organization.

Bryan Midlik found something other than skis to travel on. Photo by FlashBang Photography

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

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The staging and changing area for performers.  Photo by Sam Mickowski Karen And Joey Ricci  Photo by Sam Mickowski Janice Sudia  Photo by Sam Mickowski

Ryan Peshina    Photo by Sam Mickowski

Bobbi and Aaron Bandy   Photo by Sam Mickowski

Cory And Vick Tavenier   Photo by Sam Mickowski


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Ryan Peshina finishes the flip he started on the Table of Contents page.  Photo by FlashBang Photography The time traveling phone booth helped  the story move through time.   Photo by Sam Mickowski

From left, Matt Horning, Bryan Midlik, Doug Peshina   Photo by Sam Mickowski

Dan Gaudet and Christina Beran    Photo by Sam Mickowski

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019 continued from Page 7

Melissa Ford (right), Corinne Midlik   Photo by Sam Mickowski

Bill Cee (right) and Doug Ribley  Photo by Sam Mickowski

Grace Goldsberry  Photo by Sam Mickowski

Caveman Carter Cunningham runs from a T­Rex  dinosaur.  Photo by Sam Mickowski

Nick Bailey     Photo by Sam Mickowski


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From left, Doug Peshina, Bryan Midlik and Dan Gaudet  Photo by FlashBang Photography

Natalie Bailey (left) and Sara Horning   Photo by Sam Mickowski

Soaring through the air are, from left, Bryan Mildik,  Doug Peshina. Photo by Sam Mickowski

From left, Corinne Midlik, Paula Mildik, Melissa Ford, Katie Fritts, Jenny Peshina, Andrea Sudia, Morgan Lee, Paige Peshina, Sara  Horning, Brooke Lee, Nikki Lee, Michele Ford, Teri Fetherolf­Bailey, Natalie Bailey, Christina Beran, Monica Beran.  Photo by Sam Mickowski

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

continued from Page 9

Nick Bailey, left, and Kevin Cunningham, far right, enjoyed a visit from Elvis, portrayed by Brian Kelly.  Photo by FlashBang Photography

From left, Bill Lee, Dan Gaudet holding Christina Beran,  and spotter Doug Ribley practice a doubles lift.  Photo by Sam Mickowski

From left, bottom tier: Mark Ford, Rich Esber, Nick Bailey, Doug  Peshina, Bill Lee, Doug Ribley, Dan Gaudet and Doug Poe.  Second tier: Michele Ford, Jenny Peshina, Morgan Lee, Paige  Peshina, Nikki Lee. Third tier: Brooke Lee, Natalie Bailey Top tier,  climbing: Samantha Beran. Photo by Sam Mickowski


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

From left, Doug Peshina and Bryan Mildik.  Photo by Sam Mickowski

From left, Crusaders Samantha Beran and Shane Pipoly, Natalie Bailey and Doug Ribley, and Grace Goldsberry and Brian Kelly.  Photo by Sam Mickowski

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

CHAPTER 31   My mother explained that after having  me, she and my father were very much  in love and very happy with a child, so  they decided to have a second.    A couple years after my birth, Olivia  Kizinsky was born.    Unfortunately, two kids were much  more work than one and without the  money for a babysitter, my mother had  to quit her job to take care of us.    After a while, they began to run out of  money. My father’s job alone wasn’t  enough to feed a family of four. He took  on a second, part­time job, and worked  himself to the bone just to feed us, and it  still wasn’t enough.    Finally, my parents sat down and  discussed their options, coming to the  conclusion that giving up one of us for  adoption might be their only choice.  They got the papers, decided which child  based solely on age, signed everything,  and were ready to give poor Olivia up  for adoption.    Then, my father got the news that he  was being promoted. It came with a  significant raise, but still not enough to  quit his second job and be able to  provide for two kids. The bottom line  was that he just couldn’t provide for his  family.    My mother wanted to wait for the  promotion and see if they could  somehow scrape together enough money  to survive, but everything was ready for  the adoption, and my father just wanted  to get it over with.    Losing a child in any way is hard,  especially when you’re the one giving it  away, and my father just wanted to tear  off the bandage in one swift motion.    So, one day, my father got home from  work, changed uniforms for his part­ time job, then took Olivia as he left.  He  dropped her off at the adoption agency  on his way to his second job.    This was the turning point in their  relationship, and from that moment on,  it was all downhill. No amount of  apologizing on his part and no amount  of arguing on hers could bring back their  child, and, from then on, they hated each  other.    At the end of her explanation, Lilith 

said she had no idea where my sister was  now and finding her again would be  pretty difficult. But I knew I could do it.  I’d found one sister already, no one  would doubt that I could find a second.    I put my foot down, telling Lea and  Lilith that until we found Olivia, I didn’t  want to be part of a partial family. I told  them that if they helped me find her, I’d  appreciate it, and I’d consider being a  full family with them again.    They agreed, and the three of us left  the old apartment complex to join up  with Devin and Marissa. We then drove  to the adoption center in separate cars to  see if we could figure out where in the  world my sister was.    “I never would’ve guessed that you’d  still be here,” I say, as I finish my long  narrative.    Olivia wipes away her tears for the  millionth time since I had started telling  her how the five of us had ended up here  together and looks at me like I’m some  sort of hero.    “I never forgot you,” she says just  before embracing me. “My older brother  from when I was a baby. You visited me  in my dreams more often than I can  count, always there to help me.”    “Well, you aren’t dreaming this time.  I’m really here now, and I am here to  help you,” I tell her, tears streaming  down my own face, just like when I  found Lea.    Behind us, Lea, Lilith, Marissa, and  Devin are all standing, waiting for us to  finish. I had made sure ahead of time  that I would be the first one to talk to  Olivia, but now I have to take her back  to the rest of them and figure out what  happens next.    I’m still unsure if I want to be a family  with Lea and Lilith again or not, but I’m  going to have to figure that out soon.  Very soon. Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

