Page 1

MAY 2018

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 4

INTRUDER IN A SECRET HIDEOUT PG.8

CHRONIC ILLNESS CLUE PG. 16

NETWORKS SURROUND US PG. 17

TREASURES OF THE HEART AND POCKET

SOME SEARCH FOR GOLD AND SILVER, AND SOME COLLECT HUGS AND FRIENDS. PG. 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

One

Voice

You are how You are

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 4 J O Y O F M E D I N A C O U NTY.C OM

by Amy Barnes

M

any readers who love the photos in Joy are surprised to learn that the photos that are part of the feature story and in “Oh, Snap!” are as they were at the moment the camera was snapped. Photos have not been touched up, nor are blemishes removed or colors added or enhanced. Each photo is an exact record of that moment in time. It is a question of integrity and trust, words not heard much in the world of journalism anymore. When I started my career in journalism, those words went hand in hand: honesty, integrity, trust, journalism. I am determined that those words always will be associated with Joy of Medina County Magazine. The quality and integrity of Joy is of the utmost importance, it is a promise that is made and kept to readers with every issue. Joy’s readers must be able to trust that they are getting a true and honest picture of a person or event, whether that be through the camera lens or

through words. There have been a lot of wonderful comments about the beautiful photos in Joy. They are very appreciated and are passed on to the FlashBang Photography team that works so hard to make Joy look great. Susan and Danny Feller, the terrific mom-and-son team behind FlashBang Photography (see their ad at the bottom of this page), are photojournalists-intraining. They already were skilled in the more traditional forms of photography and were thrilled to take on the new challenge of learning photojournalism. Want a copy of those great shots of family, friends, once-in-a-lifetime events, and more that appear in Joy of Medina County Magazine? Photos from any issue can be purchased by calling 440-263-4502 or e-mailing sfeller1@neo.rr.com. If you have not already, please share JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine. com on your social media pages so the wonderful people you are connected with can get a free subscription to the e-edition.

PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC E D I TO R Amy Barnes P H O TO G R A P H E R FlashBang Photography A R T D I R E C TOR Ryan Burdzinski C O N T R I B U TO R S Bob Arnold Rich Bailey Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty. com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

Specializing in: Portrait Photography • Traditional Headshots Glamour Shots • Corporate Portraits Family Portraits

Order copies of any photos in Joy of Medina County Magazine 440-263-4502 | sfeller1@neo.rr.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

Contents

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BECOMING A FLEA MARKET TREASURE

6

OH, SNAP!

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THE READING NOOK

by Amy Barnes

Sharon and Tony Gordon have spent a remarkable 41 years sharing their treasures and gaining friends at the Medina County Flea Market.

photos by FlashBang Photography

Crawling critters, slurpy spaghetti, hungry humans, beautiful baskets, jumping jazz, and more!

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Chri stopher Barnes

Cam returns to the duct, earns a scream, finds a surprise, and gets in the middle of a chase.

12 15 16

JOYFUL WISHING WELL

Wishes from those who attended The Children’s Center of Medina County Pinwheel Walk.

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

FLEA MARKET FINDS

From friends to monkey lamps, you will find it all at the flea market!

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

CLUE TO A CAUSE OF PERSISTENT ILLNESS by Paul McHam

If you can’t seem to get well, it is time to check for mold growth in your environment.

INVESTING INTELLIGENCE: SECRETS OF A MORTGAGE BANKER

STRATEGY FOR A SUCCESSFUL HOME PURCHASE by Ri ch Bai ley

Learn some tips on how to get a solid pre-approval for a house purchase.

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THE NETWORKER

BRICKS FALL HARD AND SO CAN RESPECT by Bob Arnol d

Strong buildings and successful networking share a common bond.

BICENTENNIAL BITES

OXTAIL STEW Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition, which can be found by going to JoyofMedinaCounty. com, scrolling down, then picking and clicking on the desired issue. Don’t miss out on the upcoming great stories and features in Joy Magazine! Go to the magazine’s website and click the “Get a FREE E-Edition Subscription” box. Certain features, such as Giving Hearts and Help is Here, are available only on the website: JoyofMedinaCounty.com

ON THE COVER: Sharon and Tony Gordon hold court at the Medina County Flea Market.

by C.L. Gammon

Once a popular dish in taverns, this is a great recipe for a now littlein-demand cut of beef.

18

GEMS

A LEGACY OF GIVING

by Kent Von Der Vellen

Twenty years and $147,772 later, the Medina County Women’s Endowment Fund is going strong and adding a new fundraiser with the help of a tree.

19

BITE ME!

AMYZING CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES by Amy Barnes

An easy recipe for a little something sweet with a surprise ingredient.

20

LET’S DO IT!

Time to get outside and enjoy the beauty of Medina County.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

From left, Sharon and Tony Gordon share a light-hearted moment with friend and fellow vendor Frank Armenio.

Becoming a Flea Market Treasure

by Amy Barnes Photos by FlashBang Photography

S

terling silver jewelry hiding in piles of costume jewelry, stacks of vintage sports cards, antique photos, vintage toys, and antique tools are some of the treasures that can be found at the Medina County Flea Market. Part of the treasure, that is not much discussed, is the people who gather each month and create a community of selling, bartering, visiting, and giving. To some, it is worth the price of admission just to watch the interactions and to see such rarities and oddities as antique trunks with travel stamps, a large monkey-based lamp, antique typewriters and cameras, skulls, or a hide-covered footstool. Many at the flea market would say that two of the most valuable treasures are Sharon and Anthony (Tony) Gordon, who have been regular vendors at the flea market since it began in 1977. Sharon is 83 and Tony is 85. The couple has been married for 55 years. “This lucky girl,” Tony quipped, with smile,

quickly adding, “I’ve got the best girl going.” Vendors and show attendees look for the Gordons each month. They are always in the same spot, close to the far-right corner of the Medina County Fairgrounds Community Center. They hold court while perched on metal folding chairs, greeting old friends, making new ones, and always willing to share a hug and information about their wares. They are “happy, cheerful, always gives a hug,” said Amanda Whitacre, the flea market manager. “He’s (Tony) like my grandfather.” In the 41 years the Gordons have been selling at the flea market, there have been minor changes over the years and a decrease in the number of vendors, but the friendship and camaraderie remain constant. “We’re always brothers and sisters in here,” said Tony, with Sharon adding, “Everybody is willing to help.” Vendors will watch each other’s booths, said Sharon. The Gordons were not planning to become


