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SEPTEMBER 2018

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 8

LETTING GO IN NASHVILLE PG.18

SHOOTING TEAM SHOWS METTEL PG. 4

WHEN A CHILD NEEDS A PAL PG. 21

THE COMMUNITY TURNED OUT TO PAY HOMAGE TO THE 9/11 MEMORIAL THAT INCLUDES A PARTIAL BEAM FROM THE WORLD TRADE CENTER. PG.8


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

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Voice

School’s Real Lesson by Amy Barnes

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very school year, when I was a kid, I would be excited at the chance that this year would be different. I let myself have hope that somehow freshly sharpened new pencils with unsmudged erasers and clean paper in undented folders would change the world. That this would finally be the year that I would feel smart, the bullies would have forgotten about me, and somehow a miracle would have happened, and I would be Popular. Then one year, it finally did happen, for one whole school year. I learned something that year. I knew I was the same as I had always been. I was too stubborn to have become like the popular girls to gain popularity. Later, I would realize the change had come because of the huge party I had thrown in between our freshman and sophomore high school years. I had invited almost the whole class, making sure the popular kids were invited because the boy I had a crush on was part of their crowd. I was not having the party to gain popularity, I was focused on planning to tell the boy how I felt (it did not go well, but that is another story).

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On the first day of the following school year, suddenly I was recognized as worthy by the Popular Ones, and the bullying stopped. In my puzzlement, I realized I had bought my new status. As I enjoyed my new popularity, I could see with sudden clarity how shallow and unimportant popularity really was. It was then that I understood what adults had been telling me all along: In the long run, popularity in school means nothing. The miracle year ended and so did my popularity, but it no longer mattered. I had realized the side of the room I had come from was so much the richer in texture and experience and that the friends I had there were real. High school and life are not really about who is popular, that is just the façade used as a distraction and held in place by those who are too scared to know themselves. Being popular is not the lesson, the lesson is what you learn about yourself and what you choose to do with that knowledge. Too many are so busy maintaining their social status or trying to improve it, that they miss the lesson. High school and college are far behind me now. I have watched as my children chose their paths and I tried to teach them what I had learned. As with most lessons we teach our children, I will Over 100 homes sold in 2017! not know if they it until I Call now for a free market evaluation learned see what they teach their children. 330.241.5370 office In the end, being 440.503.5820 cell brave enough to be Larry Steinbacher yourself and being 3745 Medina Rd, Suite A Broker / Owner Medina, OH kind is all that truly WWW.GREATERCLEVELANDHOMESEARCH.COM matters.

Hello Friends & Neighbors

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 8 J O Y O F M E D I N A C O U NTY.C OM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC E D I TO R Amy Barnes P H O TO G R A P H E R FlashBang Photography A R T D I R E C TOR Ryan Burdzinski C O N T R I B U TO R S Bob Arnold Rich Bailey C. L. Gammon Danielle Litton Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty. com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition. To see past issues of Joy Magazine, please go to issuu.com/ joyofmedinacounty Additional features not seen in Joy of Medina County Magazine can be found at JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Contents

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OH, SNAP!

8

9/11 MEMORIAL

Photo provided

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photos by FlashBang Photography

Paint and spaghetti, a camel and a birthday, and bees and balloons were found in our camera lens.

Americans attended the dedication of the 9/11 Memorial, which was built to honor the survivors, the lives lost, the rescuers, and the courage shown that day. THE READING NOOK

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

Devin comes up with an idea that may save the mission from failure.

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BICENTENNIAL BITES

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T H E N E T WO R K E R

CRISPY EGGPLANT by C.L. Gammon

A tasty eggplant recipe to make you fall in love with this common Revolutionary War food.

HI VALUE

by Bob Arnold

Sometimes a simple greeting is all that is needed. I N V E S T I N G I N T E L L I G E N C E : S E C R E TS OF A M O RT G A G E B A N K E R

ALL PRE-APPROVALS ARE NOT EQUAL by Rich Bailey

Do you know what a good pre-approval has?

Annabelle Stanec competing in the 2015 National Air Rifle Championship. She won first place. Read about the team on Page 4.

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J O Y F U L WO R D S E A R C H

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ADVENTURES OF DARING DANIELLE

RIGHT ON TARGET

Wonderful words from competition shooting and last month’s answer key.

BELTING TUNES by Danielle Litton

Daring Danielle leaves her comfort zone. TA L E S O F A M O L D WA R R I O R

LURKING IN THE ATTIC by Paul McHam

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CALLING THE SHOTS by Amy Ba r nes

Stan Nelsen’s love of his sons and shooting competitions led to his becoming a coach for hundreds.

ON THE COVER: Dr. Kelly Low’s dream of having a 9/11 memorial has come true, for more pictures, please see Page 8.

Several culprits can cause problems in an attic.

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BITE ME!

21

GEMS

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LET’S DO IT!

GLOP

by Amy Barnes

The name may not be appetizing, but the recipe makes for a hearty family meal.

PALLING AROUND

b y K e n t Vo n D e r Ve l l e n

Police officers donate their off-hours time to schoolchildren.

Time to grab some adventure and do something new!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Calling the

SHOTS

by Amy Barnes Photos by FlashBang Photography

H

is elementary school in New Jersey had a shooting range in the basement. As a sixth grader in the 1950s, Stan Nelsen would scramble out the door with his rifle as quickly as he could and head back to school in the evening to hone his shooting skills every chance he had. His shooting skills grew, and eventually Nelsen participated in the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) service rifle competitions in college and, years later, in high-power service rifle competitions. However, he only briefly mentions his achievements. “I took a few medals,” said

Even though the Eagles Venture Crew and competition team are based in Ashland, members are from Medina County and the northeast Ohio area. Venture Crews are youth development programs that are part of the Boy Scouts of America. They welcome both boys and girls as members. Nelsen said girls really enjoy shooting with the Venture Crew because there are no special rules for girls. New team member, Emma Bruce, Everyone is treated equally, from Highland High School, shoots a and competition is based bullseye from a standing position. solely on shooting ability. “Kids’ chemical Nelsen, who has a Level 3 rating dependencies at that age in the National Rifle Association’s are perfume and gasoline,” said coaching program. Nelsen, with a deep chuckle. He When his sons, Stanley and added that the shooting team helps Brian, wanted to join a rifle team, teenagers learn to focus and gives he was happy to accommodate them goals to accomplish. them. He helped them join the The club usually utilizes the Ashland Eagles Junior Rifle Venture gun ranges at the Hill N Dale Club, Crew. 3605 Poe Road, Medina, and the His sons’ interest in competitive University of Akron. With UA’s range shooting rekindled his interest, and under renovation, the team has that was when he became a highbeen using the Ashland Lake Gun power service rifle competitor at Club range as its secondary location. the state and national levels. Compressed air is used in the Little did he know he still would team’s rifles in place of gunpowder. be coaching young shooters to The team has a scuba tank they success 30 years later. It was during use for refills. Before acquiring the that time, he moved from Medina scuba tank, rifles had to be filled by to Polk. pumping.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

