Page 1

JUNE 2018

THE CONFIDENCE AND THE CLOTHES PG. 22

WHOM DO YOU KNOW? PG.10

TIME TO GRAB LOCAL VEGGIES, HONEY AND MAPLE SYRUP PG. 25 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 5

THE FAMILY THAT GIVES

SAVING LIVES, FEEDING THE HUNGRY, AND HOLDING FUNDRAISERS ARE ALL PART OF AN AVERAGE DAY. PG 4


2

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

One

Voice

A Marketing We Will Go by Amy Barnes

T

he time of year for farmers markets has finally arrived, and that means it also is time for winter-beaten souls and bodies to soak up the sights, sounds and flavors of area markets. Yay! Starting with this issue and going through to October, Joy will be publishing a guide to area farmers markets to ensure readers do not miss out on a single bite. If you are hungry for the delicious assortment of fresh food available from local growers, this is the list for you!

Medina County

FARMERS' MARKETS 2018

Go to the Table of Contents to find the market guide, which includes addresses and hours. Special events at the markets will be listed in the Let’s Do It! calendar published at the back of each issue of Joy and the Let’s Do It! calendar pages at https://www. joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/ If you happen to buy too much, you then have the opportunity to really brighten the day of veterans by sharing with them. To donate some of your bounty to formerly homeless veterans now living at Newbridge Place, call Elizabeth Mikita at 330-948-8000 to find out how and tell her that Joy of Medina County Magazine sent you. To learn more about Newbridge Place, see the feature article in the April issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine at https://issuu.com/joyofmedinacounty/ docs/joy-april-2018

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 5 J O Y O F M E D I N A C O U NTY.C OM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC E D I TO R Amy Barnes P H O TO G R A P H E R FlashBang Photography A R T D I R E C TOR Ryan Burdzinski C O N T R I B U TO R S Bob Arnold Rich Bailey Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty. com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

Specializing in: Portrait Photography • Traditional Headshots Glamour Shots • Corporate Portraits Family Portraits

Order copies of any photos in Joy of Medina County Magazine 440-263-4502 | sfeller1@neo.rr.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

Contents

4 10 14

THE PAINTING WAY by Amy Barnes

Jeanette and Del Painting are building an amazing legacy of saving lives and giving to others that their offspring are continuing with pride.

OH, SNAP!

photos by FlashBang Photography How many people and pets do you know?

THE READING NOOK

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

Cam falls head first into the unknown in more ways than one.

19 20

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

FOOD ON THE BUS

Sharing all of the help one bus can carry.

TALES O F A MOLD WARRIOR

DETERMINING MOLD TYPES by Paul McHam

It is important to know which black mold you are battling.

INVESTING INTELLIGENCE: SECRETS OF A MORTG AG E BANKER

STUDENT LOAN LESSONS by Rich Bailey

Thinking of deferring student loan payments? Read this first!

Del Painting sits ready at the pass-through window of the bus to hand dinners and drinks out to other bus volunteers who stand outside of the bus to distribute the meals.

4

21

THE NETWO RKER

ADMITTING FAILURE by Bob Arnold

What do you do when you realize you just had a networking failure?

BICENTENNIAL BITES

HOECAKES

Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition, which can be found by going to JoyofMedinaCounty.com, scrolling down, then picking and clicking on the desired issue.

ON THE COVER: Some of the family members gathered recently to support Annabelle Stanec’s Leukemia and Lymphoma Society fundraiser. First row, left to right: Dawn Nelson (in pink), Cici Stanec, Annabelle Stanec, Alex Nelson, Mark Nelson (with glasses), Heather Barrett (in red). Back row, left to right: Brandon Nelson, Aubree Nelson (baby), Tina Nelson, Cait Painting (in blue), Jeanette Painting, Jake Kovach (with glasses and Abbey’s boyfriend), Del Painting, Justin Barrett, Abbey Stanec (in gray), Drew Painting (in cap), and Emma Stanec (in gray).

by C.L. G ammon

Known by many names, hoecakes were used as a side dish, a bread substitute or a light meal.

22

GEMS

HELPING WOMEN WITH THEIR FIRST IMPRESSION by Kent Von der Vellen

Sometimes the obstacle to success is as simple as the lack of a dress.

23

BITE ME!

LAZY DAY POT PIE by Amy Barnes

Chicken pot pie is as easy as dump, stir, spread, bake.

24 25

LET’S DO IT!

From outdoor summer concerts to the Kids Day of Fun, it is time to swing into summer fun.

A MARKETING WE WILL GO

The county’s farmers markets are open and waiting for you.

3


4

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

The painting way by Amy Barnes

Photographs by FlashBang Photography

T

he lesson of saving others probably started for Jeanette and Del Painting with their

mothers. Jeanette’s mother used to bring home broken figurines from her job and repair them. Del’s mother used to bring home sick fish from her place of employment to nurse them back to health. With childhoods spent watching their mothers use faith and skill to rescue what others would have thrown away, it is no wonder the two were drawn to each other and to doing good. “My mom was a giver and rescuer,” Jeanette said, adding that her own desires to rescue those in need is inherited. Del said, “My folks were the

advice givers and peacemakers.” The deep bond between Jeanette and Del was noticed by their classmates, who named them North Royalton High School’s Romeo and Juliet in the yearbook. They married in 1959, a year after graduating, and rented a home in North Royalton. In 1962, they moved to Hinckley. Del was the Hinckley Chamber of Commerce president from 1967 to 1969. He proudly recalls Buzzard Day 1969 when astronaut John Glenn visited, and Walt Disney made the movie “It’s Tough to be a Bird,” which includes actual footage from Buzzard Day. They had no idea what was to come next and the lives they would touch. Throughout their married lives, they have found themselves in

situations where they could help save a life or give a helping hand. About forty years ago, they were driving in Hinckley when they spotted a car, with a man inside, overturned in the river. It was 20 degrees outside, but Del and a stranger managed to pull the man out of the car and rescue him. Del and Jeanette were wearing coats they had just purchased, but they gave no thought to that as Jeanette wrapped her coat around the man to help keep him warm. Both coats ended up ruined and covered in blood, but the couple quickly adds that the man was saved. On another day, while on the way to church, they saw a man lying motionless on a driveway. After debating what he was doing, Del and Jeanette pulled over to check on him. They became more


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

concerned when they saw the man was bleeding. The man’s wife came outside, returning to the house to call for help at Del and Jeanette’s urging. Jeanette said that the wife took an extraordinary amount of time to call 911. It turned out that the man had been cutting a branch off a tree by the driveway and decided that instead of letting the branch fall to the ground, he would tie one end of a rope around his waist and the other around the branch. When the branch fell, so did the man. Another time, they rescued a man who had driven into a ravine. He was in a diabetic coma and had lost control of his car. Sometimes they travel to where they can help. They went to Mississippi and filled sandbags when the Mississippi River flooded. When Alabama needed help recovering from flooding, they went there, and Del helped build houses while Jeanette made toast when there was not much else to cook. In between rescuing people, Del and Jeanette managed to raise six children, all of whom have continued the family’s legacy of saving and helping others. Drew Painting is married and has

two daughters and one grandchild. He lives in Hinckley and won the 2017 Liberty Mutual Safety Award for saving a woman from a burning car. He works for Medina Supply as a cement truck driver. Dawn Nelson is married and has one son, one daughter, and one grandchild. She lives in Hinckley. She was a Girl Scout leader in Brunswick, currently is co-leader of a Highland Girl Scout troop with her sister Whitney, and teaches Sunday school at Strongsville United Methodist Church. Heather Barrett is married and has two sons and three grandchildren. She also lives in Hinckley and was a lieutenant with the Hinckley Fire Department until she retired after 31 years of service. Whitney Painting is going to be married in July and has one son and three daughters. She lives in Sharon Center and is co-leader with Dawn of a Highland Girl Scout troop. One of Whitney’s daughters, Annabelle Stanec, a 2018 Highland High School graduate, recently held a spaghetti dinner fundraiser for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Bradley Painting is married, has three daughters and volunteers as a lacrosse coach in Wadsworth. He

Jeanette Painting helps a child try on a coat.

owns Classic Walls and Ceilings in Wadsworth. Randall Painting is married and has three daughters and one son. He lives in Brunswick. In keeping with family tradition, he saved a boy from drowning at Mohican State Park. He works for Atlas Copco in Independence. That is six children, 17 grandchildren, and five greatgrandchildren, with another grandchild on the way. All three daughters work at their parents’ Firemark Insurance Agency in Brunswick. “It’s his dream come true to go to work with his three daughters,” Whitney jokes. Del grimaces and rolls his eyes but decides to remain silent. The family’s dedication to service and saving others is “just how we were raised,” Whitney said. She said they were taught to find their niche. It does not occur to any of them not to help if someone is in need. “You have to give of yourself,” Whitney says. In 2001, a new project found Del and Jeanette when they became members of the Strongsville United Methodist Church. At about the same time they joined the church, another church member accompanied Gwen Scott on a bus delivering meals to poor neighborhoods in west Cleveland. Scott had founded the meal program and was looking for help. When the meal delivery program was proposed to the Strongsville church, the congregation thought it was a good idea and started asking for volunteers. As new members, Del and Jeanette were happy to sign up for the project. Soon, they were traveling in a bus filled with meals and eight to 20 volunteers to Cleveland every Wednesday night.