IN DEED

N

A Pool of Gratitude by Amy Barnes As Meghan Brooks and Mindy Schmock

Schmock and her husband a gi

proved recently, it is not always negative on

certificate to The Bookshelf, the

Facebook.

used bookstore on Medina’s Public

Brooks had posted on Facebook that she was looking for recommendations for an

Square that supports Project Learn, and one to Malley’s Chocolates.

above-ground pool. She had been begging

Our next In Deed recipient's

her husband for 12 years for a pool and had

actions caused quite a reaction

decided that, this year, she was going to be

from cars passing by and on

armed with lots of facts and figures to help

Facebook posts on July 2.

boost her argument. A er seeing Brooks’ post, Schmock private

What people were seeing was a head, a human head, popping up

messaged her and said that since her own

and down in the storm sewer drain

kids were now older, she was offering her

near Dunkin Donuts on North Court

pool to the Brooks family for free.

Street in Medina with police and

Brooks was delighted. She had won the argument before she had even started it! The only catch was that the pool would

firemen gathered around. It turned out a very small kitten had gotten

his way to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals with the help of Officers

caught up in the storm waters that day and

Andrew Dziak and Evan Scherer and

have to be disassembled to move it. So,

washed into the storm drain. Heather Abbey

Firefighters Joe Kovanik and Matt

Brooks’ husband and brother headed to

was driving by and heard a kitten screaming

Neil.

Seville, prepared to spend a great deal of time for help. disassembling the pool.

Abbey pulled over and soon discovered the

Abbey visited the kitten, named him Dunkin and has plans to adopt him as soon as he is

Much to their surprise, when they arrived,

sounds were coming from the storm sewer.

the pool was almost completely taken down.

So, she pulled up the sewer grate with help

Schmock and her husband had even thought

from a male passerby, and while Abbey

little Dunkin, Mark Pittenger, the owner of

to take photos so it would be easier to re-

crawled down into the sewer (by the way, this

Heartland Pet Center, donated a $50

assemble the pool.

is not recommended, always call 911 for help)

Heartland gi card to Abbey to help with her

to search for the kitten, the man li ed the

new friend’s needs.

To top it all off, because a part of the pool

had broken the year before, Schmock ordered sewer grate on the other side of the road to a new part and gave it to Brooks, too. For helping Brooks’ 12-year-long dream come true and for so kindly helping her brother and husband have a much easier job, Joy of Medina County Magazine awarded

healthy enough to be released to her. For her going above and beyond to save

Heartland Pet Center is located at 3711

see if the kitten was closer to that side of the

Pearl Road, Medina, and is open Monday

road.

through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and

It was about then that policemen and firefighters arrived. An hour later, the kitten was rescued and on

Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thank you to all of you for helping to make Medina County a great place to live!


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

Joyful Word Search Time Traveling Skis

SKI WATER BOAT BILL TED COSTUMES

TIME MACHINE EGYPT DINOSAUR CHIPPEWA PERFORMERS CAVEMAN

Advertising once is like expecting to win a marathon with one step. It takes consistent, repeated advertising with a variety of ads to win the race.

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Answer Key for Last Month's Search

Historical Moments


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

THE IN BOX

THE NETWORKER

From Burn Out to Burning Desire

Picking Meat and Those We Meet

by Steve Rak I will never forget the day I had one of my business consultants sitting across from me in my conference room. He looked me straight in the eye and asked, “Steve, are you burned out?” I must have just sat there staring at him because he asked me the question again, but this time he was shaking his head up and down while asking me. Of course, a er the second time, I realized it was not a question at all but an implication of my current state of mind. This occurred about three years ago and, as hard to admit as it is, I was burned out. Big time! I just didn’t want to admit or even acknowledge it. I was toast. It took me about two years to work my way out of it. I totally blew up my company, took what was le , and started rebuilding. It was hard. It is still hard, and I believe it will continue being hard into the foreseeable future. That is what happens when you get burned out, you either turn to ash or start burning brighter. Now things are better. I am no longer burned out. As a matter of fact, I am energized. How did I get from there to here? Here are a few things I did to correct my course. I had to be honest with myself about where my company was and where it was headed if I did not make changes. I had to face the brutal reality that things had to change. I decided to clean house. That meant making hard decisions about everything from employees to vendors. I fired customers. This one was hard, but it had to be done. I took inspiration from other businesses that I liked to frequent and decided to try using some of the principals they used to be successful. I let go of trying to be in total control of everything. I let things take their course and used my gut instincts to move forward. Now I am moving in the right direction. No more burnout, only burning desire. Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an awardwinning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, www.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

by Bob Arnold Your network is as critical as eating! I read a friend’s comment on a report he read about how picky we are at the meat case in the grocery store. We stand there and pick up one package of meat a er the other, until we find the one with the right color. Yep, color happens to be the most critical aspect to us. The authors of the report go into great detail about color measurement and analysis. My friend said the shoppers at the market are humorous, especially since it is all the same stuff in the packages. So, how does this relate to networking? Well, there are many conversations we have with someone new to us. However, not all of those we meet or talk with become a part of our network. Your network is intuitively made up of those you feel can help you or you can help them. I call these people Networking Partners. It is crucial that you get to know those you bond with in some way. In fact, it is not just crucial, it is a living necessity. Who in your network have told lately that you appreciate them? How do you feel when someone reaches out and tells you that they appreciate you? Pretty good, I bet! The Main Point is to make an effort to know your network personally. Reach out and make someone’s day. You never know how much that one action may spur a business or personal referral. The reality is, just as the quality is about more than just the color of the meat you buy, your network is the same. It is built of a variety of individuals with differing qualities and interests. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