An air rifle is not considered a gun because it does not use gunpowder, said Nelsen. The team uses small bore (.22 caliber) and rifles, with most of them imported from Germany. They range in cost from $1,500 to $2,000 each. Over the years that Nelsen has been involved with the club, 300 teenagers have participated. Some team members have had their shooting talent rewarded not only with championships, but also college scholarships, Nelsen said. He added that there are few scholarships for shooting. “If you want to pick a sport with the highest percentage of scholarships (per participant), it’s rowing,” Nelsen said, chuckling. He said there are few competitive rowers because most schools don’t have rowing teams. The Eagles’ competition team has won multiple championships over the years and members have won several trips to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Two of the club’s best competition shooters were from Wadsworth. Abby Stanec, who won

a national championship, and her younger sister Annabelle Stanec who was ninth out of 385 shooters in the Civilian Marksmanship Program national competition last June. Annabelle also was awarded a scholarship based on her shooting abilities to The Ohio State University. The team as a whole scored as the 18th highest in the same competition. Continuing the Nelsen family tradition, Caleb Nelsen, Stan Nelsen’s grandson, took silver in an American Legion shooting match. Among other top Eagles competitors were April Engle and Christine Holden. While April Engle was a member of the Eagles’ competition team, she was sent to the Olympic Training Center four times. She has been named as one of the National Rifle Association’s Top 50 Women in shooting competition. She also was on the shooting team for Akron University. Christine Holden was a part of the Eagles team and went on to win the National Standing Air Rifle Championship two years in a row. She currently assists Nelsen with the Eagles team.

ABOVE: In 2015, the team won first at the NRA National Air Rifle Championship. Team members, from left, are Antonio Remedios, Annabelle Stanec, Josh Kovach, and Chrissey Holden. RIGHT: A winning team, from left, Coach Stan Nelsen, Annabelle Stanec, Chrissey Holden, Josh Kovach, and Antonio Remedios. Photos provided.

Each year, the American Legion sponsors matches to pick young shooters to send to the Olympic Training Center where the shooters will compete to be included in the Junior Olympic National Championship Rifle Match where potential USA Olympic team shooters are identified. Chief Range Officer Gary Antill has been with the group for approximately 25 years. He works with the teenagers who are new to shooting and teaches them safe handling of guns and the rules of competitive shooting. After Antill teaches the new arrivals the fundamentals of shooting, they then work with Nelsen for further training. Nelsen also schedules matches for the young shooters. Typically, Nelsen says, the group participates in two competitive matches a month. He limits the number of monthly matches because competing in the matches is exhausting for the teenagers. “It puts a real drain on them,” he said. Parents form car pools or convoys to transport their teenagers to competitions.

cont inued, Pag e 15

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

His highness, Charlie the camel, recently celebrated his 10th birthday at Spring Mist Farms in Brunswick. Charlie the camel welcomes visitors to his birthday party.

Iyliah Jacobson, 8 years old, is sporting the bee’s knees in nail art.

Oh,! Snap

Photos by FlashBang Photography

Left to right, Emma and Charlotte Lees, 21-month-old twins, and Micki Parr, their nanny, lend their artistic hands.

Brunswick Library personnel bravely covered tables in white paper, flipped them on their sides, and invited children to use paint-dipped spaghetti noodles and stamps to decorate the paper.

Two-year-old Emerson Sholtis perfected a recipe of blue and yellow paints and cooked spaghetti.


The Medina Library Bee Festival celebrated bees in many forms, while Medina County Beekeepers Association members were present to answer questions and encourage a love of bees.

Three-year-old Xavier Jacobson stretches toward MCBA volunteer Lynette Horn for his bee nails.

Peggy Garnes, MCBA member, shares her beekeeping knowledge with festival attendees. Bee Festival crafts were made fashionable by 6-year-old Megan Kolecki, 11-yearold Nicole Kolecki, and 10-year-old Jenna Wyatt. Buzzing with balloons at the Bee Festival.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Retired U.S. Army Master Sergeant 30-year veteran Jerry Gardner, daughter Kristina Svancara, and grandson Frankie Svancara pay their respects. James Pittis watches as Janet Pavlic hushes her dog, Sadie. Pavlic is a member of Sons and Daughters of Pearl Harbor Survivors and tries to attend events honoring the military and first responders.

9/11

MEMORIAL MEDINA, OHIO The Medina 9/11 Memorial, located at Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina, features a beam section from one of the New York World Trade Center towers destroyed by a terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. Dr. Kelly Low was the driving force behind getting the beam section for Medina’s memorial, and the Medina Evening Rotary Club funded the construction cost of approximately $75,000.

Chatting with ceremony attendees are Ohio State Highway Patrolman Sergeant William Lee, left, and Chris Spence, middle, who served together in the 1st Special Forces Group Airborne.

Left to right, Medina Fire Chief Robert Painter; Tom Csanyi, #1 Landscaping owner; Dr. Kelly Low, who was integral in getting the Twin Tower beam section for the memorial; retired Master Sergeant Chris Spence, 5th Special Forces Group Airborne who was part of the military response to 9/11; and Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Get Involved

We Need You! Get Involved Today!

Volunteer

Donate

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Become a volunteer tutor or work at one of our BookShelf locations in Medina County.

Books and other materials are always needed at Project: LEARN or The BookShelf locations.

Purchase books at one of our three locations or through Amazon.com’s Smile Program!

The BookShelf

Project: LEARN's Used Bookstores Brunswick

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Wadsworth

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105 W. Liberty St. 330-723-1314

130 Main Street 330-334-3333

learn more at: projectlearnmedina.org

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

CHAPTER 15

TH E READ I NG N O O K

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to issuu.com/joyofmedinacounty for all of our past issues.

I showered in the hotel bathroom, washing off the sweat and anxiety of travelling halfway across the world. It felt great. Afterward, I emerged to find Marissa, out of bed and dressed, talking to Devin about Heath. My heart jumped immediately, knowing how attractive Heath was to girls, and hoping that Marissa was one of the few outliers. “He’s a good guy. I’ve known him for years, and I’ll admit that as far as boyfriends go, he really is a great one,” Devin said, vying for Heath to the girl who was supposed to like me. I had to hold my breath so I wouldn’t ask why he was betraying me like this. “Oh! Cam! I was just asking Devin about your friends, so I could get to know them a bit better. I hope you don’t mind,” Marissa explained. “Why? Garret and Heath aren’t here, so why do you need to know about them?” I asked, feeling like she wasn’t telling me the whole story. “Because,” she paused, glanced at Devin, and then said, “A girlfriend should know her man’s friends.” Her lips curled into a smile even as she spoke and, of course, hearing the word “girlfriend” come out of her mouth like that made me mirror her expression. “Good point,” I said, laughing nervously. I didn’t really know what to say to that, because she knew I wanted it at least as much as she did. There was an awkward silence as we both tried to think of what to say next. A really awkward, really long silence. “Alright lovebirds, enough gazing into each other’s eyes. I’m starving!” Devin to the rescue. “Right! I hope it’s good,” I said, slipping into my shoes and grabbing my phone. We made it to the buffet just 15 min-

