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E AG LI AP FO M LL UR 8 FA TO P G

OCTOBER 2018

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 9

HELPING BUSINESSES AFFECTED BY CONSTRUCTION PG.2

SEEING LIONS PG. 22

THEY ATE YOUR GARDEN PG. 18

GETTING FRIED PG. 22

FIFTY YEARS AGO, THE MEDINA COUNTY FALL FOLIAGE TOUR MADE ITS DEBUT AND PEOPLE HAVE BEEN FALLING FOR IT EVER SINCE. PG. 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

One

Voice

A Helping Hand

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J O Y O F M E D I N A C O U NTY.C OM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC E D I TO R Amy Barnes

by Amy Barnes s we all are painfully aware, everyone, from business owners, employees, shoppers, and those just trying to navigate from one end of Medina to the other, has been dealing with the consequences of the lengthy major road construction around the city. Despite the city’s best efforts, it has been tough for everyone involved. These were just not going to be easy projects. While the construction was needed, it seemed that there just had to be a way to give a helping hand to my fellow small business owners in the spirit of old-time Medina. So, I am delighted to be able to announce a special program to help those terrific business owners who have patiently stuck it out and a reward for those who want to help give them a boost. If 1,000 new subscribers sign up for a free subscription to Joy of Medina County Magazine by September 30, 2018, I will give every small, nonfranchised business in Medina whose address is on a section of road that has had major road construction on it

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 9

this year, one free 1/8 page full-color ad in a future issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine, starting with the December issue, which will publish mid November. As an additional free bonus, each free ad will be clickable through to each company’s website. For everyone who has wanted to help those business owners, now is your chance! Pass the word, get friends and family to sign up for free subscriptions, and take a look at the magazine for the business owners who would deeply appreciate your business. Then show them how much you appreciate them, and shop in their stores! To sign up for a free subscription, go to JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com and click on the “free subscription” tile. Companies who want to register for a free ad can e-mail joy@ blakehousepublishing.com with the subject line: Free Ad. Be sure to include your company address and contact information. Deadline to register is Oct. 10, 2018.

P H O TO G R A P H E R FlashBang Photography A R T D I R E C TOR Ryan Burdzinski C O N T R I B U TO R S Bob Arnold Rich Bailey C. L. Gammon Danielle Litton Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty. com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

Contents Pine Crest Farm

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J O Y F U L WO R D S E A R C H

JUMPING IN!

Finding fall foliage.

OH, SNAP! photos by FlashBang Photography

A horse as small as a dog, a dog as big as a horse, and a fest as big as a square. THE READING NOOK

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

The mission is temporarily set aside to fulfill a secret desire.

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BICENTENNIAL BITES

BAKED RABBIT by C.L. Gammon

A fall evening meal is made complete. T H E N E T WO R K E R

NETWORKING NO PASSING ZONES by Bob Arnold

Sometimes the signs are there that it is time to move on. I N V E S T I N G I N T E L L I G E N C E : S E C R ETS OF A M O RT G A G E B A N K E R

FALLING FOR FOLIAGE

AVOIDING SCARY PITFALLS by Rich Bailey

by A my Barnes

It is time for the county’s beloved Fall Foliage Tour and the story of how it all started.

As more people decide to retain ownership of their old home, it is important to know the consequences.

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ADVENTURES OF DARING DANIELLE

VEGAS, DANIELLE STYLE by Danielle Litton

What do Elvis, Jason, Friday the 13th, a pool, and drinks have in common? TA L E S O F A M O L D WA R R I O R

AIR IN THE ATTIC by Paul McHam

Ventilation is key to defeating mold.

22 FALL FOLIAGE TOUR MAP

BITE ME!

FRIED POTATOES by Amy Barnes

A filling comfort-food side dish that is great with eggs. GEMS

Load the car and hit the road, it’s time to enjoy a day in the country!

LIONS SHARE b y K e n t Vo n D e r Ve l l e n

ON THE COVER: A stop on this year’s Fall Foliage Tour, the Richman Farms barns in Lodi stand ready for visitors.

It is about so much more than collecting used eyeglasses.

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LET’S DO IT!

Time to enjoy fall-ing for Medina County!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

Magical Farms, Inc., Litchfield, now closed, October 1999

b y A my B a rn e s photos by Beth Schnabel

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. n the 1950s, as more people moved to the country to enjoy living in more open, green space, the growing pains were felt by the agricultural community. City folk did not seem to understand such things as there was no controlling a cow mooing at 4 a.m. as it waited to be milked, the inevitable smells of farm life that would travel with the wind, or the tractors that plodded along on roadways as farmers traveled from one field to another. The best solution, it seemed to The Ohio State University Cooperative Extension Service, was education. But how to educate the newcomers to the old way of life they now were living next door to? The creative answer was to create a fall tour where there would be a chance for people to visit various farms and sites so they could learn what it takes to run a farm. So was born the Medina County Farm - City Fall Foliage Tour (now known as the Medina County Fall Foliage Tour), a drive-it-yourself tour that included agriculture, history and education.

Clowning with apples at Geig’s Orchard, Seville, October 1998.

All aboard! Hay ride at the Apple Cabin, Lodi, October 1999.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

The first tour was held October 19 and 20, 1968. It had 13 stops and 21 drive-by sites and included greenhouses; horse, sheep, egg and poultry, and dairy farms; a cemetery; a town hall; and three industrial development sites. In 1969, the second tour reported an estimated 3,509 people drove the tour route. That year, there were eight stops, nine drive-by sites, and six side stops. As the tour grew, so did interest. In 1971, the Medina County Gazette started covering the tour, and a committee was formed to handle some of the work of the tour. The group was named the Medina County Farm-City Committee and worked under the extension service. By 1979, the tour was a 50-mile route. Tour organizers through the decades have included Farmer’s Home Administration; Medina County Park District; Production Credit Association; Agricultural, Stabilization and Conservation Service; and the Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District. While it has been 50 years that the tour has existed, it has not been 50 years of tours. In 1981, due to a drought and thus a poor growing season, few farms were willing to participate, so the tour was cancelled. Inadvertently, the tour’s cancellation served to prove just how popular it had become. Due to complaints from a disappointed public, the tour was brought back the next year in 1982. Few realize the cost and amount of work that goes into each site’s participation in the tour.

Elm Farm, Medina, October 2000. The dairy closed in 1979, the museum closed in 2010, and 100 years of dairy equipment were auctioned off in 2012. Elm Farm was first to bring pasteurized milk to Medina County.

Metal is forged at Richman Farms, Lodi, October 1999.

There is the cleaning, weed removal, barn painting, landscaping and flowers, sprucing up of signs, general grooming, and hiring extra staff for the tour so the regular staff members can continue their regular work. “It is a tremendous amount of work,” said Beth Schnabel, education specialist with the Medina County Soil and Water Conservation District and tour coordinator since 1995. Schnabel works in conjunction with the Fall Foliage Tour Committee made up of representatives from the Medina County Park District, the soil and water district, the Medina County Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Medina County Farm Bureau, and additional interested individuals. She pointed out that when the tour is held also is the busiest time of year for farmers so participating in the tour is a major undertaking. Although the tour is free, there may be a small fee for activities at each stop. Activities have included farmers markets, hay rides and gift shops.