cont inued , Pag e 6

5


6

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 5

all from getting the help they count on. “Initially, it was just feeding They come in all shapes, sizes, people,” said Del. colors. They come in all modes of It was not long before what dress and undress. They share in began as a free meal developed into a common hunger and a respect offering clothes, shoes and toys. for the help they are being offered. The change began when women They know that if there is trouble, in the Strongsville church knit Jeannette will yell out, “Let’s roll!” caps one winter to be handed out and the bus will instantly pack up with the food. The response was and leave, taking food, clothing, tremendous from those in need, and hope with it and perhaps will and it inspired more giving. not return the next week. “We started cleaning out stuff (from our homes) we could donate,” said Whitney. She joined the bus volunteers in 2006, following her divorce. She soon started overseeing clothing distribution at each of the bus’ stops. “Our office (the insurance agency) has gotten known for the work with the bus, so we get donations dropped off here,” Whitney said. Every Wednesday, no matter the weather, the bus is packed with food, clothing and toys and then One winter, it had been snowing rumbles its way into the poorest heavily, causing deep snowbanks. parts of Cleveland. Jeanette got stuck in a snowbank They have taken the bus out on getting off the bus and could not get beautiful summer evenings, as well out on her own. She was calling for as in blizzards, knowing there are help and Whitney started to make those who count on them. her way to her mother to help. The hungry gather in the early Unfortunately for Jeanette, Whitney evening, waiting in small ragtag noticed there were approximately groups, having faith that this one 30 people approaching the bus for thing in their lives will not fail them. food, so Whitney told her mother The bus will come. that she was going to have to wait When the bus arrives at each so the people could be fed. There stop, the small waiting group is no question this is a dedicated grows as people from all over the group. neighborhood seem to come from It does not matter to any of nowhere and everywhere and join the volunteers on the bus what the group. They sort through the the profession is of someone who bins of clothes while they wait for approaches the bus. All they see their turn for food. is the need and the hunger in each At some stops, children laugh, person’s eyes, and they know they play and joke. Adults watch over can help. them, knowing it takes them all to That is enough for them. raise the children. They also are “You never know what people wary should someone in the waiting will become,” said Del, referring group start trouble and keep them to those in history whose roots

“We’re not there to interfere with anybody, we’re just there to help them,” said Whitney.

had poor beginnings but rose to greatness. One particularly rough night, a drug dealer positioned himself as a self-appointed guard for the bus so the hungry of the neighborhood could be fed. “We’re not there to interfere with anybody, we’re just there to help them,” said Whitney. Jeanette and Del readily admit they go into dangerous areas. If there are fights or gunshots or if someone is belligerent, then they pack up and leave. One of their stops is a Dollar Store parking lot on Madison. The store was robbed twice in one week. “Nobody knows what it’s like till you are on it (the bus),” Whitney says. She is getting married in July and is including her fiancé in the family’s efforts. “I dragged him on the bus, too,” she says, with a laugh. At one stop, an old man sits on a bicycle, his arms hanging over the handlebars. His face is haggard and there is sorrow in his eyes. He says that it is not too bad until dinner time, when the children are hungry. He says that the adults can take it, but it is wrong for the children to be hungry. He nods in satisfaction, watching the children being handed covered Styrofoam divided containers of their eagerly awaited meal. Then he quietly rides off, gripping the bag with his own dinner in one hand, steering his bike with the other, his veteran’s cap perched on his head. When someone feels the need for prayer, a volunteer or, most often, Jeanette will clasp hands with them and pray. In these moments, nothing else matters but there are people hungry for food, for clothing, for knowing that someone in the world cares. The volunteers know each person is someone who needs to know they are loved. “Ninety-nine percent of the time it is wonderful,” Jeanette


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

says. “There are weeks I am not motivated, I don’t want to go.” Then she thinks of those who will be standing by the curb, waiting for the bus, and she finds the will to go again. When they have it, candy and toys also are distributed. “You have to be careful when handing out toys because we can’t have conflict that leads to fights and screaming,” said Whitney. Whitney recalls the time there was only one blanket left on the bus to give away. Her face saddens as she recalls how an old man and a 9-year-old girl both wanted it. The gathered crowd shouted out to let the little girl have it, but the old man would not agree. Whitney finally gave the blanket to the girl because she was cold. The old man became angry. Whitney said she could tell that he did not want the blanket for warmth, but because it would have been tangible proof to him that someone cared. There was a little boy who came to the bus one evening who had holes in his shoes. Whitney offered to find a pair of shoes for him but discovered that they did not have any in his size. She promised him that she would return the next week with shoes for him. She had no idea where the shoes would come from, she said she just knew that she would have shoes for him. A few days later, a pair of Michael Jordan shoes in the boy’s size were donated. When the next week came, the boy was not there. Weeks passed, and the boy was nowhere to be seen. Then, finally, on the fourth week, he came to the bus. Whitney had saved the shoes for him, having faith that he would return. It was important for the boy to see that she kept her word to him,

c o n t i n u e d , P ag e 8

Tom Wood, left, who has volunteered for the bus route for 20 years, hands out trays of food while some people wait in line and others sort through totes of clothes.

Whitney and Del Painting getting ready for a bus run. (Photo provided.)

Del Painting and bus driver Bill Fader load the bus with thermal containers of hot food.

7


8

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

Known only as Joel to the bus crew, he is always eager to help at the first stop of their route.

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 7

that he realized he had not asked her why. The next week he did ask. Her answer was, “Because you are here.” Kids in Medina County are happy because they get a new bike or something like that, Del said, adding, that the kids they see while on the bus are happy if they get a meal.

Whitney said, adding that people need consistency so they know they can trust. The first bus they had did not have any heat, which made the winters a bit of a challenge. They spent time between stops writing prayers on the inside of the bus. The blue-and-white bus they currently use is the third bus they have had, and it has heat, making it much easier to serve meals and withstand the cold. Del remembers the time a little girl walked up to him and asked for “glock.” Del was confused and asked many times for the girl to repeat the word. It kept sounding like “glock.” With the help of someone else, they figured out the little girl wanted clothes. For approximately four years she greeted the bus. The volunteers were told her mother Whitney talks sadly of the day had lung cancer. three boys approached her. One of One day, she suddenly told Del, the boys had a grandmother who “I’m so happy.” It was not until later had died, and he needed a white

“Every week there’s a story,” said Del

shirt to attend her funeral. They had one on the bus in his size. Then one of the other boys speaks up and says his grandmother had died, too, and finally admits it was five years ago. The third boy then quietly said he saw his friend die the week before. “Every week there’s a story,” said Del. Each Communion Sunday a wooden blue bus is passed around the Strongsville United Methodist Church congregation, so donations can be made specifically for the bus’s mission. Del said it takes approximately 100 volunteers to successfully run the program. Some cook or warm the food, some pick up the food, some help on the bus. The program has been so successful that two more bus routes were added. Twice a month, the bus goes out on Saturday morning and on Sunday after church services. Other churches also contribute to the needs of the bus. Those


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

include St. Joseph Catholic Church in Strongsville, the Vineyard Church in Parma, and the Cuyahoga Valley Church in Broadview Heights. “Once you start something like this, everyone wants to help,” Del says with a smile. Food for the bus comes from a cooperative that has restaurants as members. Each night, at closing time, the restaurants weigh, pack and freeze leftover food. The available food is then listed on a spreadsheet so organizations feeding the hungry can choose what is needed. Del said that sometimes there will be something like 50 pounds of mashed potatoes from one restaurant and not much else. Some of the restaurants donating food include Panera Bread, Red Lobster, Pizza Hut, and Longhorn Steakhouse. Donations of goods for the bus come from countless people and

even auctioneers who donate auction leftovers. What are most needed and rarely donated are new sheets, pillowcases, underwear, and socks. There is no need for bras, however. A generous donor recently dropped off several large boxes of bras at the insurance aency. Jeanette’s Wednesday work for the bus starts about 11 a.m. when she goes to the church to see what is going to be served that night. If there is something like hot dogs going to be served, she will go to a discount store and get the buns to go with them. “They’ll (those being fed) always have a main entrée, veggie and dessert,” Whitney said. While Jeanette works at “filling in the holes” for the meals that night, volunteers work on heating the food that will be packed in thermal boxes and loaded on the bus at 5 p.m.

