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APRIL 2020 VOLUME 3, NUMBER 3

Re n o Tour vation $11.99 M Pg. 1 ap! 2

HE HAS CHOPS Chef Tony is the boss of the MCCC kitchen, and while it was not originally part of his plan, a meeting one day changed his course. Pg. 4 A locally owned, independent publication dedicated to higher standards of journalism


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 3 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM

Childhood Lost by Amy Barnes

This month is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. Although no events are planned in observation of it, the progress made over the decades should be commended, a timeline of progress is at https://bit.ly/38uUn3Z If you are surviving abuse of any kind, help is available at https://bit.ly/3aEbSAt For the Survivors and the Thrivers When you give up the silence and finally speak out the cost of truth being spoken and set free is a ripping apart of heart and soul and the surrender of a fantasy so carefully built.

No longer struggling to hold together the grains of sand in shapes of walls and castles despite the ever-present ever-insistent push of the wind called Truth. Then the new building begins with solid walls and towers that do not have to fear the wind.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC EDITOR Amy Barnes ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller PHOTOGRAPHERS FlashBang Photography Ed Bacho Photography CARTOONIST Jerry King CONTRIBUTORS Bob Arnold Kelly Bailey Hunter Barnard Paul McHam Crystal Pirri Steve Rak Michelle Riley Robert Soroky Austin Steger Kent Von Der Vellen THE READING NOOK AUTHOR Christopher Barnes MASCOT Rico Houdini ADVERTISING SALES AND OFFICE 330-461-0589 E-MAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com WEBSITE JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com Learn more about the staff at Behind The Scenes, JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Open positions are listed on the website at Open Positions. JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256. It is distributed as an e-edition and in a print edition. Both editions can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Copyright 2018-2019 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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DIG IT!

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SMILING IN THE KITCHEN Find some of the words that Chef Tony uses to create success.

SEEDLING SUCCESS by Michelle Riley It is time to give seeds a strong start so you have a garden to brag about.

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OF MIND AND BODY

LACK EQUALS GAIN by Kelly Bailey Understanding sleep’s role can help with weight loss.

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HEALTHY TRAILS

WHEN BIGGER IS NOT BETTER by Robert Soroky Uncomfortable riding a bike? It might be all about positioning.

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THE UNINTENDED TEACHER

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Center Café patrons slurp up a gallon a week of this exquisite dressing.

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JOYFUL LETTER DETECTIVES

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FINDING FRIENDS AT SUPER SPEED by Hunter Barnard

GEMS

EASING THE STRUGGLE by Kent Von Der Vellen From GEDs to nursing assistant testing and more, Project Learn makes it easier for people to advance.

EVALUATING BUSINESS BURNOUT by Steve Rak On the front and back covers: photos by Amy Barnes Tony Stanislo is wielding a knife and a smile in the Medina County Career Center kitchen.

ROLL ’EM! A hedgehog arrives from space only to find himself pursued by an evil doctor.

THE IN BOX Finding help to eliminate burnout

by Austin Steger

by Jerry King

THE NETWORKER Making good connections takes planning, strategy, and getting out and about.

FINDING E-WASTE SOLUTIONS

MIRTH AND JOY

Collect the letters, solve the riddle, and send your answer in!

by Bob Arnold

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND There are local options for safe disposal or reuse of old technology.

Time for Easter bunny shenanigans!

EXPANDING HORIZONS

by Crystal Pirri

recipe by Chef Tony Stanislo

by Christopher Barnes

Area dancers hit the dance floor for charity.

BUTTERMILK BISCUITS

SWEET-AND-SOUR POPPY SEED DRESSING

ONE WEEK WITH KYLE HODGE

photos by FlashBang Photography

VEGAN VITTLES

BITE ME!

THE READING NOOK

OH, SNAP!

by Paul McHam

A dream come true: biscuits free of oil and butter and still fluffy!

Tony Stanislo’s love of cooking started at the knees of his father and grandmothers, and now he inspires others with his unmatched passion.

EASTER EGG HUNTS

GUTTER GROWTH Blocked gutters can lead to more than just plants growing in them.

by Amy Barnes

The author of “Little Truths,” the first Reading Nook story, has returned with a short story that starts in this issue. Enjoy!

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

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LET’S DO IT! While the weather is hard to predict, we predict you will find events to enjoy, indoors or out, in our extensive calendar of events.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

The Unintended Teacher photos and story by Amy Barnes

Chef Tony Stanislo is proud of his students' accomplishments. Last year, students Angie Dobson, Landon Morris, and Cheyenne Nichols won second at the national level of the FCCLA competition in California.

H

is plan did not include becoming a teacher. When Tony Stanislo graduated from Polaris Career Center in Middleburg Heights, his plan was to work at multiple free-standing restaurants and then open his own. “I thought I was going to be a chef/owner someday,” said Stanislo. As a child, Stanislo had been fascinated with watching his father and grandmothers cook. While he loved cooking, Stanislo did not realize it could be an actual job and he could make a living doing it. He still remembers the day he learned that cooking could be a career. “I remember being shocked by it,” Stanislo said. That was when he decided what his life’s path

would be and, with help of his high school principal, he got into the culinary program at Polaris. On graduation, he worked at various free-standing restaurants until landing a job as a sous chef at Harvey Corvairs in the Caxton Building on Ninth Street in downtown Cleveland. Stanislo was very comfortable at Corvairs, which specialized in modern French cuisine. His coworkers were all highly talented, which made for a relaxed camaraderie among them. “We were all friends,” Stanislo said, adding that they all have remained friends and maintain contact. That was when his life and career took a sudden turn, and it all started with a phone call. The call was from one of his former teachers at Polaris. She wanted Stanislo to meet her at the Medina County Career Center to visit their culinary program. It was not until he arrived that he found out it was a job interview of sorts. His former teacher already had paved the way and had highly recommended him to the MCCC administration to be the new head of the program. Stanislo was only 25 years old at the time. He took a week to think about it. Weighing into his decision was the financial stability that the teaching position offered as compared to being a chef/owner. “It was a good family move,” Stanislo said about


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

accepting the offer. So it was that the man who had no aspirations to be a teacher, became the bigger than life head of MCCC’s Chef and Restaurant Management program. He became known to his students and others in the community as Chef Tony, an energetic, demanding, fiercely dedicated teacher and chef who insisted on excellence. He said he and his wife, Kim, made an agreement early on. The character “Chef Tony” stays at school; at home, he is just Tony. It has been a successful arrangement as they have been happily married for 21 years, Stanislo said. Stanislo has now led the program for 20 years, never taking off a day for illness until the last week of February of this year. “To be able to inspire kids for this many years is awesome,” he said, adding that every year’s batch of students is different. His appreciation and amazement are evident when he talks about how the restaurant was operated during his illness and weeklong absence by his students and two aides, Lori Dominguez, who has worked with him for approximately 15 years, and Sara Peterson, who graduated from Stanislo’s program in 2014 and has been working with him for two years. “They still ran the restaurant, and they did amazing!” he said. He has no input over which students enter the program. He is given a student roster in July, when the students come in for uniform fitting for the upcoming school year. The junior year in the program costs $350 and covers the uniforms and a knife set for each student. Senior year, the cost drops to $200. He gets very excited when he talks about something special he is able to procure for the students to work on. Recently, it was 12-pound salmon. Each student was given a salmon to break down, not something that is usually available. Stanislo’s eyes light up when he talks about the size of the fish and the opportunity his students were given. “If it wasn’t for the support of our board of education, our superintendent and our administration, the program wouldn’t thrive the way it does,” said Stanislo. Despite living in North Olmsted, Stanislo arrives at MCCC between 5 a.m. and 5:30 a.m. every school day in order to prep for the students’ arrival. He enjoys

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A caricature of Stanislo; last year's competitive culinary team; and, in the upper right-hand corner, Lori Dominguez, who has been Stanislo's teaching aide for approximately 15 years, hangs in The Center Cafe.