Alpacas at Magical Farms, Inc., October 1999. Visiting the Maple Valley Farm tractor.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

The tour is split between four regions and rotates between them each year. This year’s tour is Region 1, which includes Harrisville, Homer, Spencer, and Westfield. Region 2 is Chatham, Lafayette, Litchfield, Medina, and York. Region 3 covers Brunswick, Granger, Hinckley, and Liverpool Region 4 includes Guilford, Montville, Sharon, and Wadsworth. As the tour expanded, the cost did, too. Since participants experience a surge in business during and after the tour and sponsoring organizations were having trouble covering the tour’s cost, it was decided to start charging participants a fee. Currently, the fee is $50 for commercial enterprises and $25 for noncommercial. To protect the tour from becoming commercialized, organizers established guidelines in 1991 to ensure the its educational integrity. The tour has had its challenges as farms gave way to development and housing and farmers were forced to get jobs in addition to their work on their farms. However, while the demand for additional housing ate up farmland, it also created a need for more landscaping supplies and brought people hungry for fresh produce. This caused more orchards, plant nurseries and greenhouses to join the tour.

A tractor that helps with the hard work at Pine Crest Farm.

A rise in non-traditional farming in the county brought the addition of farms focused on such things as alpacas, organic produce, and hydroponic farming. Conservation practices, including flood control structures, ponds and wildlife, have been part of the tour’s drive-by sites. Antique farm equipment, museums, churches, cemeteries, and private homes also have been part of the list of tour stops or drive-by sites. Safety topics covering fire, hunting and trapping, and park safety also have been covered at tour stops that included fire departments and the MetroParks Ranger Stables. The tour varies in length each year, it was 92 miles long in 1997 and 25 miles long in 1985. The disappearance of farms throughout Medina County concerns Schnabel, as each year she readies the new list of participants and notes those who have closed over the years. She energetically and fervently works for the success of the tour she loves so much, as well as the preservation of its history. Each year she can be found diligently photographing every stop for that year’s tour and has the hundreds of photographs to show for her 23 years of devotion. This year’s tour will be October 13 and 14, from noon to 5 p.m. each day.

Cows at Maple Valley Farm, Seville.

A tractor that helps with the hard work at Pine Crest Farm.

Hydroponic farming at Crop King, Lodi.

Maple Valley Farm Tour participants will be able to enjoy the beauty of farm life at Pine Crest Farm in Spencer.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

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Joyful Word Search October Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018 2018 Joyful Word Search Jumping In! Jumping In!

V G A L I V E S T O C K W

N N P G D A B R D X S Y Y

S I R P R F P Y M E K T Q

N V G A A I R P S W N Q D

FALL

I I Z L C O C U L U T P T

K R L N T T O U O E N M X

P D V S Y H I C L S S T D

M V I T N B A V R T R N L

U H F E E N S E I A U E N

P I E A I R W N C T A R D

F R U D R O U T G V I B E

G T E D L M O O E I P E J

Y M Z F B R S S T D S L S

AGRICULTURE PUMPKINS activities GREENHOUSES FLOWERS DRIVING beauty LIVESTOCK apples ACTIVITIES Medina County TRACTOR BEAUTY Pumpkins SIGNS Flowers MEDINA COUNTY

fall LEAVES leaves TOUR tour FARMS farms fifty FIFTY history HISTORY agriculture greenhouses driving

Livestock tractor signs

Answer Key For Last Month’s Search: Right on Target R

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

From left, Kemrey Cerny and Haley Madak delight in a drawing of Frankie, a Rottweiler owned by JoAnna Adams (not pictured).

Oh,! Snap

The Medina County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) and Pitbull Protectors participated in a recent pet adoption day at Pet Supplies Plus.

Photos by FlashBang Photography

From left, 11-year-olds Kemrey Cerny, Brooke Russo, Haley Madak founded Pitbull Protectors to raise funds and awareness.

Rob Haddad, Little Caesar’s Pizza owner (not pictured), also in Centerpointe Plaza, 1150 N. Court, Medina, gave pet adoption efforts a boost by having manager Shayne Gast offer free pizza slices while encouraging people to go to PSP. Thanking her are Link the miniature horse, owned by PSP assistant manager Anna Bebout (not pictured); and Jamie Chaw, PSP shift supervisor.

Joshua and Melissa Maley consider adopting a kitten.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

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Chilling while hula hooping are 11-year-old Lauren Kadlec, left, and 9-yearold Emily Kadlec.

Emily Kadlec shows her skills with five hula hoop rings.

Medina Fest, sponsored by Main Street Medina, replaced the International Festival on the square this year as part of the city’s bicentennial celebration.

Demonstrating their skills are founder and head instructor of Combat Functional Martial Arts (CFMA), Sifu Kamille Louis, left; Craig Weber, wearing sunglasses; and David Campbell.

Tiffany Yanulaitis maybe distracted by conversation, but it is clear that Rosto, a male blue tick coon hound, is busy picking out his favorite snow cone flavor.

From left, Roman Ray and Nick Dean.

From left, Mason Cayton and Connor Schultz.

Members of Wadsworth Cub Scout Pack 3403 puff to the finish line in their Raingutter Regatta Race.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

CHAPTER 17

TH E READ I NG N O O K

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to issuu.com/joyofmedinacounty for all of our past issues.

Devin, Marissa and I were heading toward the schoolyard, dragging our luggage behind us, barely talking. At this point, the sun had begun its decline in the sky, and we were all pretty tired. We really needed someplace to set down our luggage at the very least, but without any set plans, we couldn’t really afford to put our stuff anywhere. So, we trudged on quietly until Marissa tugged at my sleeve. I turned to look at her, and she smiled sweetly and pointed off in the distance. “What is it?” I asked, my eyes following her gesture and finding a glowing clock tower reaching toward the heavens in the distance. The sun was hitting it just right, and it looked like it could have been made of solid gold. I knew, or at least I was pretty sure, that it wasn’t actually made of gold, but I almost would have sworn that it was at that angle. It was magnificent, and there was no way I was going to say no to Marissa’s unspoken suggestion. We were in another country and skipping out on one of the most impressive sights we would ever see wasn’t something I planned to do. “Devin?” I asked my fearless leader in front of us. “Hmm?” he turned around, and Marissa and I both pointed toward Big Ben off in the distance. He sighed, but it evolved into a slight grin and he nodded. “It is quite the sight to see. Shall we stop there first?” “I’m perfectly fine with that,” I said. “Can we at least find some place to stash our suitcases for now? These things are heavy,” he replied with a grunt, as he once again picked up his luggage. “Why not just leave them here?” someone suggested from behind me. I turned around to find a boy of about 10