utes before they were going to close it down, so we had to scramble to get all the food we wanted. There was a good variety with eggs, bacon, sausages, and bagels, but it was all a little cold. In a word, it was subpar. The good news was that all we needed out of breakfast was energy and not deliciousness. “Well, that was disappointing,” Marissa said as we headed back to our room afterward. “It’s a cheap, near-airport hotel, what did you expect? Fine dining?” Devin said, mostly joking. “It was edible,” I reminded them, hoping Devin wasn’t upset about how late we had made him for breakfast. “True,” they said together. It was weird how perfectly timed it was, and we all laughed at it. We made it back to our room and started packing up the few things we had used in the past 12 hours or so. Devin and I were packed in five minutes, but Marissa had her makeup that she had to pack just right so nothing would leak or get shaken up or anything of the sort. While Devin and I were waiting for her, I figured it was a good time to see if Devin would admit to me what they had been talking about when I was in the shower. “She was just asking about us, your friends,” he said. “Does she think Heath is hot?” I asked, hoping I could trust him to be honest since he was my best friend. “She said so, but she also said that he seems shallow, while you’re enigmatically deep to her. She said she found you fascinating in the most beautiful way,” he said with a flourish. He stopped when he thought he heard her coming, but after a moment he continued, “Her words, not mine.” I chuckled a bit, thinking of Devin coming up with a phrase like that, and then nodded at him. “Thanks, Devin. For being honest.” “Sure thing,” he said, with a thin smile. In the moment, my mind was on seventeen thousand different things, so I didn’t noticed his odd smile or how


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

he said “sure thing,” like he had done me a favor. Later, I’d think back to this moment and piece it all together, but right then, I had no clue. “Okay! I’m ready!” Marissa called, dragging her luggage out of the room we’d shared. It was a bit bigger than it had been when we arrived, and I frowned at her. “Hey, they don’t keep partially used shampoo or anything. We might as well take it so it doesn’t go to waste.” Devin laughed, but I agreed with her. Devin probably didn’t since he could buy himself an entire hotel, but for us less fortunate kids, taking the hotel’s amenities was second nature. “So, what’s the plan?” Marissa asked, once we finished laughing. Devin looked at me and I shrugged. Now that we actually were in London, I didn’t know where to go from here. There was only one thing I could think of to do since I wasn’t about to go knocking on every door asking for the Collettes. “Devin, you’ve been to Europe before, how willing are people to help?” I asked him, hinting at my plan. “You aren’t actually counting on the kindness of strangers to find your family in this enormous city, are you?” he shot back. “Well, do you have any better suggestions?” The room was quiet while he thought about it, but he knew I was right. With how little we had to go on, asking anyone and everyone we met was pretty much the only way we would get headed down the right path. We only had a week after all, and it was already afternoon. “I don’t like this,” Devin said, as we headed down the steps toward the front desk. “Yeah, well I don’t like your attitude, mister!” Marissa chided, laughing at him. He glared at her and she playfully

glared back. I stayed out of it. These were the two people I knew I could count on, the two people I knew I needed, and a bit of banter between them was fine with me if that’s what it took for them to get along. “Good afternoon, sirs. Madame,” the receptionist said, as we walked up. She smiled a fake smile with her fake eyelashes, and I found myself missing the one that we had checked in with the night before. This one seemed like all she wanted was for us to leave. “Afternoon. I was wondering if you could help us out. We’re trying to find someone, but London is a big city and we don’t have even the slightest clue of where to begin,” Devin said politely, while the receptionist looked at him uninterestedly.

She smiled like a snake looking at a rat with a broken foot and stuck her hand out. “Hm, well I don’t know many people, but I might be able to help,” she said, her eyes widening slightly. “Oh really? If you could help at all, we’d be very grateful.” She smiled like a snake looking at a rat with a broken foot and stuck her hand out. “Well, nothing comes free,” she said. Marissa and I looked at each other, wondering what would happen next, but after a beat, Devin pulled out his wallet and put a five-dollar bill into the snake’s, I mean, woman’s hand. “And what am I supposed to do with this?” she asked, looking like she was about to spit at us. We’d forgotten to get our cash exchanged for pounds, and now it looked like this would cause us to have no starting point for our search whatsoever.

“Excuse me,” a noticeably stout man said, approaching from behind us, seemingly out of nowhere. He handed the mean receptionist a few pounds and then looked expectantly at her. She pocketed the cash quickly and then looked up at us. “I would go downtown. West of here. You should be able to get better information about their whereabouts there.” “That’s it?” the mystery man asked her. She shied away, but he didn’t push it. There was no point in fighting a snake to the death just because it bit off your tail. “I’m sorry, kids. Who are you looking for anyway?” Marissa and Devin turned toward me, and he followed their gaze. I didn’t really want to tell him whom we were looking for, but with so much sudden pressure, I gave in. “My mom. Her name’s Lilith,” I said, clenching my teeth before finishing, “Lilith Collette. Do you know her?” “Can’t say that I do,” he said, shaking his head sadly. “Lilith Kizinsky, maybe?” Marissa asked, trying to be helpful. Hearing the name stung. “No, I don’t know any Lilith. Sorry,” he replied, looking sincere that he was feeling bad that he couldn’t help us. This man and the receptionist were on two completely different sides of the spectrum of Londoners. It was an odd contrast to run into on our first full day in the city. He wished us luck, gave us 10 pounds from his own pocket, telling us that he would be fine without it, and went on his way. “Well, it looks like we only have one move to make,” said Devin, after the man left and we had stepped outside. He looked around to get his bearings, then turned toward the west and gestured in that general direction.

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c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 11 “I guess we’ll just go west until we need to stop and then ask around for information again. Someone in this city has to know where your mom lives.” I looked around at the grand city of London and wondered if we’d ever find the Collettes. Until just then, I hadn’t thought of how not finding them was a real possibility. It scared and upset me, but I still had Devin, I still had my girlfriend, and whether we found my family or not, we’d still have each other. And I was OK with that.

