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FEBRUARY 2018

FREE

ADVENTURE BEGINS WITH AN ODD CHANCE MEETING PG.8

A WINNER IN DEED! PG. 17

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 1

CREATING A SPORE-SPITTING BLOND PG. 14

UNCONDITIONAL

LOVE

HOW THIS DISABLED DOG WON THE HEARTS OF A LOCAL NURSING HOME PG 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

One

Voice

Setting New Standards

A

J O Y O F M E D I N A C O U NTY.C OM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC

by Amy Barnes t our first staff meeting, the question came up: “Are there particular rules a magazine is supposed to follow?” My response was that I did not care if there were, we would not be following them. The smiles around the table were proof I had found the perfect collection of rebels to produce this amazing magazine. Years ago, the song “One Voice” encouraged being the one voice to start singing in the darkness because it takes only one voice to begin a wave of change, with the belief that soon other voices will join. Many times throughout my life, I have been the one voice, as I believe many others have been in their lives. Unfortunately, in the jobs I held, it was too easy for the powers that be to silence or ignore my voice and claim the ideas I had were of no value or didn’t follow “industry standards” and thus were unacceptable. I have been told more times than I

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 1

can count that “you can’t do that,” and so it was with this magazine. I started it anyway. Once again, I was one voice singing in the darkness, but this time I was amazed at how very quickly other voices joined mine. As you enjoy this first issue of Joy, you will find a celebration of what is good in life, in Medina County, and in humanity. Joy of Medina County Magazine is a Medina County-focused non-political, non-religious publication dedicated to sharing the remarkable stories that celebrate life’s journey. It is the only publication in Medina County to refuse advertorials (articles promoting advertisers) and to focus instead on old-school journalism with new-school technology. This is the publication Medina County has been waiting for. Welcome, to the world of Joy.

E D I TO R Amy Barnes P H O TO G R A P H E R FlashBang Photography A R T D I R E C TOR Ryan Burdzinski C O N T R I B U TO R S Bob Arnold Rich Bailey Paul McHam Paula Weisenberger MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty. com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

Specializing in: Portrait Photography • Traditional Headshots Glamour Shots • Corporate Portraits Family Portraits

Order copies of any photos in Joy of Medina County Magazine 440-263-4502 | sfeller1@neo.rr.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Contents

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THE NOBILITY OF NESSA

6 8

OH, SNAP!

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by Amy Barnes

When she lost her leg, she found a new way to walk into the hearts of those who need her inspiration the most, and, in return, she gets their unconditional love.

photos by FlashBang Photography

Our one-of-a-kind photo collection of wonderful moments and people in Medina County.

THE READING NOOK

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

Our exclusive serial begins! An odd chance meeting in a bowling alley bathroom and nine words become the beginning of a journey to discovering little truths.

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

BLEACH ALONE CAN TURN MOLD INTO SPORE-SPITTING BLOND by Paul McHam

Do you know someone who attacks mold with bleach? Here is why that is a bad idea and what to do instead.

INVESTING INTELLIGENCE: SECRETS OF A MORTGAGE BANKER

WHEN REFINANCING IS THE RIGHT MOVE by Rich Bailey

A home is a large financial investment and there are very important points to consider when looking at the possibility of refinancing.

15 4 Joy is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition, which can be found by clicking on the Free E-Edition tab at the top of the page at JoyofMedinaCounty.com. To keep from missing out on the upcoming great stories and features in Joy, click the “follow” button on the e-edition. Certain features, such as Giving Hearts and Help is Here, are available only on the website JoyofMedinaCounty.com.

ON THE COVER: Susan McCune, Nessa’s caretaker, pets Nessa, who is wondering how many more pictures will be taken.

THE NETWORKER: LESSONS FROM A FORMER PEOPLE FLOWER

THE PERENNIAL WALLFLOWER by Bob Arnold

While networking has become a business buzzword, it also has become a source of great anxiety for many in the business world. What causes that anxiety?

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PAULA’S PANTRY

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IN DEED

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LET’S DO IT!

DOING THE MASH WITH CAULIFLOWER by Paula Weisenberger

It is easy to turn to the comfort food of mashed potatoes during the winter, but we found a great non-glycemic alternative for you to love!

THE RIPPLES A BIRDIE CAN MAKE

When our spies spot someone doing a good deed, we like to share it and reward it!

Wondering where to find your next adventure? Check out our calendar of events that are hosted by non-profit organizations in the area.

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THE NOBILITY OF

Nessa by Amy Barnes Photos by FlashBang Photography

W

Dutchess watches her best friend, Nessa, from behind the nursing home’s reception counter.

hen Nessa joined the staff of Wadsworth Pointe eight years ago, she already was missing a leg. She never talks about it and rarely shows any sign of missing it, except for the rare occasion when she stumbles. In true heroic fashion after losing her leg, she simply accepted the change in her life and adapted. No complaining, no focusing on what was or what might have been for her. Known as Vanessa at the time, Nessa was chosen from the other dogs at the SPCA in 2010 partly because of her temperament and partly because of her missing leg. It was thought by the Wadsworth Pointe staff that the nursing home’s residents and rehabilitation patients would identify with her because she had some of the same needs they did, said Ashley Leon, activities director at the nursing home and overseer of Nessa’s care. Life for Nessa has been one of acceptance and adjustment. One day she had four legs, and the next day she did not. It is believed by her caretakers that she was hit by a car, causing the amputation of her right back leg when she was younger than two years old. They also have seen signs that she once was abused. Now those days are long past, and all Nessa knows is love. Animals cope with what they must. They accept what they are handed and find ways to still do exactly what they want to, even if it is sometimes with more effort and less agility. There is a nobility and grace in that, a wisdom that is earned. The first thing Nessa had to learn when she arrived at the nursing home was that she was not allowed in the dining room because of health regulations.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