or 11 picking up a flying disc that had landed a few feet away. He was one of the boys Marissa had just talked to, now looking to get some cash out of the deal, just as Devin had warned. He was small, with blond hair and very fair skin. He looked more like a Swede than an Englishman, but then again, I didn’t live in this country or Sweden either, for that matter, so I guess I wouldn’t really know. “Yeah, right. Like I’m going to leave all my personal things in the middle of some park,” Marissa said to the kid. “Well, you could always give me a few pounds and I can watch it for you,” he suggested, wiggling his eyebrows. He grinned wide at us and held out the Frisbee upside down. “Whatcha think?” I looked at Devin, who was holding our only 10 pounds that we’d gotten from the kind man earlier. I knew I wanted to do it, just so we didn’t have to lug our suitcases all the way to Big Ben and then back, but I wasn’t sure what Devin was thinking. “Ten pounds. No more,” he said, defiantly. “Works for me!” the kid said, excitedly. He waved the flying disc in Devin’s face, impatient for his payment. “No, that’s not how it works, buddy. We’ll be back soon, and then, if our stuff is all here and untouched, then, and only then, will I pay you,” Devin responded slyly. He pulled out the 10-pound bill and let the kid look at it before he returned it to his wallet. The kid glared at Devin. “Fine, but no promises that I’ll watch it that closely.” Devin chuckled. “Don’t worry, he wants the cash. Our stuff will be here.” He pocketed his wallet and shrugged his backpack off onto the soft park grass. Marissa and I followed his lead, and then it occurred to me that I didn’t know the exact path to get to Big Ben. I mean, I could see it in the distance and I’m sure we would’ve made


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

it there eventually, but I wanted a bit more direction than that. “Hey kid,” I said, hoping he’d be willing to help us out. Luckily, he turned around and spat, “What now?” “Which street do we take to Big Ben?” I asked him, with a smile. My dad had always told me to smile at people, especially if you wanted something, no matter how rude or annoying they were. “Birdcage Walk. It turns into Great George Street,” he replied before leaving us. “Shall we?” I asked Marissa, motioning for her to lead the way. “Yes!” she said excitedly and headed down Birdcage Walk. We got to Big Ben in no time at all, and we all were immediately amazed. It was huge. Like an ancient obelisk stretching toward the sky as if it could reach up and pull heaven and angels down to Earth. It towered so high above us that it gave me a sort of flashback. Way back to when I was tiny, just a year or two old, and I was crawling on the floor of my home, staring up at my dad. He was enormous to me then, like Big Ben was to me now. He was my protector, my father, my guardian, my god. He was the one and only thing I could count on no matter what happened. At less than 30 months old, this didn’t really mean much to me, but as I aged and grew, this notion never wavered. My dad had always been my god, in a way. Maybe that’s why it was so hard for me to believe in other gods. Because mine was just a normal man who lived with me and cared for me. “Cam?” Marissa’s voice breezed into my thoughts, gently tugging me back to reality. “Huh?” I said, blinking. “I said, isn’t it magnificent?” She looked at me with her deep brown eyes and smiled brightly. I held her gaze, wondering, after a moment, how I’d never noticed the

slight flaw in her left eye before. It was just a little spot that was barely darker than the rest of her iris, but it made her unique. “Yes, it really is,” I replied finally. She turned back to the clock tower, and I found myself wishing I’d taken longer to answer. Staring into her eyes was something I thought was even more magnificent than Big Ben. “Hey! Maybe we can get a tour! You know, go inside, reach the top, see the whole of London?” Marissa said, glowing with excitement. “I wouldn’t count on it, love,” a middle-aged man said from behind us. “Only residents get to go up there.”

It towered so high above us that it gave me a sort of flashback. I bit my lip, worried as to how Marissa would react. I could tell how much she wanted to see the top, but I was hoping she wouldn’t do anything irrational. Unfortunately, that wasn’t going to be the case. “I really want to go up there, Cam,” she whispered to me after she’d turned around and let the man wander off. She tilted her head back, scanning the clock tower from base to peak, and breathed heavily when she stared at the top. “It’s always been a dream of mine. Ever since… ,” she trailed off. “Ever since, what?” I asked quietly, stepping into her so that no one, not even Devin, could hear us. “Nothing. I just want to go up there,” she replied, the strange emotion in her tone falling away. “Well, it’s definitely not nothing if you want to go against their rules to get to the top. What’s up there?” I prodded. It was like her to be secretive, but not to so bluntly lie about something.

There was something more that she wasn’t telling me, and I had to ignore the hurt from feeling untrusted while I tried to find out why she wanted to get to the top so badly. “I just do, okay? It’s important to me,” she said, stubbornly, as she started to push her way through the crowd that circled Big Ben’s base.

CHAPTER 18 Marissa marched toward Big Ben, her heart set on getting inside and up to the top, even though we knew we wouldn’t be allowed to. Unsure of what else to do, Devin and I followed her until we reached the entrance to the clock tower and saw the ticket booth. I watched carefully and saw the vendor ask for an ID before he gave anyone a ticket, confirming that we would never get tickets. “Marissa, we can’t,” Devin said sternly. “We could buy the tickets off someone,” she whispered, ever hopeful. “We already promised our only cash to that boy in the park. How do you think we’re going to pay them?” Devin reminded her. “Steal them, then?” “Marissa! Now you’re just being crazy. Why do you want to get up there so badly?” I asked finally, trying to stop her from saying something that would get us arrested. She looked at her shoes in silence. The next tour went up into the tower and left us much more exposed than we had been. With only a few other people around, trying something like stealing tickets was next to impossible. “It’s stupid,” she said, pausing and then continuing, “and childish. Never mind. Forget about it.” She turned around and began to walk away, but I grabbed her hand and pulled her back to me.

cont inued, Pag e 16

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c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 1 5 “No, it isn’t. Just tell me what’s up there for you?” I said in a deep, soft voice that I didn’t realize I had. It was the same voice my dad used when he was comforting me after something bad happened. The voice that I had needed that night after the car accident, but never got. It was now mine. Marissa looked up at me and sighed. “It’s where my dad proposed to my mom. They always say it was when they were at their happiest. Before it all went down the drain. I just want to go see what they saw so maybe…this is so stupid…but maybe I can go back home after this and remind them that they don’t hate each other.” It sunk in slowly. I’d been so wrapped up in my own problems and finding my mom that how I met Marissa in a secret place where she cut herself had completely slipped my mind. She’d never explicitly told me why she had resorted to cutting, but parents who hated each other was a pretty good reason in my mind. And then I had another thought. “Does your dad hit you?” I asked finally, almost silently. She stared into my eyes for a long moment that felt like it lasted for hours before nodding and ducking her head into my chest. In all honesty, she’d probably been waiting and wondering when I would figure it out. She’d given me all the clues, and I guess she knew it was just a matter of time. Although, I would’ve preferred to have figured it out in a more private place instead of the middle of a London street. “Everything okay?” Devin asked from over Marissa’s shoulder. I glanced at him and nodded, and that was all he needed to know to back off and just wait. He was a good guy and a smart guy, and I loved him for everything he was doing for me. For us. Marissa and I were both getting much more help from Devin than we really deserved.