traveling country roads between the school and home, even though he only has ever lived in cities. “I absolutely enjoy it. The worst part is any time there’s snow, I get the drifts (on the road),” Stanislo said. As he grew up, he was surrounded by a big extended family, thanks to his parents, Connie and Tim Stanislo’s large families. He enjoyed a lot of family time. The big family gatherings are no longer common because family members have scattered and lives became busy. His immediate family consists of his wife, who is a professor in the nursing program at Ashland University, and three children, 17-year-old Jonathan, 13-year-old Sarah and 11-year-old Caroline. continued, Page 6 background photo by Goumbik


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

ingredients when one has an unexpected shortage. Perhaps it is because of his formative years being so Stanislo said Marino does a lot of good behind the much about the bond of family that he enjoys the scenes, including hiring MCCC culinary program family bond that each of his classes graduate with, a graduates. bond he explains is forged through celebrations of “He’s so good for the community,” Stanislo said. doing amazing things and working under stress. The Center Cafe, known as The Four Seasons prior Another bond Stanislo enjoys is the one he shares to Stanislo’s arrival, provides real-world experience with other chefs. He says that all chefs in Medina get for students in a structured, learning environment along with each other, support each other, and never where they are closely monitored for professionalism hesitate to help each other. and skill. Juniors work 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m., and “I have a graduate in almost every free-standing seniors work in the café from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. restaurant in Medina,” Stanislo said. Tips earned when waiting tables are pooled into a Chef Ryan Marino, owner/chef of the Corkscrew class club account that is used to benefit all of the Saloon, located fewer than 2 miles from MCCC, was a students. junior in MCCC’s culinary program when Stanislo With the tips, the students have been able to able became the head of the program, said Stanislo. to pay for their own field trips, class T-shirts and In the same class as Marino was Melissa Khourey, sweatshirts, duffle bags, and water bottles, which are the owner of Saucisson, a butcher shop in essential for working in the hot kitchen. Cleveland’s Slavic Village. “It’s a great real-world experience for the kids,” Marino has subbed for Stanislo at MCCC, and they Stanislo said. have often helped each other out, including trading That does not, however, mean there have not been some injuries over the years. No matter how much safety is stressed or how supervised students are, when mixing teenagers, knives and fire, there are bound to be some occurrences that result in a variety of injuries. “I’ve seen some interesting cuts over the years,” Stanislo said. This year’s program has 22 juniors and 17 seniors. Stanislo said the program enrollment is down a little from previous years. There are usually 24 students in each grade level. Seventy-five percent of the senior class is ServSafe certified. ServSafe is a certification program that offers training in safe handling of food and alcohol. The certification makes those who have earned it more employable because every food service establishment must have a ServSafe certified employee present during all hours of operation. While Stanislo is not the chef/owner he once planned to be, he has proven time and again he has what it takes to make a culinary program successful. In the process, he also became the regional coordinator at Lorain Community College for the Family Community Career Leaders of America, known as FCCLA, which is a family and consumerscience based organization. Stanislo was named an honorary National Honor continued from Page 5


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

Society member by the MCCC’s National Technical Honor Society Chapter. In 2018, Stanislo was named the Cleveland chapter of the American Culinary Federation Chef Educator of the Year, and in 2019, The Center Café was named the Taste of Medina People’s Choice Award winner and the 2019 Elite 50 Culinary Programs. “Not bad for a bunch of kids and an old man,” Stanislo says, with a big grin. Also not bad for a former Rocky River high school student who had to get special permission from his principal to attend the culinary program at Polaris. Stanislo was inducted into the Polaris Hall of Fame in 2005. He was the first inductee into the hall. In 2019, three of Stanislo’s students, Angie Dobson, Landon Morris and Cheyenne Nichols, all seniors, fulfilled a promise they had made a year before when they did not make it past FCCLA regionals. They vowed they would make it to nationals in 2019. Stanislo, using reverse psychology, told his students not to do anything that would make him have to travel. When they won first at the state level, he knew they were going to be traveling to Anaheim, California. It was the first time that Stanislo had a group make it to the national level of competition. Thirty-four other states competed; the Medina group won second place. “It was very cool, they were probably one of the most driven groups I’ve ever had,” he said. Another annual endeavor for the students is the From the Heart Scholarship Dinner held in February, which raises money for scholarships. This was the 19th year for the dinner, which has raised a total of $165,000 that has been awarded in scholarships to 80 recipients over the years. This year, they hosted a total of 235 guests in three separate seatings, raising approximately $11,000 for the scholarship fund. Diners get a four-course meal for $50. In addition to the meal, there were raffle baskets donated by vendors and restaurants from all over Northeastern Ohio, as well as silent auction items. The silent auction items raised an additional $2,000. One of the auction items was a four-course meal to be cooked by Stanislo, with wine provided by Marino. Since no students will be serving the meal, wine can be served. When it comes to benefiting his students, Stanislo

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Stanislo relaxes in his office. At the top, left, is a row of chef's hats he has collected over the years. Each hat is signed by that year's senior students.

does not hesitate to ask for donations. He said if it were just him, he would never mention his awards, but he has learned to use the awards he and the students have won to prove the value of the program in order to get more donations. “I have no shame because it’s for the kids,” Stanislo said. If you are interested in donating to the program or to its auctions or raffles, call Tony Stanislo at 330-7258461, Extension 229, or e-mail tstanislo@mcjvs.edu He will be delighted to hear from you.

continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

continued from Page 7

Enjoying a very short break during cafe hours were, from left, Troy Morcus, Nadia Deyling, teaching aide Lori Dominguez (standing), Aaron Houchins, Andrew Shearer, Justen Isenhart, Olivia Mitchell (standing), and Roger Neil.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

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The Center Cafe patrons enjoy a meal made and served by the culinary program students.

continued, Page 10


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

continued from Page 9

The Center Café is open 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday, and is located inside of the Medina County Career Center at 1101 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Reserva�ons are suggested and can be made by calling 330-721-0229. Call ahead and carry-out orders are welcomed. At press �me, the café had been temporarily closed due to concerns regarding coronavirus COVID-19. Please call to confirm it is open before going.

Sam Hornick at work in the cafe kitchen.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

From left, Aaron Houchins, Andrew Shearer, Sylas Depp, Michael Stropki, and Anthony Santivasci

From left, Nick Monaco, Christian LoPiccolo and Timothy Chapin

On the left, from the front of the table, back: Noah Gillilard, Rafael Wilson and Troy Morcus On the right, from the back of the table, forward: Madison Peaco, Nadia Deyling, Olivia Mitchell, Roger Neil, and Justen Isenhart

After the cafe closes at 1 p.m., the students get 30 minutes for their lunch. If patrons linger, whoever was waiting on them is expected to continue until the patron is done.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

JoyOfMedinaCounty.com Our Sponsor

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

THE READING NOOK

One Week With Kyle Hodge by Christopher Barnes

Chapter 1

“W

hat can I get for you?” the cashier asked me, pleasantly. I stared up at the menu, lost in the grandes and the lattes, the espressos and the Americanos. It was like I had never had coffee before. I didn’t know what any of these words meant, and I was beginning to hold up the line. “The vanilla latte is my favorite,” a man said, from a nearby table. I looked back to find a man in his late 30s, sipping a steaming vanilla latte as he sat at his computer. That was the first time I saw Kyle Hodge. “Okay, sure. I’ll have a medium vanilla latte,” I told the cashier. After I paid, I turned around to thank the man who had assisted me, but he was gone. When I got my drink, I was overcome with curiosity and couldn’t help but ask who the man was. “Oh, that’s Kyle Hodge,” the woman behind the counter told me. “He comes here every morning, gets the same thing, and then sits at his computer typing away for an hour or two.” “Really? What’s he typing?” I don’t really know why I continued the conversation to be honest. Maybe I thought the employee was pretty, and I just wanted to keep talking to her. Maybe I was genuinely curious about this Kyle person. Or maybe I was just making small talk as I tasted the vanilla latte. “No clue,” she replied, thoughtlessly. “But he types for an hour every morning? Doesn’t he have somewhere else to be?” “Apparently, not.”