However, clever Nessa found a way to push the envelope. She would stand at the dining room doorway with her toes just barely over the line and wait for residents to walk by and pet her and give her treats. Unfortunately, the showering of treats eventually led to a dramatic weight gain that made mobility difficult for her, so she was put on a strict diet. Leon says Nessa has lost a lot of weight and is doing much better. When Nessa needs to go out, she knows just where to stand to make the automated doors open, then walks through, takes care of business, and returns to her post, either behind the reception desk, where a comfy bed waits for her, or she makes her rounds visiting loyal fans who wait for a chance to spend time stroking her fur and chatting to her. Nessa is a very good listener. She seems to understand when residents need her and never hesitates to offer her soft, glossy fur to pet for comfort and her smile and wagging tail to lift spirits. Residents dote on her and look to her as a connection to the world they once knew. She is a common connector among them all, helping them to share the outlook of “we are all in this together.” “The old activities director decided we should adopt a dog so the residents would have comfort care. If they are agitated, interacting with Nessa will calm them down,” Leon said. Nessa lives full time at the nursing home and fills her days with sleeping, wandering around the facility looking for friends new and old, and greeting visitors. She knows exactly where her treats are and who is the soft touch for her kind patience. It is obvious she finds joy in dedicating her life to helping those around her. Leon said that those receiving rehabilitation at the facility often eat in the dining room and use the lobby as a walking area, where they cross paths with Nessa. They see a beautiful three-legged black lab, happy to see them, encouraging them to continue, and showing them the joy of loving and the rewards of finding a new way to function. For several years, Nessa used the elevator to gain access to the facility’s upper floors and visit beloved residents. Staff members would see her standing patiently by the elevator doors, waiting for a human to push the buttons. When the doors opened, Nessa would board the elevator and ride

Nessa and McCune welcome visitor Regina Haas to the nursing home.

to the floor she wanted. She rarely goes on her upstairs rounds now, however. “We’ve had some residents pass, and I think she senses that, so she doesn’t go upstairs as much anymore,” Leon said in a hushed tone, as Nessa stood nearby. Nessa’s best friend is Dutchess, a 10-yearold German Shepherd who sometimes visits the nursing home. Dutchess is owned by Susan McCune, who works in the facility’s human resources department and is Nessa’s chosen caretaker. Dutchess and Nessa enjoy curling up together behind the reception desk around McCune’s feet. McCune bathes Nessa, takes her to veterinarian appointments, and clips her toenails (by laying full body on the floor beside Nessa and, to avoid clipping her nails too short, McCune holds up Nessa’s paws one by one so the light shines through her nails, a scene that delights many who see it, says McCune). Occasionally, McCune takes Nessa home for a playdate with Dutchess. The bond Nessa shares with McCune is so obvious that it has caused many to think she is McCune’s, said McCune, already the owner of three dogs. To those who know Nessa, she brings a Nessa looks for calmness, a certainty, friends from behind that anything in life can be the Wadsworth Pointe reception handled if taken one step at a counter. time.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Lisa Shah and her son Ethan Shah (age 2) crossed that bridge when they came to it at Putting Through the Ages at Buffalo Creek Retreat in Seville. Decorating tip: If the light does not fit with your indoor decor, try it with your outside decor!

Oh,! Snap The persistence of water and ice battling for control of the dam at Brunswick Lake Park.

Pictures From Around Medina County Photos by FlashBang Photography

The art tiles on the inside column of the arches at Brunswick Lake Park.


After kindly sharing his history at a Medina Bicentennial event at the Medina Library earlier in the day, Lathrop Seymour (portrayed by Skip Baran) decided to enjoy the warm hospitality and vittles at Sully’s on Medina’s Public Square. Baran and his wife live in the house Seymour built on North Broadway.

Elliot Shah (age 4) discusses golfing strategy with a Buffalo Creek Retreat representative while his mother, Lisa Shah, and his brother, Ethan, examine the Putting Through the Ages course before finishing their game and returning to their home in Strongsville.

An eerie night sky over downtown Wadsworth: Is it time to call Ghostbusters?


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

CHAPTER 1

TH E READ I NG N O O K

I opened the door to the bowling alley’s restroom only to discover the last thing I’d ever expect to be in a bowling alley restroom. There, with her head hanging out of the open ventilation shaft on the ceiling, with her long, brown hair swaying gently, was Marissa Colt. Marissa Colt was a 17-yearold high school junior who got straight B’s in all her classes, went to almost every Friday night football game, was hated by few, and liked by most. She was just about five-and-a-half feet tall with deep brown eyes and subtle curves that accentuated her thin figure. Basically, she was just an average teenager. “Sorry. Is this, um, occupied?” I stuttered, closing the door halfway. She spun her head around, and her eyes widened when she realized she had gotten caught doing whatever she was doing. “Nope! I was just leaving,” she replied as she gripped the grate of the vent and flipped out of the shaft, landing on her feet as agile as a cat. She stood up and smiled at me and then pushed past me as I stood in the doorway. I had no idea what had just happened, but as I watched her walk away, I realized I really wanted to find out. But whatever she had been doing was clearly not meant for anyone else to know about, and I wasn’t one to press things, so I stepped into the restroom and locked the door

behind me. I lifted the vent’s cover back to where it should be and tightened the screws so that no one would know it had been opened. Afterward I relieved myself and then left the restroom. “Weirdo,” I commented under my breath as I headed back to my friends who were sitting there waiting for me to take my turn. “What took you so long, Cam?” Devin asked me as I stuck my fingers into the bowling ball. “Nothing. What do you mean?” I shot back, hoping I didn’t seem too defensive. “Just take your turn, jerk,” Garret said, motioning toward the pins. I glanced at the scoreboard to find just what I had expected. Garret was in the lead by a good margin, Heath was in a solid second, and Devin and I were fighting for last place. The scores were almost always the same, but we didn’t mind. We had gone bowling like this every Saturday since eighth grade, and it was still a blast every time. I rolled the bowling ball down the lane and shot a finger gun at the first pin as I listened to the gentle rumble. The ball crashed into the side of the pins, knocking over the six leftmost ones, and leaving the other four untouched. I had never been good at bowling. “Nice try!” Garret clapped twice, “Next time try to hit the pins!” The others laughed, and I glared at him playfully as I retrieved a second ball to send down the lane. I hit two more pins with the second ball, and Garret continued to heckle me, but none


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

of this was new. The only thing that was new was that half my thoughts were on Marissa the rest of the night. We went back to Devin’s place after Garret inevitably won both games we played and dropped Heath off at his girlfriend’s place. Of the four of us, Heath was the only one who had a steady girlfriend. But Heath was a heartthrob, over six feet tall, sharp features, and just enough stubble to make him ruggedly handsome. The rest of us didn’t stand a chance if Heath was around, and we all knew it. We filed into Devin’s and he headed straight for the kitchen while Garret and I angled towards the den. “Coke or Mountain Dew?” Devin asked from inside his fridge. “Coke!” I shouted, flopping down onto the big recliner. A second later, a can of Coke sailed over the seat and almost flew over my head, but I caught it before it crashed into the glass coffee table. Garret and Devin joined me in the den, both sipping

Basement blah to basement wow! Call us about adding your new fireplace today!