“Hey, we’ll get up there,” I whispered in Marissa’s ear. “How? They won’t even let us in.” “Then I guess we’ll have to run,” I said with a grin. She scanned my face for sarcasm, but there was none. If she wanted to get up there this badly, then I was going to make sure that I got her up there.

“Then I guess we’ll have to run,” I said with a grin. “What are you thinking?” she asked me, glancing around as if we were about to get arrested for just thinking about doing it. “When the next tour is filing in, we get in line, and then when the guy asks for our tickets we just book it. They won’t catch us until we reach the top,” I explained, unable to drop the stupid grin from my face. It was part adrenaline and part pride in my own determination, but it was still a stupid grin. “What happens when they do catch us?” she asked, worried. “They won’t. Now come on, the next tour is lining up.” We walked over to the line that was forming and nonchalantly got in. Devin joined us with a confused look and I leaned over and explained the plan in a whisper. “No! No, nope, definitely not. Cam, you are not doing this,” he whispered back exasperatedly. He grabbed my wrist and was about to leave when a couple of British women walked up and trapped us in the line. Devin turned back around and glared at me with the fire of a thousand suns. “You son of a… .” “Beginning the tour in two minutes!” the tour guide shouted over the chatter, drowning out Devin’s voice. He looked around one more time, desperately searching for an escape,

but found none. “I hope you know I want to murder you right now,” he whispered to me. I smiled brightly back at him. “You won’t when we reach the top.” “If we reach the top,” he murmured. The tour began and the guide began leading people inside the tower. They handed their tickets to the man behind the counter and then entered. When we approached the doors, my heart began to beat like a drum being played by someone who’d drunk way too much coffee. Finally, it was our turn, and I looked at Marissa, hoping to find some burst of confidence. “Tickets please,” the man said, bored out of his mind. “Yeah, sure. I just…where did I put those?” I fumbled around, acting like I was looking for my tickets. Then I just looked up at the man and smiled, gave a shrug, grabbed Marissa’s hand, and booked it. We slipped inside the giant tower only to find that there was no elevator, or escalator, or any sort of technology that would get us to the top. There were only stairs. I looked at Marissa and she looked at me. The tour guide looked at both of us, confused, not realizing what was going on at first. “Well, come on! Don’t just stand there!” Devin shouted at us as he ran past and leapt onto the stairs. He caught me off guard, but I quickly understood what he had meant when he’d said if we made it to the top. The stairs were all there was, and in such a huge tower, there were going to be a lot of stairs. “Time to go!” I shouted, dragging Marissa to the steps and running up them three at a time. We sprinted up the stairs for a long minute with shouting coming from behind and beneath us once everyone understood that we weren’t supposed to be there. I tried to count the steps as we ran, but there were far too many, and


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

I lost count around seventy. And we weren’t even halfway. “How…much…higher,” Marissa panted a couple minutes after I’d lost count. We were simply walking up the steps now, all of us exhausted. “I think…I think we’ve got another hundred steps or so,” Devin said, looking up. “We also have another problem.” I noticed the last tour group coming down toward us and panicked. We were about to be trapped between two tour groups, neither of which we were supposed to be with. And the one behind us had a couple officers coming after us. Things weren’t looking good. “What…what do we do?” Marissa said. We were mindlessly climbing steps still, mostly because that was all there really was to do. “Keep going. And if the other group asks, just tell them we’re really excited to get to the top,” Devin replied. He had fallen a couple steps behind me, and Marissa was several steps behind him, but as long as we

were significantly ahead of the group behind us, I thought we’d be fine. The tour group coming down approached, and the woman leading them frowned at us. “Aren’t you a little ahead of your group?

Luckily, it was enough to quell her suspicions, and we passed by them without any hitches. A little while later, we could see the top of the steps. We were sweaty and panting and ready to take a 12hour nap, but we still had to find a way back down past the cops that were only a minute behind us. “There it is!” Marissa shrieked in excitement. With a sudden burst of energy, we raced to the top and, finally, out the door.

Our st ory cont inu es next mont h! Y o u should stay with them,” she said, letting us slip through between her followers without much resistance. “Sorry, love! Just excited!” Devin shouted in an awful British accent. It sounded more like he had a speech impediment.

Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and The Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.

To all company decision makers: Do your advertising dollars show your social good power? Do those dollars support bringing great stories to the reading public? Advertise in Joy of Medina County Magazine and show you care about community. Contact Amy Barnes, 330-461-0589, Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com It’s time to show the good your company can do.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

by C.L. Gammon

In honor of Medina and Medina County’s bicentennials, Joy Magazine will be publishing a recipe each month based on recipes from the same approximate period as when the two were founded. Enjoy! This is a homegrown recipe. One can purchase rabbit at a market, and of course, one can hunt his own as he wishes. Just keep in mind that wild rabbit is leaner, tougher and the meat tastes stronger.

1 rabbit, disjointed (separated at the joints) 1 teaspoon parsley 1 teaspoon rosemary 1 teaspoon thyme 1 bay leaf 2 peppercorns 1 minced garlic clove ½ cup minced shallots 2 cups corn 1 can tomatoes 1 cup minced black olives 2 teaspoons chili powder ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 2 cups yellow cornmeal 1 egg yolk

Place rabbit, parsley, rosemary, thyme, bay leaf, and peppercorns into large saucepan, and add enough water to cover. Bring to boil and simmer for 30 minutes or until rabbit is tender. Drain liquid from rabbit, keeping 1 cup for later use. Remove rabbit meat from the bones. Sauté the garlic and shallots in a small amount of fat in a skillet until tender, then add the rabbit, corn, tomatoes, olives, chili powder, salt, and pepper. Simmer for 20 minutes. Combine the cornmeal and egg yolk. Strain the previously saved liquid and add it to the cornmeal mixture, mix well. Stir into the rabbit mixture and spoon into a greased casserole dish. Bake at 325 degrees for 40 minutes or until set.

Recipes are reproduced with permission from “A Revolutionary War Cookbook (and More)” by C.L. Gammon, an award-winning and internationally known bestselling author. To see Gammon’s books, go to https://amzn.to/2ITqTBx


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

The Winds of Change in Networking!

Joyful Networking Group 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays

Photo by Vidar Nordli Mathisen

Buehler’s River Styx Community Room past the deli on the right 3626 Medina Road, Medina Free to visit, free to join. Want to enjoy lunch with your networking? Pre-order your meal at Buehler’s Restaurant, located in the River Styx location, by calling 330-725-5000, Ext. 3148, and pay and pick it up on your way into the meeting room.