She wiped off a metal pitcher, then looked at me impatiently. She wanted me to stop bothering her. “Weird, well thank you! Have a nice day,” I said, spinning on my heel and practically running out of the café. I was suddenly driven to find Kyle again. I looked both ways down the sidewalk, but it was clear to me that he was long gone. I frowned, frustrated. It wasn’t like Kyle was anything special. He was average height and average weight, with average brown hair that was an average length, but just the fact that he didn’t have to be at work, or anywhere in particular every morning was just stupefying. How did a man in his late 30s have no responsibilities? I would’ve thought he was a hobo if he hadn’t been decently dressed and using a somewhat expensive laptop. As I made my way to my own job, I knew I had to return to that café the next day. I had to solve the mystery of Kyle Hodge. I returned the next day, a bit earlier, and Kyle was sitting there at the same table he had been at the previous day. I ordered my vanilla latte, took it from the impatient woman, and then sat down at Kyle’s table without a word. He looked up at me over his laptop, and I swear a slight smiled flashed across his face. “Can I help you?” he asked. “Yeah,” I said, sipping my vanilla latte, “You can tell me what you’re doing.” I came off a bit rude and pushy, but I was kind of annoyed at how much he’d been on my mind the past 24 hours. I really just wanted answers.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

“Well, I’m drinking a vanilla latte,” he answered, taking a long drink. “No, I mean how do you have the time to sit here on your computer every morning? Don’t you have a job? A wife? Kids? Any sort of responsibilities?” Kyle blew on his latte. “Of course I do. I work, I have a beautiful wife and an amazing daughter.” I was mildly surprised, but somehow I knew he wasn’t as average as he looked. “Then how do you have the time to do this each morning?” I asked him. “I think the more important thing here is that you don’t have the time to do this every morning.” “What’s that supposed to mean?” I started to feel defensive. Somehow it felt like he was criticizing me for actually taking care of my responsibilities. He didn’t answer though and instead shut his laptop, slipped it into his bag, and stood from our table. He left without a word and left me sitting there with more questions than I had arrived with. That was the first time I spoke to Kyle Hodge. Chapter 2 I came back the next day, ordered the same vanilla latte, and then sat down where Kyle was typing away. He looked up at me, just over his laptop screen, and his eyes smiled, but his lips didn’t move. “Need something?” he asked. “What’s your wife doing right now?” I was going to get answers out of him even if I had to drag them out. “Well, I assume she’s feeding our daughter breakfast. It is breakfast time you know,” he told me, still typing away. He didn’t even look at me as he answered, it was as if it were all rehearsed.

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“Shouldn’t you be there? What kind of father ditches his family to sit in a coffee shop every morning?” “It only takes two hands to fill a bowl with cereal. Why should I have to be there?” He glanced at me, but only for a fleeting moment. “To watch your daughter grow!” I raised my voice a bit too loud and a few people glanced at us. “Nah,” was all he said, shaking his head nonchalantly. I was appalled. How could a guy who seemed like such a good person be so uncaring about his family? “You do understand what being a father means, don’t you?” I wasn’t so sure anymore that Kyle was a respectable man. “Of course, I do. I know what I’m doing, and my wife knows what I’m doing, and my daughter knows what I’m doing. Besides, my parenting style is none of your business,” he spoke calmly, but firmly. “Fine,” I said, “Fine, you know what? I don’t care. Your daughter’s probably missing her dad right now, but if you don’t care then so be it.” I got up angrily and stomped out of the café, leaving my latte sitting in front of him. That was the first time I cared about Kyle Hodge.

Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

Saturday, April 4

raffles, fire truck, police car, ambulance, Easter Bunny Breakfast and Egg Hunt more Free 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Coppertop Golf Club 2nd Annual Family Engagement Easter 5740 Center Road, Valley City Egg Hunt Extras: Breakfast feast, take pictures 10 a.m. with the Easter bunny, search for eggs. Jen’s Play ’n Learn Home Child Care Registration required, first 200 paid 320 Montview Drive, Medina guests. 500 filled eggs with area for ages 2 and Call 330-225-6122 to register. $15 per person; 2 years old and younger, younger Free free Breakfast With the Easter Bunny 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Mapleside Farms 294 Pearl Road, Brunswick Extras: breakfast buffet, hayride, craft, treat decorating, chocolate fountain, Easter bunny, special Easter egg Tickets required. $20 per person, $220 table of eight, service fee added Ages 2 and younger, ticket available for free. Tickets at https://bit.ly/38JR0q0 Brunswick United Methodist Church Easter Egg Hunt Light breakfast, 9:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Hunt starts at 10 a.m. 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick Ages: Preschool to Grade 5 Registration suggested, not required. Register at https://bit.ly/39sDpEX Free 10,000 Eggs Easter Egg Hunt Arrive by 9:30 a.m., Hunt begins at 10 a.m. Trillium Creek Dermatology 5783 Wooster Pike, Medina Extras: Bring camera for pictures with the Easter bunny, kid and grown-up egg hunts, petting zoo, snacks, prizes and

Community Easter Egg Hunt 1 p.m. Cy Hewit Park, 54 Liberty Street, intersection of Liberty Street and Spring Street, Seville Free SFX Annual Eggstravaganza 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church 606 E. Washington Street, Medina Extras: all indoors, activities, photos with Easter bunny, goodie bags, no rush for eggs Registration required, more information at https://bit.ly/2TXTEmL $4 per child, $9 maximum charge per family 3rd Annual Easter Egg Hunt 2 p.m. Living Word Lutheran Church 3631 Hamilton Road, Medina Extras: pictures, egg hunt, more Free

Sunday, April 5 Breakfast With the Easter Bunny 9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Mapleside Farms 294 Pearl Road, Brunswick Extras: breakfast buffet, hayride, craft, treat decorating, chocolate fountain, Easter bunny, special Easter egg Tickets required. $20 per person, $220 table of eight, service fee added Ages 2 and younger, ticket available for free. Tickets at https://bit.ly/38JR0q0 Montville Township Easter Egg Hunt 2 p.m. Cobblestone Park, 4765 Cobblestone Drive, Medina. Free

Saturday, April 11 Lodi Outlet Mall Bunny Express and Egg Hunt First train leaves at 9 a.m., leaves every 45 minutes until last train leaves at 5 p.m. Ride the train, meet the Easter bunny, hunt for eggs. Children must be accompanied by adult. In case of rain, event will move indoors to the on-site event room. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/39bdEZs Cost: Adults, $4; children ages 1 to 12, $8; children younger than 1 year, free York United Methodist Church Easter Egg Hunt 10 a.m. to noon 6566 Norwalk Road, Medina. Extras: light snacks, crafts, games, face painting, prizes Free


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

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Celebrate! Joy of Medina County Magazine thanks and celebrates these great companies who believe in community and make it possible for readers to enjoy this magazine for free. Please thank the following companies for bringing Joy to you!

Cable, Internet, Phone

Dentist

Armstrong

Landry Family Dentistry

1141 Lafayette Road, Medina Contact: Sam Pietrangelo Community Marketing Manager Phone: 330-722-3141 Website: https://armstrongonewire.com/

5076 Park Avenue West, Seville Contact: Dr. Joseph G. Landry II Phone: 330-769-4470 Website: www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

Fireplaces, Hot Tubs, Grills

Mold Remediation

The Place

AirXperts

2377 Medina Road, Medina Contact: Andrea Reedy Phone: 330-239-4000 Website: https://www.yourplace4.com/

Contact: Paul McHam Office phone: 330-658-2600 Cell phone: 330-280-3777 Website: http://myairxperts.com/

Want to join these great companies in sponsoring the best publication in Medina County? Contact Amy Barnes, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com, 330-461-0589.

photo by: Mike Enerio


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

photos by FlashBang Photography

Ben Walker and Shannon Federinko gave it their all at Dancing With the Medina Stars 2020.

