Page 1

GREENLAND EYES IFF 

BERLIN  24.‐30.04.2012

‐ Q&A WITH DIRECTOR AND FILM FESTIVAL  COORDINATOR IVALO FRANK  

Born in Greenland to Danish parents in 1975, Ivalo  Frank is an Artist, Film Director and Film Festival  Coordinator based in Berlin. She holds a BA in  Philosophy from Copenhagen University and a MA  in Social Anthropology from Lund University,  specializing in the logic of art. She has made  documentary films in various countries including  Bosnia, China and Greenland. The content of her  films range from post‐war portraits to post‐colonial  perspectives and in‐depth interviews with citizens  from the former DDR. Ivalo Frank is the director of  (amongst others) "Upper Reaches of the Arts", an  introduction to Shanghais’ art galleries and cultural  institutions and "Wild Dogs of Sarajevo“ a film  highlighting war‐tourism and the survivors of the  longest occupation of any capital in history. Her  latest film "ECHOES" (2010) premiered at  Copenhagen Contemporary and is a musical journey  portraying the personal stories that the American  presence in Greenland, has left behind.      THE FESTIVAL  

Ivalo, thank you for taking your time to do this and reaching out to talk about GREENLAND EYES  INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL.     *** Let’s go straight for the background info – when and where was the idea born and who’s in the  organization behind?  The idea was born at the premiere of ECHOES at the Humboldt University in November 2010. Lill‐Ann  Körber had contacted me just after I finished making “Faith, Hope and Greenland (2009)” and she wanted 


to pursue it for the Humboldt University library. When I was then making ECHOES (2010) we agreed to do  the German premiere at the University. It is a beautiful old university and I loved having the first screening  of ECHOES there. After the Q&A, we just sort of very impulsively decided to do a Greenland Film Festival  together.    Additionally, The Nordic Institute at the Humboldt University (Das Nordeuropa‐Institut) offers every other  week courses in – Greenland in Film. The Institute (estbl. 1994) has an impressive number of full‐time and  visiting researchers, engaging in all kinds of Northern studies & programs. Among historians, literary man &  women, political scientists, etc. etc. Dr. Lill‐Ann Körber (Greenland Eyes IFF coordinator) works in the field  of ‘post‐colonial Greenland studies’.  It’s a good course, you know, it manages to stay open minded,  spanning from the first Greenlandic literary work of Mathias Storch (Sinnattugaq 1914), to critical reviews  of modern Greenlandic artworks; film included. The focus is indeed on Greenland. An open focus, which  makes it interesting and vital.      *** The festival is scheduled for April 24th to 30th 2012, at the Arsenal Cinema in Berlin. Actually at the  Arsenal – Institut für Film und Videokunst e.V.  Any particular reason for choosing this venue?  Yes, Arsenal was and is THE/OUR favorite cinema in Berlin. They have a really nice mixture of art related  events, cinema, talks and the level is generally very high and serious. I really respect them as an institution  and think they do a marvelous job in promoting art cinema and more niche stuff. Apart from that they also  co‐host the Berlinale, so it’s a kind of institution which very much operates on several levels ‐ and I really  like that.    You’ll find Arsenal at Potsdamer Straße 2. It’s situated close to the German Film and TV Academy, Berliner  Philharmonie etc. Getting there is easy by using  the U‐Bahn / S‐Bahn directed to Potsdamer Platz.  Alternatively, use the Bus Service M41, M48, M85, 200, 347. More info on Arsenal   ‐ http://www.arsenal‐berlin.de   The festival program will be online w/directions as well.    *** Any  particularly important stuff to remember when going to Berlin for a film festival?    An open mind. People can look forward to some insightful days. 6 days with film + Q&A’s, workshop and  cultural events. Starting with some examples from the German‐Greenlandic film history (yes, there is one)  like Eskimo Baby (1917), starring Asta Nielsen, and SOS Iceberg (1932), starring Leni Riefenstahl, the festival  keeps focus on the emerging Greenlandic film production. The program will keep substantial space for  Q&A’s in regards of selected screenings. So, yes, it’s both for film enthusiasts and for the experts. We hope  for a lot of opportunity to let people meet in the heat of the language of the cinema.   Being a festival about Greenlandic films, having an open mind in regards of discussing Greenland as a  country as well, we want to accentuate the different genres and narrative levels in Greenland today.  A  workshop supplementing the Greenland Eyes International Film Festival will take place at Nordeuropa  Institut, Humboldt‐Universität zu Berlin, April 27.  When looking at filmic representations of Greenland  since the beginning of the 20th century, it is the proportional relation between films ABOUT and FROM  Greenland that seems to be one of the most striking features: While the spectacular Greenlandic landscape  and its often exoticized inhabitants have triggered the imagination of mostly European filmmakers and the 