Mountain Dews. They sat down on the couch and Garret tossed me a controller as they turned on three of the four Xbox-TV combos that were set up. If it’s not apparent by this point, Devin’s family was loaded and liked to pamper Devin and his friends as much as possible.

...the memory of Marissa’s head hanging out of the vent shaft flashed in my mind for the millionth time. His mother was a highly regarded surgeon and his father worked for the CIA (although we weren’t supposed to know that). So not only were they uberrich, but they also were away every weekend. Which meant we all had an adult-free place to stay, and we loved it. We would stay up until the early hours of the morning, crash around 4 a.m., and then sleep till Sunday afternoon. It was paradise for a few juniors who didn’t appreciate

getting wasted or high, but that Saturday night I could think about only one thing. Marissa Colt flooded my thoughts the entire night, greatly hindering my ability to shoot virtual soldiers which (excuse my bragging) was typically pretty impressive. “You alright, Cam? You’re not hitting anything with that sniper,” Garret pointed out as he chucked a grenade over a barricade the other team had built up. “Yeah, yeah, I’m fine,” I lied, as the memory of Marissa’s head hanging out of the vent shaft flashed in my mind for the millionth time. “At least give me the sniper, man,” Devin said, moving his character next to mine so we could switch weapons. He gave me an assault rifle and then climbed onto the roof for a vantage point. I glanced over at Devin as he fired the sniper right through a poor guy’s skull and smirked at his own shot. His tan skin was cont inued, Pag e 10

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 9 mostly covered by his longsleeved shirt and jeans, but it was still apparent that he was a quarter Latino. His maternal grandmother was from an island near Panama, and somehow all her genes went right into Devin. He wasn’t tall and muscular like Heath was, but he still had that Latino fire in his blood and that dark hair that could make girls swoon. The only thing that kept him from having equal footing with Heath toward girls was his height. Poor Devin was only a few inches over five feet, and although some girls could overlook that, a lot of them could only overlook him. So, he mostly stayed single and promised that his time would come in college when girls weren’t so picky and cared about more than height. I had no doubt that he was right about his luck, I just hoped that Garret and I would have the same experience. Garret was only a few inches taller than Devin, but he didn’t have the same heat or romantic tendencies. Instead, Garret had acne and small bones that made his small muscle mass look even smaller. His blond hair and round face made him look more like a middle school student than a high school student, and his lack of facial hair only hurt him in that department. I hoped for his sake that he wasn’t done with puberty yet, but it was very possible he had been for a while. Then there was me. With brown hair and brown eyes, I’m a pretty average dude. However, I’m just about six feet tall and very skinny. I’m one of those

lanky guys who looks like he still needs to grow into his body, but it just isn’t going to happen. The other issue is that I’m as pale as a snowflake, and I learned very quickly that being tan was a must in high school. I’m part Irish, and, well, I don’t tan. A faded cream color is my golden tan, and that doesn’t tend to go far with the girls who are looking for someone more like Heath or Devin. I don’t mind though. Girls were more of a distraction and a hassle than anything else a lot of the time, and I had Devin, Garret and Heath to hang out with. But then there was Marissa Colt.

I decided to find out what was in the vents that could have possibly inclined her to crawl through them. As I fell asleep just after three in the morning, I wondered what Marissa Colt was doing at that moment, and, for some strange reason, my mind made me imagine her wrapped around me in the same bed and under the same covers with her lips to my ear as she breathed steadily. My heart skipped a beat as my imagined scenario developed into a dream and I felt her around me. I held her tightly as she made soft sleeping noises in my ear. Marissa Colt had gone from an invisible nobody to my mysterious crush in one single

night, and we had said only nine words to each other. CHAPTER 2 The next few days passed with the same routine. I hung out with Devin, Garret and Heath; struggled to pass algebra; slept through science; and ate dinner with my dad every night. The only change that surfaced was that I was suddenly aware of Marissa. She was in my English class, which I had forgotten. I continued to keep my encounter with her to myself, but it kept buzzing through my mind without rest. I wanted to talk to her, but I didn’t know what to say or even how to approach her. We had never had a full conversation, and it would seem weird to both my friends and hers if I just suddenly started talking to her. So instead, I kept trying to forget about her, but forgetting was impossible. Already an enigma, Marissa Colt kept me guessing and wondering what in the world she had been doing in the bowling alley’s ventilation shaft. I decided to find out what was in the vents that could have possibly inclined her to crawl through them. First, I needed an excuse to return to the bowling alley alone. My father was all I had for family; my mother had run off with some French guy years ago, taking my baby sister with her. We didn’t know where she was, but none of that mattered now, all that mattered was Marissa Colt and those ventilation shafts. “Hey dad, I think I left my wallet at the bowling alley on


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Saturday,” I said to him while he stirred a mess of onions and peppers in his trusty frying pan. “And you’re just now realizing this?” He turned around and frowned at me, keeping the wooden spoon he held carefully over the pan. “It’s not like I spend money every day, dad. I just noticed it was missing today because I was doing the laundry,” I claimed. It was believable though, because I always did laundry on Tuesdays, and my dad did laundry on Saturdays. I also made dinner on Monday nights because he wanted me to know how to cook before I went to college. “Hmm.” He pointed at the car keys sitting on the table with his spoon, dripping oil onto the floor, “Be back for dinner.” I had to stifle my excitement as I slid past him, snatching the keys. I glanced at the clock and knew that I had only about fifteen or twenty minutes to make it to the bowling alley, through the vents, and back home before dinner would be ready. I’d have to be quick. “Bye, dad!” I shouted, practically running out the apartment door and flying down the four flights of steps. The elevator would have been much

too slow. I sprinted into the parking lot and jumped into our old Impala, turned the ignition, rolled down the window, and buckled my seatbelt all in one motion. It was almost summer, and I needed the breeze since the air conditioner didn’t work.