Get your week started off right with positive feedback, energy, encouragement, and even a few laughs! Sponsored by Joy of Medina County Magazine. For more information, call 330-461-0589 or e-mail Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com www.facebook.com/JoyfulNetworking Not affiliated with any other group or organization.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

T HE NE T W O R K E R

Networking No Passing Zones by Bob Arnold

He looked at me and said, “Hi.” No fanfare. No special effort to go any further. No trying to engage beyond “hi.” In fact, he even spun around in his seat and looked the other way. I had just sat next to him at a networking event. Now, you would think he was going back to talking with someone, no, that was not it. Well, maybe he was interested in a conversation someone was having across the room or close to him, I am not sure, but I do not think so. He was using an old tried and true method of connecting, the voicing of “hi.” People ask me all the time about how best to meet someone. My usual response is to approach someone and say, “Hi, I’m Bob. And, you are?” Tony, the man previously mentioned, did not waste his breath on all that. I thought he must have read my last column where I wrote about how having an interest in someone is a key component to a valuable relationship, but no, he had not. He, instead, was unconsciously testing to see if I had an interest. I said, “Hi,” back. He turned back around in his chair and shook my already outstretched hand. That is meeting someone where they are. We do not always have to be fancy in our introductions, we just have to express an interest. This is basic, primal and genuine. Look at someone today and simply say, “Hi.” You might be surprised at the result.

Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and an international best-selling author. More networking tips and information are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at OnwardNetworking.com or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com.

Ripples

Those who strike the match and have faith the candle will light move forward into greatness. Those who curse the darkness are left behind, alone in the darkness with their anger.

INVESTING INTELLIGENC E: SEC RETS OF A MORTGAGE BA NKER

Avoiding Scary Pitfalls by Rich Bailey

More and more people want to keep their current home while they purchase their next home. This is mostly because, with the current fast-moving market, they do not want to be rushed into settling on a new home, which is a ghoulish reality for many people these days. Others want to keep the current home as a rental property because they believe values will continue to increase. However, there are several things to consider when doing this. First is whether the debt ratio will be acceptable with the current house payment, the new house payment, and all other debts. If debt ratios are too high, holding onto your current home will not be a possibility. Assuming the debt ratios do work out, do you plan to sell the house as soon as you move into the new house, or do you plan to keep it as an investment property? If you sell it immediately and have a significant amount of cash from the sale, you may be able to apply a one-time large payment to the new mortgage and re-amortize the balance and payment. Your new lender will know if this is possible. If you plan to keep the home as a rental, there are several considerations regarding this. Consult an accountant regarding the repercussions of renting your previous residence, specifically ask about capital gains. Secondly, never rent to friends or family. That can be a horrifying experience! Your safest bet is to hire a property management company and let them handle the treacherous aspects of the rental process. In short, your reasons for keeping your current home as a rental property may outweigh the potential pitfalls of becoming a landlord, but you should enter that situation with your eyes wide open. Happy house haunting…err, umm…hunting! Rich Bailey is a licensed mortgage loan originator with First Security Mortgage Corporation and has 15 years of conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA mortgage financing experience for purchase and refinance transactions. Contact Bailey at rich.bailey@fsmc.net or by calling 330-571-2692. First Security Mortgage Corporation 15887 Snow Road, Suite 200 Brook Park, OH 44142 www.FirstSecurityMortgage.net NMLS 258602, 289425 MB.802718, LO.015405


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

ADV E N T UR E S OF DARI N G DAN I ELLE

Vegas, Danielle Style Text and photo by Danielle Litton

Going to the chapel, and we’re gonna get married! On Friday the 13th, I found myself sitting in a wedding chapel while vacationing in Las Vegas. My new friend, Dustin, was standing there anxiously waiting next to Elvis (an actor as far as I know), as his beautiful bride, Tiffany, was walked down the aisle by a man in a Jason mask. I had not known Dustin and Tiffany very long, 25 minutes to be exact, but when they invited me to be a part of their big day, I knew right away that I could not pass up the opportunity. I know you probably are wondering how I ended up invited to this wedding, and all I can say is it is amazing what can happen in a Vegas pool over some drinks and friendly conversation with some really awesome people. Las Vegas is truly unlike anything I have ever experienced. There are so many lights, shows, people, and things that make you shake your head that it is very easy to lose track of time and, before you know it, breakfast is being served! If you come home from Las Vegas without a story to tell, then you did it wrong! Shows are expensive but it is worth the money to see one. Gather around a hot craps table to experience the excitement. Be open minded, you will have more fun Make new friends, you never know where it may lead. Eat breakfast before going to bed, and say, yes, to the adventure!

Danielle Litton has an energetic, adventurous spirit and is always ready to jump into her next escapade. Friends know she will be ready to hit the road with them within minutes of their call. To see more of her travel pictures, please go to https:// www.instagram.com/dani_litton Following any or all of the suggestions made in this column is done so at your own risk.

TA LES OF A MOLD W A RRIO R

Air in the Attic by Paul McHam

Last month’s column was about attics, and I would bet you thought I was done! Attic ventilation is normally 1 square foot of ventilation space per every 150 square feet of attic footprint. The resulting figure would generally be split 50/50 between the ridge vent and soffit ventilation. A variety of issues can justify modifying the above formula. Oftentimes, “hip roofs” can provide particular and peculiar problems (it would be best to talk to your roofer, he is an expert in that area). Several roof issues can affect ventilation. Occasionally, insulation installers will roll up batt insulation in the soffit areas before blowing in loose insulation. This must be removed as it will stop airflow. Older homes may or may not have rolled batt insulation but may have a section of wood blocking it instead. I have seen add-on porches where the entire porch caused blockage, as the flow of air sometimes transers to the porch eaves. Siding companies sometimes install perforated soffit ventilation but forget to cut the wood out behind the perforation. This must be remedied. Once in a great while, felt paper will be wrapped over the top of a ridge vent, and the roofer may miss cutting the opening for the ridge opening. Some ridge vents have a “pot scrubber,” a fiberglass-type material to keep insects from entering. This material also will gather dust and eventually clog, going unnoticed until mold develops. Gable vents often can add aesthetic appeal to a gable end wall, but they seldom help airflow, especially if soffit and ridge ventilation already exists. For that reason, newly built homes may offer fake gable vents that are decorative, but do not allow air to flow through them. Next month, I will cover some of the nonventilation issues that can lead to attic mold. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-331-7500.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

GEMS

Lions Share by Kent Von Der Vellen

BI T E ME !

Fried Potatoes by Amy Barnes

8 microwave cooked potatoes or cold leftover boiled potatoes

¼ cup dried onion or 2 medium to large onions, diced

¼ cup butter or margarine, plus more during cooking

Season salt

Cook eight large potatoes in microwave until tender. Leftover boiled potatoes that have been drained and refrigerated also can be used. Either of these two cooking methods is recommended so potatoes will not crumble too much during cooking. Peel potatoes and cube. Melt butter in large frying pan and add dried or fresh onions. If using dried onions, also add half a cup of water to frying pan and stir. When water has evaporated by at least half and the dried or fresh onions are browned, add potatoes. Sprinkle with season salt. Be patient and do not flip them until edges are lightly browning. Add butter to frying pan as needed to avoid burning or sticking, can also add a few tablespoons of water to avoid using excessive butter. Flip potatoes and brown other side. In my house, yield is three servings.

