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N O TI P VA MA ! O N UR DE RE O SI 14 T IN G. P

APRIL 2018

VOLUME 1, NUMBER 3

LOOKING FOR THE RIGHT WORDS? PG. 7

IRRITATED BY SQUIRRELS? PG.17

INTIMIDATED BY NETWORKING? PG. 17

FINDING HOME

SHE IMMIGRATED FROM HUNGARY AND BECAME A BEACON OF HOPE FOR AMERICAN VETERANS AND THE MENTALLY ILL. PG 4


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

One

Voice

Come Plant a Pinwheel With Me

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 3 J O Y O F M E D I N A C O U NTY.C OM PUBLISHER Blake House Publishing, LLC

by Amy Barnes

I

f you do not know what the Childrens Center Pinwheel Walk is, you have been missing out on a powerful celebration of courage, of what is good in the world, and an observation of what still needs to be fixed. On Sunday, April 8, the free event begins on Medina’s Public Square at 1 p.m. with speeches and various fun activities and games. Then everyone gathers with pinwheels clutched and walks up East Washington Street to St. Francis Xavier Church to plant a pinwheel, one for each case of reported child abuse. It is a walk that is an odd mix of jaunty spinning pinwheels and somber thoughts of the reason for the walk. Usually the ground is soft, and the pinwheels push easily into the giving soil and start crazily spinning and sparkling in the April breeze. This year there will be 627 pinwheels. Want to come and plant a pinwheel with me? Joy Magazine is inviting everyone

to join us in celebrating the courage and bravery of the children, the adult survivors, and those who help save children from abuse. This is a great opportunity to show support for those who work at the Childrens Center and at other agencies in this field who have an amazing fortitude to listen day after day to stories that break their hearts while offering the children their courage to cling to and their outwardly calm acceptance of whatever a child must share. Please visit the Joy Magazine booth! We’ll have a couple of activities, including the chance to write down a wish to put in our Wishing Well. We’ll publish a few of them (without names) in our May issue. Help today’s child and tomorrow’s adult will be strong.

E D I TO R Amy Barnes P H O TO G R A P H E R FlashBang Photography A R T D I R E C TOR Ryan Burdzinski C O N T R I B U TO R S Bob Arnold Rich Bailey Paul McHam Kent Von Der Vellen MASCOT Rico Houdini OFFICE 330-461-0589 EMAIL Joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com JOY of MEDINA COUNTY MAGAZINE is published monthly by Blake House Publishing, LLC, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio, 44256. Send change of address cards to above. It is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition that can be found by clicking on Free E-Edition at JoyofMedinaCounty. com. Copyright 2018 by Blake House Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or pictorial content without written permission is strictly prohibited. Printed in the United States. Any unsolicited materials, manuscripts, artwork, cartoons, or photos will not be returned.

Specializing in: Portrait Photography • Traditional Headshots Glamour Shots • Corporate Portraits Family Portraits

Order copies of any photos in Joy of Medina County Magazine 440-263-4502 | sfeller1@neo.rr.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

Contents

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A PLACE TO BE by Amy Barnes

Elizabeth Mikita was a refugee from Hungary when she arrived in America. For 20 years she has worked tirelessly to give veterans and mentally ill people a place to call home.

JOYFUL WORD SEARCH

PEACE OF NEWBRIDGE

Find the words about finding home.

OH, SNAP!

photos by FlashBang Photography

We’ve captured a fun fairy, imaginative ice, and a virtuoso violinist.

THE READING NOOK

LITTLE TRUTHS

by Christopher Barnes

As Cam tries to accept his dad’s death, he struggles to find ways to ease the pain of his loss.

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THE RENOVATION TOUR

The map and list of seminars for the amazing annual self-guided tour of home improvement companies in Medina.

TALES OF A MOLD WARRIOR

MOLD CAN TAKE FACE AND LIFE by Paul McHam

When Mark Tatum lost his face to mold, our columnist visited him and tried to solve the mystery of the mold’s source.

INVESTING INTELLIGENCE: SECRETS OF A MORTGAGE BANKER

EXPLAINING THE HOUSING SHORTAGE by Rich Bailey

Wondering why homes are selling so quickly and for more than the listed price? Our mortgage banker has the answer.

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THE NETWORKER

MAKING THEIR EYES LIGHT UP by Bob Arnold

A favorite subject can be the key to easy networking.

BICENTENNIAL BITES Joy of Medina County Magazine is distributed for free in a print edition and as an e-edition, which can be found by going to JoyofMedinaCounty. com, scrolling down, then picking and clicking on the desired issue. Don’t miss out on the upcoming great stories and features in Joy Magazine! Go to the magazine’s website and click the “Get a FREE E-Edition Subscription” box. Certain features, such as Giving Hearts and Help is Here, are available only on the website: JoyofMedinaCounty.com

BAKED SQUIRREL by C.L. Gammon

Celebrating the bicentennial through recipes!

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GEMS

BLUE PRIDE PROVIDES SUPPORT TO FAMILIES by Kent Von Der Vellen

A community’s loss led to the creation of a group that helps

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BITE ME!

SCRUMPTIOUS STUFFED PEPPERS by Amy Barnes

A warm, filling meal to end winter and welcome spring.

ON THE COVER: Elizabeth Mikita of Newbridge Veterans Place makes everyone feel at home.

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LET’S DO IT!

Time for lambs and flowers to start springing, and there is lots to do for humans, too!

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

A Place to

Be

by Amy Barnes Photos by FlashBang Photography

T

he delicious smell of dinner cooking, almost ready to serve, in a warm-toned kitchen that says “home” in every inch. The appliances are modern, but the furnishings are a step back in time to the fifties and sixties, perfect for creating an atmosphere of home for the veterans here. The setting is comforting for those living at Newbridge Veterans Place. It takes them back to a time before they experienced the horrors of war and military combat. Now, all they want is peace and a place to be. They are welcome here in a way that some of them have never been. Some of the residents experienced home as children only as a wistful dream because they came from very poor or abusive homes and went into military service for a place to go. When their service ended, they returned to America, broken in mind and body, and found they were not welcome or were ignored, expected to integrate back into society on their own as if they had never left. Then, in 1998, a woman who was born in Hungary decided she wanted to help the Medina County area’s disabled and homeless veterans and the mentally ill.

As a child in Hungary, Elizabeth Mikita had dreamed of having a career working with disabled children. For reasons she still doesn’t understand, she was pressured to choose another profession, so she went into theater. Growing up in Hungary, she had a very limited understanding of the Vietnam War. She recalls that as a child in school, she and her classmates were required to knit squares. The squares were then assembled into blankets that were sent to Vietnam. Mikita said she had no idea why the government required the blankets. Her face saddens as she explains she did not understand the war or America’s involvement until she started studying American history. Little did she know when she was dutifully knitting those squares that one day she would be helping the veterans from the other side of the war. In January 1989, when Elizabeth (Erzsebet) Mikita; her husband, Viktor Mikita; and their 3-year-old daughter, Rita Mikita, came to the states, they were arriving from Austria where they had spent 1 ½ years in a refugee camp after fleeing Hungary as the Soviet Union’s Iron Curtain began to fall.