C H A P T E R 15 We walked west for an hour or so, dragging our increasingly heavy suitcases with us, and began to really regret not getting pounds to pay a cab. The kind man’s 10 pounds wouldn’t be enough for a cab ride all around London, which is what we really needed, so we had to stay on foot whether we liked it or not. “I need a drink,” Marissa said finally, as we walked onto a street full of restaurants. A lunch break sounded great to me. My stomach was empty enough for a meal, but what I really wanted was a place to sit down and take a break from lugging my suitcase around. “Well, what are you thinking?” Devin asked, looking around at the restaurants nearby. “There! That Mexican grill. Sounds delicious,” Marissa said, with her mouth practically watering. The place was covered in red with golden lights all around, and it honestly looked far too fancy for a quick lunch stop. Marissa was right though, it did sound delicious. “What do you think, Devin?” I asked him, already picturing a fat burrito in my hands. “I think I’m hungry, and that place probably has food, so I’m in,” he re-

plied. “Cool,” I said, heading for the doors. We walked in and found that the inside was just as fancy as the outside. Luckily, they took credit, and Devin paid for the lunch. We ordered, sat down, and dug in. The food was delicious, much better than airline or hotel food. As we ate, we discussed a few ideas of how to find the Collettes, but none of them were very viable. Devin even asked the waiter, but he just laughed at us and said, “How should I know?” We finished lunch and left the restaurant, still with our luggage in tow. It was awkward, and we really needed a place to sit and figure out what the next step was, so Devin pulled up a map on his phone and did some searching.

“I only thought as far ahead as getting to London.” “How’s a park sound?” he asked us a few minutes later. “We can find a bench, hang out, brainstorm, and even ask a few pedestrians passing by.” “Works for me. I’m not entirely sure what we’re doing here at this point. I only thought as far ahead as getting to London. Now, I’m a little lost,” I said, shyly. “That’s okay. We’ll figure this out together,” Marissa said, rubbing my back gently. “St. James’s Park is nearby,” Devin said, pointing down the street. “Let’s go!” Marissa responded quickly. Her enthusiasm filled me with hope, and I smiled slightly as we headed toward the park. We found our way to the beautiful, lush park and sat down on a bench. Our luggage sat around our feet as we discussed options or, more

accurately, our lack of options. “The city’s too big,” Marissa said after almost two hours. Even she was getting discouraged. Suddenly, a woman walking her dog a few feet away perked up and asked, “Too big for what, dearie?” Marissa looked back at her hesitantly, then back at Devin and me, and then back to the woman. “Too big to find someone we’re looking for.” “Oh, that can’t be true. Everyone’s around here somewhere. Who are you looking for?” Marissa and Devin turned to me expectantly. “Um…Lilith. Lilith Collette,” I said. “Hmm, the name doesn’t ring a bell, but don’t give up! I’d try restaurants and pubs. Everyone comes around to them once in a while,” the woman replied. “OK, thanks,” I said, half-heartedly. I was grateful she had tried to help, but at the end of the day, she just wasted our time. We already knew asking around in popular places wasn’t a bad idea. We needed something more concrete. The woman nodded and walked off with her dog leading her away. I turned to Marissa, hopeless. “Now what?” “I guess we listen to her.” Marissa frowned a bit, grabbed my hand, and squeezed gently. “We can try nearby restaurants, slowly moving downtown, asking everyone who’ll give us the time of day if they know her. It’ll be tedious and irritating, but someone, somewhere, has to know of your mom,” Devin said. He looked serious, and I was beginning to realize that he wasn’t going to let us give up that easily. We came to London for a reason, and Devin wasn’t leaving until we found her. “Can we even get into pubs, though? We’re still minors,” Marissa pointed out.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

“Well, it depends on the place. Some allow minors as long as they don’t drink, others don’t allow us to even step foot inside,” Devin explained. “Great, we’re not going to be allowed into the one pub where the bartender knows Lilith. We’re going to run around this city for days with nothing to show for it.” I sighed, loudly. “Cam-” “I’m sorry I brought you guys out here. This was a dumb idea. We can just head home.” “Cameron,” Marissa stopped me, squeezing my hand again, “I think Devin has an idea.” I turned to my best friend and found a giant smile stretching across his face. He looked like an eager kid on Christmas ready to tear into his presents. “What’s got you so happy?” I asked, a little annoyed. “Oh, nothing! It’s just that, if we can’t get into pubs, then you know who else can’t get into pubs?” There was a long pause of awkward silence while I tried to figure out where he was going with this, but I was either too dull or too discouraged to get the picture, so I just shrugged. “Lea. Lea Collette. She’s only, what, 14?”

“Thirteen,” I corrected. “Okay, 13. Either way, she’s a kid! And you know what kids do?” “Play hopscotch?” Marissa asked playfully, but unhelpfully. “They go to school!” Devin’s big reveal didn’t really hit us yet. “School’s out for summer, Devin,” I reminded him bluntly. “Yes, but the playgrounds are always open,” he said, still smiling. “Can you just explain your thought process here? I’m too beat to figure out what you’re trying to say, man,” I told him. He sighed and rolled his eyes at me. “We go to the schoolyard, find a kid about Lea’s age, ask them if they know her and repeat until we get someone who says yes. Then, we can go from there on how much they’re willing to tell us!” “Actually, that doesn’t sound like a half-bad idea.” Marissa turned back to me and raised her eyebrows. “Welllll… ,” I said, dragging it out. It really didn’t sound like a bad idea, but at the same time, I didn’t want some middle-aged mom attacking us for talking to her kid. Plus, 13-year-olds were probably “too cool” for playgrounds. But it was the best shot we had. “Fine, I’m in. Now we have to find the nearby school,” I said. “No worries! I already have an

idea for that,” Devin said, pointing at a few schoolboys playing Frisbee in the park. “Perfect! I’ll go ask them!” Marissa said, heading off in their direction before Devin could stop her. He chuckled in response and turned toward me, “We’ll see how far she gets without this.” He waved the 10-pound bill in front of my face, laughing at Marissa’s foolishness. He quickly stuffed it back in his pocket as she returned. “Hey guys! School’s that way,” Marissa said, pointing. Devin’s jaw dropped. “There’s no way you got that out of teenage boys without paying them. I know teenage boys, and they like to get money out of people.” “They also like girls,” Marissa said, giggling, while she grabbed her luggage and walked off. Devin looked at me for some sort of reassurance, but I just shrugged, smirked, and stood from the bench to follow Marissa to the school.

Our st ory cont inu es next mont h! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.

Specializing in: Portrait Photography • Traditional Headshots Glamour Shots • Corporate Portraits Family Portraits

Order copies of any photos in Joy of Medina County Magazine 440-263-4502 | sfeller1@neo.rr.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

by C.L. Gammon

In honor of Medina and Medina County’s bicentennials, Joy Magazine will be publishing a recipe each month based on recipes from the same approximate period as when the two were founded. Enjoy!

Wash, peel and slice eggplant. Sprinkle generously with salt. Allow to sit for 30 minutes. Rinse and pat dry. Set out two shallow dishes or trays. Pie pans work well. In the first tray, add bread crumbs, half of the parsley, half of the cheese, and garlic and onion powders.

Eggplant was brought to England from Egypt and was then brought to America. At that time, eggplants produced small, round white or yellowish fruits that looked like eggs, unlike the large purple oblong fruit seen in today’s grocery stores.

In the second tray, beat the eggs with a fork. Add the remaining cheese and parsley.

• 2 small eggplants

Dip the eggplant into the egg mixture, turn to coat both sides. Dip and coat both sides in the bread crumb mixture.

