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P RO F E S S I O N A L M A K E U P A RT I S T RY

Photo shoot ready make up techniques $4.99

SEPTEMBER ISSUE


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departments

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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GALLERY Inspirational photos featuring this season’s hair and makeup looks

contents SEPTEMBER ISSUE

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MAIL BOX

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DAY IN THE LIFE interview of Sarah Teek- about her business style and daily life

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ARTIST PROFILE An interview with professional make up artist Kandee Johnson

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FOR A CAUSE Celebrity makeup artist reaches out to women with breast cancer to show them his tips and tricks for glowing skin

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TIPS AND ADVICE Our on-staff artists share their favorite products for the month

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TREND WATCH What’s hot this season? We have the scoop for you

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THE COVER STORY What makes make up for a photoshoot different from makeup for a movie? lets find out in this issue!


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features

FEELING THE SUN Now that the season of sun is behind us, its time

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to explore ways to stay bronze while avoiding

Guest writer shares her reasons why making

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those harmful rays!

BEYOND MAKEUP

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P RO F E S S I O N A L M A K E U P A RT I S T RY

people beautiful is more than just a career for her

MAKEUP MEETS TV A list of all the things needed to complete the

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looks of the zombies seen in the popular hit television seriese The Walking Dead

HALLOWEEN SPECIAL

Photo credits: Karen Scott

As halloween is fast approaching we have our

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facorite costume makeup to share!

BECOMING A PRO the steps and connections every pro must make to reach their make up artist goals

Photo shoot ready make up techniques $4.99

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ABOUT THE COVER :

What makes the make up used for photoshoots different than make up for movies, television, or events.

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THE CAUSE

Giving Back Their

Glow By Sam Trapani

Celebrity makeup artist teaches breast cancer patients his makeup tips and tricks “When you look good, you feel good” is a basic truth for most of us. This is the principal many makeup artists are applying as they share their skills with those suffering from illnesses. For people experiencing a health crisis the need to look healthy and feel more like themselves can make a big difference in remaining positive as they head towards recovery. One local makeup artist who is known for making over his celebrity clientele is also sharing his talent and techniques to teach cancer patients how to retain their glow during and after treatments. David Nicholas, president of DNI International, and David Miranowicz, co-president, have a lengthy list of celebrity clients that range from Bill Clinton to Sarah Jessica Parker, Matt Lauer to local TV news anchorwoman Francis Rivera. In an autographed 8-by-10-inch photo of Rivera that is displayed among many other famous faces at DNI’s new Rowley headquarters, she writes, “Only you two can make a girl look this fabulous and gorgeous.” And that is the goal of DNI: to help all clients look marvelous and feel better about themselves. DNI recently moved its headquarters after 16 years in Boston to a new state-of-the-art studio in Rowley at Forest Ridge to be closer to their home in Ips-

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Photo credit: Edward Hill

THIS PART OF MY WORK IS THE MOST REWARDING

Nicholas began his first corrective skin-care work with burn victims. He was recently honored by the Shriners Burns Hospital in Boston for his 20 years of volunteer work with burn patients. Nicholas works with the patients to learn how to apply makeup to soften the effects of the burns and create a natural appearance.

transforms them and brings back their confidence.” The face of a cancer patient enduring multiple therapies

Lipstick being applied to a young girl who is on oxygen after a cancer treatment at Saint Jude’s Hospital

BY THE TIME DAVID WAS FINISHED SHE WAS FEELING BETTER THAN SHE HAD IN A LONG TIME

wich. They formally lived in Topsfield for eight years and in Georgetown for six. The new location, which was unveiled four months ago, houses not only a full-service photography studio but also training facilities where students attend in-depth professional classes to learn Nicholas’ techniques. Nicholas is world renowned for his innovative work in the art and instruction of cosmetic application and

for his pioneering work in the field of reconstructive/ corrective makeup. Nicholas has been equally recognized for his philanthropic endeavors. “When I began in the industry I was focused mainly on fashion, glamour and theater,” said Nicholas. “Soon I found that the industry was solely focused on youth. I always believed that beauty is found in every person, at every age. And I realized that the techniques I created could benefit those who had been burned or were going through treatments for various diseases.”