“The people will have a warm meal, always,” said Del. Once the bus is loaded, volunteers climb on board and the bus rumbles out of the Strongsville United Methodist Church’s parking lot on its way to those patiently waiting. The bus returns to the church between 8:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. For those who mention that there are people in Medina County who need help, too, Del and Jeanette said they would be happy to help teach others how to run their own bus program. They inherited their route and program, and they can not let down those who wait by the side of the road. Donations of goods for the bus can be dropped off at the Firemark Insurance Agency, 3849 Center Road, Brunswick.

The crew from the bus, from left to right: Joyce Ayres, Linda Allwood, Del Painting, Tom Wood, Jeanette Painting, Thomas Agee, Rose Russo, Bill Fader, Don Hossman.

9


Animals of all kinds were at the Pet-Tacular. From left to right, Mia Weber, Ciana Artino and Chloe Weber enjoyed Nigerian dwarf baby goats and a Mille Fleur Bantam chicken.

You know that moment when you snap a picture and it is later when you realize everything that was going on when the shutter snapped?

Salvatore Devivo of Sit Means Sit dog training poses with Stella, a yellow Labrador Retriever.

It was all smiles at the Pet-Tacular for Verne and Mary Friberg and their Old English Sheepdogs, Calli and Lizzie.

Oh,! Snap

Photos by F l a s h B a n g P h o t ography

Officers attending the 9/11 dedication at Fire Station No. 1

Community members crowded Fire Station No. 1 in Medina for the 9/11 Memorial dedication and groundbreaking.

The Avenue Brass performance at the Wadsworth Public Library was sponsored by ORMACO as part of its cultural outreach program. Members of the quintet are, left to right, Andrew Brott, trumpet; Sarah Palmer, French horn; David Burnett, tuba; Andrew Wegierski, trombone; and Cody Ray, trumpet.

Greg Robinson, an honor guard with American Legion Post 292, listens to the presentation at the dedication of the 9/11 Memorial at Fire Station No. 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina.


Boy Scout Troop 501 takes a break from helping out at the Newbridge Place spaghetti fundraiser. Sitting at the table, left to right, are Steven Wiley, Aiden Veney, Scoutmaster Dave Marvinney, John Fuhry, and Michael Mihalec (in the gray fleece). In the back, left to right, are Aiden Dexheimer, David Kornblum and Christopher Jones.

From left, Bill Nagy, Bart Lanchman, and fundraiser organizer Dick Heilman enjoy sharing stories while selling raffle tickets at the Newbridge Place fundraiser. Alaina Bohmer cannot wait to enjoy a red-white-andblue cupcake served at the Newbridge Place fundraiser.

The American Legion and Boy Scout Troop 501 lent their support at the Newbridge Place spaghetti fundraiser. Funds raised totaled $2,000. To learn more about Newbridge Place, go to Page 4 of the April issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine at https://bit.ly/2rDimeP

Time to check cell phones! Waiting to serve during a lull in the chow line at the Newbridge Place spaghetti fundraiser are, from left to right, Irene Zieja, Tracy Davies, Deborah Brown, Brenda Abasolo, Christi Meyer, and Bob Meyer.

As part of the celebration of Medina’s bicentennial, Miss Molly’s hosted Mystery Women of Medina’s History performances by, from left to right, Cyndi McClintock as a 1901 telephone operator, Vickie Jackson as Helen Blake, Donna Bica as Cora Munson Blakeslee, Marcia Aguiar as Letha House, and Carolyn Robinson as Rachel Whipp.

Don Baker, a 90-year-old Army vet, is being served by Tracy Davies while server Irene Zieja and Don’s son, Kevin Baker, watch during the Newbridge Place fundraiser. Ed Wright shares a laugh with Char Klimko, the owner of Dance D’Elegance Dance Studio. Wright and his wife, Dinah Wright, sponsored the Mystery Women event and donated the proceeds to the Medina Bicentennial Committee.

Kim Oliver portrays a flapper for her Mystery Women performance.


Want to be a part of bringing Joy to Medina County?

Call 330-461-0589 to make your reservation now, before space is gone.


14

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

CHAPTER 9

TH E READ I NG N O O K

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCounty.com for links to past issues.

Marissa led the way through the metal ducts as we escaped from her hidden room before the bowling alley employees could catch us. The ducts smelled musty and stale, and I had to resist the urge to cough as we crawled through them. Meanwhile, shouts bounced off the cavernous metal, vibrating the walls behind us. “Marissa, what’s happening?” I asked, trying my best to keep up with her as she took a sudden left turn. “They found me up here once before. Well…they caught me coming out of the vents back into the bathroom.” She didn’t stop crawling as she tossed words over her shoulder at me. “That time they questioned me and banned me from the alley. I didn’t tell them about the room of course, and they forgot I wasn’t allowed in after a while, so that was that.” “Now they want you in jail?” “I just said that to get you to hurry. Now c’mon, we’re here.” “And where is here?” In a moment, Marissa’s body went headfirst straight down into the darkness. I shouted, grabbing at her ankles as she fell, but I couldn’t get a solid grip, and she was gone. A weird, mushy crunch echoed back up the ventilation shafts, and Marissa’s attractive laugh followed. I looked down where she had fallen and found her staring up at me from the inside of what must have been the bowling alley’s dumpster. It was disgusting, but then again, I had no other choice. I didn’t have enough room to turn around in the shaft, so, with a deep breath, I dove headfirst into the pile of garbage. It smelled horrible. I didn’t have much time to gather my composure before she grabbed my arm and urged

me to keep running. “Cam, let’s go! We aren’t out of the fire just yet,” she said. She looked me in the eye and a smile grew across her face, then she hopped out of the dumpster and ran. “Marissa! Ugh….” What was I doing with this girl? I was starting to think that she was crazy. But she was right, we weren’t out of the fire yet, and I didn’t want to get caught in the dumpster of all places, so I pulled myself out and ran after her. As we ran, my thoughts began pushing back to the front of my mind. My dad was dead. My mom was gone. My fingers were scarred. My best friend had no idea where I was. These were the thoughts distracting me when Marissa slowed to a halt and pulled me down to sit on a bench. I realized we were in a park, a brisk fall wind stinging my cheeks. Leaves rustled above us, and a nearby squirrel darted up a tree. There were no other humans around. It was just us. “How are you doing?” Marissa asked. “Could be better,” I replied. “Do you want to go home now? I’m sure your mom is worried.” I winced. Marissa didn’t know about my mom. She didn’t know about anything other than my dad. Now I’d have to sit here and explain it all to her. Oh, no. This was going to be bad. “No. I don’t…I don’t have a mom,” I said, beginning to think about what she was most likely doing in those moments. She should’ve been here with me, not in Europe with my little sister doing whatever the hell she was doing. “Did she pass away, too?” Marissa asked. “No. She’s in France,” I answered through clenched teeth. “What? Why?” “Because she hates me! And she hated my dad. And she decided that ruining our lives would be the best


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

thing for everyone!” I yelled at Marissa, losing control all over again. But could you really blame me? With all that I’d been going through, I think I was allowed a few breakdowns. “Okay, okay. Shh,” she whispered, putting her arm around me and rubbing my shoulder. We sat there quietly for a few minutes, and then she said, “Now, calm down, and talk to me. What happened with your mom?” I gritted my teeth tighter and looked at her. She wasn’t going to get anything out of me. I knew Marissa’s type well enough to know what she’d say. She’d say something along the lines of my mom probably knew what she was doing, and she did it because it was what made her happy, and I’m allowed to be upset about it, but I shouldn’t hold it against her. Just like the child counselor my dad took me to after my mom left. After he found out what she was saying to me and the ideas she was putting in my head, he pulled me from the meetings and bad mouthed the place all around town, but I still learned a lot from that counselor. I learned not to trust people like her or Marissa when it concerned my mom. “Come on, tell me what happened? It’s obviously something awful, and I want to help you.” She waited for me to answer, but when it became clear to her that I had no intention of doing so, she continued. “Look, I’m sharing my vent room with you, and you’ve already read a bunch of my writing that wasn’t meant for anyone’s eyes. The least you can do is tell me what happened. I won’t even comment on it, okay? I just want to know.” I looked at her and sighed, rolling my eyes. It felt like I was back with the old counselor, but I knew I wasn’t. Marissa was different, maybe not different enough to see things differently than the counselor,

but different enough to have earned an explanation. “Well, my dad worked at the shoe factory, right? Well, while he did that, my mom mostly stayed at home and took care of me and the house and stuff. One day though, she took me out to a French place and ordered me some fancy food while she went into the back room. The food was good, and she had given me a coloring book, so I was perfectly happy on my own, munching on some food and coloring while she did adult stuff. I found out later that the adult stuff was actually an affair, and she’d been seeing this French scumbag for a while. Eventually, my parents had another kid, my little sister, and afterwards my mom came out to my dad and confessed everything. So then, her next logical step was to take my baby sister, meet up with the French guy, and fly to France to start a new life. And that was that. I haven’t seen her or spoken to her since, and I can’t say I ever want to.”