• ½ cup fine dry bread crumbs • 2 eggs • 4 tablespoons freshly minced parsley • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese • ½ teaspoon Italian seasoning • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder (do not use garlic salt) • ¼ teaspoon onion powder (do not use onion salt) • ¼ teaspoon salt • ¼ teaspoon pepper • 3 cloves garlic, whole, peeled • 3 tablespoons olive oil

Heat a pan with a quarter inch of olive oil. Add the garlic in whole pieces. As the oil toasts the garlic, mash it with a fork to flavor the oil. Remove before browning.

Fry in hot olive oil over medium-high heat for five to 10 minutes or until golden on both sides and is tender in the center. Serve as is, season to taste with salt and pepper.

Recipes are reproduced with permission from “A Revolutionary War Cookbook (and More)” by C.L. Gammon, an award-winning and internationally known bestselling author. To see Gammon’s books, go to https://amzn.to/2ITqTBx


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

cont inued f rom Page 5, CALLING THE SHOTS The rifle team is a four-year program. When young shooters being the program they are 14 years old, when they finish the program, they usually also are graduating from high school. There have been exceptions made for a few extraordinary 10 -year-olds, who were allowed to join the club. Dues are $175 and includes ammo, targets, shooting jackets, and guns. The ammo costs from $135 a case to $250 a case, with each case holding 5,000 rounds. Approximately 600 rounds are used per match. Nelsen ensures team members get as much value as possible from their dues, and he wants to spare parents the equipment costs in case students decide they are not interested in shooting. “We don’t recommend that, in the beginning, they buy the equipment, to be sure the kids are really into it,” Nelsen said. Nelsen is looking for new shooters to turn into champions. Currently, there are 10 members of the Eagles and two members on the competition team. Two more are needed for a complete competition team. When prospective team members show an interest in joining the Eagles, they are asked to attend a club practice at the Hill N Dale Club, 3605 Poe Road, Medina, on a Monday night to meet the other club members and Nelsen and to ensure that the shooting club is a good fit for them. Those interested in joining the Eagles can contact Stan Nelsen at snelsen223@yahoo.com.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

T HE NE T W O R K E R

Hi Value by Bob Arnold

He looked at me and said, “Hi.” No fanfare. No special effort to go any further. No trying to engage beyond “hi.” In fact, he even spun around in his seat and looked the other way. I had just sat next to him at a networking event. Now, you would think he was going back to talking with someone, no, that was not it. Well, maybe he was interested in a conversation someone was having across the room or close to him, I am not sure, but I do not think so. He was using an old tried and true method of connecting, the voicing of “hi.” People ask me all the time about how best to meet someone. My usual response is to approach someone and say, “Hi, I’m Bob. And, you are?” Tony, the man previously mentioned, did not waste his breath on all that. I thought he must have read my last column where I wrote about how having an interest in someone is a key component to a valuable relationship, but no, he had not. He, instead, was unconsciously testing to see if I had an interest. I said, “Hi,” back. He turned back around in his chair and shook my already outstretched hand. That is meeting someone where they are. We do not always have to be fancy in our introductions, we just have to express an interest. This is basic, primal and genuine. Look at someone today and simply say, “Hi.” You might be surprised at the result.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and an international best-selling author. More networking tips and information are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at OnwardNetworking.com or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com.

Ripples

When someone says, “Thank you,” do not say “No problem.” It lessens the value of the thank you. Instead, say, “You’re welcome!” so they know you appreciate the gift of the thank you.

INVESTING INTELLIGENC E: SEC RETS OF A MORTGAGE BA NK ER

All Pre-Approvals Are Not Equal by Rich Bailey

If you are planning to purchase a home, the first thing you should do is get a pre-approval. However, all pre-approval are not created equal! To get a pre-approval, first, complete an application with a reputable mortgage lender. Be complete, truthful and accurate in the application because anything left out could cause problems later and will likely be found out anyway. Most lenders simply collect a pay stub and possibly W-2s and tax returns. Whether the returns are reviewed by an underwriter or not is another issue. Then a credit report is pulled, and the applicant’s file is run through an automated underwriting system to get an automated approval. I highly recommend allowing the lender to take the time to be more thorough than that. A thorough pre-approval would include a review of tax returns and bank statements by an underwriter and even a written job verification. The lack of those three items in a pre-approval are the cause of the high percentage of mortgage loan failures during a purchase process. Things like unreimbursed expenses in tax returns and finding payments to others in bank statements that are not listed in a credit report can severely impact the debt ratio and cause a loan approval to spiral into oblivion. People want to rush through the process, but it gets expensive when hundreds of dollars are spent on inspections and an appraisal. Then there is the emotional thrashing from a loan being denied because of one of those things showing up weeks into the process. Buying a home is a big deal! The loan application and underwriting process will be very intrusive and frustrating, depending on the expectations that are set and how thoroughly everything is explained. However, with a thorough, fully underwritten pre-approval, you can be confident that those things will not ruin your transaction. Happy house hunting! Rich Bailey is a licensed mortgage loan originator with First Security Mortgage Corporation and has 15 years of conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA mortgage financing experience for purchase and refinance transactions. Contact Bailey at rich.bailey@fsmc.net or by calling 330571-2692. First Security Mortgage Corporation 15887 Snow Road, Suite 200 Brook Park, OH 44142 www.FirstSecurityMortgage.net NMLS 258602, 289425 MB.802718, LO.015405


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Joyful Word Search Right on Target R

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UNDER

Answer Key For Last Month’s Search: Scholarship R

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

ADV E N T UR ES OF DARI N G DAN I E LLE

TA LES OF A MOLD W A RRIO R

Lurking in the Attic by Paul McHam

Belting Tunes Text and photo by Danielle Litton

Standing on stage in Nashville, the lights dimmed around me, and the crowd got still as the music to “Rocky Top” started to play. I took a deep breath and, right on cue, belted out, “Wish that I was on ol’ Rocky Top down in the Tennessee hills.” The crowd went wild! At least that is how I remember it. Now, it may have taken some encouragement from my friends to get on stage and sing karaoke in the Country Music Capital of the World, but in that time, outside of my comfort zone, I truly realized how good it feels to let go of fears and enjoy the moment! Nashville is one of my favorite cities because of the live music and entertainment, boating on the river, delicious bushwhackers (adult milkshakes), a plethora of food choices, honky-tonks and karaoke bars on Broadway, minor league baseball games, and the country music history. However, celebrating one of my best friend’s 30th birthday was the purpose of this trip and it showed me that no matter how awesome a place already is, enjoying it with the ones we love makes it magical.

Do not be scared to get on stage and sing a little karaoke, even if you do not like country music. Experience the honky-tonks on Broadway. If you drink a bushwhacker, drink only one. Visit Centennial Park to see a full-scale replica of the Parthenon in Athens, and most of all: Do not grow up, it is a trap.