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

vendors at the flea market, but once they started, they enjoyed it so much they kept going. “The more we do it, the more we love it,” Tony said. People will come to their booth and touch something and then walk away. “They don’t even realize they do it,” he said. “You make money, not a lot, but you have to like people.” The Gordons’ selling career began with Sharon selling dolls at doll shows in Cleveland, Toledo, Columbus, and Strongsville. “I had about 4,000 dolls, I signed up (for the flea market) and came home and told Tony, ‘Guess what I did?’ ” They never had been vendors at a flea market before. “We didn’t know what a flea market really was,” Tony said. From their first day at the Medina flea market, they were impressed. “Everyone was always so friendly,” said Sharon. Their booth features collectible dolls, vintage figurines, jewelry, and other miscellaneous items. Even though they both attended West Tech High School in Cleveland at the same time, he was a football player and she was a majorette, they didn’t meet until years later when a girl Tony was dating brought him home to meet Sharon. “He’s the best thing that ever happened to me,” Sharon said. She said Tony told her later that he fell in love with her the minute he saw her. She said she never did understand why her friend introduced them, because she thought the friend and Tony were dating. Their first date was a 200-mile drive on a Sunday. They still love going for long drives, and twice a week they go for drives of 150 to 200 miles each, always along the back roads. They like the connection they feel by traveling the back roads as compared to traveling the highways. Sharon got a job out of high school with East Ohio

Cy Levkanich, left, first time vendor at the flea market, discusses marketing strategies with Frank Armenio, who was a regular flea market character for eight years, but has now retired.

Gas where she worked as a bookkeeper for 10 years. She married her first husband and quit her job to become a homemaker and mother to their daughter, Vanessa. It was after her first husband was no longer in the picture that Sharon and Tony met. Twelve years after Vanessa was born, Sharon and Tony added another daughter, Colleen, to the family. Tony started as a welder at age 14 and continued welding for 35 years. He also was an Army paratrooper during the Korean War, where they had him jumping out of planes over Germany. He said it did not make any sense to him that the war was in Korea, but they had him on missions in Germany. It is bad luck to count missions, Tony said, so he does not know how many he was on but says that he served as a paratrooper for almost three years before becoming injured when he landed from a jump. He says his knee has never been the same since the injury, and at the same time he downplays the danger of the missions. “It was more dangerous getting thrown out of a beer garden on Clark Avenue in Cleveland than it was jumping out of planes,” Tony said, with a twinkle in his eye, causing Sharon to give him a look of admonishment. She shook her head and mentioned that Tony loves to tell tall tales. He has fond memories of his days as the owner of Tony Gordon’s Barber Shop at 51st Street and Clark Avenue in Cleveland. By the time he retired, he had a shop in Cleveland and one in Brunswick. The shops were busy from morning to night, Tony said, with obvious pride. Sharon and Tony are planning to continue having a booth at the flea market for the foreseeable future. They are ready to share their knowledge and expertise and are looking forward to gaining new friends, with Tony ready and willing to spin a tall tale for listening ears. They will be there, in their usual spot, enjoying the adventure.

5


Martin Warchola teaches Barb Kefalos, left, and Tammy Clark dog first aid with the help of a dog dummy at Wolf Creek Park, Wadsworth.

Helping at the Feeding Medina County fundraiser were Spring Leadership Ball honorees, from left, Adrian Slovenec, Meriwether Harmon, Janiece Joyner, and Brooke Swain.

ORMACO brought the Lempner Jazz Duo, guitarist Adam Sarata and saxophonist Tom Lempner, to perform at the Wadsworth Public Library.

Oh,! Snap

P hot os by FlashB a ng P hot o g r ap h y

During Buzzard Fest at Brongers Park in Hinckley, Matilda the turkey vulture (called a buzzard locally) is a true friend and likes to provide shade for handler Jaime Mautz from the Medina Raptor Center. Matilda is 25 years old and weighs 4 1/2 pounds. A large crowd at the Galaxy in Wadsworth enjoyed the Breaking Bread on Bourbon Street fundraiser for Feeding Medina County. Matilda Kirchner accepts the challenge of crossing a rope bridge at Brongers Park during Buzzard Fest. Assisting her are Life Scout John Pesarchick, left, and Life Scout Matt Bearer, while Eagle Scout Robby Cerrito supervises.

Turkey vulture Matilda shows off her 6-foot wing span.

A wild turkey struts its stuff at Wolf Creek Park.


Ken Gill Jr. backs up a Stormtrooper while his son, Ken Gill III, delivers some punishing blows on Medina Public Square. From left, Tom Richards, Becky Richards, basket weaving instructor’s assistant Emily Smith, and Belinda Charbonneau work together building baskets.

Marlene Wolfe concentrates on making a basket at Wolf Creek Environmental Center, Wadsworth.

From left, Sherry Ulrich and Ginny Venditti get the hang of basket weaving.

Basket weaving instructor Betty Rettig gives encouragement to Rose Marie Tramonte.

Two-year-old Andrew Sturgill and his father, Terry Sturgill, wait for the armadillo in Deb Brady’s hands to unfold at the Seville Library’s Zoomobile. Brady is an Akron Zoo education specialist.

Deb Brady holds an armadillo for (from left) Makenna Lucas and Maisen Lucas while their mother, Amy Lucas, and Madeline Schuett enjoy the Akron Zoo’s Zoomobile visit to the Seville Library.

Kelsey Hurley, Medina County Fair queen, and Joan Jellison share a laugh at Breaking Bread on Bourbon Street. Enjoying the festivities at Breaking Bread on Bourbon Street are, from left, Medina County Commissioner Patricia Geissman, Feeding Medina County Director Sandy Hinkle, and Lafayette Township Trustee Lynda Bowers.

Spring is here, and orange barrels are blooming along North Court Street. Challenges for those traveling Medina’s roadways include trying to stay within painted lines and navigating an approximately three-foot wide lane. Photos by Amy Barnes

Leading other walkers back from the Pinwheel Walk to Prevent Child Abuse are Warriors for the Children members, Wheelz (left) and Crash.

Annabelle Stanec (right), a Highland High School senior, held a spaghetti dinner fundraiser for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society with help from friends and family, including her sister Abbey, on the left.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

CHAPTER 7

TH E READ I NG N O O K

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCounty.com for links to past issues.