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They are welcome here in a way that some of them have never been.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

The Mikita family’s hopes for a new life soon were dashed when Victor Mikita’s longing for Hungary and his life there made it impossible for him to remain in the U.S., and he returned to Hungary. By then, Elizabeth Mikita already had seen that the opportunities for their daughter were much better in their new home than in Hungary, so she decided to build a life for herself and her daughter in the U.S. Within two weeks of arriving in the U.S., Mikita had a job as a baker at Baldwin Wallace University and her daughter was in day care. Neither of them knew a word of English. It was her steely determination to succeed and to give her daughter a new life that drove Mikita. She worked as a baker at the university while working toward earning a degree. By 1996, Mikita had a degree in international studies from Baldwin Wallace and had completed two internships, enabling her to go into international business. She went to work for a Chinese exporting company in downtown Cleveland. When Mikita realized the international business world was not for her, she moved to Burbank and started the Dome Home in 1998, a residence with a small working farm for disabled and homeless veterans and the mentally ill. The desire for a decent cup of coffee inspired her to start her own coffee shop in 2000 called Central Station at the Lodi Outlet Mall, now known as Ohio Station Outlets. She specialized in importing her own coffee from Brazil. By 2002, Mikita felt overwhelmed running what was by then two group homes and the coffee shop, so she decided to leave the coffee business and instead concentrate her energies on the residents of the Dome Home, fulfilling her childhood desire to help people. Since opening the Dome Home, Mikita has added two additional facilities, Newbridge Place and Newbridge Veterans Place, both located in Lodi. Newbridge Place and the Dome Home are for veterans as well as for those suffering from mental illnesses. Newbridge Veterans Place is for veterans only. Between the three facilities and an independent living facility, there are 30 beds available for male and female veterans and the mentally ill, with 15 employees ensuring the residents’ needs are met. The homes serve to help in healing and recovery and avoiding self-medication with addictive drugs and alcohol. Because of her business background, Mikita ensures the facilities operate within budget, but it is not an easy task. Funding is almost non-existent,

so the facilities rely on $600 per month from each resident’s Social Security disability check, donations and grants. “You can imagine, our overhead is very high,” Mikita said. Newbridge Place for Veterans’ main mission is to provide care for low-income and disabled veterans. Veterans receive room, board and transportation. They are served three home-cooked meals a day, with open access to the kitchen for snacks. Meals depend on what they can get through donations and with their limited funds. When funds allow, residents are taken on vacations. Mikita said that some of the veterans had never been on a vacation prior to moving to Newbridge. They would ask Mikita what they were supposed to do, they did not understand they could just sit on the beach and enjoy the sounds of the waves. “It is important for them to have a normal life,” said Mikita. What the facilities need most are knowledge, time and money. Clothing is not needed. Any donations of goods should be items someone would use in their own home, not anything that would

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Elizabeth Mikita works endlessly to care for the residents of the homes she oversees.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 5 be headed for the garbage bin. There is an urgent need for donations of knowledge and time by contractors and handymen and materials for repairs and projects. The retaining wall at Newbridge Veterans Place needs repairs. Mikita also would like to clean and improve the small pond on the property and is hopeful that a wildlife or butterfly sanctuary could be established. Volunteers are needed as drivers and to do activities with the residents. “We have to be creative” to be able to provide highquality services for low-income vets, Mikita said. Residents are placed in the homes through the Veterans Administration, social workers, clinics, and hospitals. “It is a team,” Mikita said. Each resident is thoroughly vetted to ensure he or she can handle selfcare and will be a good fit with the other residents. Mikita laughs when she says the oversight board is concerned about her 90-hour work week and urges her to cut back to avoid burnout. “When I decided to do this (start the facilities), that is when my life took real meaning,” Mikita said, adding that the emotional reward is incredible. “I’ve always been a very grounded person. Every day I will do something good.” Over the years, Mikita has seen many successes. She has seen people enter the facility depressed and battling mental illnesses and then seen them heal. Some leave and re-enter the world. Others stay for the rest of their lives. “We have some very ill people who may never recover but at least they have a good quality of life,” Mikita said.

With tears in her eyes, Mikita explained that family members expect normal, but sometimes that is not possible. Families pull away, no one wants to talk about mental illness. For instance, she said, family members do not understand what it is like to battle the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and can not understand why their family member is not able to be as they expect them to be. Over the years, the residents bond with Mikita. Her warm smile and easy acceptance of how they are and her encouragement to heal, combined with the homelike setting she strives to provide, gives them the love and support they need. “Everybody deserves a supportive home environment to increase their quality of life,” Mikita said. When a resident veteran dies, Mikita attends the funeral. Sometimes, she said, with tears filling her eyes, the families do not come, even if they live close by. “It’s really hard to accept that flag,” she softly said. Seventy-five percent of people who enter one of Mikita’s facilities get well because they want to get well, Mikita said. She said that if someone is not ready to heal, then they will not. “The better way to think of success is: Do I want to get up in the morning? And the answer for 20 years is, ‘yes’,” Mikita said. Mikita has another reason to be proud. A love of learning was instilled in her daughter, Rita Mikita, who grew up to become a school teacher. She teaches physics at the MC2 Stem High School in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, is married and has a son. In November 2017, she won an Excellence in Teaching Award.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

Joyful Word Search Peace of Newbridge I

C A T

I

S C R E E N

I N G F

B D U C M A F G R O N K T U P U S O E A F D R E C O V E R Y O C R L H E S A H 0

P E P P H

L E L E L T N E C T W T A T E D R M W S Y E L O N C E H E R T

I O R E

I H U N G A R Y S E

R N T U R N A I P D O A M R E K A R E G D I

R B W E N Z G E

W P E P H E M O D O T S U L G E Y R E V A R B A N E G A I U V A C A T

I O N S B U L E F F

N R P U T

I M E E H O F R S E

A E C A E P U T Q T

I

B B A R

H

I

D A B A

I

Y T

I

NEWBRIDGE LODI SAFETY VETERANS HOPE FUNDRAISERS

L

I

B A S

DISABILITY RECOVERY HUNGARY TIME KNOWLEDGE REFUGEE

ERZSEBET VACATIONS SCREENING DOME BRAVERY PEACE

Answer Key For Last Month’s Search: Good Guy Graham

AirXperts

LLC

Council-Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant

Integrity • Knowledge • Quality Indoor Environmental Assessments & Testing Specializing in Mold Remediation, Meth Cleanup, Duct Cleaning - Tailored Seminars Available -

Paul McHam CEI,CMI,CIE,WRT,AMRT,CTS,CIEC Office: 330-331-7500 Cell: 330-280-3777 MyAirXperts.com

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Avery Rice does not look ready to part with the baby tooth the Tooth Fairy (Anna Monhollen) picked out on a visit to the Medina County Health Department.

Dr. Darren Thomas gives Clayton Domanich his first dental exam at the health department’s Breakfast With the Tooth Fairy.

Keowynn (left) and Kilian Zamora play with blocks with Jenna Phillips at the health department’s Tooth Fairy event.

The bees in the Medina Public Library observation hive are buzzing about the approach of spring.

Oh,! Snap

Photos by F l a s h B a n g P h ot ography

Ray Fain gives a presentation about Tom King, a black Medina resident in the 1800s, at the Medina Bicentennial: Black History in Medina event.

Area residents gathered to learn about the important roles of blacks at Medina Bicentennial: Black History in Medina at the Medina Public Library.

Peggy Garnes, of the Medina Beekeepers Association, educates a class of hopeful future beekeepers at the Medina Public Library.

Virtuoso violinist Sylvia Wehr kindly posed following her recent performance at the Wadsworth Public Library as part of ORMACO’s efforts to making the arts more accessible.

Sharing her passion and dedication, virtuoso violinist Sylvia Wehr performs recently for a crowd at Wadsworth Public Library courtesy of ORMACO.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

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Medina Ice Festival New to the competition was Drew Rickbrodt, Medina, with his saber-tooth tiger. He started learning ice carving last August. Some brought their own toys, like Lucy, the chocolate Labrador, who was accompanied by her owner, Melanie Leonardi, from Medina.

Ali Hall works on a seahorse sculpture. Mark Spangenberg, from Madison, happily creates his leg lamp sculpture.

K-9 Kapers at Allardale Park with (from left): Joe Denardi and Charlie, Jim Swaney and Winston, Amy Snell and Ziggy, Jan Denardi, Michelle House and Mokka, Barb Pinizzutto and Bear, and Rick Stoper and Finigen.


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

CHAPTER 5

TH E READ I NG N O O K

Catch up on previous chapters of our story in the Joy Magazine e-edition! Go to JoyofMedinaCounty.com for links to past issues.