Luckily, it was unoccupied, and I slid right in without a problem. I locked the door behind me and spun around to find the vent cover still slightly loose, just as I had left it on Saturday. I unscrewed the cover with my fingers and let it hang down on its hinges as I used the light of my phone to see inside it. It looked a little dusty and kind of gross, but I didn’t see any spider webs or rats, so I gripped the edges and pulled my head into the shaft. The light from my phone illuminated the immediate vicinity and that was when I realized that this was an unused vent. There was no airflow at all, the air I was forced to breathe was stagnant and stale. But I had to find out why Marissa Colt was in there and what she was doing. I climbed into the vent the rest of the way, having to stay flat out on my stomach as I pulled myself towards the turn in the metal tube. The whole system seemed to have been unused for years, and, fortunately for me, there were no forks or if there were they were blocked off by secondary grates. I crawled

I sped out of the lot and down the street to the bowling alley. I got there in just under three minutes, which was impressive, but meant I had been speeding pretty badly. I thanked the almighty powers that there had been no cops on my route and reminded myself to take it a bit slower heading back. Then I ran into the bowling alley and glanced at the people behind the desk with a look I hoped displayed extreme urgency as I ran into the bathroom.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 11 through the vent for a good five minutes before I saw any sort of exit. It was in the form of a motionless rotary fan missing one of its three blades. And on the other side was the last thing I ever expected to find when it came to Marissa Colt. I emerged from the stuffy ductwork into a small, makeshift room with a couple of beanbag chairs, pens and notebooks scattered all over the place, a guitar leaning against the wall, and hanging on a rack on the opposite wall was an array of razor blades and knives. Frowning, I carefully stepped around the mess on the floor and examined the blades closer. Both razors and two of the three knives were stained with a dried maroon color that suggested exactly what I didn’t want to think. I stepped backwards as my heart started pounding in my chest, only to slip on one of the numerous notebooks and fall into all the papers. I landed with a thud that echoed through the shaft and sent several of the loose notebook pages fluttering through the air. I grabbed one before it hit the floor and tried to ignore the similar red stains as I read the words in a whisper. “Every day just like the last/ Just a girl and her haunting past/ Wishing for a brand new start/

Pining for a brand new heart/One that doesn’t feel the pain/Mother help, she’s gone insane.” I dropped the page in my lap and looked around at the hundreds of poems, deciding immediately that Marissa wasn’t some serial killer like I had feared when I first saw the blood stains. Marissa Colt, the happy, successful, mostly average girl that had as few enemies as a kitten, had a secret hiding spot in the ventilation shaft of the local bowling alley where she didn’t murder others, but instead slowly worked on killing herself. I took a closer look at the guitar against the wall and found worn strings that didn’t even look like they were the right kind. I didn’t understand how she had gotten a guitar and beanbag chairs into her secret room considering the vents were too small to fit much more than my shoulders, but I shrugged it off as I suddenly understood why she had been so shy in that moment when I caught her crawling out of the vent. I had run into her just after she had been in this place, writing poetry, playing music, possibly harming herself, and releasing her pain. She had been vulnerable and weak when I found her, and I found myself extremely relieved that I had been the one to find her instead of someone else. Someone else might not have respected her privacy like I had.

Be sure to click on “follow” at the bottom of this issue so you don’t miss the next installment of “Little Truths” in the upcoming issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine.

I was far from perfect, but I respected other people and their privacy, and that was what Marissa needed on Saturday. But now things were different. I knew Marissa’s deepest, darkest secret and things about her I doubted anyone else in the world knew. What I should’ve done was gone to her parents and told them that their daughter was having trouble dealing with things and needed some help. Maybe even outright tell them about the stained knives. Instead, I decided to keep it all to myself. I crawled back through the vent and emerged in the bathroom far later than I had originally planned. “Uh, oh,” I said under my breath as I flushed the empty toilet and washed my hands. There was no way my dad would just ignore how late I was. I brushed the dust off of me as best as I could, and then ran from the bathroom without a second glance at the employees. I wanted to go see Marissa and talk to her about what I had found, but I was already late for dinner, and, again, I didn’t know what I should say to her. Something along the lines of, “Hey! I found your secret stash and I know way more about you than you ever wanted me to!” didn’t seem like it would go over well. Our st ory cont in u es next mont h! Christopher Barnes is a 2013 Medina High School graduate and a 2017 The Ohio State University graduate. Visit his website at http://cbthesurvivor. com to read more of his stories.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Joyful Arrival!

We were overjoyed to see the county was celebrating the pending arrival of Joy this last holiday season!

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Can you tell where each “Joy” was captured? We will publish the answers in the next issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine.

Joyful Word Search All About Nessa N O I

T A C

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D E D H L F P P

K R D J D P L O V E A E R N K T B H V C A R

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M S O T K Q E T A W H E U D R K L M T E C A R G Z H V M G D R N E G N

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G E G A R U O C H C S T S G G W Y J R O V M Y D E B O T N E T N E D N E P E D N

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UNDER

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330-769-4470

5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273 www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

TAL E S OF A M O LD WAR R I O R

Bleach Alone can Turn Mold Into SporeSpitting Blond by Paul McHam

Using bleach to eliminate mold is a common mistake made by many individuals and even some government organizations. Do not use bleach if any other resource or if mold removal professionals are available. The key to getting rid of mold is through appropriate removal, whether by a homeowner or by a professional. It cannot be sprayed with any currently known product and be eliminated. To remove the spore and pieces of the plant (hyphae), the affected area and all items in that area must be thoroughly HEPA vacuumed. A HEPA vacuum is a High Efficiency Particulate Air special vacuum that is 99.97 percent efficient down to .30 microns in size. When all personal items and the structure have been HEPA vacuumed or discarded, you are likely to be safe enough, if done properly. If kept dry in the future (no water intrusion, relative humidity remains below 50 percent, and surface moisture is kept below 16 percent), it is

not likely to return. Control the moisture, control the mold. With most of the mold spore and particulate removed, folks often are concerned about the remaining discoloration. The stain is only melanin and can be considered an aesthetic issue and not harmful. The only use for bleach, in this scenario, is to remove this stain. Even though one of the ingredients in bleach, sodium hypochlorite, is a “high oxidizer,” it will not penetrate the surface to eliminate mold subsurface roots or hyphae. However, once the area and items have been properly HEPA vacuumed, bleach can be used on the stain. Keep in mind that bleach may be the most caustic material in a home. Mixing it with other cleaners, even by accident, can cause harmful and dangerous fumes. Do not use it without HEPA vacuuming first, as the bleach may cause the mold to spit out its spore and spread. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation who has served as an expert witness. To learn more about McHam’s expertise and services, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and get updates and tips on his Facebook page Moldsporewars at https://www.facebook. com/groups/1636710423258189/. He can be reached by calling 330-331-7500.