Devin and I talked for a while. He said he’d only told Garret and Heath about my dad, but I knew they wouldn’t be able to keep quiet about it for long. By the time I went back to school, if I ever did, everyone would know me as the kid with no parents. After a while, he asked me what I’d done all day, and I said, “Nothing.” “Hmm,” was his response. We sat in silence for a long moment, mentally debating if it was worth it to keep the conversation going. Finally, Devin asked, “You want anything to eat?” “Not hungry.” “Ok.” The silence resumed, and Devin stood and headed toward the bathroom. I heard the shower turn on, and I sighed in relief. As much as I appreciated him and all he was doing for me, I knew he couldn’t understand the pain and grief I was going through. If I told him about the cuts on my fingers, he would be upset that I hurt myself and not understand why. To be honest, I didn’t really understand why either, but I knew it helped. I listened to the shower, it sounded like a heavy rainfall in midApril. It made me think of the tears and blood that had drained from me in Marissa’s room. I could picture it perfectly and started craving that sensation again with a giddy excitement like a kid rushing home from school to play with his new toy. My mind focused on the gentle sting of my fingertips, my heart started racing, and my breath got shorter and shorter. Suddenly, the shower shut off, and I jumped. In that moment, I knew I had to decide whether to continue with this new hobby, or to come clean to Devin and give it up. I’d just given up everything in

a horrible car accident. This was the only thing that helped. I wasn’t about to give it up just because Devin wouldn’t approve. Before he could get back to his room, I slipped on my shoes and ran. I ran down the stairs, out Devin’s front door, down to the sidewalk, across the street, and just kept on going toward the bowling alley. Nothing could stop me. I was invincible. Cars honked as I sprinted across streets, forcing them to slam on their breaks, but I wasn’t about to slow down for anyone. I ran through the brisk air and found myself standing in front of the bowling alley once again, just eight or so hours after the last time I was there. I took a moment to catch my breath and then marched in confidently. Without even looking toward the clerk at the desk, I strode straight to the bathroom and walked in, locking the door behind me. All was peaceful. Then I noticed the vent cover was gone. A bunch of thoughts flooded my mind, but one in particular stuck out to me. Someone found the room. I held my breath as I pulled myself into the old ductwork and began crawling toward the secret room at the end. About halfway through, I paused just long enough to realize what I was doing. I looked at the thin metallic walls pressing in on me, and I found that it actually felt better than being outside the vents. Outside was the real world, where my dad was dead, my mom and sister were long gone, my friends were worried about me, and Marissa was just another classmate. But inside, none of that was true. I made the last turn and saw the light behind the broken fan. Almost immediately, the soft rustling of papers gently echoed through the shaft. Someone was in my, I mean, Marissa’s home away


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

from home, and they were messing with her things. I almost backed out, cut my losses and headed back to Devin’s. I could try to forget about Marissa and the bowling alley and everything, but there was no way that would actually happen. I held my breath and pulled myself through the gap in the rotary fan, crawling into Marissa’s room and making her scream bloody murder. A pillow hit me square in the face and fell in front of me. “What are you doing?!” she screamed at me. I froze, suddenly completely braindead. What was I supposed to say? I didn’t even know what I was doing myself. Not to mention, I’m pretty sure I was about two seconds away from getting stabbed with one of the knives on the wall. “Um, I’m here to help you,” I said, clueless as to what I meant exactly, but hoping I could wing it like I did most high school presentations I was forced to do. “Help me? With what exactly? And how did you even get in here? And-” She went off on me. Her questions got more and more aggressive and threatening until she finally stopped and frowned at me. “Well?” she shouted. I hadn’t realized it was my turn to talk. Stupid me wasn’t even thinking of what to say the whole time either, I was just staring at the wall of blades behind her, longing for their cold metal. “I-I…,” my mouth gave out and I stood there like a statue. An idiotic statue. “Wait. You’re Cam,” she said as if that explained everything. The nickname my little sister had given me when she was first learning to speak because “Cameron” came out more like “Can-ban” didn’t explain anything in this situation. At least, not as far as I was concerned.

Luckily, Marissa was smart and put together the pieces of the puzzle quickly. Considering I was standing there dumbfounded, it was a good thing she did, too. “You left me the note, didn’t you?” This was the first question she’d asked that didn’t sound like a threat. I rubbed the back of my neck and chuckled awkwardly. “Yes,” I replied, staring at the floor. I couldn’t peel my eyes from the shiny metal floor, but I heard movement from her side of the room. As I looked up, I found her arms wrapping around my torso, and her head resting gently against my shoulder.

My vision went white again, and this time I could feel myself falling. “I…am so sorry,” she whispered into my chest. Hesitantly, I put my arms around her smaller frame, completely confused. “Uh…it’s okay?” I said it as more of a question, hoping she’d catch on to my confusion. She looked up at me, still embracing me, and I found myself staring back at beautiful, glistening eyes. “Your dad,” she whispered, “I heard what happened.” My vision went white, like a picture that hasn’t been developed yet, and then I could see my dad perfectly. His lifeless body crushed in that old Impala. Suddenly, I couldn’t tell if I was in that car with him, or if I was in some chilly ventilation shaft in a bowling alley with a girl wrapped around me. My vision went white again, and this time I could feel myself falling. It was kind of like when you’re

falling asleep, and then all of a sudden think that you’re falling off a cliff to your death and you jump yourself awake and sigh, annoyed at your body and mind for teaming up together and playing tricks against you. Except I didn’t jump myself awake. I just fell. And fell. And fell. And I didn’t stop. I fell for hours, wondering if it would ever end or if this was oblivion. Then I hit the ground with a metallic clang that was so loud I thought my eardrums would burst. My head followed, bashing itself into the hard metal floor and making my whole body feel numb. I heard someone shouting, but I still couldn’t tell if I’d just been in a car crash or not. It was a limbo between a rock and a hard place, and to be quite honest, I wasn’t very interested in waking up and discovering which nightmare I was really in.

CHAPTER 8 I awoke with my head in Marissa’s lap, looking up at her. “Oh, thank heavens,” she said softly. “Cam? Can you hear me?” Every time she asked me a question, it was softer, kinder, and sincerer than the last time. It was nice. “Yeah, I hear you,” I said, trying to sit up. She placed her hand gently on my chest, not allowing me up. “You just had a bad fall, I don’t want you standing up and fainting again.” She kept her hand on my chest until I stopped resisting. I felt so unmanly in that moment, in front of this pretty girl, I almost forced myself up out of sheer pride but knew that doing so might cause me

cont inued, Pag e 10

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c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 9 to pass out again, and that would be even worse. Then she’d see me as feminine and dumb. “We’re still in the bowling alley ventilation?” I asked her. “Yes, Cam. And we’re safe here. They can’t get to us, they can’t hurt us in here,” she said ominously. “They, who?” I questioned, a little worried and very confused. “Hmm? Oh, um, no one in particular. Just the…the bowling alley workers. They don’t know about this so we’re safe.” There was something she wasn’t telling me, but I didn’t have the energy or the mentality to probe any further, so I just accepted it. A moment passed as she stroked my arm thoughtlessly. I shut my eyes and let out a deep breath. “You okay?” she asked. “No,” I said, shakily. “Is that why you used the blades?” My heart caught in my throat. It hadn’t occurred to me that Marissa knew everything. It wasn’t exactly rocket science though. My dad had passed away, there was a new stain and an apology note in her room, I hadn’t been at school that day, and now I was actually in her room. “Yes,” I said simply, hoping I could stick to one-word answers. She nodded, her long hair bouncing around her shoulders. “How’d it feel?” “Good.” So far, so good. “It does, doesn’t it?” I almost replied with a simple yes, but realized just in time that she’d just admitted to me that she’d used them too. Something about the way she did it and the tone of her voice told me she hadn’t told anyone else about this, and that meant I was the first. I didn’t know what to do with that information, but my mouth thought it could handle this

dilemma, and butted in like a moron. “We’re like penknife pals!” Easily the stupidest thing I have ever said. Marissa’s jaw clenched and she averted her gaze. “I think you can stand now.”