I spent the night in the hospital. I got several texts from my friends throughout the day, but I couldn’t bring myself to reply. I didn’t know what to say really, and I knew the moment I started to talk to someone about what had happened it would all just pour out. I wasn’t sure if I would cry or not, but I didn’t want to, at least not in front of anyone. So, I remained in the hospital bed, wasting the time away with my phone and some weird soap operas that were on the hospital TV. Every couple of hours or so a kindly nurse would come in and check up on me, always bringing me more pudding to replace the empty cup that I’d eaten the last time. This was the extent of human interaction I had. It wasn’t until after three in the afternoon that I received a call from Devin. I stared at my phone for a long moment before answering. “Cam! Where were you today? You doing okay?” His voice was mostly joyful, with a hint of concern. He had no idea how bad things were. “I’m fine, but um, my dad…,” I stopped and pulled the phone away as I swallowed hard. I brought the phone back to my ear and heard Devin again, “…dad? Is he okay?” His concern was much greater now, and I thought I could even hear his heart pounding through the phone. “No. He’s uh…well…my dad’s dead, Devin.” Just saying the words were enough to force a tear to roll down my right cheek. My heart sunk for the second time within the last 24 hours and chills went down my spine. I stayed on the line though. I needed to make sure Devin had heard me clearly. There was a long pause, then he simply whispered, “What?” so softly

that it barely came through the line. “I’m in the James Hospital,” I spat out before hanging up and tossing the phone on the table next to me. I turned over and buried my face in the pillow, holding it against my eyes. I sobbed so hard that my throat hurt, and my eyes burned. I couldn’t even form a full thought throughout my breakdown. As soon as I thought of my dad, another bout of tears would pour out. Some immeasurable amount of time later, a gentle hand rested on my quivering shoulder. “No, thank you,” I managed to get out, assuming the nurse had returned to check on me with more pudding. Silently, the person sat down on the bed and started rubbing my back. “Breathe, Cam, breathe,” Devin’s voice rung in my ears, and I suddenly wondered if I had forgotten to actually hang up my phone. Then I realized that the hand on my back wasn’t the nurse’s at all. I twisted my head so I could see over my shoulder, and through the haze of tears I saw Devin sitting there, rubbing my back like a comforting mom. A comforting mom that I should have had in that moment, but I didn’t. All I had was Devin. Through the overbearing silence, I sat up to sit next to Devin. I leaned against his shoulder, and he put his arms around me. In any other moment of my life, I would’ve been terrified of seeming weak, vulnerable or even feminine, but right then, right there, I didn’t care. I stared at one specific floor tile and calmly waited for the tears to stop coming. My breathing got steadier and steadier until I could take a full breath. “Devin, what are you doing here?” I asked finally, my voice still slightly shaky. He frowned at me, “I’m here to help you. I’m here to remind you that you’re not alone. I’m here to hold you up until you can stand on your own.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

But mostly I’m just here for the hospital pudding.” I stayed stoic, staring at that floor tile, “Oh.” “Cam,” his voice softened, “I was joking about that last one.” He rubbed my shoulder, and I just looked onward. “Wanna’ tell me what happened?” I glanced at him, “Not really.” I tried to stand up, but my knees buckled, and I fell onto the cold, cruel hospital floor in a mess of limbs and emotion. “Cam!” Devin sat down next to me and pulled me back up to sit on the floor with him. I looked back at him and exhaled, “I’m okay.” My dad was dead, but that didn’t mean I had to die with him. He had put my seatbelt on me for a reason; he wanted me to be safe, and I wasn’t about to throw away this life he had given me. It would just be immensely harder now that I had no parents. Not to mention I had witnessed my mother’s leaving and my father’s death. “He took me to a bar,” I whispered, Devin’s ear close enough that only he could hear. “Why?” “He promised me that he’d teach me about alcohol and let me taste a bunch of different kinds, so that’s what we were doing.” I let out another deep breath and blinked slowly. Devin let my words fade out before continuing with his questions, “Did he drink?” I swallowed and nodded, tears finding their way back to my eyes. I had told the cop the night before that I had no idea how much my dad had to drink, but I could still picture all four beers he had downed as he drank them. He also finished my drinks when I got tired of them. “How much?” Devin asked, going slowly through the questions. “A few,” I choked out between

sobs. I was losing it again, thinking about his laugh just before we had pulled out of the bar’s parking lot. “Ahh, and then, what? A crash?” Devin spoke softly. I buried my face into his shoulder and made some sort of affirmative grunt.

My little sister had disappeared with my mom.... His hands ran up and down my back for a while, sitting there in silence as I cried and cried. His shirt was soaked by the time I found my breath and calmed down. “Cam?” “Hmm?” “You wanna’ go back to my place? You can stay with me for the night.” I thought of my apartment. The one I shared with my dad. His jacket was still on the back of his chair, his frying pan was in the sink, his toothbrush was in the medicine cabinet. He was still there, without being there. “Where do you think he is?” I asked, instead of answering Devin’s question. He thought for a moment before saying, “I think he’s somewhere. Not physically here, but somewhere nearby. And I know that he’s looking at you and smiling. You’re a great guy, Cam, and any father would be proud of you.” I nodded slightly. “Yeah. Let’s go back to your place.” He led me out of the hospital, and I’m not even sure if he checked me out at the time or not, but the next thing I knew we were pulling up in his driveway. I stumbled into his house behind him and immediately headed for the couch when he grabbed my

arm. “No, uh-uh, you’re taking my bed tonight, man.” He led me to his room and practically shoved me into his bed. I saw his digital clock sitting on his desk and discovered that it was already past two in the morning. “Thanks, Devin,” I said quietly, curling up under his fluffy blankets. It was warm outside, but his room was nice and cool; a great temperature for sleeping. “No problem,” he replied as he shut the door. I heard his soft footfalls as he walked down the hall and then down the stairs. I let out a long, deep breath and almost relaxed for a moment. That’s when the thoughts set in. My dad, my one and only dad, had died in a car crash the previous night. My mom was nowhere to be seen, and I hadn’t heard from her in years. My little sister had disappeared with my mom and as much as I loved her when I knew her, I had no idea who or where she was at that moment. My whole family was gone, and while I knew I could count on Devin and his parents to take me in, what I really needed was my own family. Not that I would have preferred living with anyone else other than Devin, but still, his family wasn’t mine.

CHAPTER 6 I didn’t sleep that night. I heard Devin moving around and using the bathroom around six in the morning and realized he was getting ready for school. He didn’t bother coming into his room though, leaving me alone with the same thoughts I’d been thinking all night. After a short while I could hear the door open and shut behind him as he left. I wondered what he would tell

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

c on t i n u e d f ro m P a g e 11 Garret and Heath, if anything, but then my thoughts slipped back to Marissa for the first time in what felt like an eternity. Then I remembered the bowling alley. I bolted upright in Devin’s bed and checked the clock. It was seven. The bowling alley didn’t open until eight, but it would take half an hour just to walk there, so I had time. If Marissa could find peace and tranquility there, then so could I. Besides, right then, it was something to keep my mind off of other recent events, and that was what I needed. I got out of bed and snagged one of Devin’s loose shirts. It would still be a bit tight on me, he was significantly shorter after all, but it would work. I didn’t even bother trying to put on a pair of his jeans though. I took a quick shower and then checked my phone. As I hit the power button to light up the screen, I realized that I hadn’t plugged it into a charger in almost twenty-four hours. I sighed, staring at the blank screen. I’d just have to hope that I didn’t need my phone for any reason. I tossed it on Devin’s bed and slipped on my sneakers. The bowling alley was a couple miles away, so I figured I’d head out and hopefully arrive just after they opened. As I approached, I saw the manager unlocking the doors. My heart fluttered a bit as I realized just how crazy this was, but I knew it would keep my mind busy at the very least. I walked into the bowling alley at just after 8 a.m. on a school day and got several strange looks from the front desk. “Hey, Cam, shouldn’t you be in class?” Zack asked me from behind the counter. He had dropped out after his junior year, but we had

known each other for a while before that. I looked over at him and knew I must have looked horrible by his expression, “Yeah, probably.” He nodded and then turned away, “I don’t know anything.” “Thanks,” I said, and then headed to the bathroom. I slipped in, locked the door, and immediately opened the ventilation shaft. I crawled through and found my way to Marissa’s chamber in just a few minutes. It was still a mess, and I could only hope that meant that Marissa hadn’t returned since I had discovered it. Cautiously, I picked up another poem and read it. My hands were shaking, so it was a bit tricky to read the poem, but eventually I made out the letters.

I am alone, She whispered softly. No one understands me, She whispered softly. No one has tried.