Dancing With the Medina Stars returned from hiatus with dancers ready to hit the dance floor. The event benefits Faith In Action, which provides transportation for senior citizens, the homebound and people with disabilities. Kevin Rych and Cindy Phillips danced their way to win the People's Choice Award.


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From left, Melody Costello, Rod Carter, Leslie Burns, Cindy Phillips (in back), Carol Carter, Michelle Powell, and Kevin Rych (in back). Rod and Carol Carter won the event's championship.

Samantha and Eric Gasser danced with flair.

When you are told to hold the balloons, you hold the balloons! Emily Hurt keeps a firm grip while filling out paperwork.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

Donna and Russ Rauscher, Faith in Action volunteers, are thanked by Kathy Herte, program administrator.

From left, master of ceremonies Mike Kovack and judges David Centner, Jackie Gerspacher and Sam Livingston.

Debbie Dewey, a Faith in Action client, thanks the Dancing With the Medina Stars crowd.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

THE NETWORKER

Expanding Horizons

THE IN BOX

W

Evaluating Business Burnout

by Bob Arnold

by Steve Rak

I am convinced that the best way to network is by being out and about. Horizons are expanded by engaging with other people. Being out and about does not mean going just anywhere. Unexpectedly popping into places can set up some disappointing results. For example, I know networkers who drop in to random networking events. One person told me recently that he randomly attended an event and found everything was so structured that he did not have the opportunity to network. I recommend doing a little before-you-go research into the event you are planning to attend. Each of us is most comfortable in specific situations. Certain events or gatherings are ripe to fuel our business or personal interests better than others. However, you may need to go beyond your comfort zone occasionally because good results can be achieved when you do. The key is being ready to go outside of your comfort zone when opportunity arises. After an event has ended, what are you going to do with the people you meet? Follow up? Let them go? We desire to follow up, however we tend to not do so. I have found that when I network, I need to purpose some time to follow up. Recently, I was at a networking event where we mapped out a strategy on how to purposefully attend a business expo. Afterward, we used our strategy at an actual expo. Part of our strategy was to avoid frivolous conversations, instead steering our conversations in a direction to help us achieve our goals. After the expo, we met again and discussed strategies and what would be the best approach for following up with our new connections. It is fulfilling to see networkers get something from an event that builds their businesses. Have questions about networking? Contact me. Your successful networking is important to me.

Quite a few years ago, when I was going through some tough times with my business, I had a consultant come in to assess what the issues might be. As he looked across the conference table at me, he asked, “Steve, are you burned out?” He was shaking his head up and down and smirking, as though he already knew the answer would be yes. Of course, I told him no, but he knew better. Burnout in business is real, and while there is not enough room in this column to get into the depth of what burnout can do to a business owner, the consequences of burnout can be detrimental for a business as well. There are three scenarios that can happen when you hit the burnout wall: go out of business; be miserable, depressed and feel helpless; or get help. Since most businesses fail within the first five years, I would bet that the going-out-of-business scenario is the most common, followed by being miserable for as long as humanly possible and, after all is lost, going out of business anyway. What can you do when you get burned out? My answer is to get help, and to do it soon. As business owners, we all think we are superheroes, but that is not the case. You have to evaluate what is causing the burnout. Is it the cash flow, employee problems, low sales, competition, or all of the above? The good news is there are tools, consultants and industry trade associations that can help with these issues. You can find a lot of information online to help, as well. I would highly suggest checking with your chamber of commerce, trade association or other business owners in the area and see what resources they have used. You are not alone and your problems are not unique. You can get help, it is out there.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com

Medina resident Steve Rak is an award-winning columnist and has spoken at numerous venues throughout the United States and Canada as the owner of Rak Consulting, http://www.rakconsultingllc.com/, and Southwest Landscape Management, http://www.sw-landscape.com/ E-mail questions or suggestions for future column topics to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

Joyful Word Search Smiling in the Kitchen

CHEF RECIPE KITCHEN CAFÉ STUDENTS CULINARY

FOOD UTENSILS UNIFORM CAREER CENTER AWARD WINNING DISCIPLINE

E Answer Key for Last Month’s Search

Granger Bicentennial Bash

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

DIG IT!

Seedling Success photos and text by Michelle Riley Would you like to experience the joys of growing your own garden from seed? It is time to choose what to grow and to purchase seeds. Most annual vegetables should be sown indoors at least six weeks before the last hard frost. There are many container options for seed starting, such as yogurt containers, half of an orange peel, peat pellets, or egg cartons. Whatever container you choose, make sure it is clean and has drainage holes. Use the peat pellets for cool season crops such as lettuce, greens, kale, onions, and sugar snap peas so you can plant them outside a couple weeks before the last hard frost. The best medium for starting seeds is a seed starter mix as typical garden soil does not drain well enough for seedlings and can contain pathogens that may harm the new sprouts. Plant seeds twice as deep as the width of the seed. Do not forget to label the containers or you may be scratching your head in a month trying to remember what you are growing. Keep the soil moist, not saturated. Once the seeds germinate, the tiny roots will not need much water to grow and you do not want to drown them. Place your newly planted seeds in a warm area. Keep temperatures in the high 60s. A good overhead light can do wonders and may be as simple as a clamp light. You will want a bulb that provides 1500 to 3000 lumens (brightness or intensity) and 4500 to 6500 kelvin (mimics daylight). To ensure consistent light, connect the lamp to a timer set for 16 hours on and six hours off a day. Place the lamp a few inches above the plants, adjusting it upward as needed. Wait until after the last hard frost to plant your non-cool season crops outside. Growing your own vegetables from seed is an amazing experience. Not only do you get to decide how the seeds are raised, but you gain a few weeks in the growing season, especially in colder climates. As an added bonus, it also opens the door to a wider variety of plant choices.

Michelle Riley is a local horticulturist, landscape designer, and consultant. She is founder of MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com and NeOhioGarden.com and is the president of All About You Signature Landscape Design, Inc. She can be contacted at Info@MichelleRileyHorticulturist.com or by calling 234-678-8266.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

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OF MIND AND BODY

Lack Equals Gain by Kelly Bailey

Nearly 70 percent of Americans are considered overweight according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Is it any coincidence that nearly 70 percent of Americans also report that they sleep poorly? Sleep deprivation has a direct impact on weight in a few different ways. Hormones that regulate hunger and satiety are changed by sleep loss, hunger increases and normal amounts of food are not satisfying, according to National Sleep Foundation studies. Sleep loss also impairs judgment. Being tired behind the wheel of a car is as bad as driving intoxicated. Similarly, being tired at the plate can cause impulsive decisions about what and how much to eat. It also appears that sleep loss makes it more likely that there will be late-night eating and increased eating the next day. The mechanism behind this is not fully understood. Suffice it to say that late-night eating and eating more calories than your body needs will cause weight gain. To avoid these issues, there are some steps that can be taken to improve sleep. The first step would be to turn off all electronics at least 30 minutes before going to bed. The blue light emitted from electronic devices disrupts circadian rhythms, making the brain believe it is high noon. If turning off devices is not acceptable, at least

download a blue-light blocking app. Next, set a bedtime routine. I cannot say enough about the importance of getting your mind and body prepped for sleep. We do it for our kids. A routine can be as simple as having a cup of chamomile tea, brushing your teeth, and reading a boring book for a half hour before hitting the hay. Also, try sleeping in a cold, dark room. Get shades or light-blocking curtains. Cover alarm clocks or anything else that emits light. Crack a window in the winter, and set the air conditioning during the summer to keep the room around 65 degrees. Try a sleep divorce. There. I said it. The truth is this: If your spouse (or dogs and cats) keep you up for half the night, it is time to consider a better solution for your health, such as sleeping separately. Kelly Bailey is a certified personal trainer and certified holistic nutrition coach. She owns and operates Kelly Bailey Wellness. Read her blog and contact her at https://www.kellybailey.fit/