“I haven’t seen her or spoken to her since, and I can’t say I ever want to.” There was a stale silence in the air as a pigeon hopped up towards us and cocked its head. After a moment it flew away, and I looked back to Marissa. “Do you want me to comment on that, or not?” she asked, sticking to her word. “I don’t care,” I said, the anger boiling inside me again. It was funny, after my dad passed, I was starting to think about my mom more and more. Shouldn’t it have been the other way around? I hated it even more because she didn’t deserve to be in my thoughts.

“Well, I think your mom made a huge mistake. Maybe she was bored at home while your dad was working, but she could’ve gotten her own job or something, right? But instead she decides to leave you and your father for some European guy who she didn’t even have anything with?” She leaned in close, placing her hand on top of mine, and speaking softer. “Anyone who leaves you like that is an idiot. You’re amazing, Cam, and I’m sorry she didn’t see that.” I looked at her big brown eyes, almost losing myself in them. She wasn’t the same as the counselor at all, in fact, Marissa was quite the opposite: sensible. She saw that my mom was the one who’d messed up, and that she should’ve stayed with me. She had said what I’d needed to hear for a long time. Yeah, my dad had said the same stuff, a bit harsher with his word choice, but I needed someone else to say it. When I told Devin about it, he just said, “That sucks,” and we played video games for 12 hours straight. Marissa was more invested. She cared. “That’s why I don’t have anyone,” I said softly, tears welling up in my eyes as I stared into hers. “You have Devin,” she tried, knowing how close we’d always been. But Devin was my best friend, he wasn’t the person I went to when I needed a shoulder to cry on. Actually, I hadn’t had someone like that since my mom left. My dad and I didn’t really open up to each other that much. We were close, and I loved him more than anything, but we didn’t share feelings that much. That was a mom thing. “Sure, but it’s different with Devin. He’s like a brother to me, but at the end of the day, he’s just my friend.” I finally broke eye contact, looked down at our hands, now

cont inued, Pag e 16

15


16

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 1 5 wrapped around each other, and used my free hand to wipe at my eyes. “Okay, fine,” she said, leaning in so close that our noses almost touched, “then you have me.” “Yeah?” I asked, giving in to her eyes and letting them suck me in. “Yeah,” she said, smiling softly and touching her lips to mine. My first kiss with Marissa Colt was preceded by intense pain, but it made me forget all about that. As soon as our lips met, it was like she was drawing all that pain and suffering out of me, leaving behind refreshing relief that I’d only found one other way before that moment. And it turned out, I liked kissing her much more than I liked cutting.

CHAPTER 10 Marissa and I sat on that park bench for a long time. We talked about family and friends and how neither of us had never had anyone to open up to. Maybe that was why we both ended up resorting to blades. Either way, the kiss we shared unlocked a lot of feelings inside both of us, and we sat there just talking until it got dark. “Oops, I should get home,” Marissa said, looking at the sky and realizing the stars were coming out. There was a pang in my gut when she said the word “home,” but I knew it wasn’t her fault. It wasn’t fair for me to expect her not to say everyday words just because they hurt me. “Yeah, I guess I should get back to Devin’s place. He’s probably

thinking I jumped off a bridge or something,” I said half-jokingly. “You better not!” “I’m kidding, calm down,” I said, laughing a bit. “Well, now that you put that thought in my mind, I’m going to walk you there just to make sure you don’t do anything stupid,” she replied with a smile. “Isn’t it supposed to be the other way around? I’m supposed to walk you home.” “Shut up. Now come on, I have to get you to Devin’s, so I can get back to my place,” she said, taking my hand and pulling me up from the bench. “I just wish I could go home to my dad,” I said honestly. “Hey, don’t think about how he’s gone. Think about all the good things, all the things you’ll remember him by,” Marissa said, patting my arm tenderly.

“I have an idea,” she said, beaming. “I know. It’s just hard. I don’t want to think about it at all right now. I just need some time away from everything,” I said. I thought of how Devin’s house wasn’t that far from everything that reminded me of my dad or lack thereof. We stopped in front of Devin’s place, and Marissa turned to look at me. For a moment, she just stared at me and then her eyes brightened as she thought of something. “I have an idea,” she said, beaming. “Am I going to like this idea?” I

Be sure to click on “follow” at the bottom of this issue so you don’t miss the next installment of “Little Truths” in the upcoming issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine.

asked her hesitantly. “Maybe, I’m not sure. But I think it’s a good idea,” she said, her smile wavering a bit. Whatever this idea of hers was, I had a feeling it was in no way a good one. “Well, spit it out.” I waved my hand as if trying to coax it out of her. “Never mind, you won’t like it.” “But now you’ve made me curious! Just tell me what your idea was,” I said, now feeling bad that I had been so harsh. “I won’t even say if it’s a bad idea.” I reached out and grabbed her hand, holding it in mine and looking into her eyes. I’d never liked anyone as much as I liked Marissa Colt, and I’d only known her, the real her, for a day. I wanted to spend more time with her, all of my time. I wanted to be hers and I wanted her to be mine, and I really wanted to know what her funny little mind had thought up when I mentioned I needed to get away from things. “Maybe later,” she said, pulling her phone out. “Give me your number. I’ll call you.” I frowned, disappointed, feeling as though I’d ruined something, or at the very least upset her, which was the last thing I wanted to do. I put my number in her phone, then typed my name in and handed it back. She looked at it for a second before making a quick change and pocketing her phone. “What was that?” I questioned, pointing towards her pocket. “Oh, nothing,” she grinned slightly and grabbed both my hands before pulling me close and kissing me for the second time. After a long moment that felt way too short, she pulled away. “Goodnight, Cam. I’ll call you later.” I couldn’t help but smile idiotically as she walked away. It was almost as if I had needed an angel to save me from myself, and the powers at large had quickly


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

presented me with exactly what I asked for. Maybe God’s real, I thought to myself, standing there in the cool night breeze, watching Marissa walk away. Then it occurred to me that if this were true, that God had really screwed me over up to that point in my life. I immediately pushed any thought of religion and afterlife out of my mind knowing it would only bring up thoughts of my dad. I hurried into Devin’s house, only to find his own dad walking past, into the dining room with a large platter of shrimp. “Hi Cam, who’s the cutie?” He winked at me as he set the platter down, and Devin looked up at me. “What cutie?” Devin asked as he frowned at me. “Uh, I don’t know. What are you talking about, Mr. Holguín?” I stammered. I hadn’t realized Devin’s dad had been watching us, and I really didn’t know how to explain to Devin everything that had happened. He would’ve taken it well, of course, I just didn’t really want to admit the more shameful events that had taken place. “C’mon, I saw you out there. You guys weren’t shy about it,” Mr. Holguín said, chuckling as he sat down to eat. Devin’s frown deepened. “Cam, dude, who is it?” I sat down across from him and stared at my empty plate. It wasn’t like I could keep Marissa a secret forever. Besides, Devin would’ve undoubtedly been the first person whom I admitted everything to. It was unfortunate that it had to be so soon, but nothing could be done after his dad had mentioned it. I cleared my throat, accepting defeat, and looking anywhere but back at Devin, whose eyes bore into me like a judge staring at a guilty defendant. “Marissa Colt.”

“What?! Marissa Colt? Where’d this come from?” Devin exclaimed, obviously hurt by my lack of communication with him, my best friend. I didn’t really know what to say without explaining everything, so I swallowed hard and took a deep breath. “Look, Devin, you deserve an explanation, but can this wait till after dinner? I’m starving.”