“We’re like penknife pals!” Easily the stupidest thing I have ever said. I took my cue graciously, pulling myself to my feet as she stood up. “I’m so sorry. I just-” “It’s okay. Why’d you come back here anyway?” I’d really blown it. I was just one sincere comment away from having a real talk with someone I had similarities with, but instead I made a pun. I must be the dumbest person on the planet. “Well, I was having that craving again,” I said, trying to save it. “No.” “What?” What did she mean, no? “You don’t need those. If that’s the only reason you came here, it’d be better if you just left,” she said solemnly. She didn’t seem mad exactly. Somber maybe? I wasn’t sure. “But you use them,” I argued. She glared at me. Then her eyes welled up, her fists clenched, and she looked like she was about to explode. “I’m weak, okay? I’m small and scared and naive and I can’t control myself! But you’re better than that, okay? You’re better than I am, Cam!” she cried out. Her outburst caught me off guard and living life with just my father had taught me almost nothing about women and especially nothing about

consoling them. She buried her face in her hands and wept. I stood there awkwardly. I felt bad that I was just standing there as she cried, but I was terrified I would make a mistake if I tried to do anything for her, so I just stood there and waited. She took a deep, shaky breath a few minutes later and looked up at me with hurt in her eyes. I was the one who had to look away that time. “What did you read?” she asked after a moment. I could hear the tears in her voice without even having to look at her. “What do you mean?” “My writings. Which ones did you read?” She sniffled, regaining her composure. “Oh, no. I-” “Did you read this one?” She held out a notebook toward me, open to a page with a short poem on it. Standing there like a sentinel, I knew she wouldn’t budge until I read the poem, so I gave in and stepped close enough to make out the words. We all hold our secrets tightly to our hearts, Afraid that if we let them out people will see what’s truly beneath. But what we should fear most of all is what would happen If we all kept our secrets in. Will they eat away at our lives Until there’s nothing inside? Will they invade our dreams Till we come apart at the seams? Will they kill all our souls? Throw our hearts in dark holes? They will destroy us from the inside out, If we let them. The thing about the darkest secrets,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

Is that they will seethe, Unendingly and unforgivingly, Unless you let them breathe. “Marissa,” I started, but found myself speechless once again. “Get it?” “I think so?” She sighed. “We need people in our lives. People we can talk to about the deepest, darkest, scariest things. Those things that we don’t talk about in school or with our friends while we’re eating froyo at the mall or with our parents around the dinner table. You have to have someone you can trust when you’re crashing and burning and it feels like the whole world is falling down around you.” “I’ve never had anyone like that,” I replied honestly, not even trying to sound sad or pitiful. “I know. Me, neither,” she said, never taking her eyes off me. Finally, for the first time since I’d crawled into this room and made Marissa scream, I didn’t feel like a complete idiot because I understood what she was saying. “Marissa, I barely know you,” I reminded her. “We can change that.” I was trying to think of something to say when there was a loud bang somewhere in the connecting vents, then shouting. I couldn’t make out the words being said, but Marissa jumped and dug her nails into my arm, so I knew this couldn’t be good. “We need to get out,” she whispered, her face going pale. “What? Why? What’s happening?” I asked, my heart racing like a hummingbird. “They told me if they catch me up here again I’m going to jail!” she said, digging her nails deeper into my forearm and making me wince. “But…I thought…is there

another way…?” I couldn’t finish a thought. All I could think of was how perfect it would be for me to end up in jail at the end of all this. It’s not like anything else in my life was going right. Maybe prison was where I belonged.

pulled the metal sheet back in place and crawled off behind Marissa Colt as she led me through a metal maze. I had no idea where we were going, where we’d end up, or even if we’d make it, and yet, in that moment, I didn’t really care. I felt safe with Marissa, and that was a feeling I wasn’t sure I would ever have again after my dad passed. Maybe, just maybe, I could trust Marissa. The jury was still out, but everyone in the courtroom already knew the verdict.

Our st ory cont in u es next mont h! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of “Cam!” Marissa shouted, Medina High School/Medina Counsnapping me out of my selfty Career Center and Ohio State wallowing, “C’mon!” University. Find his stories of realShe’d pulled a metal sheet off istic fiction and magical realism at the far wall, revealing another http://cbthesurvivor. set of ductworks with even more notebooks and pens inside. She pulled her guitar Top DenTisT inside and then beckoned for me naTional awarD to follow. UNDER winner for america’s besT I was terrified young DenTisTs we were going to get stuck or run into a Come discover for yourself why Dr. Landry working rotary is recognized as one of fan or maybe America’s best dentists! just suffocate, New patients of all ages, but I figured and emergencies are taking a chance welcome. with this odd, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays yet somehow alluring, individual was better than getting arrested for crawling around a bowling Joseph G. Landry II, D.D.S., F.A.G.D. Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry alley’s ventilation 330-769-4470 shaft. 5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273 So, I climbed www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com in behind her,

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

Wishing Well

Wishes

Gathered at the Children’s Center of Medina County Pinwheel Walk

I want $1,000.

I would like more scholarships for college.

b.

r jo e m m u s a t n I wa

I want my volunteer job to become a paid one I want it t o b e warmer.

(Note: The t

emperature w

as 38 degrees

.)

My wish is not get h for kids to urt anym ore.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

The Children's Center of Medina County Community Pinwheel Walk to Prevent Child Abuse. Walk participants returning to Medina Public Square after planting pinwheels at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church at 606 E. Washington Street, Medina.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

Joyful Word Search Flea Market Finds

Hello Friends & Neighbors Over 100 homes sold in 2017!

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K N U R T A C R U N C S O A R E O F B O M Y R L E W E J Y

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L T S H A S S F J T K L A O G G T D P E B H R C O D S L M U T O R H T M A A R K O N G N I

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

TA L E S O F A MO LD WAR RI O R

Clue to a Cause of Persistent Illness by Paul McHam So, maybe you have been feeling sick, but it is really hanging on and you do not know why. It could be the flu or even just a cold, but then I am no doctor. I do know, however, that it is said that nearly 80 percent of all human ailments comes from the environment they live in. If you are feeling bad and do not know why, it may be that your environment is affecting you. Mold, for example, can have a negative human health effect. There may be tens of thousands or even hundreds of thousands of mold species. It is estimated that 90 percent are allergens and the remaining 10 percent are toxigenic. The allergens are serious because they can cause minor allergic reactions like sneezing, nose dripping, or coughing and clearing the throat, or they can cause asthma or even emphysema. Toxigenic molds can lead to a far more serious response like cancer, lupus, memory loss, or even organ failure. Maybe it is time to examine your home and business environments to determine if they are affecting you. Look for areas that may have gotten wet, such as the basement, under sinks, and in the attic and look for discoloration from the mold colonizing. Once you find discoloration, use a strong flashlight to expose small filaments growing out of the wet or recently wet material. You may have to turn the flashlight sideways against the surface to really make the profile of those filaments stand out. If you see filaments or what may look like hundreds of small beards sticking out from the surface, it is likely time to get a professional to render an opinion or, even better, to test it. Next month’s column will cover what makes a good professional a “good professional!” Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-331-7500.