S


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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

MIRTH AND JOY

Only a Line Away

by Jerry King

by Paul McHam We have finished talking about toilet leaks (see July 2019 column, “My Bowl Runneth Over”) but keep in mind that it is not just overflows that can cause problems. There is a shutoff for water supplied to the tank, and that shutoff can develop leaks and become a source of water for mold, as well. Included as possible mold sources in the bathroom are the water supply lines and the sink and tub drains. When water lines leak, the water is clean and is referred to as Category 1 water or white water, and it is free of abnormal bacterial growth. Category 1 can become Category 2 (gray water) within 24 to 48 hours and can deteriorate to Category 3 within an additional 24 to 48 hours. Category Three is like sewer water from beyond the toilet trap, which is why you want to get water cleaned up as fast as possible. There are two other sources of water in the bathroom. The water to the showerhead generally runs up a pipe on the other side of the shower end wall. There are multiple connections in that pipe from the control handle and mixing valve (hot and cold water), all the way to the showerhead. The second possible source is the drain area that includes the drain elbow (where the water goes down) and the overflow above it (where overfills drain off). There is yet one more area of concern that is not a water source and is seldom thought of as a problem area. Many tub surrounds are composed of tiles placed on the surrounding wall in a decorative manner, then grout is pushed in between the tiles and wiped off to form a smooth fill in between the tiles. The tiles are not waterproof and will ultimately allow water to soak in and to reach the drywall behind it. To prevent this and to avoid generating lots of mold (not to mention having the tub surround begin to sag), seal the tile grout and it may need resealing again later.

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

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BITE ME!

Shandy Beaches photo and column by Ed Bacho •7 ounces watermelon shandy •2 ounces orange moonshine •5 ounces limeade Mix orange moonshine with watermelon shandy in a chilled glass. Top off with limeade. Photographer Ed Bacho steps in this month with another talent: creating beautiful drinks. His website is www.edbacho.com and he can be contacted at 330-5954109. Mention seeing his ad in Joy of Medina County Magazine and get 15 percent off of a portrait package.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

DIG IT! Between the Trees by Michelle Riley Everything communicates, at all times, although maybe not in expected ways. Humans communicate using a wide variety of means, but did you know that plants also communicate? While they do not hang out on social media sites, they are very social. Plants have been found to not only communicate, but they also know and support their kin. Take a stand of Douglas fir trees. They will have an interlocking root system, and there will be a matriarch in the group. The matriarch can sense a younger tree in her tribe who may be in distress. Sensing this distress, the matriarch will send nutrients and water through the root system directly to the distressed tree. Plants have many reasons to communicate. Some flowers use light to attract attention by creating a visual runway to the nectar source for a pollinator. A mimosa tree will slap its leaves together when it is touched as a defense mechanism. If you get to know a mimosa tree, it will stop closing its leaves when you touch it. Whoever said plants cannot think was not watching them closely enough. For those of you who love the smell of a fresh cut lawn, yep, they also are communicating. The cut grass blades are sending a signal to the uncut grass blades to alert them of the carnage to come. The same holds true for flowers. Their fragrance is more robust a er being cut as a survival mechanism to attract pollinators quickly, hoping to guarantee a longer family lineage. Plants communicate to survive, whereas we must survive our communications. The next time you are shaking your head wondering how a simple text could go so wrong, go to the garden. Your plants will not judge you. Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-6788266.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

HEALTHY TRAILS Exercise Levels Depend on Goal by Kelly Bailey It is no secret that exercise is important for overall health and leads to improved heart health, increased energy, improved mood and cognition, reduced risk of chronic disease, weight loss, and more. You may be surprised to find how little or how much exercise you need based on whether the goal is improved health or weight loss. According to the American College of Sports Medicine’s 2011 general recommendations, only 20 minute of exercise a day will achieve general health and cardiovascular improvements. Twenty minutes per day may improve your health, but it is probably not enough to cause weight loss. With so many people trying to lose weight, it bears mentioning that exercise is a very important component of reaching and maintaining a weight-loss goal. The ACSM’s updated guidelines for weight loss and prevention of weight regain is 35 minutes a day of moderateintensity exercise per week. I believe that recommendation should be bumped to 45 or even 60 minutes per day for permanent weight loss. For both general health and weight loss, the ACSM recommends a diversified exercise routine that includes cardio and resistance training. Twenty minutes a day of moderate-intensity cardio, such as brisk walking, is best for general health. For weight loss, at least 35 minutes per day. You can break these times into shorter segments. Take a brisk walk for 10 minutes at 8 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m. BOOM! That is 30 minutes of exercise! Resistance training helps maintain lean muscle mass and strength, which are important for health and fat loss. A total body strength training routine using bands, weights or machines should be done two to three times per week. Do not overlook resistance training in favor of cardio, especially if the goal is weight loss. Hire a trainer if you are unsure of form or how to get started. If these guidelines seem overwhelming, remember that even 10 minutes of brisk walking has cardiovascular and metabolic benefits and can help create a new habit. Remember to check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program! For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PY26zQ Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach and owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and reach her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