INV EST ING INT ELLIGENCE: S ECRETS OF A MORTGAGE B A NKER

When Refinancing is the Right Move by Rich Bailey

Interest rates have been about the lowest they have ever been for the past several years. If you have owned your home for more than five years, you likely already have refinanced at least once. Looking back, did you realize a benefit from refinancing? There are many reasons to refinance a home. Typically, it is to lower the interest rate, change the loan terms, or to eliminate mortgage insurance. Sometimes refinancing is done for legal or financial reasons, such as divorce, debt consolidation, renovations, or long-term financial planning. Lowering the interest rate is a good reason to refinance, however, the monthly savings


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

sometimes do not justify the cost and people will often go backward on their term. This means that they may have been a few years into a 30-year loan, but now they are back to the beginning of a new 30-year term. It is not a very sound financial position to be in, unless there is no other choice. It is important to consider how much the monthly savings of a new mortgage will mean versus paying off the mortgage sooner. My first recommendation is to keep the payment the same and shorten the term. That philosophy also helps to justify the cost of refinancing. Would you rather save $100 a month now or pay off your home three years sooner? That obviously depends on how long you plan to keep it, but paying it off sooner is money in the bank when it is sold. In conclusion, if you have owned your home for three years or more and think you have a fair amount of equity, it may be worth a look to see if a benefit would be realized from refinancing into a shorter term and possibly removing or decreasing the monthly mortgage insurance as well. Rich Bailey is a licensed mortgage loan originator with First Security Mortgage Corporation and has 15 years of conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA mortgage financing experience for purchase and refinance transactions. Contact Bailey at rich.bailey@fsmc. net or by calling 330-571-2692.

First Security Mortgage Corporation 15887 Snow Road, Suite 200 Brook Park, OH 44142 www.FirstSecurityMortgage.net NMLS 258602, 289425 MB.802718, LO.015405

T H E NET WORKER: LE SS ONS FROM A FO R M ER P EOP LE FLO WER

The Perennial Wallflower by Bob Arnold

Tony interrupts, “But Bob, I like being a wallflower!” “Ok. Why is that?” I ask. “Well,” he responds, “it’s kind of funny really. At the back of the room I can watch how others network.” “Do you learn anything by watching?” I ask. “Yeah….,” he says, hesitantly, to which I reply, “Tony, I commend you on watching for ways to improve your networking, but, quite frankly, if you don’t set your mind to get out there and do it, you rarely implement anything new. Make sense?” “It does,” he responds, “but I’m so nervous when I meet people.” Thus, the first real concern rises to the surface about why we feel anxiety during a networking event. People who hang out by the wall or in the

back of the room typically are called wallflowers, and it is the first clue they are very nervous being in the room. Another place they can be found is sitting at a table staring at their phones. Being a perennial wallflower is not the problem, it is a symptom of the problem of feeling afraid to meet new people. This fear is real and affects most networkers. In fact, it is so real for my mentoring clients that it is the first concern I help networkers get past. Getting past that fear takes practice. However, there is a mindset problem that really gets in the way. To overcome that, we must realize that we are talking with people! “Bob, that’s so obvious!” you say. It is obvious, yet we have real difficulties dealing with this fact in our minds. Like I said, it is a mindset that needs your direct attention while you are networking and meeting people. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and an international bestselling author. More networking tips and information are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at OnwardNetworking. com or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

PAULA’S PA N T RY

Doing the Mash with Cauliflower by Paula Weisenberger

Recently, grocery stores have started stocking packages of chopped cauliflower to be used for making mashed cauliflower as a replacement for mashed potatoes. One store franchise had such a high demand for the packaged cauliflower that they had to limit purchases of it in some of their stores. Many of those who have made mashed cauliflower said they cannot tell the difference between the cauliflower and mashed potatoes. While potatoes can be a glycemic no-no for diabetics, this gives them another way of enjoying a favorite food without the sugar shock. The available number of mashed cauliflower recipes available is overwhelming. Recipes included a wide variety of items, including cheese, almond milk, yogurt, and sour cream. There are many options for those who want to enjoy a mashed potato substitute, depending on taste. One recipe in particular worked well, it had great taste and gave the desired consistency. Paula Weisenberger became interested in better nutrition and opened Last Diet Ever in Medina after using the program to lose 50 pounds. Learn more about Weisenberger at http://bit.ly/2xJ3VtK and more about Last Diet Ever at http://lastdietever.com/

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Mashed Cauliflower • 1 head of cauliflower, whole or pre-cut packaged • 1 to 2 teaspoons of unsalted or salted butter • 1 1/2 cups Greek yogurt-unsweetened Sea salt and pepper to taste. Steam the cauliflower. Once cooked and tender, drain in a strainer to eliminate some of the water content. Mash the cauliflower with a mixer using the whisk attachment. Once mashed, slowly add the softened butter, yogurt and salt and pepper.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

IN DE E D

The Ripples a Birdie Can Make This column recognizes and rewards those who are caught by our Joyful spies doing good deeds in Medina County. Companies and individuals who donate gift cards for this endeavor will be recognized in this column as well.

PR

OO

F

A few months ago, Birdie Waugh was driving through the intricate and complicated construction zone on Route 42 in Medina. The area was causing a great deal of stress because of the road construction, the numerous “No Left Turn” signs that were posted, and the confusing and ever-changing traffic patterns. Road rage between drivers was rampant and traffic tickets were common. So on a cloudy Wednesday morning, here came Birdie driving steadily and calmly through the worst of the construction. At every parking lot cut there were cars waiting impatiently to pull into traffic, but they were being blocked by the solid stream of traffic. Birdie kept an eye out for each one and would slow down far ahead of time to give them time to pull out and continue with their day. We are recognizing Birdie for her kindness and patience and for watching out for her fellow humans. She was rewarded with a gift certificate for The Book Shelf, a used book store at 105 W. Liberty Street in Medina. All proceeds from The Book Shelf benefit the Project Learn literacy program. Thank you, Birdie!

