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APRILÂ 2019

V O LU M E

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N U M B E R

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BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION PHOTO GALLERY Pg. 16

BEYOND THE HI Pg. 24

LICKING YOUR CHOPS Pg. 26

THE LINCHPIN

Roger Smalley avoids the limelight, but his love for Medina got him talking about his dedication to the preservation and progress of the city he loves. Pg. 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 3 JOYOFMEDINACOUNTY.COM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC

License to Create Chaos

EDITOR

by Amy Barnes Since a staff member was stunned to learn this, it seems worthy of mention. When you renew your driver’s license, you now face a choice: standard or federally compliant. The standard is what we are all used to having. You can simply renew with just that license. However, did you know that you will not be allowed to fly on any planes or to enter federal buildings that require identification if all you have is a standard license, unless you happen to have a passport and have it with you? The Joy staff member did not know that. All he was asked is if he had his birth certificate with him when he renewed his license. When he said, no, his license was renewed as a standard license. A little unfortunate since he is planning a trip to Texas next month. The fun does not end there. If you are a woman who has changed your name as a result of marriage, you face additional challenges to getting the

Amy Barnes

compliant license. You will have to get an official stamped copy of each of your marriage licenses so you can prove the entire succession of names you have had from birth to present day. A bureau clerk said they had a woman who had to bring in (brace yourself!) all 17 of her marriage licenses. Yikes. She probably has a few more issues than trying to get a compliant license, but I digress. You can find a list of documents accepted to prove you are you for the compliant driver’s license here: https://bit.ly/2H4wQhd Just to be clear, this is not Ohio’s doing. It comes from the federal government. Senator Sherrod Brown https://www.brown.senate.gov/ Senator Robert Portman https://www.portman.senate.gov/public/ Representative Anthony Gonzalez https://anthonygonzalez.house.gov/ Representative Bob Gibbs https://gibbs.house.gov/

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ed Bacho Photography FlashBang Photography

ART DIRECTOR Danny Feller

CONTRIBUTORS

Bob Arnold Danielle Litton Paul McHam Steve Rak Kent Von Der Vellen

MASCOT

Rico Houdini

OFFICE

330-461-0589

EMAIL

Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an eedition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty.com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

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THE ART OF CELEBRATION

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JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

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THE NETWORKER

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THE IN BOX

Medina's historic 1918 fire engine was reconditioned by the  Medina Firefighters Association. New tires were installed and  repairs made to make the vehicle street safe. Nicknamed "Old  Asthma" by firefighters, it was part of Medina's Bicentennial  Parade, July 4, 2018. Photo provided. Page 4

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OH, SNAP!

photos by FlashBang Photography

We found cards, charity, chips, and creativity in the county.

TO KNOW YOU IS TO HELP YOU by Bob Arnold

Networking leads to successful connections when you go beyond the hi.

UTILIZING GOALS FOR SUCCESS by Steve Rak

These three steps could make all the difference in your business.

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BITE ME!

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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

TANGY PORK CHOPS AND MORE by Amy Barnes

A tasty twist on fried pork chops, dirty rice, and quick rice pudding.

THREE AVENUES WATER TRAVELS by Paul McHam

Using any one of these three ways, water can cause basement mold. GEMS

by Christopher Barnes

Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free as an e-edition and in print. To subscribe to the e-edition, see past issues, and to order print issues and copies of photos, go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com. Additional features not seen in the magazine, such as Giving Hearts, also can be found on the website.

It is easier to find our hidden words than it is to find Roger Smalley taking credit for what he has done for Medina.

He thought it would be a quick stop at the pharmacy, but the opportunity to do a good deed slowed him down.

LITTLE TRUTHS

ON THE COVER: Roger Smalley poses with pride  by the banner celebrating the city he loves. Photo  by Amy Barnes.

THE MAN BEHIND THE CURTAIN

by Amy Barnes

THE READING NOOK

Cam begins to accept the loss of his dad and the changes it has brought to his life, then he gets a letter that flips his world upside down.

The Medina County community celebrated Black History Month through colorful, passionate performances and artwork.

PRESCRIPTION FOR GOOD

by Amy Barnes

He has never been one to grab headlines, but his story is interlaced with the county’s history and is one of dedication to community.

photos by Ed Bacho Photography

IN DEED

A SMALLEY PART OF THE BIGGER PICTURE

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CARING DURING CRISIS by Kent Von Der Vellen

When four co-workers decided to take action, they found a way to help.

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GUEST COLUMN

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LET'S DO IT!

CONNECTING SOULS by Thomas Sigel A birthday to remember.

Spring into action with these great activities to share with family and friends!


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

Beginning in the late 1800s, the center of Medina’s Uptown Park always contained a fountain. The original fountain was cast iron in a  popular Victorian­era style. The last fountain was removed in 1974 to make way for the 1975 gazebo. Through the efforts of the Medina  Uptown Park Advisory Committee and the Main Street Medina Design Committee, a new Victorian­era style fountain was proposed.  Funds provided by the Van Epp Family Trust covered the creation and installation of a new fountain and pool in the Bicentennial  Commons in 2017. Photo provided.

A SMALLEY PART OF THE by Amy Barnes

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BIGGER PICTURE

f you notice the quiet, unassuming man standing off to the side at an event in Medina, you would be unlikely to guess from his demeanor that he was the linchpin for the event. It also is unlikely you would ever realize as he stands there, with a twinkle of satisfaction in his eyes and a slight smile, the countless times he has connected people, needs and dollars, until another goal has been achieved for the city he loves. For example, when the Bicentennial Commons was created at the site of the former Key Bank

drive-through building on the corner of Court Street and Liberty Street, Roger Smalley saw it as an opportunity to answer the o en-stated wishes of community members who longed for the square to once again have a fountain. Sue and Murray Van Epp, through the Van Epp Family Trust, provided the funds and a large Victorianstyle fountain started splashing its way through summer in a corner of the commons. It is the first time Medina’s Uptown Park has had a fountain since 1975, when the present-day gazebo was built over top of the historic fountain that had been there for many decades.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

Even as a child, Smalley was driven by a deep passion and fascination with history, unlike his younger siblings, Pamela and Dave. “When I was a kid, for some reason, I really enjoyed history, even when I was 8 years old. I was always fascinated by stories of what people had done in the past,” Smalley said. Perhaps his love of history comes from the stories of his family, which has deep roots in the Medina area and America’s history. He is related to several old Medina families, including those with the last name of Washburn, Bradway (as in Bradway Creek), and Webber. Smalley’s mother was Jane Arndt. Smalley traced his mother’s paternal family back to a Hessian drummer boy who came to America during the Revolutionary War. Hessians were German troops hired by the British to fight Americans. A er the war, the boy had the chance to return to Germany but chose to stay in the U.S. Arndt’s maternal side of the family was part of the Webber family, who arrived in Medina in 1838. The Webber family specialized in casting and liquid metal work and started the Holloware Foundry, located in Hinckley. Smalley said that Foundry Street in Medina is named a er the foundry. Sometime in the 1840s, one of the Webbers, who was a blacksmith in the foundry, was killed when a bolt of lightning traveled down the foundry’s chimney and struck him. Eventually, the Webbers sold the foundry to John Smart. John Smart’s name may be familiar because his house, at the corner of Liberty and Elmwood in Medina, is the current home of the Medina County Historical Society. Smalley’s mother was born in a home on West Friendship Street in 1920, during a blizzard. She graduated from Medina High School in 1938. His father was born in England, 50 miles north of London, during a powerful storm. Storm waters had flooded the first floor of the house, so his father was born on the second floor. The Smalleys came to the U.S. and settled in Cleveland following WWI. A er Smalley’s father returned to America following his service in World War II, his mother and father stayed with Smalley’s grandmother in

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Married less than a year, Benn and Jane Smalley, parents of  Roger Smalley, stroll together in San Antonio, Texas, in 1942.  Benn was completing training in the U.S. Army Air Corp and  would soon be transferred to the Pacific Theater where he  would serve in Australia; the Philippines; Okinawa; and, finally,  in Japan itself. Photo provided.