After 75 years of service in Medina and countless pairs of eyeglasses, the Medina Lions Club continues to help those in need. Lions Club International grew out of the dream of Chicago businessman Melvin Jones. Jones believed local business clubs should work to improve their communities. Today, the “We Serve” motto is shared by more than 1,350,000 members in more than 45,000 clubs in 206 countries, making Lions Club International the world’s largest service organization. The Lions Club became best known for collecting used eyeglasses, thanks to Helen Keller. In 1925, Keller challenged the Lions to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.” Since that time, service to the blind, as well as to the sight and hearing impaired, has been one of the Lions’ most important goals. The Medina Lions Club did not stop with helping countless individuals receive eye exams, eye glasses and hearing aids. The club also helped obtain the initial funding for the Miracle League baseball field at Sam Masi Park and funds the league’s annual picnic. The group also has helped, through donations of time or money, the Trinity Rose Foundation, the Isaac Walton League, the Medina Battered Women’s Shelter, Hospice of Medina County, Faith in Action, Pilot Dogs, Feeding Medina County, the Salvation Army, and many others. In support of the youth of Medina, the Lions sponsor students for Buckeye Boys and Buckeye Girls State, helped build the pavilions at Huffman and Mellert Parks, support After Prom, and award two scholarships each year to graduating students from Medina High School and the Medina County Career Center. Local members serve pie and ice cream at the Medina Community Band performance in July, sell roses for Sweetest Day, collect for Toys for Tots at their annual Christmas party, and buy clothes and toys to help needy families at Christmas time. For more information, go to https://bit.ly/2oKgyyE, visit the club’s Facebook page at https://bit.ly/2Q1RRKN or e-mail medinalions@zoominternet.net. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

AirXperts

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Council-Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant

Integrity • Knowledge • Quality Indoor Environmental Assessments & Testing Specializing in Mold Remediation, Meth Cleanup, Duct Cleaning - Tailored Seminars Available -

Paul McHam CEI,CMI,CIE,WRT,AMRT,CTS,CIEC Office: 330-331-7500 Cell: 330-280-3777 MyAirXperts.com

Hello Friends & Neighbors

PR

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Over 100 homes sold in 2017! Call now for a free market evaluation

330.241.5370 office 440.503.5820 cell Larry Steinbacher

3745 Medina Rd, Suite A Medina, OH

Broker / Owner

WWW.GREATERCLEVELANDHOMESEARCH.COM

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Top DenTisT naTional awarD winner for america’s besT young DenTisTs

Come discover for yourself why Dr. Landry is recognized as one of America’s best dentists! New patients of all ages, and emergencies are welcome. 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays

Joseph G. Landry II, D.D.S., F.A.G.D. Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry

330-769-4470

5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273 www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018

Let's do it! Monday, October 1 Balloons Around the World Day https://bit. ly/2wkUUWQ 6 p.m. Card Making; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. WAITING LIST. Register https://bit.ly/2pqAZRX 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Veterans Roundtable; Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. Featured speaker: Carl Bilski, U.S. Army. All Ages. No registration.

Tuesday, October 2 Name Your Car Day https://bit.ly/1tXxMFD 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesdays:Something’s Poppin’ ; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Celebrate National Popcorn Poppin’ Month. Register at https://bit.ly/2NV1vjT 6 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Wednesday, October 3 National Boyfriends Day https://bit.ly/2P2QyKc , Techies Day https://bit.ly/2vQdF5s and Virus Appreciation Day https://bit.ly/2gOVyq0 (If your boyfriend is a techie and has a virus, this is really his day!) 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Danbury Senior Living Brunswick, 3430 Brunswick Lake Parkway, Brunswick. http://www.redcross. org/local/ohio/northeast 2:30 p.m. Green Dot Our Community; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn the 3Ds to turn negative situations into positive ones. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. MCPAL Fall Mix and Mingle; Blue Heron Brewery and Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Benefits the Medina County Police Activities League. Silent auction, live music. Tickets are $40 and include two drinks and appetizers. Contact Rebecca, 330-661-0121 or rbyrne@montvilletwp.org, for more information or sponsorship information. Tickets at https://bit.ly/2PDvkDD More information 7 p.m. The Spirits Speak; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Stories of mediums who charged high fees to “talk” to the dead and used trickery and secret assistants. Learn about spirit trumpets, voiceless dolls, ectoplasm, message frames, and other spiritual powers. Register at https://bit.ly/2PPt8Zi

Thursday, October 4 Taco Day https://bit.ly/2xacP35

October 2018 Non-Profit Calendar

9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Therapy Dog Thursday; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Pet and read to dogs. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Beyond the Storefronts of Medina; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Robert Hyde, lifetime Medina resident, shares the history of Medina’s Public Square. Register at https:// bit.ly/2NoO2S0 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Master Gardener Decaf Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit. ly/2DDEYQw

Friday, October 5 World Smile Day https://bit.ly/2xaqaZf and Do Something Nice Day https://bit.ly/1iZE1GT (Seems like one would cause the other!) 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Master Gardener Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw 10:30 a.m. Musical Storytime; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Move, groove, sing along. WAITING LIST. https://bit.ly/2PQP9Xw 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, October 6 Mad Hatter Day https://bit.ly/2xRIYu2 and World Card Making Day https://bit.ly/2D5E9Eg 9 a.m. to noon. American Legion Post 202 Paper Shredding Day, 620 N. Broadway Street, Medina. No plastic, no binders. Flags will be given proper disposal. Donations accepted. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pumpkin Festival, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick. Museum tours, hay rides, rock and tiny pumpkin painting, entertainment, all free. There is a charge for raffles and food vendors. Sponsored by the Brunswick Area Historical Society.11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Harvest Festival; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Crafts, games, pumpkin decorating,

balloon animals, birds of prey from Medina Raptor Center, family concert with Chip Richter. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Lab Tie and Tails Gala; Medina Country Club, 5588 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Benefits the labs of Lake Erie Labrador Retriever Rescue, Inc. Tickets, $50 per person or $350 for a table of 8. Contact Sarah at head12crows@yahoo.com or Ed at ed@lelrr.org

Sunday, October 7 Bald and Free Day https://bit.ly/2x9V2ZJ 9 a.m. to noon. 4th Annual Harry Potter 5k Fun Run and Walk; The Book Store and Handmade Marketplace, 109 W. Washington Street, Medina. Runners invited to dress in costume. Benefits Ohio literacy programs through grants, scholarships, book donations. https://www.facebook.com/ events/903194836485785/ 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pumpkin Festival, 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick. Museum tours, hay rides, rock and tiny pumpkin painting, entertainment, all free. Noon to 1 p.m., dog costume contest. There is a charge for raffles and food vendors. Sponsored by the Brunswick Area Historical Society.