“It is unbelievable the positive effect it has on a person’s emotions to feel beautiful again,” said Miranowicz. “They can arrive feeling terrible, but when they put on the makeup it

to battle his or her disease can go through a variety of challenges. “Patients often come to see me who have a sallow, drained look,” said Nicholas. “Chemotherapy can yellow the skin, they often lose their eye brows and eye lashes, and radiation burns the skin. But with some education we can empower them to soften the effects of those treatments and they can feel more like themselves again. Which make them feel better.” Continued on page 24

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THE CAUSE

David Nicholas, front, and David Miranowicz are shown with their DNI International makeup collection that they use at clinics in the Boston area

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SEPTEMBER 2013

wall dedicated to a “brow bar” where customers can try various lashes and brows too. Nicholas stresses that with cancer patients being careful to use comfortable materials that will not hinder the hair’s re-growth is very important. “They can’t have anything long

wearing,” Nicholas said. Sometimes a client may want to play up a feature she never did before she got sick. Nicholas can do that too. “We had a client who had little to no eye brow to begin with, and when they lost what little they had from chemo, I said, now’s your chance! Let’s give you the brow you always wanted,”

Wicked local photo by David Sokol

The unique line of makeup used for corrective imagery was designed by DNI to be gentle for the skin of the patients. It is a user-friendly line of products that Nicholas demonstrates at clinics where patients can learn how to apply the makeup so they can do it by themselves at home. The Rowley studio has an entire

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THIS PART OF MY WORK IS THE MOST REWARDING


Nicholas said with a smile. General Hospital’s oncology unit has carried DNI’s cosmetic line for six years now in its Images Boutique in Boston. Kathleen Bazazi, general manager for the Images Boutique, said the partnership they have with DNI has been invaluable for patients of all ages. “I just watched him transform a woman the other day,” Bazazi said. “She was really not feeling that well, but by the time she was finished with David she was feeling better than she had in a long time.” “David is extremely gifted and talented. He also has a warm, caring, gentle side that shows through when he does make up. The way he

can make clients feel amazing is a gift,” Bazazi said. The North Shore’s satellite location of Mass General in Danvers will hold a clinic with DNI for their oncology patients on October 28 from 11:00 a.m. till 2:00 p.m. “We’ll be donating some make up to the oncology unit and introducing our makeup line to patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation at the North Shore location,” Nicholas said. “We are very excited to be working with them on the North Shore as well.” “This part of my work is the most rewarding,” Nicholas said. “To see a client take control of a situation which they have very little control of, and feel better again, is a wonderful thing.”

DNI also holds clinics at the Taj Hotel in Boston or by appointments in the Rowley salon. They have also done house calls for patients who aren’t feeling up to making the trip. A typical session with Nicholas runs from $250-$350, but the DNI team has never turned down someone if they have an inability to pay that fee. They can work with them on a sliding payment scale. “We’ve also had family members and friends that have given our services as a gift to someone going through treatments,” Miranowicz said. “It’s all about the neutralizing, softening, toning and enhancements we can teach them,” said Nicholas. “To help them get through in the best way they can.”

DAVID IS EXTREMELY GIFTED AND TALENTED. HE ALSO HAS A WARM, CARING, GENTLE SIDE THAT SHOWS THROUGH WHEN HE DOES MAKE UP.

David uses warm toned eye shadows with a frosted finishe to reflect light and bring out the most glow in his client’s complextion

Mwuave and nude toned lipsticks help to even out the skin-tone of patienrts without making them look overly made-up.

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THE PROS

KEEPING YOUR KIT

clean

Having clean brushes and tools is a crucial responsibility of any make up and beauty practitioner

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Use disposable mascara wands. Never wash mascara wands that come with a mascara tube on your clients. They will not be 100% clean and you will be risking your client’s health.

Put you makeup brushes, tools and applicators into a simple pvc bag, lantern bin when you have used them and keep unused tools separate. Put a red ribbon on anything that you have used. Wash you brushes after every session, daily. Use an antibacterial washing up liquid under warm water until the water runs clean and leave to dry naturally overnight or in the airing cupboard.