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

HEALTHY TRAILS

When Bigger Is Not Better by Robert Soroky

A big reason people give for not riding their bikes, besides time, is comfort. As you can probably guess, the majority of comfort complaints tend to center around, yep, that seat. The solution many riders choose when dealing with an uncomfortable seat is to, well, just get a bigger one. But the truth is, bigger is not always better. For this to make sense, it is important to understand what drives the design of a seat’s size and shape.

pubis). Therefore, the road bike seat is much skinnier, with seat pads closer together and slightly more forward in order to, once again, line up with your sit bones. Since your center of gravity is now forward of the seat, less padding is necessary as less of your weight needs to be supported. Another aspect of seat design is its position on the seat post. Most people know that seats can be adjusted up or

There are many different types of bikes on the market,

down, but did you know they also can slide forward and

from recreational and comfort to fitness and racing, and

backward? Or that they nose up and nose down? Believe

each is designed with a specific rider geometry in mind.

it or not, just a minor adjustment to one of these positions

For example, when you sit in a completely upright

can make all the difference in comfort.

position on a cruiser bike, you are sitting on the widest,

So, today’s lesson?

most rear part of your sit bones (the ischium). Hence, the

The wrong seat on the wrong bike makes for a rough

seat on a cruiser bike tends to be wide and cushy

day!

because, not only does it have to support all of your

Robert Soroky is a lifelong cyclist regularly participating in long distance charity rides and manager of the Century Cycles Medina location. Contact Soroky at robert@centurycycles.com to suggest column topics, for further information or to chat about bikes.

weight directly, it also has to line up with where the sit bones are making contact. By contrast, if you were on a drop-bar road bike, your body would be seated in a more aggressive, forwardleaning position. In this case, you are now sitting on a much narrower and forward part of your sit bones (the


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

Gutter Growth by Paul McHam Have you ever seen plants and even trees growing out of a house’s gutter? I will bet your first thought was that the home was not well maintained. That thought may have extended to an additional question regarding the degree of damage that may be inflicted on the home by this lack of maintenance. The answer is that the damage will vary, but can be huge. When gutters or downspouts become blocked, water runs over the gutter top and falls to the ground, landing very close to the foundation wall. The water likely will travel down the foundation wall and will either run into the footer drains or enter the basement through the foundation wall. Whether it makes its way into the basement or just builds up on top of the footer to create a relative humidity problem remains a question. The answer will be evident if eventually efflorescence (a white line of salt deposit) can be seen on the block at or near the bottom of the foundation wall. In any case, it ultimately will lead to mold in the house. Back at the gutter, the remaining rain water will sit in the blocked gutter and freeze in the winter, blowing out the gutter joints, letting more water run down the foundation wall. Even though many new homes have a continuous gutter, the endcaps on the gutter may be forced loose or off entirely by the freezing water. The water then will flow to below the dirt line and freeze there. When water freezes, it exerts approximately 27,000 pounds of pressure-per-square foot and can push walls in, to the point of unwanted horizontal cracks or step cracks. These cracks, in turn, let water enter its ultimate destination, the basement. Once again, it ends up causing mold and further damage and devaluation of the home. Regular gutter maintenance is an important step to avoid basement moisture and mold growth. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600. For a list of his certifications, go to https://bit.ly/2WH19Pt

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

VEGAN VITTLES

BITE ME!

Buttermilk Biscuits

Sweet-and-Sour Poppy Seed Dressing

by Crystal Pirri When I first took a bite of these golden puffs of heaven, I knew that I had succeeded in making a perfect oil- and butter-free biscuit. I also knew I would have to make a second batch for everyone else in my house because these were all mine. • • • • • •

1 cup unsweetened soy milk 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda dash sea salt

• 4 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce • 1 teaspoon cinnamon, optional, do not add for biscuits with gravy Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Prepare a baking sheet with either a nonstick liner or parchment paper. In a small glass container, add vinegar to soy milk and let sit to create the "buttermilk." Meanwhile, in a separate bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, soda, salt, and cinnamon, if using. Drop applesauce into dry mixture and whisk until wellcombined, it will be a bit crumbly. Gently, without overmixing, pour the soy milk mixture into the dry mixture and stir together with a wooden spoon. Mix just enough to ensure everything is combined and not a second longer, or the biscuits will lose their fluffy deliciousness. At this point, you can either gently shape the dough into a round slab on a lightly floured countertop and use a biscuit cutter to cut out perfectly shaped round biscuits, or you can use a large spoon to gently drop biscuit-cutter sized dollops of dough onto the baking sheet. The drop method saves time and works the dough less, which makes your biscuits even fluffier and more delicious than your imaginary competition’s. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until you see the edges beginning to turn golden brown in spots. Eat immediately with jam for sweet biscuits or with gravy for savory. Note: Whichever method is used to form the biscuits, make sure they touch each other on the baking sheet so they can support each other to reach their full potential. Crystal Pirri is an author, coach and oil-free vegan. Her recipes can be found at https://bit.ly/2v6NQi5. Have a question or request? E-mail Crystal@CrystalsRecipes.com

recipe by Chef Tony Stanislo This month’s guest cook is award-winning Chef Tony Stanislo, the chef and restaurant management instructor at the Medina County Career Center. He is well known in the area as Chef Tony. In addition to his teaching duties, he oversees the studentstaffed Center Café, which is open 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesday through Friday, in the Career Center at 1101 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Make a reservation at the café by calling Chef Tony at 330725-8461, Extension 229. The restaurant is open only during the school year, so it will close in mid-May and re-open during the fall semester. For a menu and more, go to https://bit.ly/38seCiM • • • • • • • •

1 red onion, quartered ¼ cup water 1 tablespoon dry mustard 1 ½ cups sugar 1 cup red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon salt 3 cups vegetable oil 3 tablespoons poppy seeds

I

Combine onion and water in a high-speed blender. Turn on the variable speed for four to five seconds. Set blender to highest speed setting and blend for 20 seconds, turn off. Add mustard, sugar, vinegar, and salt. Turn on blender to variable speed for 4 to 5 seconds, then blend at highest setting for 20 seconds. Switch back to variable and a medium-high speed setting (on a scale of 1 to 10 it would be a 7). While the blender continues to run, slowly add the oil to emulsify. Pour dressing into a container. Stir in poppy seeds. Store covered and labeled until needed. Want to have your recipe featured in a future issue? Send it with your name, phone number (in case we have questions), the city you live in, and some information about you to: Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “recipe” in the subject line. Recipes MUST be your original recipe and by submitting a recipe you are guaranteeing it is one you have developed or modified and used.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

FROM A TECHNICAL MIND

MIRTH AND JOY

Finding E-Waste Solutions

by Jerry King

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by Austin Steger Many electronics have a short life span, resulting in homes full of old phones, tablets, televisions, printers, and more. However, old electronics can be broken down for their raw materials, used to repair other devices, and be upcycled into art, jewelry and more. Valuable raw materials can be extracted from technology using several processes, including melting and stripping. Extracted materials can include copper, tin, iron, aluminum, titanium, gold, and silver. Even some of the less valuable materials, such as plastics and glass, can be recovered, reused and recycled. Some companies purchase broken phone screens because the liquid crystal display glass can be replaced to make refurbished screens. Many repair shops will purchase or accept donated electronics to use parts for repairs. These components can include cameras, screens, charging ports, buttons, antennas, and more. Electronics recycling faces several challenges. Even though the volume of recyclable electronics is increasing, the quality of recyclable content is decreasing. Devices are getting smaller and smaller, which means they contain fewer precious metals and less valuable material. Many products are being manufactured in ways that make them not easily recyclable, repairable or reusable. Proper disposal of e-waste is important because the presence of hazardous materials in these products poses risks to humans and the environment. E-waste is especially hazardous when it gets hot because it then releases toxic materials which can seep into groundwater and impact water supplies, animals, oceans, and humans. There are local options for e-waste. Computers and their accessories can be turned in at repair stores and the Medina County Recycling Center. Repair stores will sometimes pay for the items and will reuse many components for repairing other units. The recycling center accepts other e-waste as well, although it does charge for disposal of some items. A list of what it accepts and a fee schedule is available at https://bit.ly/2IpBc0U Working cell phones are very much in need at the Battered Women’s Shelter. Contact the shelter at 330-723-9610 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, to arrange for donations. Other places that will recycle cell phones and sometimes offer to buy them are phone companies and technology repair shops. Austin Steger is a local computer and mobile electronics technician and technical communicator. He can be contacted at repairs.riztech@gmail.com or by calling 330952-1225.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

ROLL ’EM!