GEMS Teaching Teens Advanced Driving by Kent Von Der Vellen Many Medina County residents are familiar with the names Michelle Sanderbeck, Jessica Schaffer, and Erin and Andrew Ehrbar and the stories of their deaths in separate car accidents between March 2006 and April 2010. Their families created the Michelle’s Leading Star Foundation, the Jessica Lynn Schaffer Fund, and the Ehrbar Angels Foundation to honor them. One of the goals for each foundation was to improve teen driving skills. The families consulted Montville Township Police Chief Terry Grice about what could be done to help teen drivers and to prevent other families from suffering the loss of a child. Grice invited Westfield Insurance representatives and Medina County Probate/Juvenile Court Judge Kevin Dunn to join the conversations, which led to the creation of Take Control in May 2013. Take Control is a driving program for Medina County teens to learn the skills and confidence for operating a vehicle in difficult situations. It is an expansion of a county diversion program that was designed to teach driving skills to teens who had received a driving violation. Advanced driving skill classes are taught by three Ohio Police Academy certified law enforcement officers. Teens learn how to be more vigilant and aware of their surroundings and how to react to varying weather and road conditions. The free classroom and driving time would cost several hundred dollars at an advanced professional driving school. Last spring, Take Control found a permanent home at the Medina County Career Center. Two-and-a-half acres next to the center were converted into a driving pad. In addition to Take Control, the pad is used as a training course for area law enforcement and for educational purposes for the career center. Funding for Take Control is provided by Michelle’s Leading Star Foundation, the Jessica Lynn Schaffer Fund, the Ehrbar Angels Foundation, Westfield Insurance, Dunn, and the career center. For more information, go to http://www.takecontroldriving.org/ or go to https://bit.ly/2RTdNZK . To schedule a teen driving class, call 330-661-0122. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

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August 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Thursday, August 1

and National Clown Day

Wooster Street, Lodi. Securing personal

National Mountain Climbing Day

https://bit.ly/2snI05A

information in event of death. Register at

https://bit.ly/2tiRyzy

Medina County Park District: Hiking for the

https://bit.ly/2MJE0Ly

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina

Health of It, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Austin Badger

Monday Movie Matinee: “Instant Family,” 1

Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

Park, 5741 River Styx Road, Medina. Four- to

p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Room A and B,

Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer

five-mile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-

weather, wear appropriate footwear. Ages 10

Wadsworth. Reserve space by calling Soprema

0588.

and up. Free. No registration.

Senior Center, 330-335-1513.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8

Stories at the Market, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.,

Polymer Clay, 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sycamore

p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road,

Main Street Wadsworth Farmers Market.

Room North and South Brunswick Library,

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Stories, song, movement.

3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Sculpt polymer

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

Building with Brackitz, 11 a.m. to noon,

clay figurine. Register at

Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina.

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

https://bit.ly/2RbuEH6

Domestic Relations Court volunteers help

Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 3 to 5. Build and

Stand-Up Paddle Boarding for Adults, 6 p.m.

those not represented by a lawyer in family

design structures. Register at

to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in

court. First come, first served.

https://bit.ly/2WFKHTp

Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera,

Cooking From the Garden: Chickpea

Frog Feats, 2 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental

1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Ages 18

Ratatouille, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community

Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn

and over. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee:

Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

how frogs can teach scientists new things and

$25. Register by contacting Christine,

Street, Medina. Veggie-packed dish will help

more.

ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-210-

use surplus from gardens. Note at registration

ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Tim Coyne

7449.

of any food allergies. Register at

Quartet, 7 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring

The Archetype: Literature Through the

https://bit.ly/2WCkr7j

lawn chairs, picnic, blankets, family. Rain

Ages, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A,

Friday, August 2

location: United Church of Christ, 217 E.

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

National Ice Cream Sandwich Day

Liberty Street, Medina. Free.

Wadsworth. Identifying archetype and why

https://bit.ly/2MAsVax

Sunday, August 4

characters stand out.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to

U.S. Coast Guard Day https://bit.ly/1oWcPYn

Veterans Roundtable, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,

4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, 1000 E.

and Friendship Day https://bit.ly/1nxCcvh

Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B,

Washington Street, Medina.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 1

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

p.m., Saint Martin of Tours, 1800 Station Road,

stories of survival. Dee Ann Williams will

End of Summer Party, 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.,

Valley City. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

speak. All ages. No registration.

Community Room A and B, Medina Library,

Monday, August 5

Tuesday, August 6

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to

Work Like a Dog Day https://bit.ly/UqBN76

Wiggle Your Toes Day https://bit.ly/1vaa5fL

12. Escape room, egg drop contest, slime your

Shrinky Dinks, All day, Seville Library, 45

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to

librarians, more. Register at

Center Street, Seville. Grades 4 to 12. Shrink

noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649

https://bit.ly/2WHDFxx

designs to make tiny creations.

Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

Saturday, August 3

Digital Estate Planning, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Grab Some Nuts Day https://bit.ly/2z7K2in

p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

Seville. Grades kindergarten to 5. Armstrong

7:30 p.m., Plum Creek Assisted Living, 891

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Air and Space Museum presentation. Register

Marks Road, Brunswick. Benefits HANDS

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7

at https://bit.ly/2KJPXhv

Foundation. Appetizers, wine, beer, music,

p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

side boards, silent auction. Tickets: $20.

Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road,

Reservation by August 1, to 330-220-4900 or

Back-to-School Supplies Makeover:

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

by e-mailing

Creative Expressions, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.,

Cut the Cord, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Chrissy@plumcreekseniorliving.com

Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132

Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625

Healthy Dips and Dressings, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30

Broad Street, Wadsworth. Bring school

Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about non-cable TV

p.m., Sycamore Room North and South,

supplies to decorate into something new.

options in lecture-style class. Register at

Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road,

Register at https://bit.ly/2WHYdWG

https://bit.ly/2WABtmz

Brunswick. Joy of Medina County Magazine

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

Beginning Web Design, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

columnist Kelly Bailey shares healthy dips and

233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and

Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S.

dressing. Samples provided. Register at

classic cars, free, public invited.

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn basic website

https://bit.ly/31srT8V

Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30 p.m.

building skills. Register at

Ready for Kindergarten, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30

to 8 p.m., Lake Medina, State Route 18,

https://bit.ly/2RaqTkZ

p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Medina. Bike 6 to 10 miles. Before beginning

Know Your Bike Hands-On Program, 7 p.m.

Wadsworth. Readiness skills for those

ride, learn basic tips on keeping bike and

to 8 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth

entering kindergarten. Register at

riders fit. Helmets required. Ages 17 and older.

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn

https://bit.ly/2JxvPy7

Locker Magnets, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

essentials of bike care. Register at

Friday, August 9

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

https://bit.ly/2KgXB3t

Book Lover’s Day https://bit.ly/UqBXeV

Ridge Road, Medina. Make locker bling.

Thursday, August 8

Picnics on the Patio, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Office

Register at https://bit.ly/2KcO9hB

Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor’s

for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive, Medina.

OSU Master Gardener: Drying and Saving

Porch Day https://bit.ly/1mupZbu

Cheeseburgers, sides from Sandridge.

Herbs, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sycamore Room

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

Entertainment by Frank and Dean. Open to the

North and South, Brunswick Library, 3694

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

public. Senior citizens, $4; under 60, $5.

Center Road, Brunswick. Tips on growing,

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4

storing herbs. Register at

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

p.m., Wadsworth City Hall, 120 Maple Street,

https://bit.ly/2WAGWd0

330-725-0588.

Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Wednesday, August 7

Stroller Hike With Medina Library, 10:30

Yarn Art, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley

National Lighthouse Day

a.m., Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 1674 S.

Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard,

https://bit.ly/1kLL5qY

Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Hike trail as

Brunswick. Yarn ornaments, animals, more.

Solar System Step-Out, 11 a.m. to noon,

“Blueberries for Sal” is read. Cra , snack. Free, Supplies provided.

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

no registration.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Ridge Road, Medina. Grades kindergarten to

DIY Bird Feeder, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Children’s

p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center,

fi h. Learn how far planets are by walking

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad

855 Weymouth Road, Medina.

between them. Register at

Street, Wadsworth. Create a bird feeder for a

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

https://bit.ly/2WClCUh

backyard. Register at https://bit.ly/2WD8NJt

Family Stand-Up Paddle Boarding, 5:30 p.m.

Back to School Snack Attack, 1:30 p.m. to

It’s a Code, Code World: Can You Escape? 4

to 7:30 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in

2:30 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library,

p.m. to 5 p.m., 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., Meeting Room

Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera,

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 3 to 5.

A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn

Snack ideas for back to school. Register at

Wadsworth. Ages 12 to 18. Listen to music and

basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25 and up.

https://bit.ly/2WyOxsG

videos that have been tampered with.

Register by contacting Christine,

No Escape: The Truth About Black Holes,

Register for 4 p.m. at https://bit.ly/30y1Yvm

ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-210-

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., Seville United

and for 5 p.m. at https://bit.ly/2XbCYMe

7449.

Methodist Church, 74 West Main Street,

Summer Breezes at Plum Creek, 6 p.m. to

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

35

p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201

Wadsworth. Learn about moths and meteors.

Street, Lodi. Grades 6 to 12. Study

Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30

Bring flashlight, blankets.

fundamentals of drawing and cartooning.

p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation

Sunday, August 11

Bring favorite sketchbook. Register at

admission $3, dinner is additional donation

Son and Daughter Day https://bit.ly/1ohFl8a

https://bit.ly/2WABVkL

request. Bring favorite dessert to share.

An Affair on the Square Cra Fest, 11 a.m. to

Kerbal Space Program, 2 pm. to 4 p.m.,

Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

5 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Handmade

Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn

scheduled.

cra s and vintage exhibits, food trucks,

rocket basics, test launch survival. Grades 8 to

Saturday, August 10

music.

12. Register at https://bit.ly/2LUM7mj

National S’mores Day https://bit.ly/2uDae0x

Yarn Art, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley

Stand-Up Paddle Boarding for Teens, 6 p.m.

Mr. Science, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sycamore

Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard,

to 8 p.m., Brunswick Lake Trail, meet in

Room North and South, Brunswick Library,

Brunswick. Yarn ornaments, animals, more.