Yet, she doesn’t understand Herself. So, how can she expect Someone Else to understand What She doesn’t. There was far more to Marissa Colt than anyone realized, but in that moment, I didn’t care. There was a reason I had returned to that place when I was feeling overwhelming pain. It wasn’t to share it with Marissa, because I didn’t know how to express it in words, or write my feelings out, because I’m not a good writer, or play guitar, since I had no idea how to. I was there for the razors and knives because those were things I knew how to use. I stepped over a notebook and a pillow and stared at the sharp

edge of the kitchen knife that was hanging on the wall, attached by a magnetic hook. It looked cold and unfriendly, like it could really hurt somebody. But that was exactly what I wanted. It felt balanced in my hand as I pulled it off the hook, but it was too big. I didn’t want to lose a limb, I just wanted a release. Some way to let out all of whatever was inside me, pressing on my veins. I put the kitchen knife back and picked up a pocketknife instead. It was much smaller, and I doubted I could even lose a finger to its short blade. The blade felt like ice as I ran my finger along its edge, but it felt good. I repeated the motion over and over again, slowly pressing my fingertip harder and harder against the sharp steel. A drop of blood fell onto my shoe, and I realized my finger was starting to really hurt, so I switched fingers. Half an hour later, every finger on my left hand was dripping blood, and it stung like crazy. I looked down to find a puddle of blood and salty tears at my feet, pooling together as if the two liquids were long lost lovers. I watched the blood swirl into the tears, squeezing my hand to keep the bleeding going. It was calm, peaceful and painful, and it helped. My breathing slowed, my heart rate plummeted, and my cuts stopped bleeding. All that was left was the puddle of pain at my feet. No longer stuck inside me, I was relieved of most of the anguish just by the simple act of slicing my fingers. I stared at the beautifully painful pool of salty blood and understood Marissa Colt far more than I ever dreamed I would. At first, I wasn’t sure whether I should clean up the mess or not.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

Marissa would know someone had been in her secret room either way, but I figured it would be rude and disgusting to just let my pain dry up and leave a stain on her metallic floor. I looked around for a notebook that wasn’t filled up, but it wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be. Almost every page in every book had been filled with poems, prose, and drawings. Some pages even had drops of dried blood dispersed throughout them. But there were no stains on the floor. Guilt started to overcome me as I searched for a few empty pages. Finally finding some, I wiped up the pool of blood and tears as best as I could. Unfortunately, I had taken too long finding clean pages, and there was already a visible stain on the metal. I’d need some sort of chemical cleaner to get it up completely, and that wasn’t something I had. The next time Marissa retreated to her hiding place, she’d know beyond any shadow of doubt that someone else had been there. Someone who read her work and used her knife. I had no idea how she’d react, but I knew that I didn’t want her knowing it was me who invaded her privacy. I began to worry as I realized she’d probably be able to guess that I was the one who had found her secret room. I had seen her leave the vent just days before, and everyone at school would know about my dad by the end of the day. It wouldn’t take Sherlock Holmes to figure out who broke into her ventilation shaft haven. I had to get out of the room before she decided to return though, and that meant I had to leave immediately. I had no idea what time it was, but if she’d had a rough day at school, she might be heading to her secret room right after it let out. My shoes squeaked against

the steel as I went to pull myself out, but then I felt guilty again and decided to leave something behind. Something small just to let her know that I wasn’t trying to ruin her sacred place or anything like that. The only thing I could think of was to write an apology, so I picked up a pen and scribbled “SORRY” on the back cover of one of the dozens of notebooks. Then I left without wasting any more time. I made it back into the bowling alley bathroom within a couple minutes, and I had to stop myself and take several deep

breaths before I could leave. It was a surreal experience, cutting. It was awful and painful and wrong, but at the same exact time it felt like I’d been a sponge full of soaking wet agony, and someone had just wrung me out. Relief washed over me as I tore up the bloodied notebook pages and flushed them down the toilet, finally doing away with the pain. I knew it would return soon, but for now, it didn’t exist. It was beautiful and horrible, and I loved it. I knew then that I’d be returning to Marissa’s room at some point, I just didn’t know when. Thoughts about how careful I’d have to be and how often I could go to Marissa’s secret room bounced around my head as I walked all the way back to Devin’s house. One of

the last things I wanted was to run into Marissa in the middle of using her blades. Another thing I didn’t want was for Devin to see the cuts on my fingertips. I slipped into his house and washed my hands, making sure no trace of blood was left. The cuts were visible, but as long as I didn’t call attention to my hands, I was confident Devin would never know. I laid down in his bed, staring at the clock. Somehow the whole day had passed, and Devin would be home any minute. My plan was to lie to his face, claim that I hadn’t even gotten out of bed, and hope that he believed me. I didn’t know if he’d buy it, considering he knew me better than anyone else did, but I was going to try. The door opened downstairs and an audible thud resonated through the house as Devin’s backpack hit the floor. “Hey Cam!” I heard him shout from the stairwell. I wasn’t sure how to respond to him or if I should even respond at all. I didn’t even know if Heath and Garret were with him or not. I didn’t hear them, but I wasn’t certain. Devin’s footfalls on the stairs told me that he was alone, and a moment later the bedroom door opened. I swallowed hard and prepared to tell the biggest lie ever to my best friend. “Hey, Devin. How was school?”

Our st ory cont in u es next mont h! Christopher Barnes is a graduate of Medina High School/Medina County Career Center and Ohio State University. Find his stories of realistic fiction and magical realism at http:// cbthesurvivor.

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Sleepy Hollow Rd

10:00 am – 5:00 pm Saturday, april 7

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2462 Pearl Road, Medina 330-225-6000

tR

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Hamilton Rd Pe a rl Rd Rou te 4 2 MDG

See the latest trends and talk to the experts! Tour includes four of the top, locally-owned, indoor and outdoor home renovation stores in the county who are all Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau!

Fenn Rd More information: www.TheRenovationTour.com www.Facebook.com/TheRenovationTour

N Court St.

MDG 3812 Pearl Road, Medina 330-725-5252

ut e Also meet specialized contractors and factory reps at some of the locations.

Medina

Rd Route 18

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Rd te t e ay 42 Laf oute R

7

Route 3

Route 57 Route 18

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Bring your questions and consult with the experts while having fun, learning, and seeing cool new products and ideas.

Ro

Today’s Carpet Technology: 10:30am and 1:00pm Discover the difference in carpet fiber. Make an informed decision on what would work for your project. Heated Floor System: 11:00am and 2:00pm Get a taste of what’s available with an affordable interior designer. Learn about product and color selections plus enter a drawing for a free in-home consultation with design board (Discounted gift cards also available for purchase.) Luxury Vinyl Plank: Noon and 3:00pm You have to see it to believe it. Be amazed by the benefits, durability, and beauty of luxury vinyl planks and tiles. All-day tours of our showroom, including carpet, hardwood, vinyl, ceramic, and laminate displays.

Route 42

3

5 Steps for Remodeling Success: 10:30am and 1:30pm From concept to production to installation, Architectural Justice is determined to produce innovative, functional spaces, while staying on the cutting edge of design. Learn about the remodeling process at Architectural Justice and what to expect each step of the way. Countertop Material Guide: Noon and 3:00pm With over 3,000 full slabs of stone on premise, Architectural Justice is one of the largest stocking fabricators in Northeast Ohio. Learn about the properties, care, and maintenance of granite, marble, quartz, and more. All-day tours of our showroom plus granite, wood, metal, and cast shops. Special tour-day savings on granite, furniture, and accessories. Tour participants will be entered in a drawing to win great prizes!

Sponsored by Joy of Medina County Magazine. Their e-edition is informative and uplifting. Enjoy it at no charge and print out the Renovation Tour map! www.JoyOfMedinaCountyMagazine.com


0am – 5:00pm 0 : 10 Why travel to find professional services or companies when the experts are right here in Medina?