INVESTING INTELLIGENC E: SEC RETS OF A MORTGAGE BA NK ER

Strategy for a Successful Home Purchase by Rich Bailey Last month, the shortage of houses listed for sale was explained. This month, buying strategy will be examined. In this limited housing market, it is extremely important as a home buyer to have a solid pre-approval letter from a mortgage lender and, as a home seller, to insist on one. Pre-approvals come in many shapes and sizes, so you will want to make sure yours is as thorough as possible. They are typically as basic as a buyer having a credit report run and supplying a pay stub to document income. It may go one step further and be run through an automated underwriting system for an automated approval. Those are the basis of most pre-approvals in the market today. However, these are potentially woefully inept preapprovals and a plethora of things can, and do, go wrong with them regularly. It is no wonder that a fair amount of home sales fall apart in underwriting two to five weeks into the transaction, devastating both buyer and seller. Some of the reasons for failure are that filings in tax returns can often take away income that looks legitimate, items found in bank statement transactions can add to debt ratios, and written verification of income from a buyer’s employer can undercut income that is documented on pay stubs and tax returns. Therefore, without having all of these items reviewed at the same time by an underwriter, not a loan originator, you are playing Russian roulette with your future, the seller’s future, and the futures of those in any other transactions in the chain of sales and purchases. I highly recommend when you seek a pre-approval that you request a fully underwritten pre-approval. This process cannot be done in one day, so do not be fooled by gimmickry and rocket speed. Happy house hunting! Rich Bailey is a licensed mortgage loan originator with First Security Mortgage Corporation and has 15 years of conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA mortgage financing experience for purchase and refinance transactions. Contact Bailey at rich.bailey@fsmc. net or by calling 330-571-2692. First Security Mortgage Corporation 15887 Snow Road, Suite 200 Brook Park, OH 44142 www.FirstSecurityMortgage.net NMLS 258602, 289425 MB.802718, LO.015405


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

T HE N E T W O R K E R

Bricks Fall Hard and so can Respect by Bob Arnold It is humbling to realize how networked the materials are that we live and work in every day. I was called in recently to help analyze and redesign the 226 South Court Street building in Medina, which housed the Gardener’s Cottage and recently had its three-story rear wall collapse. As an architect, I find it fascinating how we can take these common materials and put them into networkable products and forms. I am never more humbled than when I see these networks malfunction. Yes, the buildings we live and work in are networks! Our buildings are built upon the same principles our business and social networks are: the principle of bonding. All of the materials used in building a facility are carefully placed to respect their adjacent materials and they must bond together to accomplish their task to give you a comfortable place to work and live. Sometimes, just like in our business networking relationships, a building experiences a breach in the bonding capacity of some of its materials, thus the plight of the South Court building. The brick and mortar became compromised and lost their capacity to hold each other up, so down they went in a heap on the ground. When a business relationship loses respect for a networking partner, the relationship comes apart. I hate seeing this kind of thing happen to those of us in business, however, I also know that truly profitable relationships are built on a mutual bond, and we must work at them to see them flourish and continue to hold. I encourage you to let someone in your networking circle know how much they mean to you today. Don’t delay, bonds can look strong but fail instantly. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and an international best-selling author. More networking tips and information are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at OnwardNetworking.com or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com.

Ripples

Find a reason to say, “thank you,” to someone.

by C.L. Gammon

In honor of Medina and Medina County’s bicentennials, Joy Magazine will be publishing a recipe each month based on recipes from the same approximate period as when the two were founded. Enjoy! Formerly, oxtail referred to only the tail of an ox or steer. An oxtail typically weighs 2 to 4 pounds, but this recipe calls for only 1 pound of meat. Uncooked oxtail can be refrigerated and used later. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 oxtails, ½ pound each 3 tablespoons flour ¼ tablespoon salt ¼ tablespoon pepper 2 tablespoons oil 2 10-ounce cans beef broth ½ cup water ½ cup chopped onion ½ cup chopped tomato 1 carrot, peeled, quartered 1 clove garlic, minced 3 parsley sprigs 1 bay leaf 1 cup sliced carrots 1 cup sliced green onion

Wash oxtails, pat dry. Combine flour, salt and pepper. Coat oxtails with flour mixture. In Dutch oven, brown oxtails on all sides in heated oil. Drain fat. Add broth, water, onion, tomato, quartered carrot, garlic, parsley, and bay leaf. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 90 minutes or until meat is almost tender. Remove carrot and bay leaf. Add sliced carrots and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer 10 minutes longer or until veggies are tender. Recipes are reproduced with permission from “A Revolutionary War Cookbook (and More)” by C.L. Gammon, an award-winning and internationally known bestselling author. To see Gammon’s books, go to https://amzn.to/2ITqTBx

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

GEMS

A Legacy of Giving by Kent Von Der Vellen In 1998, three local women decided it was time for a fund that would focus on the needs of Medina County’s women and children. Jane Lang, Katie Horn and Gwen Rivers grew the Medina County Women’s Endowment Fund from the Medina County Community Fund by spearheading efforts to raise $104,000 to start the new fund, said Mary Isaac, MCWEF’s president.

The local Women’s Health Fair received the first MCEWF grant in 2001 to provide child care and transportation for low-income women so they could attend the fair. In the 20 years since, the MCWEF has awarded $147,772 to 49 organizations, while the Akron Community Foundation provides administrative, legal and investment expertise. This year, MCWEF is honoring Lang and Rivers, both of whom died in 2017, and is celebrating 20 years of helping the community. The new Legacy Tree of Giving Campaign’s goal is to match the $104,000 that was initially raised in 1998. Donors are asked to donate $100 a month to MCWEF for a year. The first 100 donors will receive a photograph by Matthew Platz of the Legacy Tree, which is located along Route 3.