Cleveland. During the time they lived in Cleveland, Smalley was born at Glenville Hospital, which was demolished shortly a er his birth, fitting for a boy whose parents were both born during intense storms. “A er me, they tore it down,” Roger says, with a chuckle. It is a little bit of a twist on the old saying that a er someone is born, “they broke the mold.” He majored in history at Muskingum University in New Concord, Ohio, the hometown of astronaut John Glenn, who also had attended the university. Smalley would o en see Glenn jogging on the track, and the two would exchange greetings. Smalley earned his teaching degree, following that up with getting his masters at the University of Akron. He began teaching in 1970. Then, one day at church, Linda Hamilton caught continued, Page 6 his eye.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

continued from Page 5

Hamilton Monday, they was a said they did Brunswick not know teacher and because it sang in the depended on church choir what the at Medina’s circumstances First were by then. Christian The Medina Church, judge located on immediately Broadway jailed the first Street, list of between teachers. Garfield Teachers As the museum was being developed, it was decided that a pivotal moment in Medina’s  history should hold a prominent place in the displays. Most of the buildings around the  School and had been square were constructed after the Great Fire of 1870. Local artist Cindy Allman was  Medina placed on lists contracted to create a mural depicting how the fire might have appeared on that fateful  night of April 14, 1870.  Photo provided. Library, determining which now the order in houses Evolve Academy. which they would be arrested and jailed. But when Smalley tried to talk to Hamilton, she Smalley said his wife was placed on the second was not interested, he said, with a twinkle in his list of teachers who were going to be jailed in an eye and a laugh. effort to put pressure on the Brunswick teachers’ He tried again at a Brunswick bar called Coaches negotiating team leader, who just happened to be Two, which was owned by a couple of school Smalley himself. coaches and was a regular Friday night teacher Jailing teachers garnered Brunswick national hangout. This time, he was successful, and in attention, partly due to the reporting of the story December 1977, the two were married. by Dorothy Fuldheim, a well-known television Little did they realize their new marriage was news Channel 5 and Plain Dealer reporter who about to be tested by circumstances that would owed part of her fame to her interviews with get national attention and change teaching in Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler. Ohio. The bargaining session to end the strike went on In 1978, just a couple of months a er their for 50 hours, spread over two days. Smalley wedding, Brunswick teachers went on strike over recalls sleeping on the floor of the mediation longevity, pay and fair dismissal. Prior to the room. strike, teachers could be fired without an A settlement was finally reached, but there were explanation. no winners, said Smalley. “If someone didn’t like what you wore to work, “You never really win a strike,” he said. they could fire you the next day,” Smalley said. Soon a er the end of the strike, the Ohio Both of the Smalleys were Brunswick teachers legislature passed a collective bargaining bill when the strike was called. At that time, it was giving public employees the right to strike. illegal for public employees to strike. Smalley said the legislature would deny it, but he “What we did was illegal, it was an act of civil always has believed that the Brunswick strike was disobedience,” Smalley said. instrumental in causing the passing of the bill. When striking teachers were asked by a judge if From 1998 to 2001, Smalley was a member of they would be back at their jobs the following the Medina City Council. When he joined the


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

council, Wilda Bell was holding office as the first black woman council president. As a member of council, Smalley was integral to creating the partnership between the city and the Medina City School District to build and fund the Medina Community Recreation Center. Phil Duke had started the effort to build a recreation center when he was the chair of the city’s Parks and Recreation Committee, but he had trouble getting traction for the project, Smalley said. Smalley renewed the effort and partnered with Dr. Robert Wilder, who was a member of the Medina City Schools Board of Education at the time, to get a recreational facility study completed. The study was a compilation of information from other communities that had recreational centers. To finance the recreation center, in mid-2001, with the help of the city’s financial director, Wayne Hamilton, the team worked together to achieve a great bond rating by meeting with Moody’s Investors Service, a credit-rating agency, located near the World Trade Center in New York City, Smalley said. A few months later, the towers

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were gone as the result of the 9/11 terrorist attack. The Moody’s building they had met in was damaged in the attack. Once the recreation center was underway, Smalley and Wilder turned their attention to another joint agreement to create a television station. The Greater Medina Chamber of Commerce already had been pushing for a cable television studio, Smalley said. Using the Armstrong franchise fee, which is paid by Armstrong customers per state regulations, a new city cable channel was created and city council meetings, board meetings, and other public meetings were brought into living rooms. Despite all he has done for Medina, Smalley struggles to stay out of the limelight, preferring to connect dollars and needs, quietly, without fanfare or notice. “I’m just happy when things get done and it benefits the community.” With some pushing, he sighs and thinks for a minute. He is reluctant to list all of the projects he has been a part of and is even more reluctant to list any he was the main force behind. He finally admits he helped write legislation to create the position of city forester, was part of the Historic District overlay project, the head of the Medina Archives Commission, and a member of the Community Design Committee. Smalley’s quiet influence will be felt throughout the city of Medina for generations to come, but much of what he has accomplished may never be well known. “It’s not just me, a lot of people do that (help the community),” Smalley said. “There’s just been so many One of the main attractions in the Medina Town Hall and Engine House Museum is the 1918 fire  truck. Built in Elmira, New York, by the American LaFrance Company, the truck had a top speed of  people over the years. 75 miles an hour when it arrived brand new in Medina. It was used to fight fires until 1960. Photo  provided.

continued, Page 8


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

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It’s what Medina’s been about, a lot of people behind the scenes.” Smalley also was the quiet voice of untiring determination behind the Medina Bicentennial celebration that was observed with approximately 30 activities and events from November 2017 to November 2018, including a Civil War encampment (see photos at https://bit.ly/2C1iMAQ and watch a video of the camp at https://bit.ly/2tIGY6B ). He officially started working on the celebration in June 2014, planning events, enlisting volunteers, and finding funding. “The hard part was the funding,” he said. A er Medina City Council approved allotting funds for the celebration, businesses and individuals started donating funds. As a result, the Bicentennial Committee has carryover funds because they have not yet had to touch the council funds. “I was very prudent with our funds,” Smalley said, smiling, adding, “We made it work.” The final threads of Medina’s Bicentennial celebration are coming to an end. Remaining to be finished are the compilation and publication of a collection of community photos in a book that will be available to the community, the planned burying of a time capsule (that would include a copy of the photo book) in Bicentennial Park, and the dedication of the Bicentennial Bench, also in the park and funded by the Van Epp Family Trust. Smalley is ready to turn his full attention to celebrating the May 4 opening of the renovated Medina Town Hall and Engine House Museum. Until the 1990s, when new fire stations were built in Medina, the engine house at 50 Public Square was home to Medina’s fire department. With the move, there was talk of selling the older equipment, Smalley said, but Bob Miller, a former radio station owner who has since died, was determined that the equipment be saved. In 1996, the Medina City Archive Commission was created by Miller and Smalley to oversee the museum and gather historic artifacts. The commission’s goal was “to gather historic