HWY I-71

il r p a , y da

7

Sa tu r

Ridge Rd Route 94

Beach Rd

Boneta Rd

HWY I-271

Windfall Rd

FREE Mini Seminars & Consultations with Experts • 20-Minute Mini Seminars • Free Parking • No Entrance Fees • Expert Advice • Fun – Casual – Informative • Free snacks at each location • See full selections – not a small sampling in a 10x10 show booth. • Exclusive Promotions for Tour Day Only

2377 Medina Road, Medina 330-239-4000

A+

Medina Rd Route 18

1977 Medina Road, Medina 330-239-3630 Simplifying Remodeling: 10:15am Find out how Cabinet-S-Top can simplify your kitchen or bath remodeling project. Come learn our secrets to a successful renovation. We’ll share with you the nuts and bolts of our easy remodeling process. Design Panel Q&A: 11:00am “Ask Our Experts” is a question-and-answer session with our award-winning design team. Our professionals will share their answers to top questions consumers

Fireplace Makeovers: What’s Possible? 10:30am, 12:30pm, and 2:30pm Is your fireplace dated, inefficient, or just never used? You will be amazed at the possible transformations. See projects before and after makeovers. Consult with Ross Peterson from HHT, the largest fireplace manufacturer in North America. How to reface your fireplace: 11:00am and 2:00pm Live demonstration and education on how to change your fireplace look with cultured stone. Newest in Hot Tub Care and Fun: 11:30am and 4:00pm Water care products are continually evolving. Learn about the newest products that make hot tub care easy plus get special discounts if you want to try them out. Swim Spas – Demonstration: Noon and 1:00pm Grandparents, enjoy year-round wellness for yourself and fun for your grandchildren. Marybeth Skunta, Aquatic Exercise Arthritis Instructor, demonstrates for the over 55 crowd. Exercise can be painless, beneficial and fun. Destiny Farm Beef grilling demos by KCBS Barbeque Champion, Paul Grant – all-day samples What’s better than local, naturally raised beef? When it is grilled by KCBS Barbeque Champion, Paul Grant. Learn from a winner. All-day facility tours, swim spas open for trying, and cooking demo/sampling featuring Destiny Farms beef

would like to know before starting their kitchen or bath remodeling project. Bring your questions! We’ll answer them! Islands…The Oasis of the Kitchen: 1:00pm Come learn the new trends in kitchen island design, if an island is for you, and the things to consider when installing an island. Reface or Replace your Cabinets: 1:45pm Is cabinet refacing for you? Learn what options are available, what’s the process and the advantages of using Cabinet-S-Top to reface your cabinets. Showroom tours all day, plus a FREE gift for every visitor


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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

TA L E S O F A MO LD WAR RI O R

Mold can Take Face and Life by Paul McHam Almost sixteen years ago, I saw a story about a man named Mark Tatum titled “The Man Without A Face,” and I was intrigued. If you go on the Internet and type Mark Tatum Mucormycosis in the search bar, you can get more of the details. (Editor’s note: If choosing to look up Mark Tatum, please be aware that the photos can be rather shocking.) Unlike some companies who just tell the story, I called Tatum and drove to his small hometown near Owensboro, Kentucky, to test his home. I wanted to help determine where he had picked up the disastrous Mucor mold. Mucormycosis is a fungal infection caused by the Mucor mold, which oftentimes concentrates in the sinuses. This situation, though rather rare, can often result in death. This genus of mold generally has its greatest impact on people who have had their immune systems lowered from other diseases like diabetes and more. In Tatum’s case, he had diabetes and had received several steroid injections, which also help lower the immune system’s ability to fight infection. The long and the short of it is that, after extensive sampling and assessment, we did not find the Mucor genus at his home. He did have several areas of significant mold growth, however, including a railroad caboose which he had attached to the house as a unique bedroom. It was our assumption that he had been exposed to the Mucor mold at work or from other frequented areas. I leave it to you to check it out and learn some of the extreme effects of this and other molds. I believe Mark and I could have been good friends had his life not been cut short. He passed away on February 26, 2005, at the age of 48, from the effects of mold. Paul McHam is a local expert on mold remediation. For more information, visit his website at http://myairxperts.com/ and his Facebook page Moldsporewars http://bit.ly/2E2Fj3y or call 330-331-7500.

Hello Friends & Neighbors

OO

F

Over 100 homes sold in 2017! Call now for a free market evaluation

330.241.5370 office 440.503.5820 cell Larry Steinbacher Broker / Owner

3745 Medina Rd, Suite A Medina, OH

WWW.GREATERCLEVELANDHOMESEARCH.COM

INVESTING INTELLIGENC E: SEC RETS OF A MORTGAGE BA NK ER

Explaining the Housing Shortage by Rich Bailey These days it is common for sellers to receive multiple offers on their homes due to a persistent shortage of houses. If you recall the housing crash that started around 2006 and continued through 2010, the market was flooded with foreclosed properties which took several years beyond 2010 to clear out of bank inventories. During that time, it was difficult to get a construction loan or a lot loan to build a home. Despite historically low rates, it took six to eight years for construction loans to regain popularity. At the same time, the economy was weak and there were many young people who had graduated college that were not earning up to their potential and were not purchasing homes. In the last couple of years, the economy began gaining strength. The young people who were on the sidelines are now earning higher incomes and looking to buy homes, as are the young people currently coming out of college. Add everyone who is normally buying and selling homes in the market, and you have the overall cause of the housing shortage. If you have had the slightest thought of selling your home, this would be the time to ask friends and family for a referral to a local agent that they trust and had a great experience with. Ask your real estate agent for a market analysis and a seller net sheet, as well as information on homes in the price range and areas that you might have an interest in. Remember to contact a lender to get a loan pre-approval. With interest rates rising, this is the perfect time to upsize or downsize or move into a new community where you might like to live. Rich Bailey is a licensed mortgage loan originator with First Security Mortgage Corporation and has 15 years of conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA mortgage financing experience for purchase and refinance transactions. Contact Bailey at rich.bailey@fsmc.net or by calling 330-571-2692. First Security Mortgage Corporation 15887 Snow Road, Suite 200 Brook Park, OH 44142 www.FirstSecurityMortgage.net NMLS 258602, 289425 MB.802718, LO.015405

Never undervalue the importance of having fun. Fun is not unprofessional, after all, professional clowns prove that every day.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

T HE N E T W O R K E R

Making Their Eyes Light Up by Bob Arnold Ever thought about what happens “after”? You are on the way to a networking event, nervous as all get out. You are sweating because you do not know anyone there. Your mind conjures up all kinds of devastating scenarios about what will happen. You want to turn around and go home, but then you realize you are entering the door. You take a deep breath and mutter, “Well, here goes nothing!” You quickly scan the faces in the room and notice a smiling one. Next thing you know, you are shaking this person’s hand and saying your name. Before you know it, you are laughing, and you have met four people you did not previously know. Suddenly, it is over, and you did not die! Networking (“getting to know someone”) really is not as bad as it is made out to be. Start with the right mindset. Everyone in the room is a person and wants to be treated as one, including you. What happens at a lot of networking events is we tend to treat people as if they are businesses, not people, and that leads to devastating circumstances. We even go in thinking that we must get business out of the event, which is thinking like a business. When you meet people, rather than businesses, you notice different topics surface, like hearing them mention their horses, motorcycle or that they attended Ohio State. If you listen, you will find yourself resonating with them. Ask them a question about their favorite subject, and watch their eyes light up. After all, you like to talk about your favorite topic. Notice that someone’s favorite topic usually is not about business; however, it can quickly turn into a business discussion. Try it out next time you are networking. Bob Arnold is the founder of ONward Networking and an international bestselling author. More networking tips and information are available at “Bob’s Pencil Points” blog at OnwardNetworking. com or by contacting Arnold at TheNetworkingPencil@gmail.com.

by C.L. Gammon In honor of Medina and Medina County’s bicentennials, Joy Magazine will be publishing a recipe each month based on recipes from the same approximate period as when the two were founded. Enjoy! • 2 squirrels, cut up into pieces • 1 ½ cup plain flour • ¼ teaspoon salt • ¼ teaspoon black pepper • ½ cup cooking oil • 2 onions, sliced in rings • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 2 cans cream of mushroom soup • ½ cup green onion and parsley Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Coat squirrel pieces with flour seasoned with salt and pepper. Brown in oil and remove from skillet. Line baking dish with foil and place squirrel in dish. Add onion and garlic and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Blend cans of soup with a small amount of water; pour over squirrel. Cover with foil and seal tightly. Bake at 325 degrees for two hours. Open foil, add green onion and parsley. Reseal and cook for 15 minutes longer.