He looked at me harshly, then looked down at the fancy meal in front of him. “Sure, fine. It’s not like you just pulled Marissa Colt out of thin air. How do you even know her?” “Calm down, Devin. I’m sure he’s got a good explanation, don’t you Cam?” Mr. Holguín said, paying more attention to his phone than us. “I do, but I’d prefer to eat first,” I said to Devin, shoving a forkful into my mouth. Devin grumbled something and then started eating. Thankful, I focused on my own food and ate a good meal for the first time since the accident. “Well, I’ve got some work to do, so I’ll be in my study if you need me,” Mr. Holguín said, rising from the table, “But don’t need me, okay?” “Got it. Night, dad,” Devin responded dryly. I’d always

known that he wasn’t close with his parents, but in that moment, I suddenly understood how detached they were. Devin didn’t have parents much more than I did. He looked at me once his dad was gone. “Cam, talk to me.” I averted my gaze, knowing I couldn’t hold his. “Remember on Saturday, at the bowling alley?” “Yeah, we go bowling every Saturday,” he responded, his suspicions rising quickly. “Well I saw Marissa there. But before I tell you where I saw her, you have to promise not to tell anyone,” I said, trying to take deep breaths and not get wrapped up in the events of the past week or so. So much had happened so fast that I had trouble understanding it all myself, much less explaining it all to someone else. “Dude, you know me better than that. Tell me not to tell a soul, I won’t tell a soul. Not even Garret or Heath.” He never looked away, and eventually I looked up at him, only to find him looking sincere. It calmed me somewhat, and I remembered that this was Devin I was talking to. “Sorry, I’m just kind of out of it still,” I told him honestly before continuing. “Well, I went to the bathroom, and found her hanging out of the vent. I know, weird. But she ran out before I could ask her anything, and I just tried to forget about it. But I couldn’t. So I went back on Tuesday and crawled in myself, and I found this secret room she’d made where she had all kinds of stuff. It’s like a home away from home for her, and I really liked it. So I went back today, and I ran into her.” “Whoa, you just walked right into her private room, found her

cont inued, Pag e 18

17


18

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 1 7 there, and you ended up kissing her? You can’t be serious. That doesn’t even sound plausible,” he said. He pushed his plate away and leaned back, crossing his arms. Thinking about it myself, I realized just how crazy it sounded. But it was the truth, and I wasn’t going to flat out lie to Devin anymore. I needed people in my life whom I could count on and trust, and Marissa and Devin were going to have to be those people whether they liked it or not. “It’s what happened. You don’t have to believe it, but I swear it’s true. We talked for a long time, about a lot of personal stuff, and I

think we’re just really similar. More similar than we realized. And I don’t know, we just kissed and it was nice.” I shoved what was left of my food around with my fork the whole time I was talking, but Devin kept all his attention on me. “And?” he asked after I finished. “And what? That’s it. I can’t really explain what I felt when I was talking to her,” I said, assuming he was fishing for something in particular. “Cam, there’s got to be a reason you went back to her vent room. A normal person doesn’t find a secret room in a bowling alley, not tell a soul about it, and then return to it like you did. What’s in the room? Is

it something personal?” My heart sunk. I’d returned because of the blades. But could I tell him that? Could I tell anyone that? Devin’s face was filled with worry now. “Cam. What is in that room?”

Our st ory cont inu es next mont h! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http://cbthesurvivor.

Why buy from The Place? • Experts for advice and service

Fireplace in Strongsville, Ohio

FirEPlacEs

Showroom in Medina

PaTio FurnisHinGs

• Best brands competitively priced • We make it easy!

Swim Spa in Richfield, Ohio

HoT TuBs & sWim sPas

Grills & smokErs


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

Joyful Word Search Food on the Bus H

I

N C

I

Z P

A

N E R A R E N A P

N F R

I

E D S H

C L O T K T S

E

K

Y L

I

M A

F

AirXperts

B R E

A

Z

S

I

P B U Y R

L

A H Y E

S

F

A E M E

A

H

C

I

L

T 0 L

Z

Z

L O R N

G H T O R K N H S

E B U A

Z

Z

I

P C

T M S

I

L O S U B N

L O N G

H O R N S

T

U

P D O N

S

A

F

T

I

O N O

A B U H

I

H N O

I

T

A N O D E

N A O N

M A L O F

I

R E M E

F

E E Z

P

I

H S D N E

I

F

S T U

F

P

I

M A P

I

Z A N

K R A M

E R

I

R A D N

E

R S H

HINCKLEY FRIENDSHIP FAMILY LONGHORN BUS

I

F

I

F

B O A

R

F

L

R

S U

L O N G H O T I

P B R E

STUFFED ANIMALS DONATION TOYS BREAD RED LOBSTER FOOD

E O F B O M Y R L E W E J Y

E

A Y U B N E S O S Y E W I

E L

Indoor Environmental Assessments & Testing Specializing in Mold Remediation, Meth Cleanup, Duct Cleaning - Tailored Seminars Available -

Paul McHam CEI,CMI,CIE,WRT,AMRT,CTS,CIEC Office: 330-331-7500 Cell: 330-280-3777 MyAirXperts.com

GREAT BRANDS GET NOTICED. GEEKHOUSESTUDIOS.com

UNDER

R C R O N Z O A D V D H O R H I

Council-Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant

Integrity • Knowledge • Quality

40 40

K N U R T A C R U N C S O A R

W A E R K C O D K Y T

S

PIZZA PANERA (2) CLOTHES SHOES FIREMARK

Answer Key For Last Month’s Search: Flea Market Finds

A J

D

S

S S N J E W E L R E S D P W S S E D L B H T O R K Y O T E

A

A L S N O T T U B O S L S J

L

LLC

Top DenTisT naTional awarD winner for america’s besT young DenTisTs

Come discover for yourself why Dr. Landry is recognized as one of America’s best dentists! New patients of all ages, and emergencies are welcome. 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays

L T S H A S S F J T K L A O G G T D P E B H R C O D S L M U T O R H T M A A R K O N G N I

P

B O O K S R C R C G F R A N

G J C R N D O N U O K C O R C E O E A S H N D U K N A R F

A

S Y R O S K C O R C E L B A

T

Joseph G. Landry II, D.D.S., F.A.G.D. Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry

330-769-4470

5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273 www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

19


20

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

TA L E S O F A MO LD WAR RI O R

Determining Mold Types by Paul McHam I often am asked, “What about black mold?” You see, there are hundreds of thousands of mold species, depending on which scientist you ask. Of those many species, only 13 belong to the genus Stachybotrys, which is the black mold most people are referring to. While there are thousands of molds that are black, olive or dark brown, they also can come in many of the same colors you might find in a box of crayons. This might include yellow, gold, green, orange, and more. If you see discoloration, the color may have some significance, but no human can tell what type of mold it is just by looking at it. All molds are identified by various characteristics including their spore shape and size and even by growing the plant (culturing it) to see the minor differences that can help identify it. Most mold sampling will identify the mold to the genus, but in a few cases, it may be important to identify it down to the species. For instance, if someone has been sick and it may be due to the mold. If someone in the family may have been affected by mold, contact a reputable mold remediation company. To know if they are reputable, ask to see their credentials, their level of education, even references (though few will give you their worst clients to talk to). Keep in mind that roughly 90 percent of molds are allergens, while the remaining 10 percent are potentially toxigenic. An allergic reaction might include asthma and even emphysema. The potentially toxigenic affect can get considerably worse. I recommend reading the results of a 10-year study done by WHO, the World Health Organization. It can be found at https://bit.ly/2nGrpH4. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http:// myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-331-7500.

INVESTING INTELLIGENC E: SEC RETS OF A MORTGAGE BA NK ER

Student Loan Lessons by Rich Bailey Student loans are very prevalent these days. As lenders, we see them in credit reports on a daily basis. Student loan debt can affect a homebuyer’s debt ratio and limit or even eliminate the opportunity to purchase a home. If the loans are in deferment and no payments are due, lenders still have to use as much as 1 percent of the total loan balance as a payment against the debt ratio for each student loan. Payment history also causes issues. A lot of folks think that if the process of differing student loans is initiated, payments do not have to be made while that process is ongoing, but that is not true. Lenders often see multiple late payments showing up on credit reports for student loans because of that, which, of course, will destroy a credit score. One other thing that many people do not realize is that while student loans are deferred, interest is being charged beginning the day they are opened. The balance is increasing every day, so deferring them does not do anything but increase debt. While choosing the lowest payment possible is quite tempting and comfortable, the best thing to do is adjust your budget and pay as much as possible to eliminate them as quickly as possible. Maybe even waiting a year or two to buy a home and fancy car so the focus is on eliminating debt. It will save thousands of dollars in interest and eliminate the loans a lot sooner. Otherwise, they will haunt you forever. They cannot even be discharged in bankruptcy. Finally, never borrow student loan money to live on. You will regret that for many years after you graduate. Happy House Hunting! Rich Bailey is a licensed mortgage loan originator with First Security Mortgage Corporation and has 15 years of conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA mortgage financing experience for purchase and refinance transactions. Contact Bailey at rich. bailey@fsmc.net or by calling 330-571-2692. First Security Mortgage Corporation 15887 Snow Road, Suite 200 Brook Park, OH 44142 www.FirstSecurityMortgage. net NMLS 258602, 289425 MB.802718, LO.015405


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

T HE N E T W O R K E R

Admitting Failure by Bob Arnold I fail! There, I said it! Admitting a failure is a traumatic experience we would rather not have, especially if there are consequences. I cannot pretend to be immune to failure, after all, it is obvious that I am a human being, and one of the characteristics is failure. But before any calamity (failure), there are usually warning signs. Many times you will see a crack form somewhere. As a forensic architect, I investigate what causes cracks, sags and bulges in buildings. There are many instances when I can see the reasons for cracks right away and other times where much more analysis is necessary to determine its cause. When I see a crack, I know that the crack is not the issue, it is a symptom of the problem. The problem is what I must find. This also is true in a networking fail. Most networkers will kick themselves when they mess up a sentence they just muttered or when they cannot come up with any questions. They decide that they are bad networkers. When I mentor someone experiencing networking malfunctions, usually the main issue can be traced back to a faulty or misguided mindset. Our mindset about networking reveals itself in our actions with new people we meet. Do not ignore the cracks or symptoms, though. It is healthy to admit you make mistakes. Perfection is not expected, just do not get hung up on the mistakes. Listen to those you meet, find out where your interests align, and follow that path for awhile. You just might find new friends and future customers. Future customers come from new friends you make and connect with. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and an international best-selling author. More networking tips and information are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at OnwardNetworking.com or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com.