artifacts before they disappear into garage sales,” Smalley said. Miller’s original thoughts involved the expenditure of $750,000 to create a museum in the old engine house. “Bob had grand ideas,” Smalley said. The engine house was built in 1878 a er a third fire on Public Square destroyed three buildings in 1877. The first two fires were in 1848, which destroyed the west side of the square, and The Great Fire of 1870, which destroyed 40 buildings. When the engine house was completed, there were offices on the second floor for town officials and police. On the first floor were jail cells in the back and fire equipment in the front. The town hall stayed in the building until the 1950s. However, the building remained the only operating fire station in Medina until the 1990s, with some of the equipment stored in the city garage. By 2004, Miller’s plans were downsized to make a museum more affordable and local historian Gloria Brown had joined the effort. With the help of community members, the Willard Stephenson Foundation, and the Feckley Charitable Foundation, funds were raised for the restoration and renovation of the former Medina Town Hall and Fire Engine House. Funds were quickly depleted, with a lot of work still needing completing, including much-needed display cases, Smalley said. Grants and money were raised through additional local fundraising efforts. Jim Gowe created display areas for the museum, with city council providing $18,000 in funding in 2007. Instrumental in the renovation and opening of the museum were Jim Shields, city council member and Medina Schools District human resources and legal counsel; the Van Epp Foundation; the Community Design Committee; and many others, Smalley said. “A lot of good folks were involved,” said Smalley. The first floor of the museum opened to the public in 2013. In 2016, the second floor of the engine house was vandalized, causing a setback in the restoration work on that floor. More recently, students in the construction


9 Community Design Committee, and a community room. The community room will include a projector, drop-down screen for presentations, a kitchenette, historic displays and some standing historical displays. Smalley said the Archive Commission will determine how the 30-person capacity community room will be utilized. It would help, Smalley adds with a wince and a smile, if the elevator were dependable. So go the ups and downs of saving the history of Medina.

Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

trades at the Medina County Career Center have been working on the second floor’s restoration as part of their class curriculum. Smalley said the museum is a popular stop during the annual Ice Festival because there are large heaters keeping the facility warm. Ice Festival visitors come from all over Ohio, Indiana, New York, Pennsylvania, and many other states, Smalley said. Attendees to events on the square are always welcome, Smalley said, and during cold weather events they are invited to come in and get warm. In the museum’s first five years, there were approximately 22,000 visitors. Between November 2018 and February 2019, there were 3,000 visitors. When the renovations are completed, Smalley said there will be offices for the museum, the

The Medina Town Hall and Engine House Museum hours will be 10 a.m. to noon during the Farmers Market this summer, 7 p.m. to 8:25 p.m. in June and July before the band concerts on the square, with extra hours for special events on the square. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medinamuseum/

On November 30, 2018, the last major event of the Bicentennial Celebration was held at the United Church of Christ Congregational.  More than 250 people attended the official birthday party for Medina as the actual founding date of November 30, 1818 was celebrated.  At the end of the event, everyone was invited to congregate on Broadway Street, in front of the 1841 courthouse, and created a living  “200” in recognition of the bicentennial. The city provided the Forestry Department’s extension truck for parks department employee  Thad Conkey to snap this photo. Roger Smalley stands on the end of the beginning of the “2” using a cell phone to talk to the  photographer.  Photo provided.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

photos by FlashBang Photography An enthusiastic crowd enjoyed food, games and a Texas Hold'em tournament at a recent casino night benefiting the Scholarship Foundation of  Wadsworth at the Galaxy Restaurant in Wadsworth. 

Dealer Frank Smolinski is dealing smiles  and cards to Brittany and Jason  Yankowski and John McNosky.

From the look on dealer Cheryl  Catalan's face, looks like the house is  losing to the players, from left: Susan  Cleary, Janie Parish,Tony Laurene,  Kim Laurene, and David Parish.

Melisa Wallace and Don Felice were the crap dealers for  Beth Biagini in front of the table and, from left, Jerry  Biagini, Matt Jacobs, and Thomas and Tanya  Cumberledge.

The father­and­daughter team of Robert  and Sara Wellert won the Texas Hold  'Em tournament. Dealer Dave Bruffy adds a special touch to  the roulette wheel for Troy and Leigh Cottrill.

Ed Giddens serves up drinks to, from left, Brittany  Yankowski, John Doyne and Becky Alexander.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

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One of the activities offered to community  members during Medina County's long, cold  winter was a Highland Library workshop in  which participants used pages from old books  to create flowers. 

Creating flowers from book pages, glue sticks, hot glue, and  floral tape and wire were Leslie Ciammaichella, left, and Fran  Johnson.

Lisa Perotti Balodis and Dave Sours enjoy creating flowers.

Working on creating paper bouquets  are, from left, Lisa Perotti Balodis, Dave  Sours, Leslie Ciammaichella, Fran  Johnson, Joanne Maloney, Julie and  Stephanie Egler, Jeri Penn, library  associate Ginny Goettler, Cassandra  Irizarry­Carbone, and Bryan Carbone.

Intent on their artwork are, from left, Joanne Maloney, Julie Egler,  Stephanie Egler, and Jeri Penn.

Jeri Penn and her bouquet.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

CHAPTER 27 THE READING NOOK

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com for all of our past issues.

  Devin and I met Marissa at the old  apartment.  She  hugged  me  tightly  and kissed me gently.    “How are you doing?”       “I’m  good.  I  think  I’m  ready  for  this,” I replied with a deep breath.     I looked at the apartment door that  I’d come in and out of every day for  so  many  years  before  the  accident,  and  memories  rushed  back  in  a  flood.    Memories of my dad, doing all he  could  to  give  me  the  best  life  possible.  He  was  the  one  I’d  relied  on my whole life, and now with him  gone,  I  was  having  to  learn  how  to  live  without  him.  I  didn’t  have  anyone else I could rely on like that.  No one could fill that hole.    No one except for me.    As much as I needed my dad when  he  was  alive  to  take  care  of  me,  teach  me,  and  help  me  grow,  I  suddenly  discovered,  staring  at  the  door, that I no longer needed him.      This  whole  time  I’d  been  running  from the empty space he left behind,  but now I was looking right at it, and  it no longer terrified me.    My dad is gone.    This is a fact.         He  left  a  gaping  hole  where  he  should be, but it’s not a black hole. It  doesn’t  have  to  suck  me  in  and  drown  me  in  an  unbearable  weight  that will slowly smother me. It’s just  a normal, empty, solemn hole.       I  pulled  the  apartment  key  from  my  pocket  and  slid  it  into  the  keyhole.  I  unlocked  the  door  and  pushed  it  open,  shoving  a  small  mound  of  mail  to  the  side.  I  walked  into  the  old  apartment,  Marissa  and  Devin right behind me, silent.    It was empty. I mean, it still had all  the  furnishings  and  knick­knacks  and  pots  and  pans  and  trash  and  everything, but it was devoid of any  life.