Finding Friends at Super Speed by Hunter Barnard I saw the new “Sonic the Hedgehog” movie, and I thought he was pretty fast. Sonic is not a regular hedgehog, and he came from space. He has special rings his mom gave him that let him travel to all sorts of different places. Sonic used one of those rings to travel to Earth, where he found a small town to live in. He could not let anyone know he lived there, so he had to spy on people sometimes and gave them funny names since he could not ask their real ones. Sonic likes to run really fast and that is how he spends a lot of his time. Sonic never really relaxes; he just runs a lot. Eventually, Sonic has to start running from the bad guys but he doesn’t want to use a ring to get away because he wants to stay on Earth. He decides to get help from a guy he had spied on a lot, Tom Wachowski. They got to do lots of fun stuff together and started running away from the bad guy together. The bad guy’s name is Dr. Robotnik. He likes to use lasers. Robotnik was really smart with robots and lasers, but not so good at everything else. He was chasing Sonic because he wanted to study him and use his powers to rule the world. Robotnik was kind of funny, though. Sonic is sad through a lot of the movie because he was not able to have a lot of friends because he was too fast and had to hide a lot. Sonic taught me that it is important to have friends and let them help you, because you can have fun with them, too. I thought the movie was a really funny and silly one. It was kind of sad, but had a good ending so that was very good. I think people should go see the movie, it was really fun to watch.

“See? That’s why I’m never going to have kids.” “Why?” “Because you have to raise them.”

“Are you calling me fat?” “No, I just called myself skinny.”

“In kindergarten, if you let someone borrow your crayons, they’re your best friend for life.”

Hunter Barnard is an energetic 6-year-old who attends Brunswick City Schools and likes to share his opinion. He is assisted in writing his column by his mom, Jessica Rapenchuk.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

GEMS

Easing the Struggle

H

by Kent Von Der Vellen The English as a Second Language program is close to the heart of Project Learn’s new executive director. Angie Braidich said the program means so much to her because she is a first-generation American, and she knows the struggles her parents had as immigrants to America. Another reason the program is important to her is stories like the one she shared of an immigrant’s excitement when visiting a fast-food restaurant for the first time. It was more than being able to vocalize an order, it also was having the confidence to be out and participate in the community. Project Learn of Medina County was started 37 years ago by Ellen Daiber to help adults with math and reading skills. Today, Project Learn has three permanent locations called The Bookshelf. The Bookshelf is located at 831 Pearl Road, Brunswick; 105 W. Liberty Street, Medina; and 130 Main Street, Wadsworth. The Bookshelf locations are open to the public and sell gently used books at a discount. Fifty-five percent of the funding for Project Learn comes from the book stores. Project Learn helps adults improve math and reading skills; in passing the state-tested nursing assistant test, the armed forces admission test, and the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery; learn English; and prepare for the General Educational Development test. Students are matched with a tutor who specializes in their specific needs. The Bookshelf and Project Learn staffs include five paid staff members and 170 dedicated volunteers. More volunteers are needed who speak the native languages of Hispanic, Asian and Eastern European students. Currently, there are 108 students participating in the GED and English as a Second Language programs, an increase from 89 students two years ago. Books for the English program alone are $12 each, with several books needed for each student, but students are never charged for any materials or services regardless of the program. Braidich is looking for ways to increase funding, make services easier to access, and coordinate with other county nonprofits. Project Learn will be holding its annual trivia fundraiser, Match Wits 2020, on April 16, at Blue Herron Brewery and Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. For more information about the fundraiser, please go to https://bit.ly/38u03vb. For more information about Project Learn, go to https://bit.ly/2TKU93r. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com .

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

April 2020 Nonprofit Calendar Editor’s Note: Please be aware that many events are being cancelled due to concerns about coronavirus COVID-19. Check before going to ensure events you plan to attend are still being held.

charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Benefit Dinner for Emma Pfouts, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Galaxy Banquet Center, 201 Park Center Drive, Wadsworth. Includes pasta dinner, cash bar, auctions, wine pull, DJ and dancing. Tickets range from $50 to $60 At press time, all events for the Medina County District Library had at https://bit.ly/2T5bnt9 been cancelled up to April 7. Woodcock Walk, 7:30 p.m., Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about bird that sings with its wings, Wednesday, April 1 dances for dinner, and has a flexible bill. Hike to try to see one. Free. International Fun at Work Day (note that it also is April Fool’s Day) Saturday, April 4 https://bit.ly/2Q5Z91C National Walk Around Things Day https://bit.ly/3cQ1fMN Especially if Google Seminar: Using Data to Drive Business Growth, 8:30 a.m. to the dog did something there! 9:45 a.m., 333 Foundry Street, Medina. Learn how to analyze how A Healthy Dose of Nature: Hiking Series, 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Plum online customers engage with your business. Free for members of Main Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Monthly Street Medina or Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce, $10 for nonvigorous 3- to 5-mile hike with naturalist. Dress for weather, wear members. Tickets at https://bit.ly/2Ib4xft appropriate shoes, bring water bottle. Ages 10 to adult. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Avenue Care Basket Weaving 101: Everyday Basket, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek and Rehabilitation Center, 699 E. Smith Road, Medina. Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Cost is $17 per https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp basket. Register by March 27 by calling Betty Rettig, 330-975-4251. Easter Egg Decorating With the Harry Potter Club, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., SPCA Kitten Shower, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For a list of needed items and Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, the eight locations, go to https://bit.ly/2IA4VEy Wadsworth. Decorate eggs with dragons and Harry Potter characters 2020 Medina Beer Fest, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Foundry Warehouse, 333 and make golden eggs. Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/33bvI3q Foundry Street, Medina. Benefits Main Street Medina. Tickets are VIP, After-Work Wildflower Walk, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley $50; regular, $40; designated drivers, $14. For tickets and more Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Casual walk among spring information, go to https://bit.ly/38e6ja8 flowers. Notebook, pencil, wildflower guide suggested. Free. Ages 10 Sunday, April 5 and up. First Contact Day https://bit.ly/38LSKiL and Read a Road Map Day Plant Swap, 6 p.m., Boyert’s Greenhouse, 7171 Wooster Pike, Medina. https://bit.ly/2W2XxJU Do you suppose first contact was made because Hosted by Medina Plant Partnership. Bring plants or cuttings to trade. a map was misread? Bring food, beverages to enjoy. No purchase necessary to attend. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 8 a.m. to noon, Litchfield Township ORMACO Sogbety Diomande: West African Drumming, 7 p.m. to 8 Fire Station, 9487 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. West African https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp drumming and dance, costumes, instruments. Interactive ORMACO Party Bus to ONE EACH: Still Lifes by Pissarro, Cezanne, performance. Free. Reservations at https://bit.ly/2PdnBOd Manet, and Friends, 9:30 a.m., leave from Buehler’s, 3626 Medina Thursday, April 2 Road, Medina. Travel to the Toledo Museum of Art on party bus. Lunch International Children’s Book Day https://bit.ly/3cTA0RC in Toledo at Tony Paco’s at 11:30 a.m., visit Libbey Glass Factory outlet if time allows, then to the museum for a private docent tour. Explore Friday, April 3 the mansion after the tour. Bus leaves at 4:30 p.m. Enjoy a wine-andNational Find a Rainbow Day https://bit.ly/2vlrtpK cheese party with chocolates on the way back to Medina. Arrive in American Red Cross Blood Drive, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Medina Hospital, Medina at approximately 6:30 p.m. $95 per person. Reservations at 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp https://bit.ly/2v755QB or by calling 330-722-2541. Limited seating. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Orienteering at Allardale, 10:30 a.m., The Lodge at Allardale,141 Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 Remsen Road, Medina. Map and compass navigation activity p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional challenging ability to navigate a course of varying land features. Lecture, guided map hike, short orienteering course on own. Sturdy