Cleveland Clinic parking lot next to Panera,

3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Grades

Supplies provided.

1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Ages 13

kindergarten to 5. Be a science wiz using

ORMACO A-Minus: Positive Hip-Hop With

to 17. Learn basics, strokes, balance. Fee: $25.

household items. Register at

Ameer Williamson, 2 p.m., Wadsworth Public

Register by contacting Christine,

https://bit.ly/31uwJlS

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free

ccancianadventures@gmail.com, 216-210-

Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s

but reservations recommended due to limited

7449.

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad

seating. For reservations, call 330-722-2541 or

Tuesday, August 13

Street, Wadsworth. Children read to therapy

e-mail tsigel@ormaco.org

Le -Handers Day https://bit.ly/WidcDa

dogs.

Monday, August 12

Volunteens: Play Dough for Preschoolers,

Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar

Middle Child Day https://bit.ly/2snCGz3

11 a.m. to noon, Community Room, Buckeye

Rides, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9 a.m. to 3

Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make play

Seville. Admission to museum is free.

p.m., Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road,

dough for children at Buckeye Preschool.

Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Volunteens: End-of-the-Summer Party,

13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12;

Woodstock Festival, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

noon to 2 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye

and no charge for children under 5.

Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick

Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Pizza for

http://www.trainweb.org/norm/

Library, 3694 Center Road, Brunswick. Watch

Grades 6 to 12. Register at

Yarn Art, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley

Woodstock concert footage, celebrate 50th

https://bit.ly/32pWPqF

Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard,

anniversary.

Kerbal Space Program, 2 pm. to 4 p.m.,

Brunswick. Yarn ornaments, animals, more.

Art in the A ernoon, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn

Supplies provided.

Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library,

rocket basics, test launch survival. Grades 8 to

Bug Appreciation Day, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Wolf

132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make cra

12. Register at https://bit.ly/2LUM7mj

Creek Environmental Center,

sticks as mixed media lollipop trees.

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Get up close

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6

233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and

and learn about a diversity of insects.

p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High

classic cars, free, public invited.

Starry, Starry Nights with Medina County

Street, Wadsworth.

Ready for Kindergarten, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30

Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

Association, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., Letha House

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7

Wadsworth. Readiness skills for those

Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham

p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan

entering kindergarten.

Township. Use association telescopes to view

Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Register at https://bit.ly/32AZkXw

deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities

Preschool Dance Party, 2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.,

Earth vs. Flying Saucers, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

and displays in barn on cloudy nights.

Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S.

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No

Broadway Street, Medina. Ages 3 and up.

Ridge Road, Medina. Watch films from 1950s

registration, first come, first served.

Dance, play back-to-school BINGO. Register at

about flying saucers. Register at

Moths and Meteors, 9 p.m. to midnight, Wolf

https://bit.ly/2IbMvus

https://bit.ly/2X1ONEP

Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Comic Drawing With Doug, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster

Wednesday, August 14

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

National Creamsicle Day

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

https://bit.ly/2tG8YsZ

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street,

Internet Scams and Prevention, 10 a.m. to

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers

11 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library,

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

help those not represented by a lawyer in

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to

330-725-0588.

family court. First come, first served.

deal with scammers, fake emails, more.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7

Healthy Lunch Makeovers and Water

Register at https://bit.ly/2MM7zMk

p.m., Medina Performing Arts Center, 851

Exercises: Nufit, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s

Natural Discoveries, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Lake

Weymouth Road, Medina.

Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad

Medina, SR. 18, Medina. Award-based hiking

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Street, Wadsworth. Adults only. Learn new

series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go

Medina County Government Academy:

recipes, dispelling myths, and tips from

to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details

Crisis Management, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

experts. Register at https://bit.ly/2WZhl2w

Space Lander Challenge, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.,

University of Akron, Medina County University

Friday, August 16

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina.

National Tell a Joke Day

Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 3 to 5. Build a

Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8

https://bit.ly/XhpOen

spaceship, egg drop challenge. Register at

p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at

Valley City Summer Street Fair, downtown

https://bit.ly/2ZkXQ0U

https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ

Valley City. Carnival games, concerts, vendors,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Cooking From the Garden: Cabbage Rolls, 6

beer tent. https://bit.ly/2IMOeHt

p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive,

p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center

Music and Movement, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.,

Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Street, Seville. European cabbage roll cooking

Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132

Thursday, August 15

demonstration. Register at

Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn songs

Relaxation Day https://bit.ly/2tO50Pu

https://bit.ly/2R9AfNN

through dance, instruments, more. All ages. Yarn Art, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Yarn ornaments, animals, more. Supplies provided. Nature Sketch, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Medina

A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late. Contact the hosting golf course for pricing, registration and sponsorships. Chippewa Golf Club 12147 Shank Road, Doylestown 330-658-6126

Medina Country Club 5588 Wedgewood Road, Medina (330) 725-6621

Friday, August 2

9th Annual Marian’s Closet Golf Scramble 9 a.m. Benefits Marian’s Closet Chippewa Golf Club

Monday, August 5

Give Back on the Green Golf Outing 9 a.m. Benefits SHC, the Arc of Medina County Medina Country Club

Pine Valley Golf Club 469 Reimer Road, Wadsworth 330-335-3375

Shale Creek Golf Course 5420 Wolff Road, Medina 330-723-8774

(Monday, August 5, continued)