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  The three of us stood there for a  moment, then I headed into my old  bedroom  to  retrieve  the  phone  charger for Garret.       Everything  I  looked  at  brought  back  a  different  memory  of  my  dad.  Some  not  so  good,  some  so  happy  that  it  brought  tears  to  my  eyes  as  I  missed  him.  But  everything  had  a  story.  From  the  sticky­note  with  “DO  THE  DISHES”  written  on  it,  to  the  silver  trophy  from  the  baseball  team I played on in middle school,  every  single  thing  was  written  into  my  mind  with  a  memory  of  my  dad.    I stood there alone in my room, a  forgotten  phone  charger  in  my  hand  that  reminded  me  of  Garret,  while everything else reminded me  of my dad.       Marissa  was  right  when  she  had  held  that  ladybug  up  to  me. At  the  time,  I  hadn’t  really  believed  her.  Then,  in  London,  I  discovered  that  every  person  has  their  own  little  truth.    As I stood there in my old room,  surrounded  by  these  inanimate  objects that linked me to my father,  I  finally  understood  what  she’d  said.    Everything has a little truth to it.       Not  every  saying,  not  every  person, but everything.    I emerged from my old room and  exhaled heavily.       “Still  doing  okay,  Cam?”  Devin  asked upon my return. Marissa was  busy  sifting  through  the  mail  in  case anything was important.    “Yes,” I sighed.    “You got the charger,” he said.    “Yeah.”       “Do  you  want  to  leave  now  or  stick  around  for  a  minute?”  Devin  asked gently.    “Can I be alone?” I asked.       “Of  course.  We’ll  be  right 


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

outside,” he  replied,  grabbing  Marissa’s arm and dragging her out  of the apartment as she scooped up  a handful of mail. He shut the door  behind  them,  and  I  was  alone  again.    I scanned the apartment, looking  over  all  the  little  truths  of  my  dad,  and I smiled.      The  tiny  green  pan  that  he  used  to  teach  me  how  to  break  and  fry  an  egg  hung  over  the  stove.  The  bottom  was  mostly  rusted  at  this  point,  and  probably  unsafe  for  cooking in.       The  TV  with  a  crack  in  the  corner  stared  back  at  me,  forcing  into  my  mind  an  image  of  when  my dad and I were horsing around.  How  I,  at  around  seven  years  old,  had run up and tackled him, and he  playfully shoved me off of him and  into  the  TV.  My  elbow  swung  and  smack  the  screen  hard,  leaving  a  permanent  crack  in  the  top  right  corner.       The  bathroom  door  sat  crooked  in  its  hinges  from  when  I’d  gotten  stuck  in  the  bathroom  as  a  child.  My dad had had to grab his toolbox  and  take  the  whole  door  off  to  rescue  me.  I  remember  running  out,  tears  and  snot  running  down  my  face,  and  collapsing  into  his  arms as the door lay on the floor a  couple feet away.      The  little  stuffed  polar  bear  that  he’d  gotten  me  for  Christmas  one  year,  and  I  thought  it  was  a  stupid  gift  because  I  was  too  old  for  stuffed  animals.  Then  he’d  kept  it  on  his  own  shelf  after  I’d  rejected  it because he thought it was cute. I  made  fun  of  him  for  liking  it  so  much, but he just laughed with me  and insisted one day I’d like it, too.    Today was that day.       I  spent  a  long  time  in  that  apartment, looking over every little  detail  and  taking  in  all  the  small 

things that  I’d  forgotten,  neglected  or  overlooked  over  the  years. And  somehow,  somewhere  along  this  journey  of  memories  and  honesty,  the hole in my chest was filled.       You  can’t  replace  one  person  with another person, no matter how  hard  you  try,  but  you  can  fill  the  space  they  leave  behind  in  your  life. You just have to fill it yourself,  by  growing  into  the  person  they  wanted you to be.       My  dad  is  dead,  but  I  am  not.  I  will  live  my  life  the  way  he  would’ve  wanted  me  to.  He  made  sure  to  buckle  my  seat  belt  for  me  after all. If I had given in and given  up  after  he’d  saved  my  life,  then  I  would’ve failed him.    Instead, I was standing in our old  apartment,  understanding  that  he  cared more about me than himself.       When  it  came  down  to  it,  he  wasn’t fighting to survive, working  as hard as he could to keep food on  the  table  for  himself.  In  his  mind,  when  my  mom  left,  his  life  was  over.  Maybe  that’s  why  he  didn’t  buckle his own seat belt that night.  He no longer cared about his safety  or  well­being.  He  probably  would’ve  given  in  long  ago  if  it  wasn’t for one small thing that kept  him  going.  One  tiny,  honest,  little  truth in his life.    Me.       “I  love  you,  dad,”  I  whispered,  hot tears welling up in my eyes.       I  blinked  them  away  and  swallowed hard.    “Thank you. For everything.”       With  that,  I  wrapped  Garret’s  charger  around  my  hand,  and  left  the  apartment  that  held  what  was  left of my dad inside.    As soon as I stepped out, Marissa  practically jumped on me.    “Cam!” she shouted in my face.    “Hey, calm down, Marissa. Give  him  some  space,”  Devin 

interjected, pulling her back.       “I’m  fine,  Devin.  What’s  so  important?”  I  asked,  giving  them  a  soft  smile  to  let  them  know  I  was  all right.    “You won’t believe the letter that  you  got  yesterday!”  Marissa  shouted,  excitement  leaping  out  of  her.    I chuckled at her.    “What letter did I get?”       “Look!”  She  shoved  a  handwritten  letter  in  my  face.  I  took  it  and  read  over  it,  my  disbelief  growing  greater  and  greater as I finished it.       I  looked  up  at  them,  my  jaw  hanging open.    “What the heck am I supposed to  do about this?” I asked.       “Well,  it  seems  like  they’re  already  on  their  way,  so  you  just  have  to  decide  if  you’ll  meet  them  or not,” Devin replied logically.    “I don’t even know if I can face  Lea  and  Lilith  again  after  everything  that  happened,”  I  told  them.       “I  can!  Let  me  give  them  what  they  deserve!”  Marissa  chimed  in,  shaking a fist in the air.       I  looked  from  Marissa,  back  to  Devin, and back to the letter.    “All right, let’s get this over with  once  and  for  all.  I  don’t  know  what’s  going  to  happen  when  we  meet them, but we will.”    “And we’ll be right by your side,  whether  it  ends  well  or  poorly,”  Devin said, clapping my shoulder.       “I  wouldn’t  have  it  any  other  way.” Our story continues next month! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

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TH E ART O F C ELEB RATI O N

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

by Amy Barnes photos by Ed Bacho

The 17th Annual Black History Month Program: “Celebrating Black History Through Music, Dance and Story” brought together people from around the county to celebrate and honor black history and culture. Community members were invited to be a part of the Diversity Choir while enjoying stories, dances, songs, and artwork at Second Baptist Church, 451 Bronson Street, Medina. The free event was presented by Fellowship Baptist Church of Medina, Second Baptist Church, and the Medina County branch of the American Association of University Women.

Blake Elementary School student artwork.

A Freedom Quilt made by the second grade at Heritage  Elementary School.

Fellowship Baptist Church Pastor John Peterson  delivered the invocation.

Senesa Peterson and Pastor John Peterson enjoying the  performances.

Kimberly Oliver, American Association of University Women  member and diversity event co­chair, was the mistress of  ceremony. Kathy Kraus, AAUW president and event co­chair,  watches in the background.


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The Claggett Middle School choir performed, led by  teacher Carrie Knox.

Kathy Kraus, AAUW president and event co­ chair, gave a presentation on the "Underground  Railroad Quilt Code." On the boards on top of  the podium are the many examples of signals  that would be sewn into the quilts.

A'kyra Holley read "A Salute to Historic Black Abolitionist"  by Rev. Henry Highland Garnet.