MCWEF grant recipients will be awarded their grants at the primary fundraising event, Seasons of Giving, 6 p.m., June 14, 2018, at the Blue Heron Event Center, 3227 Blue Heron Trace, Medina. Isaac said it is important for Medina residents to see how the money is helping their community and to give the organizations a chance to publicize what they do. This year, MCWEF will award a $10,000 impact grant funded by a donation made by the J.M. Smucker Company to the Akron Community Foundation to divide among its member organizations. MCWEF expects to award more than $20,000 in grants this year. To learn more about MCWEF, go to https://bit.ly/2pQvY4E . To support the Legacy Tree of Giving Campaign, contact Renee Scherick, 330-436-5612, rscherick@akroncf.org. Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com

Congratulations to Logan Detwiler for being a highlighted speaker at the Developmental Disabilities Advocacy and Awareness Day at the Ohio Statehouse! Detwiler’s photo appeared in the March issue of Joy as part of Tim Tebow’s Night to Shine prom. To see his photo, go to Page 7 at https://bit.ly/2qqPeGr

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

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Amyzing Chocolate Chip Cookies by Amy Barnes

When measuring brown sugar, packing it down always has seemed a waste of time. The brown sugar is never the same amount twice because the final amount depends on how firmly it is packed. It also makes it a large lump to add to the mixer, rather than the softer form prior to packing. My rule of thumb is to add a quarter cup extra of brown sugar and skip the packing. • 2 ½ cups flour • ½ teaspoon salt • 1 teaspoon baking soda • 2 sticks margarine • 1 cup brown sugar (do not pack) • ¼ cup granulated sugar • 1 tablespoon vanilla • ¼ cup sour cream • 3 eggs • 1 pound chocolate chips (be aware, a bag of chocolate chips is less than a pound) • Optional: 1 cup coarsely chopped nuts, 14 ounce bag shredded coconut Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Use a balloon whisk or fork to combine flour, salt, baking soda. In separate bowl, use mixer to thoroughly combine butter, sugars, vanilla, sour cream, eggs. Add flour mixture. Add chips. Add nuts and coconut, if desired. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or with foil sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Drop by teaspoon, approximately 2 inches apart, onto prepared cookie sheet. Bake for 10 minutes or until browned around the edges. Yield is approximately 5 dozen.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018

Let's do it! Tuesday, May 1 Mother Goose Day http://bit.ly/2GkHk93 and Batman Day http://bit.ly/2p6R2Ug 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Grace Baptist Church, 3480 Laurel Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Gearheads: Robotics Challenge; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Divide into teams, create robot. Must attend all four sessions. Register at https://bit. ly/2qjB7Ds 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. ORMACO: The Great Gatsby touring company performs; Highland High School Auditorium, Highland High School, 4150 Ridge Road, Medina. Tickets $15 in advance at all Medina County Buehler’s starting April 1, $18 at the door. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541.

Wednesday, May 2 Brothers and Sisters Day http://bit.ly/2tG2fRe 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Nature Through the Seasons; Chippewa Inlet Trail South, Chippewa Road, west of Lake Road. Easy walk, part of award-based hiking series. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. https://bit.ly/2v1W76m 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 School Drive, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Create Your Own Bath Bombs; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Grades 7 to 12. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Papier Mache Masks; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Register at https://bit.ly/2Hpxh2W 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Alzheimer’s Association: Fundraising After 5; Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 5185 Gateway Drive, Medina.Kickoff event for Medina County Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Register by April 27 to Stephanie Mueller, smueller@alz.org or call 234-284-2752. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Appraise It!; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Call for qualifying items, 330-948-1885. Register at https://bit. ly/2GQ1wz8 7 p.m. The Lamps are Going out all Over Eu-

May 2018

Non-Profit Calendar

rope: Causes of the Great War; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2Hbuv3Q

Thursday, May 3 Garden Meditation Day http://bit.ly/2Dl0VCZ, Lumpy Rug Day https://bit.ly/2q6n7wK, and World Press Freedom Day https://bit.ly/2IxbmGD 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Summa Health Center at Wadsworth-Rittman, 195 Wadsworth Road, Wadsworth. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Shop to Share; Raspberry and The Rose, 241 S. Court Street, Medina. 20 percent of purchases donated to Friends of MCDL. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Retro Craft Club: Decoupage Chic; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Ages 18 and older. Register at http://bit.ly/2p77eVy 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Master Gardener Decaf Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw

Friday, May 4 May the Fourth be With You: Star Wars Day http://bit.ly/2p4f2bj , Migratory Bird Day http://bit.ly/1wIvwE5 and International Tuba Day http://bit.ly/1nPT6L3 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Master Gardener Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 7:30 p.m. Medina Community Band: Spring Concert; Highland High School Auditorium, 4150 Ridge Road, Medina. Free.

Saturday, May 5 Cinco de Mayo https://bit.ly/2Iwmtzg and National Hoagie Day https://bit.ly/2GzhuRP All day. Free Comic Book Day; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Free comic book while supplies last, make 8-bit art. 7:30 a.m. 85th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks are led by experienced birders. Watch as migrating birds return. Register http://bit.ly/2Dm5rkp 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Medina County Park District: Hiking for the Health of It; Hubbard Valley

Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Four to five mile hike at brisk pace. Dress for the weather. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. 9 a.m. to noon. American Legion Post 202 Paper Shredding Day, 620 N. Broadway Street, Medina. No plastic, no binders. Flags will be given proper disposal. Donations accepted. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Medina County Pet-Tacular!; Pinnacle Sports, 313 Medina Road, Medina. Pet adoption, obedience classes, dog vaccinations, face painting, pet massage, and more. Free. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Cinco de Mayo; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Make a piñata, maraca, snacks. Grades kindergarten third grade. Register at https://bit. ly/2IIXoBw 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Fabulous and Fancy Tea Party; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Dress in exquisite ensemble, enjoy teas, snacks. Grades kindergarten through fifth. Register at https://bit.ly/2qoxr2n 10:30 a.m. to noon. Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Farmer Boy Presentation; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Stories, artifacts. https://bit.ly/2qkXU1P 11 a.m. Book Lovers Luncheon; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring appetizer to share. Register at https://bit.ly/2GRyI9n 11 a.m. to noon. Hot Wheels and Trucks; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Stories, race cars. Grades kindergarten to fifth. Register at https://bit.ly/2GNye3Y Noon to 4 p.m. Computer Support, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Help removing viruses and malware from laptops. Library tech department will assist. Ages 55 and up. First come, first serve. NO PHONE CALLS. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Cinco de Mayo; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Make a piñata, maraca, snacks. Grades fourth through sixth. Register at https://bit.ly/2JyP1cO 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Mom and Me Scrapbook; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Make scrapbook for mom, bring small mementos, photos. Register at https://bit.ly/2EC3KQC 5:30 p.m. Children’s Center Night at the Races; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Doors open 5:30 p.m., heavy appetizers 6 p.m., post time 7 p.m. Tickets $50. Sponsorships and tickets http://www.medinacountychildrenscenter.org/ 7 p.m. Medina Chorus Spring Concert; Medina Presbyterian Church, 5020 Burgundy Bay Boulevard, Medina.