Wadsworth Drug Free Community Coalition Golf Outing 9 a.m. Benefits Wadsworth Drug Free Community Coalition Pine Valley Golf Course

Thursday, August 22

Annual Golf Outing and Casino Tailgate 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Benefits Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance Shale Creek Golf Course

Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 3 to 5. Sketch nature, hike. Register at https://bit.ly/2KetVUI American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Beat the Heat A er-Hours Movie, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit.ly/2YQZRlN Saturday, August 17 National Honeybee Awareness Day https://bit.ly/2z499Tc Valley City Summer Street Fair, downtown Valley City. Carnival games, concerts, vendors, beer tent. https://bit.ly/2IMOeHt Healthy Strides, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., Central Shelter, Buckeye Woods Park, Lafayette Road. Physician talk and 1- to 3-mile walk. Ages 10


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

37

and up. Free. No registration.

https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details.

Brian Henke and Ginger Ackley, 7 p.m. to 8

Ohio Division of Wildlife: Hunter Education

Wednesday, August 19

p.m., Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road,

Course, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wolf Creek

National Potato Day https://bit.ly/2IDltch

Medina. Folk, New Age, Celtic music. Free.

Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road,

OSU Master Gardener Chat: Drying and

Thursday, August 22

Wadsworth. Required course for all first-time

Saving Herbs, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community

National Tooth Fairy Day

hunting license buyers. Do NOT BRING

Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road,

https://bit.ly/2kufWLY

FIREARMS. One-hour lunch break, no lunch

Medina. Growing, storing herbs. Register at

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

provided. Ages 10 and up. Register at

https://bit.ly/2WBm0aC

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

https://bit.ly/2ae6vIS

Tuesday, August 20

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

Sensory Storytime, 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.,

National Radio Day https://bit.ly/2sDzUds

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649

Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to

330-725-0588.

Center Road, Brunswick. For children with

noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6

autism, sensory integration challenges, or

Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome.

p.m., Sharon Township Administration

who have difficulty sitting still or focusing.

Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon

Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2JzsxKR

2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

Center. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Yarn Art, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley

233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard,

classic cars, free, public invited.

p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

Brunswick. Yarn ornaments, animals, more.

Wednesday, August 21

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Supplies provided.

National Senior Citizens Day

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Teen Tech Treks, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Plum Creek

https://bit.ly/1yf5ze1

p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street,

Park North, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Brunswick Hills. Bring smartphone. Learn to

p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road,

Daniel Tiger: Exploratory, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30

research protecting nature. Register at

Medina. https://

https://bit.ly/2XpZ7GQ

rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

12th Annual Pig Roast, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

The Greatest Light

Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley

Show on Earth:

Road, Seville. Benefits the Free Clinic of

FUSE, 4 p.m. to 5

Medina County. Tickets, adults, $40; children 4

p.m., Meeting Room

to 12, $12; 3 and younger, free. Call 330-764-

A, Wadsworth Library,

9300 for tickets or go to

132 Broad Street,

https://fcomc.org/12th-annual-pig-roast/

Wadsworth. Learn

Sunday, August 18

about Aurora Borealis

Bad Poetry Day https://bit.ly/2temy5W

and experiments.

Valley City Frog Jump Festival, 11 a.m. to

Register at, https://

5:30 p.m., Mill Stream Park, Maple Street,

bit.ly/2RpO370

Valley City. Food, drinks, souvenirs, music,

History Series: Van

activities, frog jump contest. Free admission,

Deusen Diaries, 6:30

parking.

p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,

Yarn Art, noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley

Community Room,

Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard,

Lodi Library, 635

Brunswick. Yarn ornaments, animals, more.

Wooster Street, Lodi.

Supplies provided.

Diaries show 66 years

Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Beetles, 3 of everyday life in p.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Marsh, 4266 Fenn Road, Medina County. Medina. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to

Music at The Lodge:


38

Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019 p.m., Meeting Room A and B, Wadsworth

includes Made in Medina expo and Medina

Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Ages

Farmers Market.

2 to 6. Stories, rhymes, cra s and games

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to

about Daniel Tiger. Register at,

2:30 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation

https://bit.ly/2J07dg8

and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road,

Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride, 6:30

Brunswick.

p.m. to 8 p.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Wedgewood Road, Medina. Meet in ball field

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 10 a.m. to 3

parking lot. Tips on keeping bikes and riders

p.m., Hinckley Fire Department, 1616 Ridge

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 9 through October 13 Heritage Farm, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV

in shape. Bike 6 to 10 miles. Helmets

Road, Hinckley.

required. Ages 17 and older. Free.

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

OSU Master Gardener Chat: Drying and

Community Volunteer Fair, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,

Saving Herbs, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Children’s

Community Room A and B, Medina Library,

Activity Room, Wadsworth, Library, 132

210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Local

Broad Street, Wadsworth. Growing, storing

agencies looking for volunteers.

Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 4 through October 12 Medina Public Square

herbs.

Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar

Friday, August 23

Rides, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5515 Buffham Road,

Ride Like the Wind Day

Seville. Admission to museum is free.

https://bit.ly/2tGv5Qf

Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children

3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, June 18 through August 20 Medina County Center for Older Adults 246 Northland Drive, Medina No new vendors are being accepted. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2DC3Vxs

Messy Sensory Play, Session 1: 10 a.m. to

13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12;

11 a.m., Session 2: 11 a.m. to noon,

and no charge for children under 5.