Generations gathered at the celebration. Standing is Ashley  Powell. Sitting, from left, are Louise McMorris, Jacobe  Powell and Edin Gant.

The Fellowship Baptist Youth Dance Troupe performed  the traditional African dance, "Fanga Alafia."


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

The Medina Black History Choir sang, "This Little Light of Mine."

Pastor Arthur A. Ruffin Sr., of Second Baptist  Church, delivered the benediction and closing. Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell  spoke with Pastor Arthur A.  Ruffin Sr. in the background.


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Jill Heck, AAUW member in charge  of hospitality, read "A Salute to  Blacks in Government," by  Councilwoman Wilda Bell.

Christ is the Answer Ministries Praise Team performed for the celebration.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

Donna Hamilton, AAUW co­vice  president for program development,  read "A Salute to Black Pioneers," by  Barney Ford.

Senesa Peterson read "A Salute to Blacks in the Arts," by  Lorraine Hansberry.

Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell, right, and Pastor Arthur A.  Ruffin Sr. hug at the end of the celebration.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

Joyful Word Search The Man Behind the Curtain

ARNDT BICENTENNIAL MUSEUM FOUNTAIN TEACHER COUNCILMAN HISTORIAN PRESERVATION CELEBRATION FIREHOUSE

RESTORATION WEBBER FOUNDRY HISTORY MUSKINGUM GLENN BRADWAY WASHBURN HESSIAN REVOLUTIONARY

Answer Key for Last Month's Search

It Takes Guts

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

THE NETWORKER

To Know You is to Help You by Bob Arnold Last month’s column focused on the mystery of finding the right networking partners. Whenever you are trying to solve a mystery, you look for that first clue that lets you know you are on the right track. The same thing is true in networking. Since both of you are human beings, let us go straight to the fact that in order to help each other, you have to know each other. Yes, that means you must meet people! Meeting someone is much more than just shaking hands and saying, “Hi.” It is also much more than just telling someone where you work and what you do. I know, I know, that is what you are told to do so this new friend can direct work your way. But that is not what works! You have things you like to do and, believe it or not, so does the person you just met. In fact, you need to find out if there are mutual interests. That is called having an affinity. Most of the time, people I meet like to help people. That is a pretty broad statement, so I have learned to narrow it down some. Instead of asking someone where they work, I like to start with a question similar to: “So, tell me how you help people in your line of work.” They pause and look at me, mentally questioning why I asked them that, then they smile and answer. I have just put them at ease in my presence and they can now talk about something they love, which then causes them to open up a bit about how they feel about life. The Main Point: Your first clue to finding the right people is buried in the affinity. Uncover it! Next month: digging deeper! Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and the international best-selling author of “The Uncanny Power of the Networking Pencil,” which can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2KSy3Xm More networking tips are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at http://onwardnetworking.com/ or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com


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THE IN BOX

IN DEED

Utilizing Goals for Success

Prescription for Good

by Steve Rak

by Amy Barnes

I have learned a lot over the years from some very successful business mentors, and they all have a few things in common. They all set goals for their businesses, and then they hold themselves accountable. Let me share three things I have learned and use when it comes to setting goals for my business. 1. Write down your goals. There is something about writing your goals down that makes them more real. A er you write them down, post them somewhere you can see them. Mine are hanging on my bathroom mirror. 2. Make them unrealistic. Yes, I said unrealistic. You have to push yourself in business. Setting easy, realistic goals is acceptable if you want mediocre results but most people don’t start a business and want it to be just acceptable. My favorite example of this is the Tesla car. When Elon Musk, the founder of Tesla, decided he wanted to build an electric car, he was completely unrealistic with his goals. He ended up building an amazing vehicle that could stand up to any other car on the market, all while being 100percent electric. 3. Do not keep them secret. If you have a goal to double your company, then make sure you tell the people who work for you. How do you expect to grow if you keep everything to yourself? What if one of your employees has a friend or relative who just so happens to be in charge of purchasing at their job and they purchase a lot of what you are selling? So, get going and set some goals!

It had gotten dark early and people were rushing in and out of the pharmacy on their way home. An elderly woman had picked up a prescription and was going out the door to the parking lot when, suddenly, a young man broke from the those in line patiently waiting to get their prescriptions and went running a er her, catching the attention of everyone around them. He caught up to her at the door and gestured and said something to her. She said something back while emphatically shaking her head, “no.” Brandon Linder returned to the pharmacy counter and placed a Discover card in the pharmacy technician’s hand. Turns out that Linder had spotted the card on the floor just a er the elderly woman had walked away and thought it was hers. When it turned out it wasn’t, Linder made sure the card was in the appropriate hands. Linder could easily have ignored the card on the floor or simply pocketed it, but it was obvious he did not even take the time to consider either possibility. In recognition of his good deed, Joy of Medina County Magazine has awarded Linder a gi certificate to Malley’s Chocolates with a big thank you for being one of the people who makes Medina County great!

Steve Rak is a resident of Medina, is an award-winning columnist, and has spoken at various workshops and conferences throughout the United States and Canada. He is the owner of Rak Consulting, www.rakconsultingllc.com/ , and Southwest Landscape Management, www.sw-landscape.com/ If you have questions or suggestions for future column topics, please e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with “In Box” in the subject line.

“In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.” Martin Luther King, Jr.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

BITE ME!

Tangy Pork Chops and More by Amy Barnes

•3 to 6 lean, boneless pork chops •Seasoned salt •¼ cup Vermont Village* raw, organic apple cider vinegar with turmeric and honey •¼ cup water •Cooked rice Combine vinegar and water. Add mixture to frying pan on medium heat. When liquid is hot, rinse pork chops under running water and place carefully in pan to avoid splash up. Sprinkle with seasoned salt. Cook until pork chops are done, flipping at least once to coat and to cook both sides. Remove pork chops from pan. Dirty Rice For “dirty rice,” add a half cup of water to frying pan a er pork chops are removed and stir to release cooking residue. When liquid is hot, add freshly cooked rice to cover bottom of pan and stir until rice is well coated and lightly browned. This also is a great use for le over rice. If using le over rice that has been refrigerated instead of freshly cooked, you will need to use additional water in the pan when adding the rice as it will soak up the hot liquid quickly.

Adding as few as two simple ingredients to the frying pan  when cooking pork chops can add a tangy twist to this old staple. Those two ingredients also help to  make a delicious residue in the pan to use for a terrific dirty rice to accompany the tasty chops.

Another great use for le over rice (NOT dirty rice!) is rice pudding. Quick Rice Pudding •½ to 1 cup plain, cooked white rice •Box of cook and serve or instant vanilla pudding Follow instructions on the box for making the pudding, a er milk and pudding are combined but not yet set, stir in rice. Place in fridge to set. Sprinkle with cinnamon and top with whipped cream before serving, if desired. *Note: While usually we do not endorse or recommend products by brand name, in this case, it is unavoidable.