Recipes are reproduced with permission from “A Revolutionary War Cookbook (and More)” by C.L. Gammon, an award-winning and internationally known bestselling author. To see Gammon’s books, go to https://www.amazon.com/CL-Gammon/e/ B008IWM9DS/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

GEMS

Blue Pride Provides Support to Families by Kent Von Der Vellen

40 40

UNDER

Top DenTisT naTional awarD winner for america’s besT young DenTisTs

Come discover for yourself why Dr. Landry is recognized as one of America’s best dentists! New patients of all ages, and emergencies are welcome. 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays

Joseph G. Landry II, D.D.S., F.A.G.D. Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry

330-769-4470

5076 Park Avenue West • Seville, OH 44273 www.LandryFamilyDentistry.com

The morning of June 3, 2012, was graduation day for Brunswick High School. A day of celebration that would be tainted with the tragic deaths of Jeffrey Chaya, Kevin Fox, Lexi Poerner, and Blake Bartchak in a single-car accident. Julia Romito was the only survivor. Chaya and Fox were set to graduate Sunday afternoon but, instead, their chairs were empty. In response to the tragedy, a community meeting was held to determine what could be done to help the families and how to help if there were another such tragedy in the future. What came out of that meeting was the Brunswick Blue Pride Foundation, created with the goal of providing family support, awarding scholarships to Brunswick students, and advocacy. Since its creation, the foundation has assisted numerous families with funeral and other related expenses. The foundation has helped when Brunswick students have died from suicide, cancer or in a car accident. Board president Kimberlee Bublik said they respect the privacy and dignity of families and do not publicize the names of those they help. Blue Pride relies on first responders and other people in the community to make referrals. The foundation helped when there was a fire at Hickory Ridge Apartments and distributed Flood and Tornado Disaster Kits in the Brunswick area when inclement weather struck. Since the accident in 2012, the foundation has awarded 25 scholarships for $500 each. The goal is to award at least five a year. Blue Pride has participated in programs advocating internet safety and suicide prevention. This summer, they are partnering with Kelly’s Crusade to help teach teens safe driving skills. The foundation consists of community volunteers and nine board members. For more information, go to www. brunswickbluepride.org or https://www.facebook.com/ BrunswickBluePrideFoundation/ Kent Von Der Vellen is a 20-year resident of Medina. He has been a volunteer for various youth sports teams, is a member of the Medina Lions club, and with his wife, Kim, founded the Jakob F. Von Der Vellen Memorial Foundation. You can reach Von Der Vellen by e-mailing him at von106@gmail.com or by calling 330-421-0863. Learn what area non-profits need by visiting Giving Hearts at JoyofMedinaCounty.com


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

BI T E M E !

Scrumptious Stuffed Peppers by Amy Barnes

• 4 to 6 green peppers, halved and seeded • 1 lb extra lean ground beef • ½ cup onion, chopped • 1 16-ounce can no-salt chopped tomatoes or 1 can tomato soup • 1 cup rice, cooked (instant or long cooking) • 1 cup water • 3 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce • 1 cup shredded mild cheddar cheese • 1 cup shredded extra sharp cheddar cheese • 1 can corn (or 1 16-ounce bag of frozen corn)

Brown beef and onion in large frying pan. Drain off fat. Add tomatoes, rice, water, Worcestershire sauce, and corn. Heat thoroughly. Add cheeses. Mix well. Remove from heat. Line slow cooker with slow cooker liner. Put one layer of pepper halves in bottom of slow cooker, spoon meat mixture into halves, letting some collect around the halves. Keep layering pepper halves and meat mixture until all is in slow cooker. Cook on low setting for 6 to 8 hours, until peppers are tender.

10:00 am - 5:00 pm Saturday, april 7

A+

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

Let's do it!

April 2018

Non-Profit Calendar

Sunday, April 1

Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw

April Fool’s Day http://bit.ly/1FMkQJY and International Tatting Day http://bit.ly/2H9h94e

5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

All libraries closed for the day.

Monday, April 2 International Children’s Book Day http://bit.ly/2FfKQEk and Dyngus Day http://bit.ly/2D2UNz7 and Reconciliation Day http://bit.ly/2H9hxQe 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 6 p.m. Card Making; Sycamore Room North, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Create 10 cards. $10, bring adhesive. Adults. WAITING LIST. Register http://bit. ly/2IoetBs 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Veterans Roundtable; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Veterans’ stories of survival. All Ages. No registration

Tuesday, April 3 World Party Day http://bit.ly/2oTCZBp 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 7:15 a.m. to 8:15 p.m. Medina Creative Housing Tree House Dedication; Medina Creative Therapy Ranch, 5200 Lake Road, Medina. Hosted by Medina Sunrise Rotary. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Medina County in the Civil War; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Presentation by Joann King. http://bit.ly/2tJD4x3

Wednesday, April 4 Hug a Newsman Day http://bit.ly/2FfB3Ox and School Librarian Day http://bit.ly/2oF0YDt and World Rat Day http:// bit.ly/2tneqCp 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Natural Discoveries: Nature Through the Seasons; Allardale East, 141 Remsen Road, Medina. Awardbased hiking program. Free. Ages 7 to adult. No registration. 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tic Tac Toss; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Giant version of classic game. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Eliza Northrop Elementary School, 950 E. Reagan Parkway, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Thursday, April 5 National Dandelion Day http://bit.ly/2D4fWbY and First Contact Day http://bit.ly/2o7gzyu 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. Noon to 7 p.m. Ellison Die Cut Day; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Bring paper, machine and dies available. Reserve time, 330-725-4415. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Master Gardener Decaf Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington Street, Medina. $5 For topic, more information, and to register go to http://bit.ly/2DDEYQw

Friday, April 6

7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Woodcock Walk; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn more about a bird that sings with its wings, dances for dinner, and more. All ages. Free. No registration.

Saturday, April 7 No Housework Day http://bit.ly/1mU1WXS 1 p.m. Medina Bicentennial: Medina in the Civil War: Citizens and Soldiers in Their Own Words; St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 317 E. Liberty Street, Medina. Free. 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Spring into a New Beer; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring 6-pack of regional/craft beer, swap with others, leave with variety of beer. http://bit.ly/2tLJTOE 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tween Spa Day; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Make lip gloss, nail art, sugar scrubs, more. Grades 4 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2FCuLEY 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Build a Native Bee House Workshop; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Ages 12 and up. Free. Register by April 5. WAITING LIST. http:// bit.ly/2pbEMSv 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Royalty Academy; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Come in royal attire, participate in royal coronation. Grades kindergarten to 3. Register http://bit. ly/2FOMtYU

Sunday, April 8

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 10 a.m. to noon. Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1605 Center Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Root Candles, 640 Liberty Street, Medina. http://www.redcross. org/local/ohio/northeast 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Northside Christian Church, 7615 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Medicare Seminar; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Presented by non-profit Medicare Simplified. Register http://bit.ly/2Hw58Gv 6 p.m. Code T: Wild About Weather; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Experiments to answer weather questions. http://bit.ly/2DoaX6e

Wednesday, April 11 Eight-Track Tape Day http://bit.ly/2IkSk6J 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Cupcakes Upside Down; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Decorate cupcake, play game.

Draw a Picture of a Bird Day http://bit.ly/2FNAtXU

4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Crestview Elementary School, 300 W. 130th Street, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

8 a.m. to noon. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Litchfield Township Fire Station, 9487 Norwalk Road, Medina. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

6 p.m. Teen Take the Mic Night; Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Perform poetry, music. Grades 9 to 12.

1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Children’s Center Pinwheel Walk; Medina Public Square. Fun activities for kids; walk to St. Francis to plant pinwheel in honor of children who have spoken out about abuse. See “Gems” in March 2018 issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine for information about the Children’s Center. See “One Voice” column, April issue of Joy, about Pinwheel Walk. JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Kitchen Gardens; Seville Library, 45 Center Street, Seville. Learn how to create a small garden by your door. http://bit.ly/2tNnwZs

1 p.m. to 4 p.m. John Smart Open House: Civil War; 206 N. Elmwood, Medina. Guided tours and artifact displays about Medina’s role in the Civil War.

Thursday, April 12

2 p.m. to 3 p.m. ORMACO Jen Maurer: Just a Girl and Her Guitar; Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad Street, Wadsworth. Free, but reservations urged, 330-334-5761. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Wild About Wood Ducks; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Learn about wood ducks and see them in the wild. No registration.

Monday, April 9 Name Yourself Day http://bit.ly/1INfpIq 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cleveland Clinic, 3574 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross. org/local/ohio/northeast 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.