Ripples

Live with integrity and honesty and be willing to give a sincere apology when it is due.

by C.L. Gammon

In honor of Medina and Medina County’s bicentennials, Joy Magazine will be publishing a recipe each month based on recipes from the same approximate period as when the two were founded. Enjoy!

• • • • • • • •

1 cup self-rising flour 1 cup self-rising cornmeal 2 eggs 1 tablespoon sugar ¾ cup buttermilk 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon water ¼ cup vegetable oil Butter for frying

Mix all ingredients, except butter. Melt butter in medium or large skillet over medium heat. Drop the batter, by full tablespoons, into skillet. Use about 2 tablespoons of batter for each hoecake. Fry until brown and crisp, turn with a spatula and brown the other side. With a slotted spoon, remove each hoecake and place on a paper-towel lined plate to drain. Hoecakes also are called Jonnycakes, Shawnee cakes, journey cakes, and johnny bread, depending on locale.

Recipes are reproduced with permission from “A Revolutionary War Cookbook (and More)” by C.L. Gammon, an award-winning and internationally known bestselling author. To see Gammon’s books, go to https://amzn.to/2ITqTBx

21


22

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

GEMS

A Legacy of Giving by Kent Von Der Vellen

FOR ? G N I K O LO ING TO DO SOMETH It's time to take a look at Joy Magazine's calendar of events and LET'S DO IT! The fun starts on Page 24!

Kathy Warner had a reached a point in her career that she needed to make a change. Although Warner had enjoyed working at her and her husband’s company, Insyte Consulting Group, it was time for something new. With a mentor’s guidance, Warner decided she wanted to help women look professional. After researching the idea, Warner created First Impressions to ensure women in need would have professional outfits for job interviews. First Impressions is referred clients by Medina County organizations and social service agencies. Many of the referring organizations provide complimentary services such as job training and resume writing programs. Warner said referrals include all ages and backgrounds, although the majority are single moms between ages 35 and 54. First Impressions has two volunteer image consultants who talk with each referral about the position she is applying for and help her pick the appropriate business attire. Each referral leaves with two outfits including a portfolio, small purse and the opportunity to have her hair done at either Legacy Hair Studios or VCS Salon and Spa. Warner pointed out that appearance is tied to selfimage. The boost in confidence can increase the chances of obtaining a job. First Impressions gained 501C(3) status in December 2015 and helped its first client March 2016. The organization receives funding from grants, donors, occasional fundraisers, and a monthly Benefit Boutique clothing sale. It also accepts clothing donations. First Impressions has approximately 20 volunteers and an eight-person board. In 2014, they helped 14 referrals, 26 in 2017, and 28 in the first three months of 2018. Warner would like to see First Impressions spread into other communities and to find a way to help men as well. For more information, go to www. firstimpressionmedina.org. Joy Magazine lists Benefit Boutique clothing sale dates in “Let’s Do It” and a needed items list at “Giving Hearts.” Both can be found at https://www. joyofmedinacountymagazine.com/ . Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year Medina resident. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and, with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. Contact Von Der Vellen by e-mailing von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what other area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

Hello Friends & Neighbors

OO

Lazy Day Pot Pie

Filling:

PR

by Amy Barnes

1 can cream of celery (or broccoli) soup

1 can cream of potato soup

1 teaspoon celery flakes (optional)

1 teaspoon basil

2 cups (or more) cooked, cubed chicken or turkey

2 16-ounce bags frozen mixed vegetables, heated

½ cup milk

Crust: •

1 ½ cups milk

2 cups all-purpose baking mix (such as Jiffy or Bisquick)

Over 100 homes sold in 2017!

F

BI T E ME !

Mix all filling ingredients in 9x11 cake pan until soups are smooth. Mix crust ingredients and spread over top of filling. Place pan on foil-lined cookie sheet in case of overflow during baking. Bake in 400-degree oven approximately 35 minutes or until filling is hot and crust is browned.

Call now for a free market evaluation

330.241.5370 office 440.503.5820 cell Larry Steinbacher Broker / Owner

3745 Medina Rd, Suite A Medina, OH

WWW.GREATERCLEVELANDHOMESEARCH.COM

23


24

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018

Let's do it!

June 2018

Non-Profit Calendar

Friday, June 1

Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Say Something Nice Day https://bit.ly/2EJmbTj and National Doughnut Day https://bit.ly/2GWcYcd

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: Firework Fun; Community Room, Lodi, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Make a fun firework craft. https://bit.ly/2Ga7Q3d

7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 8 a.m. Liverpool Township St. Paul Lutheran Church Golf Outing; Bunker Hill Golf Course, 3060 Pearl Road, Medina Township. Supports seminary students. If pay by May 25, $100. Register at spvc.org. For more information, contact Chad Gibson, 216-4699241, chad@bunkerhillgc.com 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Master Gardener Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw 8:30 p.m. Medina Community Band, outdoor Summer Concert Series, Medina Public Square. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Free, donations accepted. http://www. medinacommunityband.org/

Saturday, June 2

National Rocky Road Day https://bit.ly/2GZDIN2 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Princess Ledges Nature Preserve, 4361 Spruce Avenue. Physician talk and one-to-three mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. 330-7229364 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Kids Day of Fun and Safety; Medina Public Square. Includes games, music, dancing, prizes, safety training, arts and crafts, costumes reflecting children’s lives when Medina was founded. https://www.facebook.com/ events/1791331131175340/ Noon to 4 p.m. Computer Support, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Help removing viruses and malware from laptops. Library tech department will assist. Ages 55 and up. First come, first serve. NO PHONE CALLS. 1 p.m. Concert on the Lawn; outside if good weather, if bad weather then in Community Room A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Teen bands perform, kick off summer reading program. 7 p.m. ORMACO Jazz Under the Stars: Bobby Selvaggio; Public Square, Medina. Rain location: United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Bring lawn chairs, blankets, family, picnics. Free. 330-722-2541

Sunday, June 3

Wednesday, June 6

National Gardening Exercise Day https://bit.ly/1hK43Xz , Yo-Yo Day https://bit.ly/2IS1NSu and Drive-In Movie Day https://bit. ly/2rQuSbF 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries Program: Nature Through the Seasons; Green Leaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Award-based hiking program. Ages 7 and up. No registration. Free. https://www.medinacountyparks.com/ 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Montville Township Police Department, 6665 Wadsworth Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Thursday, June 7 VCR Day https://bit.ly/2IUcqV9

11 a.m. to noon. The Bremen Town Musicians; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Part animal symphony, part acting class. For those who will be in kindergarten through fourth grade in the fall. https://bit.ly/2IDSJV1 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Summer Fest; field across the street from Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Meet Freddie the Frog and members of Lodi police, fire, K-9 Unit. Treats, games, balloon animals, magic, more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Sharon Township Administration Building, 1322 Sharon-Copley Road, Sharon Center. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Painting Workshop; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Use cereal boxes and other boxes to create a masterpiece. Grades 2 through 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2IC0fzv 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Seville Library: Legal Resource Center; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Volunteers offer guidance through legal system. First come, first served.

Friday, June 8

Repeat Day https://bit.ly/2EITLJ6

Name Your Poison Day https://bit.ly/2qsaMDs and Best Friends Day https://bit.ly/1kPHjde

7 p.m. Wadsworth Community Band Concert; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Variety of music. Free. http://WadsworthCommunityBand.com

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast

Monday, June 4

8:30 p.m. Medina Community Band, outdoor Summer Concert Series, Medina Public Square. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Free, donations accepted. http://www. medinacommunityband.org/

Hug Your Cat Day https://bit.ly/1oxmIgN 11 a.m. to noon. Bust a Move With the Akron Zoo; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Discover how animals move and move like them. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street Road, Wadsworth. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. Cardmaking; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2wHEKsi 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Veterans Roundtable; Medina Library, Community Rooms A and B, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. All Ages. No registration.