audience abroad for a long time, the domestic film scene is a very young but enormously productive one,  powerfully taking over the privilege of interpretation.    *** And what’s in it for the filmmakers coming all the way from Greenland? Do you see GREENLAND  EYES IFF as a PR opportunity for let’s say the European market?   To answer both questions at once, a lot. PR wise it has already started in regards of our organization getting  the journalists hooked up and the internet + social media up and running. As any other meshwork of  artistry, the public, the scholars and the practitioners, Greenland Eyes IFF offers a networking opportunity.  In that sense, PR & opportunities goes both ways for Greenland and on August 24th we announced the  cooperation with the Danish Embassy here in Berlin. This is important to us since Denmark’s Presidency of  the Council of the European Union. (More updates available at www.facebook.com/greenlandeyes ).     Apart from all that, we hope that this festival addresses the issue of critique & quality as any other festival  does. Of course in an artistic sense. We want to give the young productive scene an opportunity to engage  in a dialogue. A qualified dialogue indeed, in a way where it’s respectful for all sides involved. A critical  debate, in contact with the powerful material. An audience plays an important role in that. Overall we  expect people who participate to be prepared.    *** In reverse; it is well known that both film makers and international gatherings can be a lot of fun.  What do you look most forward to as a film festival organizer?   Meeting between the Greenlandic artists and Berlin. The possible fusion – those two together. A mutual  interest, hopefully. The flow ‐ Berliner & the Greenlandic. And Nive’s  concert. Nive Nielsen, singer and  songwriter (http://youtu.be/JC2_dafzTDE ) ‐  is basically the shining star of contemporary talented  Greenland. Very gifted in terms of international outreach. At the right pace, with the right people & right  places. We’re happy that the HBC at Alexander Platz will host the concert.    No doubt that it’s going to be an intense and a different week. I’m looking forward to see the films. On a  personal level, it’s very interesting for me to bring Berlin, Greenland and cinema together. I’m aiming at  interplay and an eye‐opener for the audience.   

 


ON MAKING FILM IN AND ABOUT THE ARCTIC  *** Being a filmmaker yourself, where do you see GREENLAND EYES IFF in terms of film‐making?  Any  personal expectations? Let me rephrase this – what makes you make film in and about the Arctic?  I have made two films in Greenland and my approach to the productions was very different.  Faith, Hope and Greenland (2009) was a very personal project. It was the first time I was back in Greenland  since I was little and the film was very much a way of meeting Greenland again. It was a way, which made it  easier in a way, to say hello again. I felt that I had a proper purpose to go there and to stay for a long time  and to work there. Doing an art project or a film is a really good way of getting to know a place because the  work is so intensive and you meet a lot of people in quite intense and personal ways. Faith, Hope and  Greenland was very much an emotional project in terms of digging into my own history and find out where  I come from – to use an over‐used phase. I decided to find that out by going there and doing something  with people who share same interests. Through that work I also had headspace to find out what Greenland  is for me, being a person who has been on the move quiet a lot. On the other hand, the film was also a  statement and a way of brining about a different perspective on Greenland. Growing up in Denmark, I  always felt that the stories coming out of Greenland were the negative ones and I was determined to tell  the story of the talented, innovative and active Greenland, which I knew also existed. Somebody has to tell  this part of the story as well.   With Echoes (2010), my personal issues had fallen into place and I could think more conceptually about  Greenland. I have a huge fascination with abandoned places, sounds and structures in nature, colourwise  and in their physicality. When you look at things this way, I actually see a big connection between Berlin  and Greenland. Berlin is the capital of minimal electronic music and when you walk around Greenland, you  often hear sounds, which sound electronic – such as the ice breaking. My idea was therefore to work on  interconnecting Berlin and Greenland through electronic music. Working on Echoes, contact microphones  where essential in my way of narrating spaces in East Greenland.  With them, we would extract sounds  from the inside of objects and I was curious to try to add actual story‐telling to a film this way. Overall, the  Greenland – Berlin relationship was one of the cornerstones of my conceptual aspirations and it is as well  with Greenland Eyes IFF.      ** What would you like the audience to take home with them after they see Echoes (2010) and e.g.  Hinnarik (2009)? Can we expect people to comprehend the wide range of narrative spaces which  undoubtedly will manifest during the festival screening and debates?   An eye‐opener. Nothing less. But it depends on the audience as well. The filmmakers need to engage to  make it happen.  Certain unspoken “requierements” are in play. The filmmakers need to engage and  explain to others their concepts, perspectives, aspirations etc.  I think that there is a good chance this will  happen. Everyone in Berlin is already excited and getting ready to welcome our guests. The University is  totally ready! You can say that a good chunk of our audience is ready, at least in Germany.   To return to your question. I expect people to take a broad understanding with them. For the students, I  expect them to engage in fruitful discussions with those who they learn about.  It’s going to be a co‐op  effort. 