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020 shoes and pants suggested. No registration. Fee, at the door, is $15 per person or group. Children under age 16 must be accompanied by parent or guardian. For more information, call 216-285-0627 or go to http://neooc.com/ Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Monday, April 6 Plan Your Epitaph Day https://bit.ly/3cP5hoV Ahhh, the joy of having the last word! Art Adventure: Pop Art Zebras, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Monday Movie Matinee: “Judy” 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Adults. Reservations by calling Soprema Senior Center, 330-335-1513. Beginning Web Design, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Design and create own web page. Grades 4 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2u8jkEu Beginning Cross Stitch Series, 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Three-part class. Register by April 5 at https://bit.ly/2U5aSyy I Tuesday, April 7 No Housework Day https://bit.ly/2U2HGIq Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Art Adventure: Paper Mosaics, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad, Wadsworth. Use small paper squares to make art. All ages. Create! Soap Carving, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Register at https://bit.ly/38LwBkH Gearheads: Roblox World Building, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Fourweek workshop. Building own worlds in Roblox. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/38PwcgW Wednesday, April 8 Draw a Picture of a Bird Day https://bit.ly/2W9qSCq Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Chippewa Rail Trail, Chippewa Road, east of Lake Road. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. Go to https://bit.ly/2HsFdBc for more details. Baby Footprint Art, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make a Some Bunny Loves You memory. Birth to 2 years. Art Adventure: Tape Resist Name Art, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. All ages. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Don’t Be Bored! 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Play board games. Grades 6 to 12. Teen Movie Afternoon: “Catch Me if You Can,” 4 pm. to 6:30 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Seasoned FBI agent pursues criminal who forged millions of dollars of checks and posed as many different people. Rated PG-13. After-Work Wildflower Walk, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Casual walk among spring

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flowers. Notebook, pencil, wildflower guide suggested. Free. Ages 10 and up. Build a Pollinator Habitat, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about butterfly gardens, water features, more. Register at https://bit.ly/33cmyni History and Legends of Rogues Hollow, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Rooms A and B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Hosted by Wadsworth Area Historical Society. Learn history of Chippewa Township former mining village with history of hauntings. Thursday, April 9 Name Yourself Day https://bit.ly/2U01XhZ You Write the Grant, 9 a.m. to noon, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. Hosted by OSU Extension. Learn how to write winning grant proposals. Second, follow-up class April 23. Registration deadline April 6. Tickets are $100 for both classes at https://bit.ly/2vRjRM0 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Breastfeeding Basics Class, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4. Art Adventure: Yarn Painting, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use glue and yarn to create art. All ages. Bug Zoo, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Make some new creepy, crawly friends. Hosted by OSU Extension Office. All ages. Can You Escape? Don’t Get Deserted in the Desert, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. You are a scientist researching the Gobi Desert. One morning you get up to find a fellow scientist has stolen your research and deserted you in the desert. You will need your Earth science knowledge to fine your way out. Ages 12 to 18. Register at https://bit.ly/2W73HZr Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Cooking Under Pressure, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., OSU Extension, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Suite 1L, Medina. Learn how to safely prepare food using an electric multi-cooker. Attendees will have chance to participate in preparation. Fee $15. Register at 330-725-4911 or e-mail ruggiero.46@osu.edu


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

Art Auction and Dinner, 6 p.m., 4797 Sharon Copley Road, Medina. Benefits Around the Sun Montessori PTO. Student artwork auctioned, raffle baskets, more. Ticket includes dinner and beverage. Tickets are $25 at https://bit.ly/2TYqnIx Friday, April 10 National Siblings Day https://bit.ly/3aHwVSO American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art Adventure: Paper Sculptures, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Use paper circles and strips to make abstract sculpture. Make Your Own Play Dough, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Use different sodas and other ingredients to make play dough. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2QcPG8L Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, April 11 Eight-Track Tape Day https://bit.ly/2W3Ywtj 87th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks, 7:30 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2IJ56xm Garlic Mustard Workshop, 10 a.m. to noon, Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn how to identify and remove invasive garlic mustard. Part of session will be outdoors. Ages 11 and up. Tales and Tails, 10:30 a.m. to noon, Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Children read with therapy dogs. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Egg-citing Eggs! noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about animals that hatch from eggs. All ages. Wine and Canvas, 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring wine, snacks, take your original painting home. Fee due to presenter at event, $15. Must be 21 or older to attend. Register at https://bit.ly/2w2atoI Sunday, April 12 Walk on Your Wild Side Day https://bit.ly/2TZSxTx Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. Meet pets up for adoption. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2PbEuYS ORMACO Presents Will Cruz: Spirit of Country, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Performance by former U.S. Navy sailor of original country music, short film on evolution of country music, question-and-answer session. Free but because of space, reservations are recommended. Call 330-722-2541. Monday, April 13 International Plant Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/38Kncd1

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Cleveland Clinic Family Health Center Brunswick, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Baby Car Seat Installations, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Medina Fire Station No. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. By appointment only, call 330723-9688. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Art in the Afternoon: Egg Art, 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Make egg art using various techniques and materials. Ages 5 to 12. Tuesday, April 14 International Moment of Laughter Day https://bit.ly/2TZTbAr Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 10 a.m. to noon., Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Tech Tuesdays: 3D Printer, noon to 12:45 p.m., Makerspace, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Demonstration of how to use 3D printer. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Stress Less With Meal Prep, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn what to buy, where to buy it and what to freeze for later. Presented by OSU Extension Office. Wednesday, April 15 Rubber Eraser Day https://bit.ly/2Q9TWWO American Red Cross Blood Drive, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Reduce, Reuse, Upcycle, 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Invent new lives for old items. Grades 6 to 12. DIY Clay Succulents, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Paint a flower pot and create a succulent. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2U2or1N Spring Flowers Storytime and Craft, 4:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Plant marigolds to take home. Ages 4 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2Qaa7TW After-Work Wildflower Walk, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Casual walk among spring flowers. Notebook, pencil, wildflower guide suggested. Free. Ages 10 and up. Bloody Corner and Beyond: Cleveland’s Prohibition Era Mob Bosses, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Presentation on Cleveland’s bloodiest period when rival gangs battled for control and many mob leaders did not survive. L Thursday, April 16 Wear Pajamas to Work Day https://bit.ly/2IDfKpz


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020 Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Teen Scene: How to Smashbook, 4 to 5 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn how to journal by smashing a book. Ages 9 to 14. Register at https://bit.ly/2Wev2Jr DIY Terrariums, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create a terrarium. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2TMyZTQ Pasta 101, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn to make traditional and vegan versions of pasta. Register at https://bit.ly/2TZpik0 Downsizing and Decluttering, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn how to downsize and declutter. Titanic: The Unsinkable Legend, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn the myths and stories that surround one of the most famous shipwrecks. Friday, April 17 Bat Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2veVXcL and National Ellis Island Family History Day https://bit.ly/3aRW25c American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, April 18 National Animal Crackers Day https://bit.ly/33dnR5o 87th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks, 7:30 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/38KXp4k Vegetable Gardening, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn easy ways to get a garden off to a good start. Bring questions. 24th Annual Earth Day Festival, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Exhibits, fishing derby, activities, food, more. Additional parking at Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Shuttle provided. All ages. Family Fishing Derby, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Parent-child teams. Bring rod, reel, bait. Limited number of fishing poles and bait available. In conjunction with Earth Day. All ages. Free. Must register on site to win prizes. Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Egg-citing Eggs! noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about animals that hatch from eggs. All ages. Sunday, April 19 National Garlic Day https://bit.ly/39ODxi0