Ripples

Never hesitate to let someone know you love them, it may be the moment that saves someone or the last chance you have to say it and always, always, always share your joy, it will make a difference somewhere.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Let's do it! Thursday, February 1 National Freedom Day http://bit.ly/2z4KrMV No Politics Day http://bit.ly/2Bo7PLt 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.

February 2018 Non-Profit Calendar

potatoes, coffee, milk, juice, soft drinks. Tickets, adults $8, and kids up to 10 years old, $10, by February 2 and in advance ONLY. E-mail stephanie@wwleader.com to arrange to pay for tickets in cash or go to http://bit.ly/2CXoymq (fee is applied to online sales). Tickets will be waiting at the door.

9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588

Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2DtK0OV

7 p.m. American Legion Post Four Chaplains Remembrance Ceremony; United Church of Christ, 217 E. Liberty Street, Medina. In memory of sacrifice of chaplains during sinking of U.S. Army transport ship, the Dorechester, during WWII.

1 p.m. Computer Support, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Help removing viruses and malware from laptops. Library tech department will assist. Ages 55 and up. First come, first serve. NO PHONE CALLS.

Friday, February 2

1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Meet the Animals; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about the center’s animals, including a snake, turtles, a toad, and a frog. All ages. No registration. http://bit.ly/2CgqcBD

Bubble Gum Day http://bit.ly/2CO3ayS 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 10:30 a.m. Read the Signs!; Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Listen to stories and music and see them in American Sign Language. Learn about deaf culture and how to spell. Register at http://bit.ly/2FDuyBw Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2Dq4M1K

Saturday, February 3 International Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day http://bit.ly/1DbqmRr and Feed the Birds Day http://bit.ly/2BnhjXd 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Breakfast; Applebee’s, 4115 Pearl Road, Medina. Benefits Feeding Medina County. Pancakes, bacon, breakfast

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Happy Birthday, Pigsley; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Celebrate Groundhog’s Day and Pigsley’s birthday. Craft, games, refreshment. All ages. Register http://bit.ly/2mD7bjO 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Pokemon Club; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Bring Pokemon trading cards or play with library’s deck. Register at http://bit. ly/2CNZfSB 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. St. Paul Lutheran Church Annual German Dinner; 1377 Lester Road, Liverpool Township. Tickets at the door. Adults, $13; children 6 to 12, $6; children 5 and under, free.

Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2zHisU6

Monday, February 5 National Weatherman’s Day http://bit. ly/2ktx4l6 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Cardmaking; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Make 10 cards. Supply fee $10. Registration http://bit.ly/2AZyKIq 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Social Issues Film Club: 13th; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. In-depth look at U.S. prison system and racial inequality. Discussion follows on 6 p.m., February 26. Ages 18 and up. Call library to register for both events, 330-278-4271.

Tuesday, February 6 National Chopsticks Day http://bit. ly/2kvkhys 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.

10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Preschoolers in the Garden: Let’s Be Kind to Plants!; Krabill Sunday, February 4 Shelter, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina. OSU Create a Vacuum Day http://bit.ly/2kvd- master gardeners use age-appropriate acqoG and Thank a Mailman Day http://bit. tivities to teach how to be a plant helper. ly/2EEy11G Ages 3 to 6 with adult. Dress for weather. Costs $5 per person at the door. Register Noon to 4 p.m. Putting Through the


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

at http://bit.ly/2BSWcZf 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesdays: Cards for the Troops; Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at http://bit.ly/2DbyCvq 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. No-Sew T-Shirt Tote; Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at http://bit.ly/2EGOWjY 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Battle of the Little Bighorn; Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. John Burke will tell the story of Custer’s Last Stand through the eyes of Chief Black Bird. http://bit.ly/2mHjz2v

Wednesday, February 7

Tickets at the door. Adults, $20; children, $5. 330-410-9905

history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2DtK0OV

5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Lodi Library: Legal Resource Center; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

1 p.m. Fifty Must Try Craft Beers of Ohio; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Discussion of book. Register at http://bit.ly/2D3mKYg

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Retro Craft Club; Story Hour Activity Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Bread dough roses. Ages 18 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2Db0FLt

Friday, February 9 National Pizza Day http://bit.ly/2z5z9Is

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 11 a.m. to noon. Messy Sensory Play; Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Play with rice, Play-Doh, shredded paper, finger paints. Old clothes suggested. Ages 1 to 3 years 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries old. Register for 10 a.m. at http://bit. Program: Nature Through the Seasons ly/2Dt36Wx (waiting list) and for 11 a.m. at Hike; Princess Ledges Nature Preserve, 4361 Spruce Avenue, Brunswick Hills. Ages http://bit.ly/2FzhMEp 7 and up. Free. No registration. http://bit. Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the ly/2zJ2LM1 Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hub2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Volunteens: Snug- bard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniagle Up and Read PJ Day; Buckeye Library, ture golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Teens. Match bit.ly/2Dq4M1K snuggly pajamas with books for commuWave All Your Fingers at Your Neighbor Day http://bit.ly/2BPE9WT and Send a Card to a Friend Day http://bit.ly/2CNPaFb

nity children.

Saturday, February 10

6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Scratch Coding; Comput- Umbrella Day http://bit.ly/1dvWFfm er Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beginner Beekeeping; Street, Medina. Use scratch coding to race. Community Rooms A and B, Medina Register at http://bit.ly/2mHjz2v Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Medina Thursday, February 8 County Beekeepers Association. Registration $85 single, $100 family. Includes Kite Flying Day http://bit.ly/2CMYaKG and Boy Scout Day http://bit.ly/2mAsXVw book, handouts, membership. Register at medinabeekeepers.com or call, 330-7239 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; 6265. Sycamore Room North and South, Bruns10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sit, Stay, Read; wick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Mewith Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 dina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2FDCGlw S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call Noon to 4 p.m. Board Game Drop In; Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, for topics, 330-725-0588. 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring favor3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross ite board game to play. Blood Drive; Saint Ambrose Church, 929 Noon to 5 p.m. Fossils of Ohio; Susan Pearl Road, Brunswick. http://www.redHambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen cross.org/local/ohio/northeast Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. Free. No 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Auditor Mike Kovack’s registration. http://bit.ly/2pSngX3 Great Medina Chili Cook Off!; Fraternal Order of Eagles 2224, 696 Lafayette Road, Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 HubMedina. See if Seville Mayor Carol Carter wins for the third year in a row! For list of bard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniawho is cooking, go to http://bit.ly/2FfPLSe ture golf course based on Ohio geological