Tuesday, June 5

Hot Air Balloon Day https://bit.ly/2vaXeRn 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Birds of Prey; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Register at https://bit.ly/2rC4Kj2 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside

6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Teen After Hours Hide and Seek; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Grades 6 to 8. Run around, be loud in the library, get lost in the stacks. https://bit.ly/2IiHgXu 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Tween After Hours Hide and Seek; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library 210 S. Broadway, Medina. Grades 4 to 5. Run around, be loud in the library, get lost in the stacks. https://bit.ly/2Kfq8Cz

Saturday, June 9

Donald Duck Day https://bit.ly/2IQOFNt 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Letha House Park West, meet at trailhead near playground, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Ages 10 and up. Free. https:// bit.ly/2IzRlCR 9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. All ages. Learn about bird banding. https://bit.ly/2jQn0Si 10:30 a.m. to noon. Bubble Painting; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Blow bubbles to create painting. https://bit.ly/2rDucWk

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Northern Ohio Railway Museum Streetcar Rides; 5515 Buffham Road, Seville. Admission to museum is free, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Streetcar rides are $4 for adults and children 13 years old and up; $2 for children 6 to 12; and no charge for children under 5. http://www.trainweb.org/norm/ 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Some Like it Iced; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn how iced tea was invented, culture and traditions around it. https://bit.ly/2KVlyKO

Sunday, June 10

National Ballpoint Pen Day https://bit.ly/2GV1d61 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. ORMACO Homerville All String Band; Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Bluegrass. Free, but reservations urged, 330-334-5761. 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Medina County Park District: K-9 First Aid; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Red Cross-based dog first-aid class on CPR, resuscitation, and the basics on keeping a dog alive until getting to a veterinarian. Do NOT bring dog to class, dog mannequins provided. All ages. Free class, book with DVD available for $20. Register at https:// bit.ly/2rCFg5Z

Monday, June 11

Corn on the Cob Day https://bit.ly/2HwHVF4 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tween Crafternoon; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Upcycle and create a gift or something for yourself. Grades 3 to 5. https://bit.ly/2jR3YeG

Tuesday, June 12

National Jerky Day https://bit.ly/2IT80xs 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Advanced Fishing for Kids; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Not for beginners. Bring poles, bait. Three-day program. Free. https://bit.ly/2rCS78k WAITING LIST 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. Playing With the Wind; Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Playing with air while learning. Free. Register for 10 a.m. at https://bit.ly/2wD4A0R Register for 11 a.m. at https://bit. ly/2Ib7Gyg 1:30 pm. to 4 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: Moana Matinee; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring a blanket, have a snack, enjoy the movie. Make Moana-inspired craft. Register at https://bit.ly/2rC7LB4 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Family Food Fest; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Food demonstrations, kid cooking classes, lots of samples. Drawing for food-themed gift baskets. For event details and list of local restaurants’ tasting tables, go to https:// bit.ly/2IEJ54k 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride; Chippewa Rail Trail, meet in trailhead parking lot, Chippewa Road east of Lake Road. Bike 6-to-10 miles. Helmets required. Adults. https:// bit.ly/2wy6sYs

Wednesday, June 13

National Weed Your Garden Day https://bit.ly/2HmHEaf 11 a.m. to noon. Bubble Lady; Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. Hosted by Seville Library. Indoor bubble show. All ages. Register at https://bit.ly/2KYgQvL 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Donuts With Dads and Dudes; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring dad or favorite dude, enjoy donut and craft together. All ages. https://bit.ly/2IfZEEF 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Make a Music Video; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Show off dance moves and learn how to make a music video. Permission slip required. https://bit.ly/2IbqehT 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. What You Auto Know; Mighty Auto Pro, 290 S. Prospect Street, Medina. Sponsored by Highland Library. Learn basics, visit learning stations. Light refreshments. Ages 15 and up. https://bit.ly/2KZ41RV

Thursday, June 14

Monkey Around Day https://bit.ly/2vccOvX 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Volunteens: Gardening at Feeding Medina County; 901 Lafayette Road, Medina. Sponsored by Buckeye Library. Work in garden to feed the hungry. Bring gloves. Wear closed-toe shoes and sunscreen. Permission slip required. For those entering Grades 6 through 12. Register at https://bit. ly/2rCDqCg


Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Messy Art; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Creative and messy art. For those entering Grades 4 through 12. https://bit.ly/2IBbbxC 2 p.m to 4 p.m. Robotics Level 1; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Two-day class using Lego Mindstorm robotic kits. Register at https://bit.ly/2KSQWd3 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Family Fishing; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road. No experience necessary. All ages, children must be accompanied by adult. Free. https://bit. ly/2jQn0Si 6 p.m. An Evening in Paradise; The Oaks Lakeside Restaurant, 5878 Longacre Lane, Chippewa Lake. Benefits Camp Paradise, an SHC/The Arc program. Buffet, live music, more. $50 per person. Contact Bev Hardin, 330-722-1900, Ext. 265 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Safari With Peter: A Travelogue; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Peter Balunek discusses poaching, lost of habitat, and human and animal conflicts. All ages. https://bit.ly/2IgWVqc 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Craft Beers in Ohio; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Booming craft beer in Ohio examined, question-and-answer session. https://bit.ly/2wxID34

Friday, June 15

Smile Power Day https://bit.ly/1LajfA0 and Global Wind Day https://bit.ly/2GVKkMD 8:30 p.m. Medina Community Band, outdoor Summer Concert Series, Medina Public Square. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Free, donations accepted. http:// www.medinacommunityband.org/ 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sit, Stay, Read; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading with Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2IciA73 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. DIY Tie Dye; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring white cotton T-shirt, dress for a mess. Grades 3 to 5. Register at https://bit. ly/2wz9c7W

Saturday, June 16

World Juggling Day https://bit.ly/2IUghS7 and National Hollerin’ Contest Day https://bit.ly/2Hx8Xwe 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Allardale West parking lot, 401 Remsen Road, Medina. Physician talk and one- to three-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. https://bit.ly/2Kj0EUY 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Pizza Palooza; Medina Public Square. Favorite recipes being accepted for bicentennial cookbook. Noon to 4 p.m. Computer Support, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Help removing viruses and malware from laptops. Library tech department will assist. Ages 55 and up. First come, first serve. NO PHONE CALLS. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Arts for the Ages Reception; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Meet artists of Vintage Artists and 2nd Monday Critique groups. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Creativity Club; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Re-discover joy of creating and writing. Register at https://bit.ly/2KWo4Rf 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. March Meander; Medina Marsh, 4266 Fenn Road, Medina. Dress for muddy trails. Free. https://bit. ly/2wzp9v9 7 p.m. ORMACO Opera Under the Stars; Public Square, Medina. Rain location: First Congregational Church, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Bring lawn chairs, blankets, picnic. Free. 330-722-2541

eries Program: Cavity Nesters; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Part of award-based hiking program. Explore nesting boxes, learn about birds. Ages 7 and up. Free. https://bit.ly/2KhyRE9

Monday, June 18

Go Fishing Day https://bit.ly/2qvq9tH , National Splurge Day https://bit.ly/2qu3san and International Panic Day https://bit.ly/2EJFGey 11 a.m. to noon. Mr. Science; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Explanations and demonstrations of crazy chemistry, amazing electricity, more. Ages 5 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2wAwSZL 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Mr. Science; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Explanations and demonstrations of crazy chemistry, amazing electricity, more. Ages 5 and up. Register at https:// bit.ly/2rGofqT 7 p.m. Tick Tock: Never too Late for Tick Awareness; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Information, prevention and tick id card. Register at https://bit.ly/2KkBFRc

Tuesday, June 19

International and National Kissing Day https://bit. ly/2GZzdlS 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. OSU Homeowner Series; Community Room, A.I. Root Candle Store, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Yard drainage. $10. http://bit.ly/2FdOtKV 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Terrific Tuesday Tie Dye; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring white cotton T-shirt, dress for a mess. Register at https://bit.ly/2Icdc3G

Wednesday, June 20 Ice Cream Soda Day https://bit.ly/2GZNzmo

1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Nate the Great; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Magic tricks. https://bit. ly/2IjeQga 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Macrame Plant Hanger; Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Learn basic knots, make simple hanger. For those entering Grades 6 through 12. Register at https://bit.ly/2IbYGJr 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Painting Workshop; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 South Broadway Street, Medina. Paint rocks, hide them around Medina. Grades 2 to 5. https://bit. ly/2jQtFfo 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Roblox Programming; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn how to design game. For those entering Grades 4 through 12. Register at https://bit. ly/2IbA5nT 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. History Series: Ohio’s Titanic Connections; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Mary Ann Whitley presents. Register at https://bit. ly/2Ig9l61 7 p.m. to 7:55 p.m. Microsoft Word; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Learn basics of creating and saving Word document. Adults. Register at https://bit.ly/2IingnV 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Music at The Lodge: Morning Star; Lodge at Allardale, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Bluegrass, gospel, Americana music. Free.

Thursday, June 21

National Selfie Day https://bit.ly/2GWU1u2 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Quick Start Canoeing;

7 p.m. Wadsworth Community Band Concert; Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth. Variety of music. Free. http://WadsworthCommunityBand.com

Your Local Storm Claims Specialists

9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Medina County Park District and Cuyahoga Astronomical Association: Starry, Starry Nights; Letha House Park West, 5800 Richman Road, Chatham Township. Use association telescopes to view deep-sky objects, observatory open, activities and displays in barn on cloudy nights. Questions welcomed. All ages. Free. No registration, first come, first served.