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Egg-citing Eggs! noon to 5 p.m., Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Learn about animals that hatch from eggs. All ages. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. 55th Anniversary Tree Planting Party, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., the shelter by the lake at Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Celebrate the 55th birthday of the founding of the Medina County Park District. Bring gloves and a shovel and enjoy refreshments while planting trees in the park. All ages. Free. Register online by April 6 at https://bit.ly/3cwl37Y ORMACO The Music of John Robert Hiatt, 2 p.m., Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Performance by Pat Masalko. New Wave, blues, country styles. Includes Masalko’s original songs. Free. Reservations at https://bit.ly/2SPsNds or by calling 330-722-2541. K-9 Kapers, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot nonretractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. Monday, April 20 Look-alike Day https://bit.ly/2TLgNdp and National Record Store Day https://bit.ly/2xzjEgT American Red Cross Blood Drive, noon to 4:30 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 7 p.m., First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Raised Bed Basics, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Medina Community Garden and Education Center, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Free presentation by OSU master gardeners. Information and opportunity to ask questions. Monday Night Intrigue: Furious Hours, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. In the 1970’s, a reverend was accused of murder and escaped justice until a relative killed him. Harper Lee attended the trial and got the idea of writing a book. Tuesday, April 21 National Chickpea Day https://bit.ly/2TYuxAd Love Our Earth Story Time, 10:30 a.m., Medina Community Garden and Education Center, 302 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Celebrate Earth Week at the Community Garden. Medina Library will present a story time.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020

A list of art shows in Medina County. To have a show listed, send the information to Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Pointillistic Art of Darrell Kent Through April 7, 2020 Kent uses colored marks to create works in pointillism. Marie’s Café 117 Public Square, Medina

Camp Wired, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-948-1885. Breastfeeding Basics Class, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Free. For more information, call 330-723-9688, Option 4. Alcohol Ink Art, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Supplies provided to create art. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2QdgENz Bird Feeder Building, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Build two birdfeeders. Bring paper milk or juice carton to build one of the feeders. Register at https://bit.ly/2QaKH8N Wednesday, April 22 Jelly Bean Day https://bit.ly/2W45wGB Growing Up Cleveland, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Relive early days of television and children shows’ hosts in Cleveland and television trivia. Afternoon at the Cinema, 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m., Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent DVD releases, light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. S’mores Pops, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. A twist on a classic treat. Grades 6 to 12.

American Red Cross Blood Drive, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Cloverleaf Middle School, 7500 Buffham Road, Seville. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp American Red Cross Blood Drive, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., The Chapel Wadsworth Campus, 1391 State Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp After-Work Wildflower Walk, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Casual walk among spring flowers. Notebook, pencil, wildflower guide suggested. Free. Ages 10 and up. Photo Management, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to download, save, edit, and organize photos in hands-on class. Register at https://bit.ly/39MWdyH Thursday, April 23 Take a Chance Day https://bit.ly/2TLbJpg Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Therapy Dog Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Visit with special therapy dog guests. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., Scene 75 Entertainment Center, 3688 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Legal Resource Center, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. Hemp Farming, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn how to get started hemp farming, about laws and regulations, requirements. Hosted by OSU Extension Office. Explorastory: I Spy on the Farm, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Read stories, do a scavenger hunt, count and sort vegetables, play game. Paint farm animal tracks and make toilet paper tube rooster craft. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/33eGLsX Garden Chats With Master Gardeners: Lasagna Gardening, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Meeting Room A, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Learn a no-dig, no-till organic gardening method that results in rich, fluffy soil with little work. Friday, April 24 National Hairball Awareness Day https://bit.ly/3cS5s2t We have no comment. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional charge. Fish dinner through April 10, $8. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass/country bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 17th Annual SPCA Animal Affair, 6:30 p.m. cocktails, 7:30 p.m. dinner and auction, Blue Heron Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Tickets $50. For more information and tickets, go to https://bit.ly/2IA4VEy Saturday, April 25 East Meets West Day https://bit.ly/33bUgcI 87th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks, 7:30 a.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2TMkO1i


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2020 Woodland Healthy: Day of Service, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Help pull aggressive weed from sensitive habitat. Bring work gloves, dress for outdoors. Ages 9 and up. Messy Sensory Play Day, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Get messy with paint, glue, more. Wear old clothes. Ages 4 to 9. Register for 11 at https://bit.ly/2TYZ54U, register for 1:30 p.m. at https://bit.ly/38FsVAQ Knitting and Crocheting Circle, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Hair-Raising Troll Party, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Put your hair in the air and enjoy cupcakes and rainbows. Register at https://bit.ly/2QbCH7v Moss Mosey, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Hike and learn about mosses. All ages. Sunday, April 26 World Pinhole Photography Day https://bit.ly/2W37bfA Monday, April 27 National Tell a Story Day https://bit.ly/3aQy6iR Then write it down and submit it to the magazine to be featured in The Reading Nook! Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Choosing Your Plants, 12:15 p.m. to 12:45 p.m., Medina Community Garden and Education Center, 203 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Covers whether to direct sow seeds or to use transplants. Free presentation by OSU master gardeners. Movie Monday, 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, newly released movie. Grades 6 to 12. Free. No registration. Wall Hanging Weaving, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Weave a wall hanging. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/3cOssj7 Sensory Friendly Story Time, 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Children’s Activity Room, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Stories, songs, rhymes, play time for children on the autism spectrum, those with sensory integration challenges, their families and caregivers. Register at https://bit.ly/33jDWXp Tuesday, April 28 World Day for Safety and Health at Work https://bit.ly/3aLddp2 American Red Cross Blood Drive, 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Medina County Board of Developmental Disabilities Achievement Center, 4691 Windfall Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Tech Tuesdays: Embroidery Machine, noon to 12:45 p.m., Makerspace, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Demonstration of how to use embroidery machine. American Red Cross Blood Drive, 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Applewood Elementary School, 3891 Applewood Drive, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Otaku Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Teen Area, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Watch anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. Grades 6 to 12. Art Show Reception, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Meet Buckeye School artists and view their work. All ages.

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A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early, but there is too late.

Friday, April 24 Steps 4 Families: 5k Run/Walk and 1-Mile Fun Run/Walk, 6:30 p.m., Buckeye Woods Park, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Registration fees raise funds to bring awareness to child abuse prevention and the need for free exercise programs for those struggling mental health or addiction issues. For fees and registration information, go to https://bit.ly/2T4onOJ Friday, May 29 2020 Medina Runs Down Cancer: Medina Half Marathon, Relay and 5k Expo; 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Summa Health Medina Medical Center, 3780

Medina Road, Medina. Information at https://bit.ly/38IIXe5 Saturday, May 30 Medina Runs Down Cancer Summa Health Medina Half Marathon and 5k, 6:45 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Public Square, Medina. Benefits Mary Grace Memorial Foundation. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2VeJDDS Friday, August 7 Medina Runs Down Cancer Collin Cares: Glow With the Flow 5k, starts with Mile Run Kids at 7:45 p.m., 5k starts at 8:15 p.m., AI Root Middle School, 333 W. Sturbridge Drive, Medina. For fees and registration, go to https://bit.ly/2VeJDDS

Wednesday, April 29 International Dance Day https://bit.ly/38QvjVD After-Work Wildflower Walk, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Casual walk among spring flowers. Notebook, pencil, wildflower guide suggested. Free. Ages 10 and up. Smart Phones, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn about changing settings, using Bluetooth, apps, more. Bring smart phone. Register at https://bit.ly/33bPjAK Thursday, April 30 National Honesty Day https://bit.ly/2TLY1SU Camp Wired, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Narcan Training, 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Meeting Room B, Wadsworth Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Presented by the Medina County Health Department. For more information, contact Jeannie Bunch, jbunch@medinahealth.org, 330-441-2734.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine April 2020