Sorry, Charlie Day http://bit.ly/2FMGS5s and National Walk to Work Day http://bit.ly/2GkyU1w

1 p.m. to 6 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Trinity United Church of Christ, 215 High Street, Wadsworth. http:// www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Hospital, 1000 E. Washington Street, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Teen Art Night; Sycamore Room South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. No sew PopTart pillow. Register at http://bit.ly/2DpuxPG

10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Master Gardener Coffee Chat; OSU Extension Office, Professional Building, 120 W. Washington

Be Kind to Lawyers Day http://bit.ly/2FHiMJz

Tuesday, April 10

7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Internet Safety: Researching Skills; Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Adults. http://bit.ly/2tI2g76

Big Wind Day http://bit.ly/2InSElu and Walk on Your Wild Side http://bit.ly/2p3j18i 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. What Women Want 2018; White Birch Barn, 7180 W. Smith Road, Medina. Music, food, drinks, raffles, silent auction, door prizes, cash wine bar. Benefits Faith in Action Medina County Caregivers. Tickets $50 each, $450 table of 10. Call 330-952-0342, mail check to Faith in Action, 120 W. Washington Street, 2A, Medina, Oh. 44256, or purchase online at www.fiamedina.org 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Retro Craft Club: Needle Weaving; Community Room, Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Ages 18 and older. Register at http://bit.ly/2ImXJKA

Friday, April 13 Blame Someone Else Day http://bit.ly/1iuEnyS 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medi-


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018 na. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment. 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, April 14 Ex-Spouse Day http://bit.ly/2FwFlkZ and International Moment of Laughter Day http://bit.ly/2tDOLFx 7:30 a.m. 85th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks are led by experienced birders. Watch as migrating birds return. Register http://bit.ly/2tNlus6 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ohio Boater Education Course; Krabill Shelter, 7597 Ballash Road, Medina. Boating and water safety course designed by ODNR Division of Watercraft. Pre-registration $30, after March 9, $35. Register by contacting Alan Hallock, by e-mail alan@hallockproperties.com or call 330722-3055. For more information go to http://bit.ly/2Go4ivS 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Brunswick Community Recreation and Fitness Center, 3637 Center Road, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/ northeast 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Ohio Division of Wildlife: Hunter Education Course; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Required course for all first-time hunting license buyers. Do NOT BRING FIREARMS. One-hour lunch break, no lunch provided. Ages 10 and up. Register http://bit. ly/2HwxUqq 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pet Palooza; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Variety of animals, crafts, activities. No pets. Bring pet food donation for SPCA. Check for show times http://bit.ly/2Do7GUg Noon to 5 p.m. Spring Scavenger Hunt; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor and outdoor scavenger hunts. http://bit.ly/2FBKRTi

5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: A Cup of Fairy Gardens; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Bring teacup or small dish or use one provided, create a fairy garden. All ages. http://bit.ly/2p6XJqm 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. littleBits; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Building with littleBits electronic building blocks. http://bit.ly/2InhJN7 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. OSU Homeowner Series; Community Room, A.I. Root Candle Store, 640 W. Liberty Street, Medina. Weed management. $10. http://bit.ly/2FdOtKV 7 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Brad Cooper Songs From Down Under; Seville Village Hall, 120 Royal Crest Drive, Seville. Register http://bit.ly/2FBvR7G

Wednesday, April 18 International Juggler’s Day http://bit.ly/2p4tyA2 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Brad Cooper Songs From Down Under; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Register http://bit.ly/2HwiUZJ 7 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Brad Cooper Songs From Down Under; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Call 330-725-0588 to register. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Windows 10; Computer Lab, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Interactive class. Adults. http://bit.ly/2p3anGG 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. History Series: Coded Quilts of the Civil Wars; Lodi Library 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. http://bit. ly/2DoogUd 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Understanding Your Teen’s Brain; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. http://bit.ly/2tL337q

Thursday, April 19 National Garlic Day http://bit.ly/2InCl83 and National High Five Day http://bit.ly/2Hoveen 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; St. Ambrose Church, 929 Pearl Road, Brunswick. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

1 p.m. Medina Bicentennial: Fires of April; Medina Engine House Museum, 50 Public Square, Medina. Lecture and photo display about the major fires in 1848, 1870, and 1877. Includes history of Medina Fire Department.

5 p.m. to 6 p.m. After School Snack Attack; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street. Cooking a variety of foods on waffle iron. Grades 6 to 12. Register at http://bit.ly/2p7uDX1

Sunday, April 15

6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ORMACO World Tour of Music: Brad Cooper Songs From Down Under; Community Room, Highland Library. Register http://bit.ly/2p78HMo

Rubber Eraser Day http://bit.ly/2HrxykQ Noon to 5 p.m. Spring Scavenger Hunt; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor and outdoor scavenger hunts.http://bit.ly/2FBKRTi

Friday, April 20

3 p.m. to 4 p.m. K-9 Kapers; Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Socialize dogs while hiking. Dogs must be on 8-foot non-retractable leash. Bring towel for muddy feet and water bowl for dog. All ages. Free. No registration.

10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Sit, Stay, Read; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Practice reading with Griffin, a trained therapy dog. Ages 4 and up. Register at http://bit.ly/2FPzfv0

3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: All About Amphibians; Plum Creek Park North, 2390 Plum Creek Parkway, Brunswick Hills. Award-based hiking program. Hike to vernal pools to search for frogs and salamanders. Dress for weather. Free. Ages 7 to adult. No registration. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Medina Bicentennial: Mystery Women in Medina’s History; Miss Molly’s Tea Room, 140 W. Washington Street, Medina. Historical vignettes, heavy hors d’oeuvres and desserts, wine, beer, tea, coffee. Proceeds benefit the Medina Bicentennial fund. Limited seating. Tickets $25, available at Miss Molly’s. 888-832-2871.

Monday, April 16 Patriot’s Day http://bit.ly/1gMv1xc and World Elephant Day http://bit.ly/2FCZUrB 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Beginning Computers; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Two-part class, learn the basics. Register for first class at http://bit.ly/2HxKg1A Register for second class at http://bit.ly/2HvoTxA 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina Fire Station 1, 300 W. Reagan Parkway, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Robotics; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Introduction to Lego Mindstorms. Register http://bit.ly/2HudsGu

Tuesday, April 17 Bat Appreciation Day http://bit.ly/2FvLXzI 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. AARP Tax Preparation; Sycamore Room North and South, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Call 330-723-9514 for appointment.1 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Look Alike Day http://bit.ly/1SszMRF

10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Paw Patrol Paw-ty; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Games, crafts. Ages 5 and younger. WAITING LIST. http://bit.ly/2FP55YZ 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Holy Martyrs Church, 3100 S. Weymouth Road, Medina. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Snack Attack; Story Time Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Quick and easy recipes. Counts toward wellness Points. Grades 3 to 5. Register at http://bit.ly/2tJCrUq 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, April 21 Record Store Day http://bit. ly/2p8qqCp 7:30 a.m. 85th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks are led by experienced birders. Watch as migrating birds return. Register http://

bit.ly/2FvEuAK 7:45 a.m. Water Tower District 5k Historic Hustle; North Elmwood Avenue, Medina. Run, walk or volunteer. Registration begins 7:45 a.m., race begins 9 a.m. Registration $25 at http:// bit.ly/2nPm0iV by April 20, 2018. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Medina County’s 22nd Annual Earth Day Festival; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Exhibits, activities, food, more. Additional parking at Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville, with shuttle to Buffalo Creek. 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Every Pony Party; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Games, crafts, stories. Ages 3 and older. http://bit.ly/2paZy4w 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Yoga for Strong Bones; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. All levels welcome. Counts toward wellness points. http://bit.ly/2DodZHq 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Family Fishing Derby; Buffalo Creek Retreat, 8708 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Bring own poles, bait. Register to be eligible for prizes. All ages. Free. http:// bit.ly/2tIaSeb Noon to 4:30 p.m. Board Game Drop-in; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring favorite game or learn a new one. Noon to 5 p.m. Spring Scavenger Hunt; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor and outdoor scavenger hunts. All ages. Free. Noon to 8 p.m. Newbridge Place Fundraiser: All You Can Eat Spaghetti Dinner; Medina Eagles, 696 Lafayette Road, Medina. Open to the public. Stay or return with dinner ticket at 8 p.m. to drink and dance to music by the Marshall Law Band. See feature story in April issue of Joy of Medina County Magazine! $6 https://newbridgeplace.org/events 1 p.m. 2 p.m. A Cup of Fairy Gardens; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Bring teacup or small dish or use one provided, create a fairy garden. Grades 4 to 6. http:// bit.ly/2tFoxCM 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Mediation for Writers; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Learn meditation techniques. http://bit.ly/2FDEsCX 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. Chess Club; Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Chess sets provided. Increase problem solving and strategy skills. Grade 3 and higher. Register at http://bit.ly/2FNjiFF 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Women’s Self Defense; Highland Library, 4160 Ridge Road, Medina. Focused self-defense training using prevention and action. http://bit.ly/2pbxrCr 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Creativity Club; Medina 1907 Room, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Re-discover joy of creating. Register at http://bit.ly/2GoVdTM 5 p.m. King’s Daughters and Sons: Giving Gala Auction and Dinner; Williams on the Lake, 787 Lafayette Road, Medina. Silent and live auctions. Benefits local charities. Tickets $40, available at three Medina locations: Cool Beans Café, 103 W. Liberty Street; Medina County Convention and Visitors Bureau, 32 Public Square; and Miss Molly’s Tea Room, 140 W. Washington Street.