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TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

GEMS

Three Avenues Water Travels

Caring During Crisis

by Paul McHam

by Kent Von Der Vellen

Time to look at some of the other causes of moisture in the basement. Window wells are an important way to get light into a basement. However, the windows are below ground level with window wells usually designed with either metal or masonry half-circle walls built around them. In order to drain rain water or snow melt from the window well bottoms, there is normally a piped-in drain at the bottom or there is gravel that allows water to drain down to the footer drain. Window wells must be kept cleared of debris and weeds so there is not captured water lying against the basement wall or draining in under the basement window. Chimneys can be another source of water in the basement. When a chimney is built on the outside perimeter of a house there are numerous places where water can enter high at the step flashing or low at the chimney base. Step flashing can develop cracks in the caulking or mortar and open up to allow leaks down the chimney wall. This water can show up inside the perimeter wall of a bedroom or in the living room, for instance, or all the way down in the basement. There is a lot of piping in most basements, both supply lines and drain lines. Many times, leaks are found at shutoff valves or at joints and elbows. The piping and floor should be regularly checked for leaks. While you are looking up, check for discoloring that might indicate mold growth. It may be darker or lighter than the background. While you are looking down, look for white marks along the walls that might indicate efflorescence. Efflorescence is a deposit of mineral salts and Portland cement that indicates the movement of water from outside to inside, usually along the bottom of the wall. Make no mistake, it indicates water moving in, which eventually will mean mold.

When four co-workers saw many of their patients struggling financially because of medical crises, they decided to take action. Karen Metzker, Kelly Baker, Beth DeFelice, and Steve Pamer created Medina Cares, which became a 501(c)3 in 2008. Medina Cares provides up to $500 in temporary aid when a new diagnosis, hospitalization or accident causes someone to fall behind on bills. The organization pays the bills directly instead of giving the money to the person in crisis. To qualify for assistance, a person must be a Medina County resident, between the ages of 19 and 59, and have suffered a recent medical crisis causing a lapse in bill payments. Referrals come from numerous Medina County agencies, including the Kidney Foundation; the Salvation Army; Love Inc.; the Office for Older Adults; the Diabetes Association; the Medina County Housing Authority; the 211 hotline; and DeFelice, who is a social worker, said Greg Nichols, Medina Cares president. People also contact the organization directly through their website and phone line. A er providing aid, Medina Cares connects people with agencies to help get them back on track. During the year, Medina Cares holds two fundraisers. A beer-and-wine tasting event in the fall and a reverse raffle in the spring. This year’s raffle was scheduled for 6 p.m., March 30, at Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. More information and tickets are available at https://bit.ly/2UbR4Z7 . The organization received additional funding last year from the 100 Women Who Care, the Wadsworth Eagles Women’s Auxiliary, and the Brunswick Eagles Women’s Auxiliary. To learn more about Medina Cares, go to https://bit.ly/2BWtnNu or http://www.medinacares.org/

Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-658-2600.

Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

GUEST COLUMN Connecting Souls by Thomas Sigel At our recent Steve Free concert at the Patricia Lindley Center in Wellington, a father brought his two young boys. The father said it was his one son’s 11th birthday and all he wanted for his birthday was to attend the concert. The boy had experienced a performance by Steve and Susan Free in a Wellington Middle School outreach program earlier in the week. I did not charge the father for the tickets for the children. I went backstage to let Steve Free know that this boy was in the audience. Following the intermission, Free gave a shout out to the boy and the band played “Happy Birthday.” A er the show, Free came out and gave the boy a copy of one of his CDs and he signed it for him. Free e-mailed me the next day and said that the boy was elated, and the father was ready to cry. He was so grateful for the experience and the kindness. This will be an evening that the father and the birthday boy will never forget.

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Advertising once is like expecting to win a marathon with one step. It takes consistent, repeated advertising with a variety of ads to win the race.

Thomas Sigel is the founder and executive director of the Ohio Regional Music Arts Cultural Outreach (ORMACO). For more information about ORMACO, call 330-722-2541, write to ORMACO, Inc., 4403 Belmont Court, Medina, Oh. 44256, or go to http://www.ormaco.org/

Movers for Moms   Gather your extra new soaps, shampoo, conditioner, bedding,  clothing, baby items, and diapers!    It is time for the annual Movers for Moms collection for  homeless and domestic violence shelters.    Donations are being accepted from April 3 to May 8, 2019, at  Two Men and a Truck, 1005 Pearl Road, Brunswick. Items will be  delivered by Two Men and a Truck employees to the Battered  Women’s Shelter of Medina County on May 12, 2019.    In addition to the previously listed items, coloring books,  crayons, Play­Doh, other items to entertain children, and gift  cards are welcome donations.     Movers for Moms is a nationwide effort with local donations  remaining local. 


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

April 2019 Non­Profit Calendar Monday, April 1 Fun at Work Day https://bit.ly/1lADyKv 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tech Club: Kerbal Space; Lodi Library, 636 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades 4 to 8. Register at http://bit.ly/2VYp5N0 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Veterans Roundtable; Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. All Ages. No registration. Tuesday, April 2 National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day https://bit.ly/2SlBWXK and Reconciliation Day https://bit.ly/2H9hxQe 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: Flying Saucer Fun; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make and decorate a personalized alien flying saucer. Register at http://bit.ly/2Ck6vrl 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Eliot Ness’ Cleveland; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about Ness during his tenure as Cleveland’s safety director. Register at http://bit.ly/2u6vwli Wednesday, April 3 Don’t go to Work Unless it’s Fun Day https://bit.ly/2GSmgci

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program; Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road west of Lake Road, Medina. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. DIY Lava Lamp; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Use simple materials to create desk accessory. Register at http://bit.ly/2TKqARx 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Create Your Own Bath Bombs; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwCnN5 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Willetts Middle School, 1045 Hadcock Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp Thursday, April 4 Hug a Newsman Day (yay!) https://bit.ly/2FfB3Ox and Walk Around things Day https://bit.ly/2T9grxA 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Sharon Township Administration Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon Center. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. Oh, Rats! Storytime; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Stories, rhymes and a special guest. Register at http://bit.ly/2TK1rXj 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Senior Helpers Dementia Care Workshop; Soprema Senior Center, 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Learn how to recognize and understand the progression of dementia. Reservations through Soprema, 330-335-1513.

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment.

6:30 p.m. Titanic and the end of the Edwardian Era; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Discussion of the Titanic from conception to the end. Each attendee will receive a boarding pass featuring a real Titanic passenger. Register at http://bit.ly/2F1MG8M

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. ESL Conversation Group; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Practice English with others in a relaxed setting.

Friday, April 5 Walk to Work Day https://bit.ly/2pQwLTn and Read a Road Map Day https://bit.ly/2U2SNzY

7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Spring Ahead; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring extra seed catalogs to exchange and hear about new gardening books. Register at http://bit.ly/2HoGv2v 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Hip-Hop Dance; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3 649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring your squad and learn street dancing moves with Caliber Dance Company. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2TQJCFU 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Mark Church, 1330 N. Carpenter Street, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/ 2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Celebration of well-known bluegrass musician Larry Calhoun’s life. Saturday, April 6 National Tartan Day https://bit.ly/2Ta8Df8 and Sorry Charlie Day https://bit.ly/2FMGS5s 11 a.m. Storyboarding for Writers; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Former Disney storyboard artist, writer, art director David Schwartz teaches how TV writers plot a story. Register at http://bit.ly/2EXurRX 11 a.m. to noon. Recycled Bird Feeders; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Grades kindergarten through 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2F2pEyu 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. Detective Academy; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn about skills needed to become a detective. Grades 2 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2HhsEuL 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Hula Hoop Dance Class; Community Room, Lodi Library. Learn dance moves to impress and keep active using a hula hoop. Waist hooping not required. Bring hoop or use one of ours. Register at http://bit.ly/2UzwP8f