Sunday, May 6 International No Diet Day https://bit.ly/2qaVhyv 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; BAPS Charities, 2915 Laurel Road,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018 Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2 p.m. Wadsworth Community Choir Spring Concert; O.J. Work Auditorium, 151 S. Main Street, Wadsworth. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. ORMACO Avenue Brass Quintet; Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free, but reservations urged, 330-334-5761. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. OSU Extension: Nature Rocks!; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Workshop about butterflies with plant scavenger hunt and paint a suncatcher. Ages 6 to 12. Fee $6. Register with Ashley Kulhanek, 330-725-4911, Ext. 106, or e-mail kulhanek.5@osu.edu.

Monday, May 7 National Tourism Day https://bit.ly/2EjHWsV 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; H. G. Blake Elementary School, 4704 Lexington Ridge Drive. http://www.redcross. org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Social Issues Film Club: Where Soldiers Come From; Highland Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. The military and its impact on soldiers and communities. Watch film, then meet May 21 for discussion. Adults. Register at http://bit. ly/2p9KWTf 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Scrapbooking; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create four pages. Supply fee: $8. Bring adhesives. Adults. Register by May 4 at http://bit.ly/2IihjYu 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Veterans Roundtable; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. All Ages. No registration

Tuesday, May 8 No Socks Day https://bit.ly/2q7wuft 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Creative Concoctions for Preschoolers; Krabill Shelter, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina. Mysterious mixtures and marvelous messes. All supplies provided, come dressed for mess. Free. Ages 3 to 6. Register by January 8. https://bit.ly/2HbmQT5 for 10 a.m.; https://bit.ly/2qp5Dv2 for 1 p.m. 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: ABC Scavenger Hunt; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at https://bit. ly/2GOWEKo 6 p.m. Writers Series: Writing Your Memoir; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Local author Katrina Morgan gives writing tips. Register at https://bit.ly/2qkS0Oe 6:30 p.m. Military Records of Our Ancestors; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Dig into military and pension records. Register at https://bit.ly/2v6aNSd

Wednesday, May 9 Lost Sock Memorial Day https://bit.ly/2GGDZAg 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Understanding and Organizing Files and Folders; Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Adults. http://bit.ly/2p3anGG 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood

Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 1:30 p.m. Summer Book Preview; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Penguin Random House rep shares new releases. Snacks, prizes. https://bit.ly/2HdWQq7 2:30 p.m. Candy Olympics; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Skittle sorting, candy taste-testing, races, more. Grades 7 to 12.

Thursday, May 10 Clean Up Your Room Day https://bit.ly/2JlcCha 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Lodi Community Hospital, 225 Elyria Street, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Volunteers offer guidance through Domestic Relations Court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. Happy Mother’s Day; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Craft a gift. Register at https://bit.ly/2IIwh9u

Friday, May 11 Eat What You Want Day https://bit.ly/1E29Q4O and Twilight Zone Day https://bit.ly/2EmqNPe 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina United Methodist Church, 4747 Foote Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wine and Canvas Night; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Bring wine, go home with painting. Supply fee $15, cash or check. https://bit.ly/2GOnO8m

Saturday, May 12

6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. https://bit.ly/2IK1xFg 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Outback Ray Animal Show; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Exotic, live animals. Hands-on event. All ages. http://bit.ly/2pc0m9j 10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Mandala Playshop for Adults; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ages 16 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2v7R98c 11 a.m. to noon. Mother’s Day Mini Garden; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Create mini terrarium. Kindergarten through Grade 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2Hd2dpy WAITING LIST. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Santa Day; Medina Public Square. Begins with Santa parade around the square, Lemons for Leukemia Challenge, face painting, more. Details at https://castlenoel. com/sd513/ Noon to 4:30 p.m. Board Game Drop-in; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring favorite game or learn a new one. Noon to 5 p.m. Wonderful World of Warblers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. https://bit. ly/2GRC5RM

Sunday, May 13 Frog Jumping Day https://bit.ly/1PCzwLR and National Train Day https://bit.ly/2GBAz6a Noon to 5 p.m. Wonderful World of Warblers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. https://bit. ly/2GRC5RM Noon to 6 p.m. ORMACO Party Bus to the Cleveland Orchestra: All Beethoven at Severance Hall, Cleveland; bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3616 Medina Road, Medina. Includes box lunch, wine, homemade cookies, trivia quiz, backstage tour, pre-concert lecture. Tickets $105 to $85. www.ormaco.org , 330-722-2541. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Songbirds; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Part of award-based hiking series. Bring field guide, binoculars. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. https://bit.ly/2HdFDgl

Monday, May 14

Limerick Day https://bit.ly/2uRvNMc Dance Like a Chicken Day https://bit.ly/1sJB7:30 a.m. 85th Annual Series of Spring Bird FMl Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Wadsworth. Walks are led by experienced birders. Watch as migrating birds return. Your Local Storm Register http://bit. Claims Specialists ly/2Dq4bgc 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Call us for a FREE Strides; Hubbard inspection before Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, you file a claim. If it’s Roofing Seville. Physician talk Siding determined you have and one- to three-mile Windows damage, we’ll guide walk. Ages 10 and up. Gary Flood Free. No registration. Tantanella you through the Fire (President) 9 a.m. to noon. insurance process. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek (330) 571-1827 (440) 862-9442 Environmental Center,

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018 Drive; Brunswick United Methodist Church, 1395 Pearl Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick High School, 3581 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Teen Art Night; Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Geometric watercolors. Register at http://bit.ly/2DnwfRm

Tuesday, May 15 Chocolate Chip Day https://bit.ly/2yFsYQ6 7:15 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. Medina Creative Therapy Ranch Tree House Dedication; 5200 Lake Road, Medina. Handicap-accessible tree house and nature learning center dedication. http://bit. ly/2oDR8mO 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. OSU Homeowner Series; Community Room, A.I. Root Candle Store, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Yard diggers. $10. http://bit.ly/2FdOtKV

Wednesday, May 16 National Sea Monkey Day https://bit. ly/2Jm1ctt 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Mandala Playshop for Kids; The Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Ages 9 to 16. Register at https://bit. ly/2JBdXjW 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Western Reserve Masonic Community, 4931 Nettleton Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. End of School Year Cookout; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Games, food, fun. Outdoors, weather permitting. Grades 7 to 12. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. History Series: Chippewa Lake; Lodi Library 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. http://bit.ly/2IpIcd1

Thursday, May 17 Pack Rat Day https://bit.ly/2uNNrk1 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Therapy Dog Thursday; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Pet and read to dogs. Noon to 5 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Sharon Township Administration Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon Center. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Code T: Pizza Garden Kits; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Plant seeds to grow pizza ingredients. Ages 4 to 7. Register at http://bit.ly/2Hu1tZy 6 p.m. Seville History Walk; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Historical walking tour of Seville, led by Seville Historical Society. https:// bit.ly/2GQ3WBS