Danielle Litton has an energetic, adventurous spirit and is always ready to jump into her next escapade. Friends know she will be ready to hit the road with them within minutes of their call. To see more of her travel pictures, please go to https:// www.instagram.com/dani_litton Following any or all of the suggestions made in this column is done so at your own risk.

Where do you look for mold? Let us start at the top this month and work our way down in the months to follow. The attic is the second most common place to find mold, usually due to ventilation issues. Attic mold is seldom considered a health issue because, unless it is a converted attic space with “knee walls,” excess spore will exit the attic with the ventilation. This assumes that ventilation is adequate. If ventilation has not been adequate, it is too late, and discoloration already exists. This discoloration ranges from black to white and is mold caused by water. The reasons for water in an attic can be caused by roof leaks from chimney flashing going bad; shingles rolling up as they deteriorate; lack of an ice and water shield membrane; a missing drip edge; old nails loosening and allowing water through; and much more. Water in an attic also can be caused by water vapor condensing on the roof deck, maybe freezing in the cold months, and growing mold as it melts. Proper ventilation avoids this. The best attic ventilation is to have adequate soffit ventilation and a ridge vent. Allowing the air to flow over the roof deck, absorb the moisture, and exit through the ridge vent, where it can condense harmlessly. Any gable vents or static vents should be blocked with quarter-inch plywood. Ridge ventilation can be cut as wide as possible to allow for adequate airflow. Bathroom exhausts should be vented separately, not connected to each other, and each should go out through the roof or the end gable wall, not to the soffit area where the moist air could re-enter the attic at a perforated soffit down the line. Perforated soffit vents should be free of insulation and the wood behind it should be cut out to allow airflow. Occasionally, felt paper is lapped over the top of a ridge vent and remained because someone forgot to cut it out. This is at least a start on looking for mold and removing the causes of it in your home! Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-331-7500.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

The Winds of Change in Networking!

Joyful Networking Group 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays

Photo by Vidar Nordli Mathisen

Buehler’s River Styx Community Room past the deli on the right 3626 Medina Road, Medina Free to visit, free to join. Want to enjoy lunch with your networking? Pre-order your meal at Buehler’s Restaurant, located in the River Styx location, by calling 330-725-5000, Ext. 3148, and pay and pick it up on your way into the meeting room.

Get your week started off right with positive feedback, energy, encouragement, and even a few laughs! Sponsored by Joy of Medina County Magazine. For more information, call 330-461-0589 or e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com www.facebook.com/JoyfulNetworking Not affiliated with any other group or organization.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

BI T E M E !

Glop by Amy Barnes

Back in the seventies, my mother was a divorced schoolteacher in a very small Oklahoma town. At that time, Hamburger Helper was all the rage. Working moms found it to be a quick and easy alternative to cooking meals from scratch. The problem for our family was that I was a very hungry teenager who was having lots of painful growth spurts. My mother had to figure out a cheaper alternative to the boxed, pre-measured meal that realistically had barely enough for two people, much less four. Mother looked at the ingredients used in Hamburger Helper and decided it was much more economical to make it from scratch and with a much higher yield, so everyone had all they could eat. No one dared to point out the irony in her taking a convenience food and taking it backward to a from-scratch version. It wasn’t long before we were eating Hamburger Glop or Tuna Glop at least once a week. Why the name Glop? Because, as my mother said, that was the sound it made when it hit the plate. You had to have a sense of humor to survive on our farm.

TIP FROM A PLUMBER: When pouring boiling water down the drain, run cold water from the faucet at the same time to avoid the drain pipe coming apart. It also helps to decrease the steam.

Meat Mixture •

1 pound lean, cooked ground beef, well drained

1 can cream of mushroom soup

1 can onion soup

5 or 6 sliced, fried mushrooms (fry with beef), optional

Mix ingredients together in pan used to fry beef. The Rest •

1 pound package of wide egg noodles

1 box of frozen peas

Add noodles to boiling water in large pot. When the noodles are almost cooked, add peas. Cook until noodles are tender and peas are hot. Drain off water. Add meat mixture and combine. Tuna version: Replace beef with two well-drained cans of tuna. Eliminate onion soup and mushrooms. Follow directions for Hamburger Glop.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

GEMS

Palling Around by Kent Von Der Vellen

It has always been important for law enforcement to foster a good relationship with the communities they serve. The Medina Police Activities League offers an opportunity for elementary-aged children to interact with police officers in a fun and educational setting. Police officers, administrators and volunteers meet with students from third to fifth grades twice weekly for afterschool activities. During this time, they have a snack with a volunteering officer, play sports, and do some art or another fun activity. The children are given a role in deciding what activities they do. Montville Police Chief Terry Grice became executive director of MCPAL in 2010. Since that time, the program has grown from one location to 10 schools. In many of the schools, the program is so popular there is one group of children in the fall and another group in the spring to accommodate all of those who want to participate. All local law enforcement departments and most of the Medina County public schools participate in the program. MCPAL holds a March Madness Basketball Tournament with student teams, organizes field trips and special events, plus has a food pantry that helps more than 20 families. Field trips are held during the summer, as well as during the school year. Trips may include a Cavs game, Browns training camp, a museum, or a charter fishing trip. MCPAL has partnered with the Ohio Regional Music Arts Cultural Outreach (ORMACO) to expose students to the arts. This past year, a group went to see “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” at Playhouse Square in Cleveland. The Medina County Sheriff’s Department and Boy Scouts Explorers program also have started working with MCPAL. The Explorers are for youths 14 to 20 years old who are interested in a law enforcement career. Program Director Rebecca Byrne is excited when talking about taking the Explorers to New York City, where they had the opportunity to visit with the NYPD and other historical sites. MCPAL is a 501C-3 non-profit organization and is funded through grants, donations and fundraisers. Judge Dunn is a key supporter and was instrumental in obtaining a state grant for MCPAL. They also receive support from the local Fraternal Order of Police, Westfield Group and other area businesses. For more information, got to MCPAL’s website at http://www.medinapal.org/ or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/medinacountypal/ Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Let's do it! Saturday, September 1 Emma Nutt Day https://bit.ly/2LKPdtH 9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Sunday, September 2 International Bacon Day https://bit.ly/2gZVd4q (Yay!)

Monday, September 3 Skyscraper Day https://bit.ly/2tJRg7r Libraries closed for Labor Day.

Tuesday, September 4 Newspaper Carrier Appreciation Day https:// bit.ly/2JWbnUM and Eat an Extra Dessert Day https://bit.ly/2uas7DV 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Liverpool Historical Spirit Walk; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Tales of historical characters, panel will share insight into Myrtle Hill Cemetery. Register at https://bit.ly/2vIUlFm

Wednesday, September 5 Be Late for Something Day https://bit.ly/2tfvTXR 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Nature Through the Seasons; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free.