1 p.m. Medina Bicentennial: Underground Railroad Presentation; Grace Drake Center for the Arts, 222 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Presentations by area Underground Railroad site owners and experts. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Treat Yourself Saturday; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Teas, essential oils, sweet treats, yog tips, chair massages. All ages. Register at http://bit.ly/2DdLRee 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Intermediate Digital Photography: Beyond the Basics; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn exposure, composition, shutter speeds, more. Prerequisite is Introduction to Digital Photography or moderate prior digital camera experience. Bring digital camera with manual. Ages 16 and up. Cost is $35 per person. Register at http://bit.ly/2zHetH8 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Creativity Club; Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Re-discover joy of creating. Register at http://bit.ly/2DvxNdK 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Medina Sunrise Rotary Annual Valentine’s Wine and Roses Benefit Dinner and Silent Auction; Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Tickets and more information at http://www.medinasunriserotary. com

Sunday, February 11 Make a Friend Day http://bit.ly/1AclH27 and National Inventors Day http://bit. ly/2CMz0vO 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Saint Martin of Tours, 1800 Station Road, Valley City. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast Noon to 5 p.m. Fossils of Ohio; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. All ages. Free. No registration. http://bit.ly/2pSngX3 Noon to 4 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2zHisU6 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. ORMACO Sylvia Wehrs, Solo Violin; Wadsworth Public Library,

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Virtuoso violin. Free, but reservations urged, 330334-5761. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Snowbugs; Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Learn about insects and spiders that are active in the snow. Hike to find them. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration. http://bit.ly/2Ck5caW

Monday, February 12

redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesdays: Valentine’s Day Craft; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at http://bit.ly/2DeRQPV 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Code T: Harry Potter Potions; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Magical chemistry. Grades 3 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2EH6LzC

Wednesday, February 14

National Lost Penny Day http://bit.ly/2B- Ferris Wheel Day http://bit.ly/2z5N8xR, nRAOz and Plum Pudding Day http://bit. National Organ Donor Day http://bit. ly/2BEtuvV ly/17a5nDY and Valentine’s Day http:// 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross bit.ly/1yqHi3g Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax PreparaCenter Road, Brunswick. http://www. tion; Community Rooms A and B, Medina redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fun Fortune Cookies; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make polymer clay fortune cookies to celebrate Chinese New Year, which is February 16. Register at http://bit.ly/2DvYWNC

Tuesday, February 13 Get a Different Name Day http://bit. ly/2BIlXMv 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Hinckley. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Root Candles, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/ local/ohio/northeast

Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.

3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Fry-Day Lenten Fish Fry; Emmanuel United Church of Christ, 6656 Center Road, Valley City. Fish, $10; shrimp, $12. 330-483-3655 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Fish Fry; Spencer Town Hall, 112 N. Main Street, Spencer. Benefits Spencer Historical Society and Black River Youth Sports. Adults, $8.50; senior citizens, $8; children 12 and younger, $4. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday Night Fish Fry; 120 Bank Street, Lodi. All you can eat, dine-in $8; carry-out, $8.25; chicken dinner, $7.25. Benefits Lodi Post 523 American Legion. Call Gregory Udics, 330-948-1523, for more information.

5:30 p.m. Medina Ice Festival, Medina 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Love is in the Air; Public Square. Also 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Speed Carving Contest. Fire and Ice TowFun activities. No registration. er, 7 p.m. 4 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. Movie Matinee: The Saturday, February 17 Emoji Movie; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Popcorn and a Random Acts of Kindness Day http://bit. ly/1DnnV1R movie. No registration. 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Free Spaghetti Dinner; Remsen Christian Church, 1500 Remsen Road, Medina. 330-239-1203

Thursday, February 15 National Gumdrop Day http://bit.ly/1Sxt1jj 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Medina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call for topics, 330-725-0588.

Friday, February 16 Chinese New Years (Year of the Dog) http://bit.ly/2ktAXXe and Do a Grouch a Favor Day http://bit.ly/2p0uMyz 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Soprema Café Customer Appreciation Luncheon; 617 School Drive, Wadsworth. Bring favorite wedding memories. Spaghetti lunch, $5. 330-335-1513

Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www. bit.ly/2Dq4M1K

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beginner Beekeeping; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Medina County Beekeepers Association. Registration $85 single, $100 family. Includes book, handouts, membership. Register at medinabeekeepers.com or call, 330-7236265.

10 a.m. to 11 a.m. For the Birds; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Hike through fields and forests to collect information for the Great Backyard Bird Count. All ages. Free. No registration. http://bit.ly/2pNqV8t 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Art in Action; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Talk to local artists, learn techniques, create art. All ages. Call Aimee, 330-722-4257, for more information. Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2DtK0OV 1 p.m. Computer Support, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Help removing viruses and malware from laptops. Library tech department will assist. Ages 55 and up. First come, first serve. NO PHONE CALLS. 5:30 p.m. Medina Ice Festival, Medina


Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Public Square. Speed carving competitions, 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. Fire and Ice Tower lighting at 7 p.m.

Sunday, February 18 National Battery Day http://bit.ly/2B9Ghp7 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. K-9 Kapers; Carolyn Ludwig Mugrage Park, 4985 Windfall Road, Medina. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration. http://bit.ly/2zJgBhs Noon to 4 p.m. Medina Ice Festival, Medina Public Square. Individual carving competitions. Noon to 4 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2zHisU6

Monday, February 19 Chocolate Mint Day http://bit.ly/2DfZ4R1 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.

5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesdays: Celebrate Polar Bears!; Story Hour Activity Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Watch San Diego zoo polar bear cam while doing polar bear activities. Register at http://bit.ly/2D3weCP 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Beginner Beekeeping; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Medina County Beekeepers Association. Registration $85 single, $100 family. Includes book, handouts, membership. Register at medinabeekeepers.com or call, 330-7236265.