Sunday, June 17

Eat Your Vegetables Day https:// bit.ly/2EJFL1Z 3 pm. to 4 p.m. Natural Discov-

Gary Tantanella (President)

Call us for a FREE inspection before you file a claim. If it’s determined you have damage, we’ll guide you through the insurance process.

Roofing Siding Windows Flood Fire

(330) 571-1827 (440) 862-9442

Medina County

FARMERS' MARKETS 2018 Brunswick 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, June 10 through October 14 4613 Laurel Road, Brunswick Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2I4I5DV Medina 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May 19 through October 13 Medina Public Square 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesdays, beginning June 20 A.I. Root Candles, 623 W. Liberty Street, Medina Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2HzA34O Seville 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May 26 through September 29 Gazebo at Maria Stanhope Park, 73 W. Main Street, Seville Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2r4Hmvk Wadsworth 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays, June 30 through September 29 Central Intermediate School, 151 Main Street, Wadsworth Vendor registration information at https://bit.ly/2JykOKc

25


26

Joy of Medina County Magazine | June 2018 Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Designed for beginners. Uses two-person canoes. Dress for getting wet. Cost $10 per person. Register at https://bit.ly/2KVRaQE for 10 a.m. class., register at https://bit.ly/2GbNUgm for the 1 p.m. class. 2 p.m.to 4 p.m. Robotics Level 2; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. More Lego Mindstorm. Must first complete Level 1. Two-day class. Register at https://bit.ly/2IfPBeA 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Volunteers offer guidance through Domestic Relations Court. First come, first served. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Next Stop, Freedom! Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Stories of Ohioans involved in the Underground Railroad. For those entering Grades 3 and up. Register at https://bit.ly/2GbnR9c

Friday, June 22

National Chocolate Éclair Day https://bit.ly/2GZWHTT and Take Your Dog to Work Day https://bit.ly/2ITPcON 10 a.m. to noon. Volunteen: Reader’s Theater Practice; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Teens needed to practice reading Reader’s Theater script with guidance. Additional practices until performance at Plum Creek Assisted Living. No experience necessary. Register at https://bit.ly/2IG4Xwx 11 a.m. to noon. The Bremen Town Musicians; Seville United Methodist Church, 74 W. Main Street, Seville. Sponsored by the Seville Library. Part animal symphony, part acting class. For those who will be in kindergarten through fourth grade in the fall. https://bit.ly/2Ilh8vj 2 p.m. B-I-N-G-O; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. For Grades 1 through 6. Win candy, prizes. 8:30 p.m. Medina Community Band, outdoor Summer Concert Series, Medina Public Square. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Free, donations accepted. http://www. medinacommunityband.org/

Saturday, June 23

and Log Cabin Day https://bit.ly/2qtSFNe 8 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. tee-off. Heroes Home Project Golf Outing; Medina Country Club, 5588 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Benefits Heroes Home Project, helps veterans. Individual, $125; foursome, $450. Tickets at http://bit.ly/2HOkvtJ 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. MCPAL Golf Outing 2018; Westfield Country Club, 6500 Greenwich Road, Westfield Center. Benefits after-school program. 4-person golf scramble, $125 per golfer. Registration closes June 18. https://bit.ly/2KdOWf1 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Grouchy Ladybug Storytime and Craft; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. It is Eric Carle’s birthday, celebrate with all things ladybug. Register at https://bit.ly/2IFUb9y 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Diversity Film Series: “Spare Parts;” Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Film is about undocumented high school students who form robotics club and take on MIT. Light refreshments served. https://bit.ly/2IhzRI5

Tuesday, June 26

Forgiveness Day https://bit.ly/2quT4PA and Chocolate Pudding Day https://bit.ly/2qtVM72 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: Bubble Lady; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Road, Lodi. Indoor bubble show. All ages. https://bit.ly/2IG8Stf 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Manga Drawing Class; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Teen drawing class. https://bit.ly/2IggItO 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Teen anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. 6 p.m. Trolls Party; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Singing, dancing, hugging. For those in Pre-K through Grade 3. https://bit.ly/2L0a1dk 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Underground Railroad in Ohio; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Stories of those involved, Ohio’s connection to the passage of the 13th Amendment. All ages. Register at https:// bit.ly/2Ih81eQ

Wednesday, June 27

Typewriter Day https://bit.ly/2GZzjd5

9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Medina County Park District: Healthy Strides; Plum Creek Park South, 2500 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick. Physician talk and one- to three-mile walk. Ages 10 and up. Free. https://bit.ly/2wA2Hln 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Intensive Editing; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. For writers with a completed first book draft, focus is on first chapter fine tuning. https://bit.ly/2rDSvTp 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Medina County Park District: Northern Ohio Live Steamers, All Aboard! Miniature Train Rides, Lester Rail Trail, 3654 Lester Road, Medina. All ages. Free. No registration.

Tau Day https://bit.ly/2IUN4GK , Paul Bunyan Day https://bit. ly/2GX6qu0 , and International Body Piercing Day https://bit. ly/2EJl6v0 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Volunteens: Gardening at Feeding Medina County; 901 Lafayette Road, Medina. Sponsored by Buckeye Library. Work in garden to feed the hungry. Bring gloves. Wear closed-toe shoes and sunscreen. Permission slip required. For those entering Grades 6 through 12. Register at https://bit. ly/2rFVlad 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Code T: Stop Motion Animation; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn how to make a movie, then make one. For those in Grades 3 through 5. Register at https://bit.ly/2IhMiU7 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cookies and Canvas; Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Enjoy cookies while creating an album cover for your favorite song. For Grades 6 through 8. Register at https://bit.ly/2KVoRlg 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cycling Makes Sense Fitness Ride; Buckeye Woods Park, meet in ballfield parking lot, 6335 Wedgewood Road, Medina. Bike 6-to-10 miles. Helmets required. Adults. https://bit. ly/2KVJD4d

Friday, June 29 Hug Holiday https://bit.ly/2Hz0UyY and International Mud Day https://bit.ly/2GX8g2e 8:30 p.m. Medina Community Band; outdoor Summer Concert Series, Medina Public Square. Bring lawn chairs and picnics, snacks are available. Free, donations accepted. http://www. medinacommunityband.org/

Saturday, June 30

9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Passport to Fishing; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. First time Passport enrollees only. Children taught to fish. Three-day program, also meets June 28 and June 29. Poles and bait provided. Register at https://bit.ly/2IAZOWk

1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Meet the Animals; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Meet and learn about animals in the nature center. All ages. Free. https://bit.ly/2KXWgfl

2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Teen Writer’s Workshop; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Inspiration, guidance, support. Two-day workshop features author, editor Lydia Sharp. Bring writing sample. Register at https://bit.ly/2Ij1bWg 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Cooking With Spices; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. How to use herbs to lower sodium, add flavor. Learn how to make teas, desserts. Samples available. Register at https://bit.ly/2KlxcO1

Monday, June 25

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Computer Classes; Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn ins and outs of buying a computer. Register at https://bit.ly/2ICNcy0

PLEASE Take My Children to Work Day https://bit.ly/2GUMigh

Thursday, June 28

Sunglasses Day https://bit.ly/2JK3jaA and Helen Keller Day https://bit.ly/2GUDxCF

Sunday, June 24

Swim a Lap Day https://bit.ly/2qtSotG

Be sure to let event organizers know that you saw their event listed in Joy Magazine!

Meteor Watch Day https://bit.ly/2unukIC

1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Summertime Beer Swap; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring 6-pack of domestic or regional craft beer. Swap and leave with variety of new beers. Must be 21 and older to participate. Register at https://bit. ly/2rGZ9ZN

Submitting Calendar Events “Let’s Do It!” is a calendar of events sponsored or hosted by non-political, non-profit groups in Medina County. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional events. There is no charge to list an event in the calendar. To have an event listed, please send date, time, event name, location, cost of event, organization benefitting from the event (and hosting or sponsoring organization if different), contact name and phone number, website if available, and name and phone number of the person submitting the information to joy@ BlakeHousePublishing.com with Calendar in the subject line or you can mail the information to Attn: Calendar, Joy of Medina County Magazine, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Oh. 44256. Calendar information will not be taken by phone.


TYPES OF LOANS AVAILABLE: • • •

• •

• •

• • • •

• •

• •


Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

Click on “follow” below so you don’t miss a single edition of Joy of Medina County Magazine!

Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine June 2018  

Whip up a batch of hoecakes (recipe in this issue) and settle down to read all about a family that does all it can to improve the world, whe...

Joy of Medina County Magazine June 2018  

Whip up a batch of hoecakes (recipe in this issue) and settle down to read all about a family that does all it can to improve the world, whe...