Thursday, September 6 Fight Procrastination Day (to counteract yesterday) https://bit.ly/2LKYceo and Read a Book Day https://bit.ly/2tfXGHE 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood

September 2018 Non-Profit Calendar

Drive; Summa Health Center at Wadsworth-Rittman, 195 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Master Gardener Decaf Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Medina Spirit Walk; meet at Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway, Medina. Special emphasis on the bicentennial. Ticket info was not available at press time. For updated information, please go to https://bit.ly/2MqxmbH

Friday, September 7 National Salami Day https://bit.ly/2NO5Thb and Neither Rain nor Snow Day (Nothing to do with weather) https://bit.ly/2LQt1Lr 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Master Gardener Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Become a Volunteer; Wolf Creek Environmental Center; 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ages 18 and up. No registration. 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Love in the Name of Christ Medina County’s Church Homecoming Fundraiser Banquet; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Food, entertainment. For reservations, e-mail bruce@ loveincmedina.org 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Medina Spirit Walk; meet at Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway, Medina. Special emphasis on the bicentennial. Ticket info was not available at press time. For updated information, please go to https://bit.ly/2MqxmbH

Saturday, September 8 International Literacy Day https://bit.ly/2mLgIFj and Pardon Day https://bit.ly/2tOiVCA 8:30 a.m. Walk to End Alzheimer’s; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. Check-in, 8:30 a.m.; opening ceremonies, 9:30 a.m. Register at https://bit. ly/2K6qfRA 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Chippewa Inlet Trail North, 5800 Lafayette Road, Medina. Physician talk and one- to three-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monarch Tagging; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Help catch and tag Monarch butterflies before they leave for Mexico. Nets available. Naturalist on hand. All ages. Free. No registration. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Northern Ohio Railway Museum streetcar rides; 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Admission to museum is free, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children under 5. http://www. trainweb.org/norm/ 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Medina Spirit Walk; meet at Medina County Administration Building, 144 N. Broadway, Medina. Special emphasis on the bicentennial. Ticket info was not available at press time. For updated information, please go to https://bit.ly/2MqxmbH

Sunday, September 9 Teddy Bear Day https://bit.ly/2ua1EGu 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Grandparents’ Day Family Fishing; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Free. REGISTER BY SEPTEMBER 7 at https://bit.ly/2Ml3nlt

Monday, September 10 Swap Ideas Day https://bit.ly/2v7p5ie 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Veterans Roundtable; Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018 Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival with Carl Bilski, U.S. Army. All Ages. No registration.

donut) https://bit.ly/2ve05El 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Craft-It-Forward; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Use library’s supplies to craft something to share. Grades 1 to 3. Register at https://bit. ly/2Mt243K

Tuesday, September 11 Make Your Bed Day https://bit.ly/2uQXthK and No News is Good News Day https://bit. ly/2AciQiN

Saturday, September 15

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers; Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2w6Exf0 for 10 a.m and at https://bit.ly/2MIUvDa for 1 p.m.

Make a Hat Day (one of our magazine publisher’s favorite days!) https://bit.ly/1sS5agB

10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast

Wednesday, September 12

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monarch Tagging; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Help catch and tag Monarch butterflies before they leave for Mexico. Nets available. Naturalist on hand. All ages. Free. No registration.

9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding.

Chocolate Milkshake Day https://bit.ly/2t5d7Y7 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Yoga for Preschoolers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Ages 3 to 6. Free. REGISTER BY SEPTEMBER 10 at https://bit.ly/2P9qY75

Noon to 5 p.m. Wiggly, Wonderful Worms; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. Free.

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Root Candles, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Making Your Money Grow; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Hosted by OSU Extension. Topics include net worth, investing, helpful hacks. Pre-registration is encouraged. Registration is $10 per person, due by September 10. Send to: OSU Extension Office, Medina County, 120 W. Washington Street, Suite 1L, Medina.

Thursday, September 13 Defy Superstition Day https://bit.ly/2NMni9N and Positive Thinking Day https://bit.ly/VH6Qwi and Roald Dahl Day https://bit.ly/2tfHTsv 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Score Some Points: Understanding and Raising Your Credit Score; Recovery Center of Medina County, 538 W. Liberty Street, Medina. One-toone sessions on how to raise credit score, differences between good and bad credit and how it affects credit scores.

Friday, September 14 National Cream-Filled Donut Day https://bit. ly/2JYtpFF and Hug Your Hound Day (perhaps not while eating a

Gary Tantanella (President)

12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Medina County Park District: Northern Ohio Live Steamers, All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. All ages. Free. No registration. 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association: Starry, Starry Nights; Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served.

Sunday, September 16 Collect Rocks Day https://bit.ly/2uQqgTT and National Step Family Day https://bit.ly/2OhbFJ3

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Call us for a FREE inspection before you file a claim. If it’s determined you have damage, we’ll guide you through the insurance process.

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Eat It!

Medina County Farmers Markets

2018 Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 10 through October 14 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 19 through October 13 Medina Public Square 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesdays, beginning June 20 A.I. Root Candles, 623 W. Liberty Street, Medina Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2HzA34O Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 26 through September 29 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 30 through September 29 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018 9 a.m. Medina Runs Down Cancer: Race With Grace 5k and Fun Walk; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. https://bit. ly/2KMOunq Noon to 5 p.m. Wiggly, Wonderful Worms; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. Free. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Caterpillars and Cocoons; Hidden Hollow Camp, 8672 Richman Road, Lodi. Search for and learn about caterpillars and their cozy winter homes. Award-based hiking program. Free. Ages 7 to adult. No registration.

Monday, September 17 National Apple Dumpling Day https://bit. ly/1wDj0Gx 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Quilting for Warm Up Medina County; Sew Much Happens, 445 W. Liberty Street, Suite 223, Medina. Bring 100-percent cotton fabric. Bring machine, if possible. Learn how to sew for free while making quilts for those in need. For more information, call 330648-3335.

Tuesday, September 18 National Cheeseburger Day https://bit. ly/2LtiA48 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Western Reserve Masonic Community, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Fenn Elementary School, 320 N. Spring Grove, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. OSU Homeowner Series; Community Room, A.I. Root Candle Store, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Topics vary. $10. http://bit.ly/2FdOtKV

Wednesday, September 19

Thursday, September 20

Sunday, September 23

National Pepperoni Pizza Day https://bit. ly/2vaml3q and National Punch (Drink) Day (sounds like lunch!) https://bit.ly/2v6YHow

Checkers Day and Dogs in Politics Day https:// bit.ly/2cIEHhO

6 p.m. What About Me? A Caregiver’s Journey to Surviving Alzheimer’s; Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Author shares her experiences. Suggestions and ideas provided. Register at https://bit. ly/2KVy105

Friday, September 21 Miniature Golf Day https://bit.ly/1MlYXSv and World Gratitude Day https://bit.ly/1tvFy7m (We are thankful for miniature golf, especially if there is a windmill on the course.) 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, September 22 Elephant Appreciation Day https://bit. ly/1j5RXQ7 , International Rabbit Day https:// bit.ly/2mHTrnE , and National Hunting and Fishing Day https://bit.ly/2LVdt8U (Interesting combination of days) and Hobbit Day https:// bit.ly/2LUJxtX The Amazing Race of Medina County. Teams tackle eight challenges around the county. Prizes, raffle. Benefits the Northern Medina County Chamber Alliance. Team of four, $100. To register a team or for more information, go to https://bit.ly/2JWFDCV

Noon to 5 p.m. Wiggly, Wonderful Worms; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. Free.