Use your pencil sharpener before applying any product such as lip and eye pencils and before you replace in your kit. Use a sanitizer wipe to clean tools such as tweezers, eye lash curlers, eye lash placer etc. They harbour germs and everyone forgets about these tools. Wipe down your makeup bags, carry cases, mirrors and wash your work towel every session. â– 

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A RTI ST PROFILE

QUESTIONS &

Photo taken From Kandee Johnson’s Blog page

Answers

I was allowed to go to beauty school for free…(I know!) I met an Emmy-winning makeup artist, Myke Michaels, right when I was finishing school, and he offered me to work on a movie...and within weeks, I was on location in a real make-up trailer watching him put scars and prosthetics on the actors. And I fell in love with being on set.

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I love the transformation. When you see the actor or model, see themselves completely transformed into the character or image they are going to present, to the in that instance their confidence soar. I love that! And of course the final result, knowing I was a part of the creation of the final outcome.

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Yes, for the basics…you need to have a strong foundation to build a career on. If you know the basics, you will soar to the top with your artistic and creative eye. If you are an artist, you can create anything. Many times I’ve been on a shoot thinking, “how am I gonna do this?”, and then I tell myself, “You’re an artist, think of it as sculpting, contouring, shading, painting”.

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Tell a little about yourself personally and if you attended school or you are a self taught makeup artist?

my head since I was about 6. I wanted to be a fashion designer, photographer, jewelry maker, director, writer, actor ….. everything involved in creating! I was always doing make-overs on my mom and poor sister. Then in beauty school, I realized I would do 30 make-up application a week, instead of the 30 haircuts I was supposed to be doing, and they would tell me, to do more hair cuts…..so I’d do more but keep making everyone up! HA HA HA

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Do you think going to school for make-up artistry is important to excel in the business later on?

What is your favorite/most exciting aspect about your job?

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Did you always wanted to be an artist, or did you stumble upon your talent by chance?

Who or what inspired you to become a makeup artist? I always wanted to be in art, I’ve been making movies in

What surprises you most about working as a makeup artist? How many people don’t notice all the details I put into my work, or the difference that make-up can make.

Describe your “Classic Approach to Beauty.” How do you define beauty?

Beauty is truly what you radiate from the inside. So when someone looks at themselves, and sees beauty that I just amplified, you can see this happy, sparkling, confidence, start bubbling up from inside. I love making people feel beautiful. Some people have been brought to tears just seeing how I added “some dewy sparkly to their already beautiful flower, of a face”……that makes my heart glow. continued on page 14 SEPTEMBER 2013

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A RTI ST PROFILE

Interview and photos by thedailygreen.com

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What individual products and brands you’re “addicted” to at the moment and you use on a daily basis? Laura Mercier Moisturizing Foundation (i love it, and you can keep adding more layers for more coverage), Un-Petroleum Moisturizer, I slather it on at night to keep looking like I’m 20! ha ha ha ha And I really like L’Oreal Double Extend Tubes Mascara, it will stay on for 2 days if you don’t wash it off!

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Halloween Special

Kandee Johnson’s

Mad r e t t a H The

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Photo Credit: Kandee Johnson

Costume make up

Kandee recreates Johnny Depp’s Mad Hatter look in a step-by-step YouTube tutorial. We share this look in 7 easy steps. Continue reading on page 68

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Halloween Special

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Face

Start by priming the face with a white base. Kandee used Make Up Forever white face paint. This can be bought on their website or sephora. Be sure to cover your whole face, ears, and eye lids. Set the foundation with a tranlucent powder. Kandee mentions that she has used baby powder to set her foundation in the past.

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Eyes

Using a liquid eye shadow, blend the color into the lid and floow with a powder shadow. Under the eye, Kandee blends pink blush until it meets the lash line. She then uses white mascara primer to achieve the white lashes of her final look.


Costume make up

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Hair

In order to achieve the hair Kandee wraped individual strands of hair around a makeup brush and flat ironed on top of it. The result is a random tight curly look as seen above. She then teased her hair to build volume and finished it off with a orange colored spray.

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Brows

Next, she adds these bright and over the top brows. By using small orange feathers she was able to build the shape of the look gradually. She glued them on with eye lash glue just below her eye brows. If she were to glue them directly on the brow they could remove her real eyebrows when she removes them.

Continued on page 70.

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Halloween Special

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the hat

The hat was made by tying a pair of leggings around a cheap, black hat she bought from a craft store. The card was made simply by drawing 10/8 on a white piece of cardstock paper. She finished off the hat by sticking a cluster of feathers into the elastic leggings. The completed hat was made for less than $20 and all of the materials were purchased from Micheals Arts & Craft supply.