Sunday, April 22 Earth Day http://bit.ly/1D7PTxU and Jelly Bean Day http:// bit.ly/2FB5WfD Noon to 5 p.m. Spring Scavenger Hunt; Susan Hambley Nature Center, 1473 Parschen Boulevard, Brunswick. Indoor and outdoor scavenger hunts. All ages. Free.

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Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

Monday, April 23

Community Recreation Center, 8525 Friendsville Road, Lodi. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Impossible Astronaut Day http://bit.ly/2Il2iVG and Take a Chance Day http://bit.ly/2DluxjE

5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Legal Resource Center; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Domestic Relations Court volunteers help those not represented by a lawyer in family court. First come, first served.

2:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Applewood Elementary School, 3891 Applewood Drive, Brunswick. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; First Congregational Church, 114 Church Street, Lodi. http://www. redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Tuesday, April 24 Poem in Your Pocket Day http://bit.ly/2tJdiJu and Pig in a Blanket Day http://bit.ly/2p4v8BN 10 a.m. to noon. Brunswick Library: Knitting and Crocheting Circle; Hickory Room, Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Beginners welcome. Making Warm Up Medina County donations. 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Afternoon at the Cinema; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Recent movie releases and light refreshments. Call for titles, 330-273-4150. 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Terrific Tuesday: Painted Pet Rocks; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Create creatures from rocks. http://bit.ly/2IorvPg 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Otaku Tuesdays; Community Room A, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Teen anime, cosplay, learn about Japanese culture, more. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Stop in for STEAM; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. Make crystals, paper circuits, elephant toothpaste, more. http://bit.ly/2p9xn6f

Wednesday, April 25 DNA Day http://bit.ly/2GlH0ac , East Meets West Day http:// bit.ly/2InPrSW and World Penguin Day http://bit.ly/1kzPhJj 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Relic Hunter Challenge; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Make a mummy, pyramid; follow a maze; read hieroglyphics. No registration. 7:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Medina County Career Center, 1101 W. Liberty Road, Medina. http://www.redcross.org/local/ohio/northeast

Thursday, April 26 Richter Scale Day http://bit.ly/2Htwjlb and Take Our Sons and Daughters to Work Day http://bit.ly/2tEeYnx 7 a.m. to noon. American Red Cross Blood Drive; Cloverleaf

6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Spring Card Making; Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Learn stamping techniques, make 3 cards. Register http://bit.ly/2paHBmJ 6 p.m. Outback Ray Animal Show; Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Exotic, live animals. Hands-on event. All ages. http://bit.ly/2tGWRxf

Friday, April 27 World Pinhole Photography Day http://bit.ly/2FKlhKY and Tell a Story Day http://bit.ly/2IhPJL3 ALL MEDINA COUNTY LIBRARY LOCATIONS: Celebrate Arbor Day! Activities and, while supplies last, get a free Norway spruce tree from Kall’s Tree Farm. 5:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Bluegrass Jam and Dinner; Lafayette United Methodist Church, 6201 Lafayette Road, Medina. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m., music starts at 7 p.m. Donation admission $3, dinner is additional donation request. Bring favorite dessert to share. Bluegrass bands welcome, arrive early to be scheduled.

Saturday, April 28 International Astronomy Day http://bit.ly/2Fuzmgm and Great Poetry Reading Day http://bit.ly/2FwW47G

Be sure to let event organizers know that you saw their event listed in Joy Magazine! 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Sensory Storytime; Brunswick Library, 3649 Center Road, Brunswick. For children with autism, sensory integration challenges, or have trouble sitting still or focusing. Ages 2 to 6. Register at http://bit.ly/2FSjxj7 Noon to 4:30 p.m. Genealogy Slam!; Community Rooms A and B, Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway Street, Medina. Explore Welsh and English research and changes at FamilySearch.org. http://bit.ly/2GsdLT6 Noon. Special Olympics Horse Show; Medina Creative Therapy Ranch, 5200 Lake Road, Medina. English and Western classes, barrel racing, showmanship, dressage, trail riding. For more information, go to http://medinacreativehousing.com/ medina-therapy-ranch/ 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Speak: Open Mic Afternoon; Community Room, Lodi Library, 635 Wooster Street, Lodi. Perform own original poetry aided by Azriel Johnson. http://bit.ly/2FME9sO 7 p.m. Bluegrass Special Concert Series; O.J. Work Auditorium, 151 S. Main Street. Award-winning Bluegrass performers featured. Tickets $20, free for ages 12 and younger. For more information, call Lisa or Larry Efaw at 330-388-7280.

Sunday, April 29 Zipper Day http://bit.ly/2p5mQcZ

7:30 a.m. 85th Annual Series of Spring Bird Walks; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Walks are led by experienced birders. Watch as migrating birds return. Register http://bit.ly/2p8gVUs

11:30 a.m. 2018 Foxy Fashion Show; Weymouth Ballroom, Weymouth Country Club, 3946 Weymouth Road, Medina. Benefits the national Mary Kay Foundation. www.marykay. com/tbirch25

9 a.m. to noon. Migratory Bird Banding; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. Dependent on weather. Learn about bird banding. http://bit.ly/2Fz6nIp

3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Natural Discoveries Hiking Series: Spring Wildflowers; Hubbard Valley Park, 8600 Hubbard Valley Road, Seville. Dress for weather, bring wildflower guide. Award-based hiking program. Ages 7 and up. Free. No registration.

9 a.m. to noon. Youth Fishing Derby; River Styx Park, 8200 River Styx Road, Wadsworth. Bring fishing pole, bait. Prizes awarded. Registration begins at 9 a.m., derby is 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Fifteen years old and younger. Free. http://bit. ly/2HwpKyl 9:30 a.m. to noon. Basket Weaving 101: Mother’s Day Basket; Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Wadsworth. All materials provided. Ages 12 and up. Fee: $17 per basket. Register by April 20, by calling Betty Rettig, 330-975-4251.

Monday, April 30 National Honesty Day http://bit.ly/1JMhNQc 2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. Movie Monday! Buckeye Community Room, Buckeye Library, 6625 Wolff Road, Medina. Popcorn, pillows, movie. Grade levels 7 and up. Free. No registration.

Submitting Calendar Events “Let’s Do It!” is a calendar of events sponsored or hosted by non-political, non-profit groups in Medina County. The calendar also is available online at JoyofMedinaCounty.com, where it is regularly updated with additional events. There is no charge to list an event in the calendar. To have an event listed, please send date, time, event name, location, cost of event, organization benefitting from the event (and hosting or sponsoring organization if different), contact name and phone number, website if available, and name and phone number of the person submitting the information to joy@BlakeHousePublishing.com with Calendar in the subject line or you can mail the information to Attn: Calendar, Joy of Medina County Magazine, 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Oh. 44256. Calendar information will not be taken by phone.


Joy of Medina County Magazine | April 2018

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Joy of Medina County Magazine 1114 N. Court, #144, Medina, Ohio 44256 E-mail: joy@blakehousepublishing.com Website: JoyofMedinaCountyMagazine.com Phone: 330-461-0589

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Profile for Joy of Medina County

Joy of Medina County Magazine April 2018  

A Hungarian immigrant who gives veterans a home, a great networking tip, lots of ice, a solution for those irritated by squirrels, and more...

Joy of Medina County Magazine April 2018  

A Hungarian immigrant who gives veterans a home, a great networking tip, lots of ice, a solution for those irritated by squirrels, and more...