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019 6 p.m. Raising the Roof Dinner and Entertainment Charity Benefit: Viva Las Vegas; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits Medina Creative Housing. Games, raffles, auctions. For tickets, contact Deb Poland, 330-635-0368, Dpoland@medinacreativehousing.com , or contact Diana Riley, 330-273-8877, driley@rpminc.com . Sunday, April 7 No Housework Day https://bit.ly/1mU1WXS and World Health Day https://bit.ly/2EpzsUj 6:45 a.m. ORMACO Party Bus to Buffalo, NY: Franklin Lloyd Wright Tour. Bus leaves from Buehler’s, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. Martin House and Graycliff Historic Home tours. Lunch on own on Buffalo’s Waterfront. Wine, cheese, chocolates, more served on way back. Arrive in Medina approximately 7 p.m. Tickets $130. www.ormaco.org , 330-7222541 8 a.m. to noon. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Litchfield Township Fire Station, 9487 Norwalk Road, Litchfield. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. 2 p.m. Ladies Night; Recovery Center of Medina County, 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Pampering, healing crystals, essential oils, tarot readings, more. First come, first served. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Egg-citing Eggsploration; Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Monday, April 8 All is Ours Day https://bit.ly/2SQR58l and Draw a Picture of a Bird Day https://bit.ly/2FNAtXU Make and Take, all Medina County District Library locations. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Jin Hi Kim, Korean Komungo Virtuoso; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Tuesday, April 9 Be Kind to Lawyers Day https://bit.ly/2FHiMJz and Name Yourself Day https://bit.ly/1INfpIq 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment.

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10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cooperative Community Services: Job Fair Preparation Workshop; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Free. 5:30 p.m. Pizza Gardens; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Eat pizza while planting seeds to grow pizza ingredients. Register at http://bit.ly/ 2u7hCPT 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Egg Hunt; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make a basket, help find eggs. Ages 2 to 7. Register at http://bit.ly/2uevect 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Gearheads: Robotic Challenge; Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Alien invasion has destroyed the library, work in teams to use robots to navigate through destruction to find important missing texts. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http:// bit.ly/2u8tzoK 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Jin Hi Kim, Korean Komungo Virtuoso; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. 7:30 p.m. StopMotion Animation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Work in groups to create film during two-day event. Film screening 7:30 p.m., April 10. Register at http:// bit.ly/2EZWqAq Wednesday, April 10 National Sibling Day https://bit.ly/ 1mR9Dim 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S.

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late. Sunday, April 7

Friday, May 3

3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Healthy Kids Running Series; Cobblestone Park, on Cobblestone Drive in Cobblestone subdivision, Medina. Ages 2 to 14. Cost is $35 for entire five-week series, non-refundable. Weekly through May 19, second week meets on a Saturday. More information and registration at http://bit.ly/2NWR9h4

5:30 p.m. Medina City Schools Foundation Run.4.Fun; Medina High School, 777 E. Union Street, Medina. Enter B3 Doors, registration is in hall by gym. 5:30 p.m. registration and packet pickup. Runs start at 7 p.m. Benefits MCSF to help students. Fun Run, 1 Mile Run, 5k Run or Walk. Sign up by April 22 to guarantee shirt. More information at http://bit.ly/2F7gKkw

Saturday, April 27 7:45 a.m. Water Tower District 5k Historic Hustle; North Elmwood Avenue between W. Friendship Street and W. North Street, one block north of city hall, Medina. Run and walk benefits Water Tower District Historic Neighborhood Association. Registration and packet pickup, 7:45 a.m. to 8:45 a.m., race starts 9 a.m. Adult, $25; ages 12 and younger, $10. Children must be accompanied by adult. Pre-register online at https://bit.ly/2T5bOVo

Saturday, May 25 6:45 a.m. 6th Annual Medina Half Marathon and 5k; 93 Public Square, Medina. Half marathon, walk, relay start at 6:45 a.m. The 5k starts at 7 a.m. Benefits Stand Up for Downs and Mary Grace Memorial Foundation. NO day of race pick-up. Expo and bib pickup is May 24, 3 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Summa Health Center at Lake Medina, 370 Medina Road, Medina. Pricing and registration at http://bit.ly/2NWyMsA


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

Broadway Street, Medina. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Giant Dominoes; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Jin Hi Kim, Korean Komungo Virtuoso; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Thursday, April 11 Eight Track Tape Day https://bit.ly/2IkSk6J and National Submarine Day https://bit.ly/2D8Dn8V 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call Medina County Office for Older Adults, 330-723-9514, for appointment. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Custom Buttons; Story Hour/ Activity Room, Lodi Library; 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades 4 to 12. Register at http:// bit.ly/2JkPaVs 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Jin Hi Kim, Korean Komungo Virtuoso; Village of Seville, 120 Royal Crest Drive, Seville. Friday, April 12 Big Wind Day https://bit.ly/2InSElu and Walk on Your Wild Side Day https://bit.ly/2p3j18i 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. 2019 Medina Beer Fest; Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Benefits Main Street Medina. Features more than 30 cra beers, food, entertainment, raffles, more. Tickets $45 for VIP, $35 regular admission, $10 for designated drivers. More information and tickets at http://bit.ly/2U5t220 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Evening Amphibian Walk; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Walk with naturalist to find frogs, toads, salamanders. Free. Saturday, April 13

International Plant Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2Nj5zYA 7:30 a.m. 86th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwOlpN 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ohio Division of Wildlife: Hunter Education Course; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Required for all first-time hunting license buyers. No firearms in class. One-hour lunch break, no lunch provided. Ages 10 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2XVsyOc 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pet Palooza; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Cra s, contests, door prizes. Katie Bee Puppet Show, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Akron Zoomobile Superheroes, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Turtle Lady, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; Spring Mist Farm, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Nate the Great Balloon Artistry, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Ferris, the Buehler’s Food Truck will have food for purchase. No pets allowed. Food donations accepted for Medina County SPCA. More activities and details at http://bit.ly/2VZOM02 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Medina Winter Market, Twiisted, 985 Boardman Alley (by Dairy Queen on Northland Drive), Medina. Indoor farmers market, first and third Saturday of each month till May. Noon to 5 p.m. Frog Art; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Free. Sunday, April 14 International Moment of Laughter Day https://bit.ly/2tDOLFx , Look Up at the Sky Day https://bit.ly/2GYxM5R and Reach as High as You can Day https://bit.ly/2T1ePpN What a great combination! Noon to 5 p.m. Frog Art; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Free. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. 2 p.m. ORMACO The Baker’s Basement: Swingin’ Folk Funk; Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free but reservations recommended due to limited seating. For reservations, call 330722-2541 or e-mail tsigel@ormaco.org 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. K-9 Kapers; Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot nonretractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. https://bit.ly/2qlPl5Y Monday, April 15 Rubber Eraser Day https://bit.ly/2HrxykQ 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tech Club: Kerbal