*** Your short film Echoes (2010) has received quite a few awards recently. Congratulations. What I want  you to ask is if you feel a genuine, international interest in Greenlandic film nowadays? And is it the art  or is it the “ultima thule” still that “attracts”?  Yes, there is definitely a huge interest in Greenlandic films and I would say that Greenland as a fantasy no‐ mans‐land still is the main focus but at the same time, I sense a huge development in the perception of  Greenland. A lot of information has come out of Greenland in recent years by international, good  newspapers and this really helps. The perspective is becoming more diverse and many Greenlanders are  being interviewed and are speaking out about culture, music, the climate, minerals and the political  situation and system. Most of the people I meet are very interested. That said, film festivals professional  arenas and that means that the films have to meet certain standards and be able to compete on an  international level. You will get rejected sometimes but in terms of quality, I believe that a little bit of  resistance is quite important in order to know what you are up against.   Then there is the question of access. Where to get a hand on those movies. Distribution etc.  Echoes is e.g.  available through the Los Angeles/ London based distribution company Shorts International and the Danish  library system. Nuummioq (2009) is out on DVD, as well as Hinnarik (2009). I know that for example  Branding Greenland is well aware of the market and a good example of global outreach is Nive Nielsen and  the Deer Children music. Many could learn from Jan De Vroede & Nive Nielsen in terms of sustainable     *** And here comes my last question. With Greenland Eyes IFF you address urban Greenland. In what  way you see the urban in Greenlandic movies?     In Germany, the nature is still very much in focus. This being the case in many other European countries or  for that matter most of the film productions approaching Greenland.  In present context, addressing  urbanity in Greenland is not about the city limits in contrast to nature. Urbanity is simply about being a  person, living in Greenland. In an abstract, but important sense, we invite you to think out of the box. The  variety of films in our program nail the fact that our goal is not to categorize, but indeed bombard you, the  spectator with contemporary art. Luckily, the film selection encompasses also exhibitions, music,  performative storytelling and finally all the interesting people to meet & greet.           *** Ivalo Frank, thank you very much and all the best.       


REFERENCES This interview was conducted January the 6th, 2012   by Jakub Christensen M.       GREENLAND EYES IFF OFFICIAL SPONSORS & PARTNERS   

  

General queries  info@greenlandeyes.com  press@greenlandeyes.com    Specific film or festival queries  Ivalo Frank:        ivalo.frank@greenlandeyes.com     +49 176 811 81 938         Greenland Eyes office  Greenland Eyes International Film Festival  Nordeuropa‐Institut  Unter den Linden 6  10099 Berlin  +49 30 2093 4956    Visiting address  Dorotheenstr. 24  Building 3  2nd floor  room 3.222    http://www.greenlandeyes.com   

  

Lill‐Ann Körber:  lill‐ann.koerber@greenlandeyes.com  +49 179 102 61 55 

GREENLAND EYES IFF - BERLIN 24.-30. APRIL, 2012  

- Q&A WITH DIRECTOR AND FILM FESTIVAL COORDINATOR IVALO FRANK

GREENLAND EYES IFF - BERLIN 24.-30. APRIL, 2012  

- Q&A WITH DIRECTOR AND FILM FESTIVAL COORDINATOR IVALO FRANK

Advertisement