Monday, October 8 American Touch Tag Day https://bit.ly/2gM3EvO 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Grace Baptist Church, 3480 Laurel Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Tuesday, October 9 Curious Events Day https://bit.ly/2vIXUtf 10 a.m. to noon. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Root Candles, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

Wednesday, October 10


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018 Take Your Teddy Bear to Work Day https://bit.ly/1GcZDdw and International Newspaper Carrier Day https://bit.ly/2JWbnUM

bit.ly/1OwQ0rJ 1:30 p.m. Spies and Secret Agents; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Solve mysteries with codes, ciphers, disguises. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2QLbMhl

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Lodi Community Hospital, 225 Elyria Street, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Teen Advisory Group Welcome Meeting; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Work with Teen Department to make the library an awesome place for teens and give teens a voice in the community. 7 p.m. Cut the Cable; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center road, Brunswick. Learn about all of the non-cable TV options, bring mobile device. Lecture-style class. Register at https://bit.ly/2PPkZUs

It’s My Party Day https://bit.ly/2phsCb8 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. Friends of MCDL Dine and Donate; Applebee’s, Brunswick Town Center, 1421 Town Center Boulevard, Suite B-10, Brunswick. Dine and 15 percent of bill is donated to Friends of MCDL. Get flyer at Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Volunteers offer guidance through Domestic Relations Court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. Remembering the Japanese American Internment; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. More than 100,000 people of Japanese ancestry were removed by Executive Order 9066. Learn of the causes and consequences. Register at https:// bit.ly/2NVhBdE

7 a.m. to 6 p.m. ORMACO Party Bus: Pittsburgh Party Bus; bus leaves from Buehler’s Wadsworth, 175 Great Oaks Trail, Wadsworth. Muffins and mimosas start the morning. Visit Clayton mansion, Henry Clay Frick historic home and art museum, Strip District. Lunch on own. Back on bus at 3 p.m. and indulge in wine, cookies, chocolates, more. Tickets $88. Tickets at www.ormaco.org or call 330-722-2541. https://bit. ly/2JBZs39 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. 11 a.m. to noon. Messy Sensory Play; Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Play with rice, Play-Doh, shredded paper, finger paints. Old clothes suggested. Ages 1 to 3 years old. Register for 10 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2DfrIFM OR for 11 a.m. at https://bit. ly/2NWr3x9

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Northern Ohio Railway Museum streetcar rides; 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Admission to museum is free, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children under 5. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Afternoon at the Cinema; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call for title, 330-273-4150.

Sunday, October 14

Your Local Storm Claims Specialists

Friday, October 12 Old Farmer’s Day https:// bit.ly/119miUM , World Egg Day https://bit. ly/2QFP6yO and Moment of Frustration Day https://

Astronomy Day https://bit.ly/2uN4ceO and International Skeptics Day https://bit.ly/2f88S52

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. United Way’s Taste of Medina County 2018; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets $50, allowable tax deduction $25. For tickets go to https://bit.ly/2NyOqJF

Gary Tantanella (President)

Medina County Farmers Markets

2018

Saturday, October 13

Fall Foliage Tour. Drive-it yourself tour featuring Harrisville, Homer, Spencer, Westfield Township and focusing on rural living, agriculture, history.

Thursday, October 11

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Common Connection: TED Talk Conversations End of Life and Death; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Watch and discuss two TED Talks. Register at https://bit. ly/2xo8I2J i

5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Eat It!

Call us for a FREE inspection before you file a claim. If it’s determined you have damage, we’ll guide you through the insurance process.

Roofing Siding Windows Flood Fire

(330) 571-1827 (440) 862-9442

Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 10 through October 14 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 19 through October 13 Medina Public Square 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesdays A.I. Root Candles, 623 W. Liberty Street, Medina Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2HzA34O Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 26 through September 29 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 30 through September 29 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018 National Dessert Day https://bit.ly/2wLfOOH 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. First Families of Medina; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Genealogical Society and library explain applications, standard of proof, resources for lineage society. Register at mcdl. info/History

Monday, October 15 National Clean Out Your Virtual Desktop Day https://bit.ly/2yGM083 and I Love Lucy Day https:// bit.ly/2vPVi0A 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Getting on Track; United Way of Medina County, 728 E. Smith Road, Medina. Addresses common money-related challenges and teaches how to work toward financial stability. Free. Call 330-7253926 to register. 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Quilting for Warm Up Medina County; Sew Much Happens, 445 W. Liberty Street, Suite 223, Medina. Bring 100-percent cotton fabric. Bring machine, if possible. Learn how to sew for free while making quilts for those in need. For more information, call 330-648-3335. 7 p.m. Monkees Tribute; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Rarely seen video clips, album tracks, and their efforts to make their own music.

Tuesday, October 16 Dictionary Day https://bit.ly/2D6qjRR and Boss’s Day https://bit.ly/1nqjx5x Friends of MCDL Dine and Donate; Dominic’s /JoJo Sports Bar and Grille; 221 S. Jefferson Street, Medina. Dine and 15 percent of bill is donated to Friends of MCDL. Get flyer at Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Project Bad Art; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Turn old junk into awful masterpieces. Make the oddest art, and you could win a prize. Grades 6 to 8. https://bit. ly/2NWQ1wh 4:15 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cloverleaf Elementary School, 8337 Friendsville Road, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 4th Annual Fall Festival: Wine, Brew & Chocolate, Too; Galaxy Restaurant, 201 Park Center Drive, Wadsworth. Silent auction, food, local brew, wine, chocolate. Benefits Wadsworth YMCA programs. Tickets, $50 each or $90 for a couple, at Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth, or online at www.AkronYMCA.org/together . 6 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 6 p.m. Tea: Traditional vs. Trendy; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Tea master Connie Sureck leads journey exploring new flavors and old favorites. Register at https://bit.ly/2Dheqso 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. OSU Homeowner Series; Community Room, A.I. Root Candle Store, 640 W.

Liberty Street, Medina. Topics vary. $10. http://bit. ly/2FdOtKV

Wednesday, October 17 Wear Something Gaudy Day https://bit.ly/2xejkCW and National Fossil Day https://bit.ly/2pfYi0r 2:30 p.m. Halloween Party; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Pumpkin decorating and bobbing for apples. Grades 6 to 12. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Brain Health; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Nutritional support and stress management techniques for brain health. Food samples. Mustard Seed Market and Café present. Food samples. Register at https://bit.ly/2PSkGse 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. History Series: Dick Anderson Presents Lodi Memorabilia; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit. ly/2PNE0a4

Thursday, October 18 No Beard Day https://bit.ly/2QE7sAj so you can enjoy Chocolate Cupcake Day https://bit.ly/2wL40vS 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Introduction to Chinese Culture; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn simple words and expressions, explore Chinese culture with Dr. Huiwen Li from Cleveland’s Confucius Institute. Register at https://bit.ly/2xu9ScV 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fall Beer Swap; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring 6-pack of domestic or regional craft beer. Swap and leave with variety of new beers. Must be 21 and older to participate. Register at mcdl.info/Cooking

Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wine and Canvas Night; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring wine, go home with painting. Supply fee $15, cash or check. Register at https://bit.ly/2NZO6r4 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. SHC Halloween Boo Bash! Camp Paradise, 4283 Paradise Road, Seville. Haunted house, games, food for purchase, dj, raffle, Trick or Treat, costume contest at 8 p.m. Free, all are welcome. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Medina County Park District: Halloween Run Northern Ohio Live Steamers, All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Children can wear costumes, avoid long, flowing garments. All ages. Free. No registration.