Space; Lodi Library, 636 Wooster Street, Lodi. Grades 4 to 8. Register at http://bit.ly/ 2VWGOo8 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Card Making; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. Register at http://bit.ly/2HuGjOk FULL Tuesday, April 16 Mushroom Day https://bit.ly/2tz43IV Click the link, you will love the graphics! 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Gearheads: Robotic Challenge; Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Alien invasion has destroyed the library, work in teams to use robots to navigate through destruction to find important missing texts. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2VX5ixv 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Green Cleaning; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn how to clean without harmful chemicals. Register at http://bit.ly/2TB14iz Wednesday, April 17 Bat Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2FvLXzI Noon to 5 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Life Care Center of Medina, 2400 Columbia Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Table Tennis; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 6 to 12. 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Stuffed Animal Sleepover Storytime; Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring stuffed animal friend for games, stories, cra s. Stuffed animal spends the night at the library, pick them up the next day with a special surprise. Register at http://bit.ly/2TyfIai 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. History Series: Amusement Parks of Yesteryear; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Presenter: Gary Nemeth. Register at http://bit.ly/2HuCTLr 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Photo Management; Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn to save, organize, download, edit photos in hands-on class. Register at http://bit.ly/2JkSQqe FULL Thursday, April 18 Newspaper Columnists Day (We will include magazine columnists, too!) https://bit.ly/2SOQgNr and National High Five Day https://bit.ly/2Hoveen 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019 skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Medina County Government Academy: Dealing With Difficult People and Conflict Management; University of Akron, Medina County University Center, 6300 Technology Lane, Medina. Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.; class, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Workshop is $50. Register at https://bit.ly/2TkDsgZ Friday, April 19 National Garlic Day https://bit.ly/2InCl83 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sit, Stay, Read; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading with Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2Uzsimf 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Bingo for Children; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Win books, prizes. Ages 5 and up. Free. Saturday, April 20 Husband Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2E0KyO3 , Volunteer Recognition Day https://bit.ly/2IwelUn , and Look Alike Day https://bit.ly/1SszMRF 7:30 a.m. 86th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwOlpN 9:30 a.m. to noon. Basket Weaving 101: Easter Basket; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Cost is $17 per basket. Register by calling Betty Rettig, 330-975-4251, by April 13. 10:30 a.m.to 11 a.m. Sensory Storytime; Story Time Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with autism, sensory integration challenges, or who have difficulty sitting still or focusing. Ages 2 to 8. Register at http://bit.ly/2u4DUlp

11 a.m. to noon. What is eBird?; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn basics of eBird, biodiversity-related citizen science bird sighting project. Learn to manage lists, photos, recordings, and more. Free. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. Noon to 5 p.m. Frog Art; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Free. Sunday, April 21 Kindergarten Day https://bit.ly/2T42NMg Monday, April 22 National Jelly Bean Day https://bit.ly/2En6jsN Brunswick City Schools closed. Make and Take, all Medina County District Library locations. 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Egg Carton Planters; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Grades 3 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/ 2O4ik9R 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2:15 p.m. to 4 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 6 and up. Free. No registration. 6 to 7:30 p.m. 8-Bit Art; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create melting bead cra . Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2HhDEs3 Tuesday, April 23

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Take a Chance Day https://bit.ly/1i2OBVr and World Laboratory Day https://bit.ly/2T6Wwzn 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Seeds and Such Storytime; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Stories, rhymes, cra . Ages 3 and up, with adult. Register at http://bit.ly/2HsAWPE 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. or 6:30 p.m. Spring Snacks; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Create pear peanutbutter-and-jelly bouquet and taste some bugs on a log. Register for one session only. Grades 3 to 5. Register for 5:30 p.m. at http://bit.ly/2T3FcXR or register for 6:30 p.m. at http://bit.ly/2T01IB2


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Gearheads: Robotic Challenge; Community Room B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Alien invasion has destroyed the library, work in teams to use robots to navigate through destruction to find important missing texts. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2HjYcQF Wednesday, April 24 Pig in a Blanket Day https://bit.ly/2p4v8BN 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Art Starts; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Create art with provided supplies. Ages 2 and up with adult. Register at http://bit.ly/2TSzz3v 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. A ernoon at the Cinema; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call for title, 330-273-4150. 2:15 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Emoji Magnets; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make magnet set to tell your story. Grades 6 to 12. No registration. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Eliza Northrop Elementary School, 950 E. Reagan Parkway, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Glass Fusion Workshop; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Create pendant. Material fee of $15 for first pendant, $10 for second, pay presenter. Up to 2 per person. Pick up finished pendant a er 11 a.m. at library. Register at http://bit.ly/2TysmpC 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Sew Much Fun; Story Hour/Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Hand sew a spring bunny, learn stitching techniques, leave with new friend. Grades 3 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2TAvhym 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stunning Alcohol Inks; Sycamore Room South, Brunswick, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create items for home. Register at http://bit.ly/2HsEgdo FULL Thursday, April 25 East Meets West Day https://bit.ly/2InPrSW 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-7250588.

Willow Dressel shares tips on marketing, publishing. Register at http://bit.ly/2u3x9QO Friday, April 26 Hug an Australian Day https://bit.ly/2BOpCcX 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Alzheimer’s Association: Caregiver Education Training; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Training explaining stages, treatments for dementia, more. Free. Register by calling 800272-3900 or go to https://bit.ly/2IOcWbY 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. Saturday, April 27 Tell a Story Day https://bit.ly/2IhPJL3 7:30 a.m. 86th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks led by experienced birders, watch spring birds return or travel through to summer breeding grounds. Free. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwOlpN 9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Medina County’s 23rd Annual Earth Day Festival; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Kids’ activities, food, Earth-friendly exhibits, bookmobile, more. Free. Additional parking with free shuttle at Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Superhero Saturday Storytime; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. All ages. Register at http://bit.ly/2u8pRLQ 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Explorastory: Spring has Sprung; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Stories and hands-on activities. Ages 2 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2VRtC3U 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Messy Sensory Play; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Paint, glue, bubble wrap, shaving cream, more. Wear old clothes. Register at http://bit.ly/2Uypfuh

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Scene 75 Entertainment Center, 3688 Center Road, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Family Fishing Derby; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Parent-child teams. Bring rod, reel, bait. Limited number of fishing poles and bait available. In conjunction with Earth Day. All ages. Free.

5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Writer Series: The Right Way to Write; Community Room, Highland Library; 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Author

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Medina Winter Market; Twiisted, 985 Boardman Alley (by Dairy Queen on Northland Drive), Medina. Indoor farmers market, first and third Saturday of

each month till May. Noon to 4 p.m. Genealogy Slam! Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how to interpret DNA test results. Sunday, April 28 World Pinhole Photography Day https://bit.ly/2FKlhKY 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Save Ohio Strays Meet and Greet; Petco, 1052 Williams Reserve Boulevard, Wadsworth. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Program Hiking Series: Spring Wildflowers; Schleman Nature Preserve, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. Go to https://bit.ly/2AZ1DaZ for more details. Monday, April 29 Zipper Day https://bit.ly/2p5mQcZ Like technology, when they work, they are wonderful! All day. Make and Take, all Medina County District Library locations. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 6 p.m. Teen Cooking Competition: Cinco de Mayo Edition; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Create dish from provided ingredients. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2HwK5Xe 6 p.m. Dads Cry, Too: Living the New Norm; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Sevillian author Brian O’Connell shares how he coped with the raw emotion following his son’s death. Register at http://bit.ly/2F9aA3J Tuesday, April 30 Honesty Day https://bit.ly/2XgASI7 and Hairstyle Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2Iug38X It may be hard to observe both! 10 a.m. to noon. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Applewood Elementary School, 3891 Applewood Drive, Brunswick. https://rdcrss.org/2ybO4Rp 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Art Show Reception; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Meet artists and view their work.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2019

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Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine April 2019  

This month, we have for you a man of history, connecting souls, an Easter egg hunting list, a local Black History celebration photo gallery...

Joy of Medina County Magazine April 2019  

This month, we have for you a man of history, connecting souls, an Easter egg hunting list, a local Black History celebration photo gallery...