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The remaining clothing portion o up of pieces Kandee found in her ing an oversized white button up leggings tied into a bow, and a bl popped. She explains that the ori colorful, however, she was attem as little money as possible.

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the


Costume make up

of the costume is all made r own closet. She is wearp shirt, a pair of light blue lack jacket with the colar iginal look was much more mpting to make this look for

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Completed Look

scarf And that completes her look! She warns at the end of her tutorial that removing the brows can be very painful. It would be best to wet the brow glue with warm water and soap before attempting to pull the feathers off. Have fun this Halloween with your Mad Hatter look! â– 

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THE

WALKING DEAD How the “walkers” are made SHOPPING LIST

Most of these items can be found at your local pharmacy, beauty supply, grocery store, or halloween specialty shop: ◊ Liquid latex ◊ Uncooked oatmeal (instant or regular) ◊ Gelatin ◊ Liquid food coloring ◊ Black cosmetic sponge ◊ Facial tissue ◊ Hair dryer ◊ Face powder ◊ Pale base makeup/foundation

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◊ Mineral oil ◊ Dark matte powder/Eye shadow (Green, Dark grey, or black) ◊ Corn Syrup ◊ Tongue depressor ◊Make up sponge ◊Inexpensive paint brush


INSTR 1: Hair

UCTIO

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Prep Gather suppli es and from a make s ny spl ure the atters. area yo “Zomb u are w ify� ha ir with orking lots of 2: Text in is p rotecte condit u r e ioner. d Apply S k i n liquid la and ap ply po tex to stretch wder. and st ipple t he skin , dry w 3: Crea ith a h air dry t e r er Create o u g h the loo a n d k or regu r lar) ov of rotting sk otting sk in er a lay i depres er of li by applying n ser. Ap quid la ply fac tex. Sm uncooked oa e pow tmeal ooth e der an d g e s with a (instant d dry w tounge ith a h 4: Crea andhe t e l d hair flesh w Mix on dryer. e (1) p o u n ack of and slo d s gel w into cu ly add more atin with 1/ 3 cup o be .I f microw s. You will n t may need less) L water (begin eed to ave for et t wi liq If your i cubes ntervals of te uify the cub he gelatin fir th less wate boil, y r ou wil n seconds. B es by placing m, then cut l need Add li to star e sure not to them in the quid fo t with o to the a new let the cubes boney d coloring o pack o r li aro sistenc f gelat boil! y of ru und around ght liquid m in. bber w akeup with a t h e f a ce. an hic tu wound ongue depr h allows yo the gelatin w d apply the mixtur u es s. Use ill turn e a black sor. Pull at t to work the i ture. n t o the con he gela materi spong a t e arou nd the in to create t l in as it sets h edges Contin to buil e rough edg ued on d even e more t of page 6 ex2...

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from Continued

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t h s e ish to infec fl w u n o r y o a t e r e a on top. on the e x u e t s 5: Creat is la t l id ia u a liq ff

o er of e edges ged piece h t d e le Paint a lay d k e in g r g a w and a small r the tissue r e v and press ith a hand o w x e y t r la d it id u low liq en flesh. B Add more t a e f o k o e gelatin. a lo h t e t lt a e e r m c o o t t up not ry careful e b e b t u b dryer

skin u d a e d , e l a yo look of p rials used,

ate he 6: Creatree lot ts of layers of dfferenatpmplying liquid latex oveer

nc by As there a g together wounds. O in n e h t p y o r e h v it e lor, mix a e areas w o h c t need to tie d g d in a id o t o en face av ply over owder. Th p p a e c the entire d a n f a ly il p o ral dry, ap little mine a h the latex is it w n oundatio pale base f sponge. face with a or olor c h t i w k powder r a h d t g p e in d ly 7: Creattehe boney structure by apopf the face. Use green eye s cast. But Bring out d out area ly e k w ic s o ll a a h in sk w in hing gives to give the t eye shado s o d n n e u s o u a w c be ound te finishes t a shadow ar m e s u s , alway ! remember n shimmer a h t e r o m k away a loo od (which lo b e t a e r c to 8: Bloodyrup and red food coloreinegn specialty shop). Use a realistic Mix corn s t a Hallow r a o f d e d s o a h lo c b r pu tter can also be e paint brush to spla siv an inexpen dry. â–  look. Blow

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