Wednesday, February 21 Card Reading Day http://bit.ly/2BI1dVk 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Color and Calm; Lodi Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Fun, coloring and warm drink. Adults. Free. No registration. 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. National Sticky Bun Day; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Treat and sticky fun activities. No registration.

guidance through legal system. Call 330722-4257 for further information. 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Apple Pie Work Along; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Make dough and filling, leave with pie to bake at home. Ages 18 and up. Check for list of supplies when register. Register at http://bit.ly/2DkdJxc WAITING LIST

Friday, February 23 International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day http://bit.ly/1tHwj9j 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2Dq4M1K

Saturday, February 24 World Sword Swallowers Day http://bit. ly/2Ds9Frr 9 a.m. to noon. Breakfast With the Tooth Fairy; Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive, Medina. Breakfast, crafts, games and activities, free screenings and cleanings, and picture with the Tooth Fairy. Free. http://bit.ly/2FwEvkz

3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Physics of Polarization; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 ridge Road, Medina. Effects of polarization on everyday objects. Regis10:30 a.m. Fiddle Fest; Buckeye Library, ter at http://bit.ly/2DfVwlh 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Drive-In Movie: 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Live perforCars 3; Community Room, Highland 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Life of Lincoln; mance. Music and folk music history. Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Pick Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Register at http://bit.ly/2D3Bp5J up cardboard box, make it into a car at Wooster Street, Lodi. Adults. Register at home, bring it back to watch the movie in. http://bit.ly/2De8Yq3 11 a.m. to noon. Once Upon a Time Popcorn provided. Ages 3 to 8. Register at STEAM Tales; Seville Library, 45 Center Thursday, February 22 http://bit.ly/2B1FsxJ Street, Seville. Fairy tales and STEAMBe Humble Day http://bit.ly/2BHze89 and based craft. Register at http://bit.ly/2DTuesday, February 20 Walking the Dog Day http://bit.ly/16trO- CfJPr Northern Hemisphere Hoodie-Hoo Day Ev Noon till 5 p.m.(?) Medina Bicentennial: http://bit.ly/1dRCU6I and Love Your Pet 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Living History; Community Rooms A and Day http://bit.ly/1d70Mzo Sycamore Room North and South, Bruns- B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; wick Library, 3649 Center Road, BrunsMedina. Living history characters FredSycamore Room North and South, Bruns- wick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. erick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, and Sowick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunsjourner Truth share stories from pioneer 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Camp Wired; Mewick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. days of Medina. Note: Come early, at the dina Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 January event it ended by 3 p.m. 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn and Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory refresh computer skills. Ages 55 plus. Call Noon to 5 p.m. What’s Up With WoodRoom, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center for topics, 330-725-0588. peckers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Making Warm Up Medina County donaBlood Drive; Ella Canavan Elementary tions. School, 825 Lawrence Street. http://www. Be sure to let event organizers 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast know that you saw their event Blood Drive; Wadsworth YMCA, 623 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Medina Library: Legal listed in Joy Magazine! School Drive, Wadsworth. http://www. Resource Center; Medina Library, 210 S. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast Broadway Street, Medina. Volunteers offer Noon to 4 p.m. Medina Ice Festival, Medina Public Square. Team carving competitions.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | February 2018

Games, crafts, activities. All ages. Free. No registration.

Monday, February 26

Noon to 7 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2DtK0OV

9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.

Sunday, February 25 National Chocolate Covered Nut Day http://bit.ly/2lm2bhX Noon to 5 p.m. What’s Up With Woodpeckers; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Games, crafts, activities. All ages. Free. No registration. Noon to 4 p.m. Putting Through the Ages; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8707 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Indoor miniature golf course based on Ohio geological history. All ages. Free. Register at http:// bit.ly/2zHisU6 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Creating With Crayons; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Projects for using bits and pieces of crayons. Ages 12 and up. Register by February 24. Free. http:// bit.ly/2zIkt2c 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. ORMACO Detroit Institute of Art: Monet Framing Life; bus leaves from Buehler’s River Styx, 3616 Medina Road, Medina, with a 7:30 a.m. pick up at the Apple Grocery Store, 209 Herrick, Wellington. Muffins and mimosas provided. Depart from museum at 3 p.m. Lunch is available for purchase at the museum café or restaurant. Return trip features wine, cookies, chocolate, cheese, more. Drop off in Wellington at 5:30 p.m., Medina 6 p.m. Tickets $74 at www.ormaco.org or call 330-722-2541

Tell a Fairy Tale Day http://bit.ly/2B8T774

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Movie Monday!; Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. No registration. 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Community Recreation Center, 855 Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ ohio/northeast 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. 3:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Tuesday, February 27 Polar Bear Day http://bit.ly/2oY6xAV and No Brainer Day http://bit.ly/2ktM4zs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations.

tions for chronic pain. Register at http:// bit.ly/2my57sp 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesdays: All Things Dr. Seuss; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Register at http://bit.ly/2FH8vu3 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Medina Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Teen anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. 6 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. Beginner Beekeeping; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Medina County Beekeepers Association. Registration $85 single, $100 family. Includes book, handouts, membership. Register at medinabeekeepers.com or call, 330-7236265.

Wednesday, February 28 National Tooth Fairy Day http://bit. ly/2kufWLY 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 1 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Afternoon at the Cinema; Sycamore Rooms North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call for movie title, 330-2734150. 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Make Your Own KoolAid Lip Kit; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make Kool-Aid lip gloss. No registration.

10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Polar Bear Party; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Celebrate polar 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Managing Photos; Sycabears with stories, songs, craft. Register at more Rooms North and South, Brunswick http://bit.ly/2mFG9IJ WAITING LIST. Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Natural Solutions Learn to locate, organize, edit photos. Series; Community Room, Lodi Library, Register at http://bit.ly/2D6n4p7 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Tips for solu-

Submitting Calendar Events “Let’s Do It!” is a calendar of events sponsored or hosted by non-political, non-profit groups in Medina County. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCounty. com, where it is regularly updated with additional events. There is no charge to list an event in the calendar. To have an event listed, please send date, time, event name, location, cost of event, organization benefitting from the event (and hosting or sponsoring organization if different), contact name and phone number, website if available, and name and phone number of the person submitting the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with Calendar in the subject line or you can mail the information to Attn: Calendar, Joy of Medina County Magazine, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Oh. 44256. Calendar information will not be taken by phone.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2018  

This month, we give tips on how to avoid creating spore-spitting blonds, share a recipe, start our book serial, and so much more! Join us at...

Joy of Medina County Magazine February 2018  

This month, we give tips on how to avoid creating spore-spitting blonds, share a recipe, start our book serial, and so much more! Join us at...