Monday, September 24 Punctuation Day (a favorite of our magazine publisher’s!) https://bit.ly/2wf5xLD 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 6 and up. Free. No registration.

Tuesday, September 25 National Comic Book Day https://bit.ly/2NJr04b 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Wednesday, September 26 Love Note Day https://bit.ly/2vHJFqG 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Know Your Rights: Getting Stopped by the Police; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. ACLU shares information on your rights. Grades 6 to 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2OCxRNk

Thursday, September 27 Crush a Can Day https://bit.ly/2uPl4iY

9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Lake Medina, State Route 18, Medina. Physician talk and one- to three-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration.

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. JFK Assassination: The Search for the Truth; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Local historian shares expertise. Register at https://bit.ly/2Bem31S

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Friday, September 28

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monarch Tagging; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Help catch and tag Monarch butterflies before they leave for Mexico. Nets available. Naturalist on hand. All ages. Free. No registration.

Ask a Stupid Question Day https://bit. ly/1KES0cH (but not to your neighbor today) and National Good Neighbor Day https://bit. ly/1lk4obk 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

International Talk Like a Pirate Day https:// bit.ly/2Lqu74p and National Butterscotch Pudding Day (better yet, talk like a pirate with a mouthful of pudding!) https://bit.ly/1q33NcC

Noon to 5 p.m. Wiggly, Wonderful Worms; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. Free.

10:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Get to Know Your Parks…Letha House! 5800 Richman Road, Spencer. All ages. Free.

7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Music at The Lodge: Gretchen Pleuss; Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Bluegrass, gospel, Americana music. Free.

7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Raptor ID; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about local raptor species and how to identify them. Presented by the Medina Raptor Center and guests. Ages 7 and up. Free.

1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Montville Township Police Department, 6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, September 29 Confucius Day https://bit.ly/2vHChf2 9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Search for Snakes; Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. All ages. Free. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bankers and Brews Beer Tasting; historic Phillips-McDowell House, corner of Blake and Prospect in Medina. Includes 4 tastings, one pint, tasting glass, food, entertainment. Tickets, $35 at Cool Beans or e-mail jksimmons@zoominternet.net. Benefits Bankers Row Historic Corridor Neighborhood. 6:45 p.m. to 10 p.m. ORMACO: Mo’ Mojo: An Evening of Zydeco Music; Wadsworth Senior High School, 625 Broad Street, Wadsworth. All are invited for a Zydeco dance lesson on stage, 6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Music is 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets $20 at Buehler’s grocery stores beginning August 27 or at https://bit.ly/2v5cyM9 Tickets at the door, $25 (cash or checks, only).

Sunday, September 30 Hot Mulled Cider Day https://bit.ly/2vHsRAh and National Mud Pack Day https://bit. ly/2mNGzfI 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Glass Fusion Pendant; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ages 8 and up. Fee is $20 for first item, $10 each after first. Register at https://bit. ly/2MLVYsi

Check out our most up-to-theminute calendar of non-profit events at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

Run

for

A list of runs and walks that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your run listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late. Monday, September 3 7:45 a.m. registration opens, 9 a.m. race and walk begin. 18th Annual Run for the Trails 5k Race and Walk; Maria Stanhope Park, intersection of West Main Street and Pleasant Street, Seville. Register by August 21, 2018, for T-shirt. No pets. Held rain or shine. Benefits promotion and building of hiking and biking trails. Online registration, $20 plus fee; race day, registration, $25. Register at https:// bit.ly/2OolViD For more information, contact Dennis Gordon at 330-769-3636 or e-mail him at dg56bk@aol. com Sunday, September 16 9 a.m. Medina Runs Down Cancer Series: Race With Grace 5k; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street,

Medina. Awards. Benefits Grace Foundation, which helps families with expenses associated with cancer. Registration online, $20 plus processing fee, race day is $30. Registration closes at noon, September 15. https://bit.ly/2KMOunq Sunday, October 7 9 a.m. to noon. 4th Annual Harry Potter 5k Fun Run and Walk; The Book Store and Handmade Marketplace, 109 W. Washington Street, Medina. Runners invited to dress in costume. Benefits Ohio literacy programs through grants, scholarships, book donations. https:// www.facebook.com/ events/903194836485785/ Register at https://bit. ly/2yaS3lV

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

SWING FOR IT! Submitting Calendar Events A list of golf outings that benefit area non-profit organizations. To have your golf outing listed, send the information to joy@blakehousepublishing.com at least two months in advance. There is no such thing as too early but there is too late.

Address List Bunker Hill Golf Course 3060 Pearl Road, Medina 330-722-4174

Fox Meadows Country Club 5588 Wedgewood Road, Medina 330 725-6621

Shale Creek 5240 Wolff Road, Medina 330-723-8774 Saturday, September 8 6:30 a.m. American Legion Post 202 Golf Outing Benefits: Birthcare of Medina Bunker Hill Golf Course 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. 11th Annual Diamond Classic Golf Tournament Benefits: Friends of Diamond Blackfan Anemia Shale Creek

Monday, September 17 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Heroes for Hospice Charity Golf Outing Benefits: Hospice Contact: Melissa Fiorilli, mfiorilli@fio-con.com , 216696-5845 Fox Meadows Country Club

“Let’s Do It!” is a calendar of events sponsored or hosted by non-political, non-profit groups in Medina County. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCounty. com, where it is regularly updated with additional events. There is no charge to list an event in the calendar. To have an event listed, please send date, time, event name, location, cost of event, organization benefitting from the event (and hosting or sponsoring organization if different), contact name and phone number, website if available, and name and phone number of the person submitting the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing. com with Calendar in the subject line or you can mail the information to Attn: Calendar, Joy of Medina County Magazine, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Oh. 44256. Calendar information will not be taken by phone.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | September 2018

Want to be a part of bringing Joy to Medina County?

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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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! r e m m u s , Goodbye

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The Chippewa Lake Water Ski Show Team waves goodbye to summer. Top row, from left, Melissa Ford, Natalie Bailey, Nikki Lee, Jenny Peshina, Brooke Lee, Morgan Lee, Grace Goldsberry, Paige Peshina. Bottom row, from left, Rich Esber, Nick Bailey, Mark Ford, Nick Timura, Bryan Midlik, Doug Peshina, Bill Lee, Doug Ribley.

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine September 2018  

Medina 9/11 Memorial, a championship shooting team, schoolchildren find PALS, and much more!

Joy of Medina County Magazine September 2018  

Medina 9/11 Memorial, a championship shooting team, schoolchildren find PALS, and much more!