Friday, May 18 No Dirty Dishes Day https://bit.ly/2EjNu6J 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hospice of the Western Reserve Warehouse Sale; Hospice of the Western Reserve headquarters, 17876 St. Clair Avenue, Cleveland. One of two days. Gently used home furnishings, artwork, lamps, dishes, jewelry, more. https://bit.ly/2EDReAg

10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sit, Stay, Read; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading with Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2GkRKFI 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Snack Attack; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Quick and easy recipes. Counts toward wellness Points. Grades 3 to 5. Register at http:// bit.ly/2Hum8g6 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, May 19 May Ray Day https://bit.ly/2GCzta8 Call for time. Royal Wedding; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Watch wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, enjoy tea and scones. All ages. 330-278-4271 7:30 a.m. 85th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks are led by experienced birders. Watch as migrating birds return. Register http://bit.ly/2FGhX0c 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. K-9 Kapers; Killbuck Lakes, 7996 White Road, Burbank. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. https://bit.ly/2qlPl5Y 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Paw Patrol Paw-ty; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Games, crafts. Ages 3 to 7. WAITING LIST. http:// bit.ly/2FyqhTL 1 p.m. to 6 pm. Medina Bicentennial: Armed Forces Day; Public Square, Medina. Veteran groups to share information about their groups and Medina’s part in war. Noon to 4 p.m. Computer Support, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Help removing viruses and malware from laptops. Library tech department will assist. Ages 55 and up. First come, first serve. NO PHONE CALLS. Noon to 5 p.m. Wonderful World of Warblers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. https://bit. ly/2GR3hM9 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Chess Club; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Chess sets provided. Increase problem solving and strategy skills. Grade 3 and higher. Register at http://bit. ly/2FNR2CM 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Creativity Club; Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Re-discover joy of creating. Register at http://bit.ly/2IpdtN4 7 p.m. Brass Band of the Western Reserve Concert: Brass Band, Big Band; Performing Arts Center, 851 Weymouth Road, Medina. Performing titles from Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Neal Hefti, Henry Mancini, and others. Adults, $12; senior citizens, $10; students, $6. http://new.bbwesternreserve.org/tickets/ 614563-7170

Be sure to let event organizers know that you saw their event listed in Joy Magazine! 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association: How to Use Your Own Telescope; Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served. https://bit.ly/2GTswOa

Sunday, May 20 Be a Millionaire Day https://bit.ly/R4H42p Noon to 5 p.m. Wonderful World of Warblers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. https://bit. ly/2GR3hM9 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Kitchen Gardens; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Fee $20. Ages 13 and up. https:// bit.ly/2Hr9Iqt Call 330-722-9316 to register by May 11.

Monday, May 21 Talk Like Yoda Day https://bit.ly/2HbedoU 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 7 and up. Free. No registration

Tuesday, May 22 Buy a Musical Instrument Day https://bit. ly/2GEfO5N and World Goth Day https://bit. ly/2uMaUlO 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Wadsworth City Hall, 120 Maple Street, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Afternoon at the Cinema; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent movie releases and light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Teen anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. 6:30 p.m. Medina County Bicentennial: Meet Letha House; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Kathy Kraus portrays Letha House. https://bit.ly/2GP470e

Wednesday, May 23 Lucky Penny Day https://bit.ly/27OUnaU 2:30 pm. Teen Territory: Celebrate Summer! ; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Games, snacks, more. 4:30 p.m. Teen Volunteer Summer Orientation; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road,


Joy of Medina County Magazine | May 2018 Medina. Grades 6 through 12. Bring completed application. Register at https://bit.ly/2GOJjG3

Thursday, May 24 Scavenger Hunt Day https://bit.ly/2qJ4AZc Noon. Writer Live Series: David Giffels; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Author of “The Hard Way on Purpose,” “All the Way Home,” and “Furnishing Eternity.” Tickets $25, includes lunch, at any Medina County Library District library. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Advanced Health and Wellness Center, 201 Great Oaks Trail, Wadsworth. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Brunswick Library: Legal Resource Center; 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. DIY Slime; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make slime. Register at https://bit. ly/2IKHnL5 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Teen Volunteer Summer Orientation; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 through 12. Bring completed application. Register at https://bit.ly/2GQ5OdS

Friday, May 25 Sing Out Day https://bit.ly/2IxUEXv and Towel Day (“Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”) https:// bit.ly/2q9k2es Civil War Encampment; Spring Grove Cemetery, 785 E. Washington Street, Medina.

3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Crafternoon; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway St., Medina. Paint, craft supplies provided to create art. Grades 1 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2FE0Wno 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, May 26 International Jazz Day https://bit.ly/2GVqSyD and Sally Ride Day https://bit.ly/1TBjeGa Civil War Encampment; Spring Grove Cemetery, 785 E. Washington Street, Medina. Civil War reenactors, review of Civil War monuments, crafts, more. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Brunswick Lake Trail, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Physician talk and one- to three-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. No registration. https://bit.ly/2GT29Ie 9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. https://bit.ly/2Hc2byh 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Granger United Methodist Church, 1235 Granger Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway

Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 11 a.m. to noon. Teen Volunteer Summer Orientation; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Grades 6 through 12. Bring completed application. Register at https://bit.ly/2GQE2Kb

Sunday, May 27 Sunscreen Day https://bit.ly/2GF8PJX

Monday, May 28 Amnesty International Day https://bit. ly/2He07mS All libraries are closed for Memorial Day. 10 a.m. Memorial Day Parade; Medina. Emphasis on Medina history.

Tuesday, May 29 Put a Pillow on Your Fridge Day https://bit. ly/2uS4rFQ

Wednesday, May 30 My Bucket’s Got a Hole Day https://bit.ly/2GGNrnC

Thursday, May 31 National Macaroon Day https://bit.ly/1ecyhrh 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Master Gardener Decaf Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina County AMVETS Post 1990, 620 N. Broadway Street, Medina. http://www.redcross. org/local/ohio/northeast

Submitting Calendar Events “Let’s Do It!” is a calendar of events sponsored or hosted by non-political, non-profit groups in Medina County. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional events. There is no charge to list an event in the calendar. To have an event listed, please send date, time, event name, location, cost of event, organization benefitting from the event (and hosting or sponsoring organization if different), contact name and phone number, website if available, and name and phone number of the person submitting the information to joy@ BlakeHousePublishing.com with Calendar in the subject line or you can mail the information to Attn: Calendar, Joy of Medina County Magazine, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Oh. 44256. Calendar information will not be taken by phone.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Joy of Medina County Magazine May 2018  

Treasures, clues, wishes, and so much more in our May issue to explore. Enjoy the wonderful stories of Medina County!

Joy of Medina County Magazine May 2018  

Treasures, clues, wishes, and so much more in our May issue to explore. Enjoy the wonderful stories of Medina County!