Sycamore Room North and South,

http://www.trainweb.org/norm/

Brunswick Library, 3694 Center Road,

Spies and Secret Agents, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

Brunswick. Wear old clothes. Session 1

Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S.

registration:

Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 3 and up.

https://bit.ly/2LQvmsz Session 2

Secret agent training, games, crack codes.

Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 25 through September 28 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk

registration: https://bit.ly/2xNUFTI Birth to 3

Register at https://bit.ly/2FhvFsr

years old.

ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Akin for

Picnics on the Patio, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,

Jazz; 7 p.m., Public Square, Medina. Bring

Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive,

lawn chairs, picnic, blankets, family. Rain

Medina. Cheeseburgers, sides from

location: United Church of Christ, 217 E.

Sandridge. Entertainment by Frank and

Liberty Street, Medina. Free.

Dean. Open to the public. Seniors, $4; under

Sunday, August 25

60, $5.

Kiss and Make Up Day https://bit.ly/2SbZXC3

Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10

Sunday Cinema Club: “A League of Their

p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church,

Own,” 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Meeting Room A,

6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens

Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street,

at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation

Wadsworth.

admission $3, dinner is additional donation

Monday, August 26

request. Bring favorite dessert to share.

Dog Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2uHEq7b

Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be

Wonderful World of Animals, 11 a.m. to

scheduled.

noon, Community Room, Highland Library,

Saturday, August 24

4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Adults only. Meet

Pluto Demoted Day https://bit.ly/2tOqPhX

animals, learn habitats and common threats.

Medina Fest! 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Public

Register at https://bit.ly/2X8hEXW

Square, Medina. Food, music and activities

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 15 through September 14 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc 4 p.m to 7 p.m. Wednesdays: June 26, July 24, August 21 Village of St. Edward, 880 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

A


Joy of Medina County Magazine | August 2019

39

p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tuesday, August 27 Global Forgiveness Day https://bit.ly/2lMxeUY 2019 South Town Cruise-In, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 233 Lafayette Road, Medina. Classic tunes and classic cars, free, public invited. Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Wednesday, August 28 Race Your Mouse Day https://bit.ly/2KyobVr American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Saturday, August 3

education, research, education,

2019 Giddy Up Coach Hunter and

programming. All ages and pets

BHSXC 5k Scholarship Run and 1-

welcome. For registration and pricing,

mile Walk, 7:15 a.m., Brunswick High

go to https://bit.ly/2Z2O43w

School, 3581 Center Road, Brunswick.

Friday, August 9

Disabilities Achievement Center, 4691 Windfall

Registration and further information at

Medina Runs Down Cancer Series:

Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

https://bit.ly/2xL7GNV

Collin Cares Glow With the Flow 5k,

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

Sunday, August 4

7:45 p.m. mile run kids and 8:15 p.m.

p.m., Brunswick United Methodist Church,

Hope Still Lives 5k Run and Walk,

5k. Family friendly events, music, food.

1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick.

7:45 a.m. to 11 a.m., Public Square,

Glow in the dark “goodies.” For

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Medina. Benefits Star Legacy

registration and pricing, go to

Color Changing Mini Notebooks, 2:15 p.m. to

Foundation, which provides stillbirth

https://collincares.net/

p.m., Medina County Board of Developmental

3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Turn a plain notebook

Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi.

while supplies last. Register at

into a color changing one.

Domestic Relations Court volunteers help

https://bit.ly/2JCv8Vt

Poetry Showcase, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting

those not represented by a lawyer in family

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5

Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street

court. First come, first served.

p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road,

Wadsworth. Poets, whose work has been on

Bees Wax Food Wraps, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.,

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

display at the library, will read their poems.

Community Room, Highland Library, 4160

Saturday, August 31

Thursday, August 29

Ridge Road, Medina. Make organic beeswax

National Eat Outside Day

According to Hoyle Day

food wraps. Register at

https://bit.ly/2K4ouUB

https://bit.ly/2tngzKy

https://bit.ly/2ZkZCz6 FULL

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 5

Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.,

Friday, August 30

p.m., Xerxes Athletics, 424 Pearl Road,

Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S.

Toasted Marshmallow Day

Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh

https://bit.ly/2bGI110

Tabletop RPG Day, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.,

computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics,

5th Annual Medina County Senior Walk, 10

Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster

330-725-0588.

a.m. to noon, Public Square, Medina.

Street, Lodi. Bring games: Magic: The

American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 5

Sponsored by Love INC and David Wadsworth,

Gathering, Dungeons and Dragons, or bring

p.m., Danbury Senior Living Brunswick, 3430

Medina County clerk of courts. Benefits

new game to share. Teens, adults. Register at.

Brunswick Lake Parkway, Brunswick.

Medina County Office for Older Adults’ home-

https://bit.ly/2XFKLil

https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

delivered meals program. Health screenings

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7

available. Walk as much or as little as wanted.

p.m., Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street,

For more information, contact Sue Becks, 330-

Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

242-1541, airbecks@msn.com Free T-shirts

Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.,

Brought to you by the fabulous advertisers seen in “Joy”!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine August 2019  

Follow the pharaohs into this issue! You'll find out who did good deeds, be a detective, find four different sections of photos, discover Oh...

Joy of Medina County Magazine August 2019  

Follow the pharaohs into this issue! You'll find out who did good deeds, be a detective, find four different sections of photos, discover Oh...