Saturday, October 20 International Observe the Moon Night https:// bit.ly/2xQgRdY goes perfectly with Sweetest Day https://bit.ly/1LP0bT6 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sensory Storytime; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with autism, sensory integration challenges, or have trouble sitting still or focusing. Ages 2 to 6. Register at https://bit.ly/2xp1POK 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. History of Manufacturing and Industry in Medina; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina.

6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. YMCA Fall Festival; The Galaxy, 201 Park Centre Drive, Wadsworth. Funds raised benefit community programs. Food, silent auction, more. Tickets $50 each or $90 per couple. For more information, contact Maureen Mizerak, 330-334-9622, or maureenm@akronymca.org

2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Medina County Park District Halloween Run Northern Ohio Live Steamers, All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. Children can wear costumes, avoid long, flowing garments. All ages. Free. No registration.

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Trick or Treat; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Walk the red carpet to show off costumes. Candy donations appreciated. Practice Trick or Treat skills. Register at https://bit. ly/2Nrzr8z

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Seville Spooktacular; Seville. Adult centric. Bonfire, costume contest, pet parade, marshmallow roast, trick or treat. Benefits Medina County SPCA.

Friday, October 19 Evaluate Your Life Day https://bit.ly/2ePjjgO 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sit, Stay, Read; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading with Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2MRe2jQ 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Sunday, October 21 Count Your Buttons Day https://bit.ly/2eLgg5Y and Babbling Day https://bit.ly/1XfeybL 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ORMACO Party Bus: Hello Dolly; bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3616 Medina Road, Medina. Includes catered box lunch, wine, cookies, chocolates, trivia quiz, more. Tickets $115 for bus and orchestra seating, $75 bus and balcony seating, $75 orchestra seating only, $45 balcony seating only, plus credit card fees. Tickets at www. ormaco.org or call 330-722-2541.

4:30 p.m. Diary of a Wimpy Kid Party; Medina Library, 201 S. Broadway, Medina. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2QRrlnQ

Monday, October 22

5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette

2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive;

National Nut Day https://bit.ly/2e0Ypr9


Joy of Medina County Magazine | October 2018 First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Poppies for Veterans; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn about World War 1, craft poppies for Ohio Poppy Project to honor Ohio’s fallen WWI soldiers. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2xoQ0YI 6:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. Gourd-eous Pumpkins; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring pumpkin, natural items provided to decorate it. Register at https://bit.ly/2QNcNW1 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Project Bad Art; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Turn old junk into awful masterpieces. Make the oddest art, and you could win a prize. Grades 6 to 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2DfwBP8

Tuesday, October 23 Mole Day https://bit.ly/2eKxIr8 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Southwest Health Screening; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Blood pressure and glucose screening. 10 a.m. to noon. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; E & H Ace Hardware, 3626 Medina Road, Medina. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Teen anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: The Music of Leonard Bernstein; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit. ly/2PSYb6m 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fundamentals of Paying for College; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn about the financial aid process, get overview of options. Register at https://bit.ly/2xrGTGJ

Wednesday, October 24 National Bologna Day https://bit.ly/2fNDVa7 Noon. MCDL Writers Live Series: Claire McMillan; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets $25, until October 15 at any county library location or online at https://bit.ly/2NuOaj9 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: The Music of Leonard Bernstein; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/2QISCc5 6:30 p.m. Halloween Party; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Show off costume on runway. All ages with adult. Trick or Treating, craft, games,

balloon animals. Register at https://bit.ly/2O1kNnO 6:30 p.m. Meditation Practices; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn guided meditation. Qualifies for Healthy Medina. Contact Community Outreach at sarend@ccf.org to get started. Register at https://bit.ly/2MOYeyi 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: The Music of Leonard Bernstein; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit. ly/2QISCc5

Thursday, October 25 Punk for a Day Day https://bit.ly/2NRa9jB and Sourest Day https://bit.ly/2wcEf45 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: The Music of Leonard Bernstein; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit. ly/2PSrWnY 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Volunteers offer guidance through Domestic Relations Court. First come, first served.

Friday, October 26 Howl at the Moon Day and Night https://bit. ly/2wct5wj and Frankenstein Friday https://bit. ly/1NRdkQo 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monstercon; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Halloween bash with slime making, sugar skull decorating, games, costume contest, more. Register at https://bit. ly/2Do0rku 5 p.m. Murder Mystery Dinner: 1960s Psycho-Delic; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Costumes encouraged. Adults 21 years old and up. Tickets $25. MUST register and pay by October 19. Register at https://bit.ly/2QKTQDx 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, October 27 Make a Difference Day https://bit.ly/1sgt59x 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. MCDL Author Visit: Alyssa Satin Capucilli; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Light breakfast. Books available for purchase. Take photo with Biscuit. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2ppkKUV 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Knitting and Crocheting Circle;

Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 11 a.m. Trick or Treat; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Walk the red carpet to show off costumes. Candy donations appreciated. Practice Trick or Treat skills. Register at https://bit.ly/2xz1OqB 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. MCDL Author Visit: Alyssa Satin Capucilli; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Books available for purchase. Take photo with Biscuit. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2PRTDgq 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. MCDL Author Visit: Alyssa Satin Capucilli; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Books available for purchase. Take photo with Biscuit. Free. Register at https://bit.ly/2MRH3MB 6 p.m. Medina Hospital BASH (Benefitting a Superior Hospital); Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital. Games, prizes, raffles, cocktails and appetizers, dinner and dancing. Tickets $125 at https://bit. ly/2D8259W 8 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music The Music of Leonard Bernstein: The Best of All Possible Worlds; Highland High School, 4150 Ridge Road, Medina. Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door (cash or check only). Get tickets by calling 330-722-2541, online at www.ormaco.org, or at all Medina County Buehler’s starting Oct. 1, 2018.

Sunday, October 28 Plush Animal Lovers Day https://bit.ly/2gLEi0W

Monday, October 29 Hermit Day https://bit.ly/2eP5NKi 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 6 and up. Free. No registration 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Our Stories: Surviving Loss From Addiction; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Support for those who have lost family members to addiction. Qualifies for Healthy Medina. Get started by e-mailing sarend@ccf.org

Tuesday, October 30 Candy Corn Day https://bit.ly/2NiBLif 6:30 p.m. Aromatherapy Neck Pillow; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring long-sleeve T-shirt. Register at https://bit.ly/2OEz4UB 6:30 p.m. Trick or Treat; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Walk the red carpet to show off costumes. Candy donations appreciated. Practice Trick or Treat skills. Register at https://bit. ly/2pm9Qzn

Wednesday, October 31 Carve a Pumpkin Day https://bit.ly/2PHI4Zq and Magic Day https://bit.ly/2f7rxhl 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 2:30 p.m. Hocus Pocus; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Spooky movie and bewitching snack. Grades 6 and up.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2018  

Fifty years of the Medina County Fall Foliage Tour, no passing zones in networking, eating what ate your carrots this summer, attic mold bat...

Joy of Medina County Magazine October 2018  

Fifty years of the Medina County Fall Foliage Tour, no passing zones in networking, eating what ate your carrots this summer, attic mold bat...