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THE NEWS SOURCE FOR DOWNTOWN & NORTHEAST MINNEAPOLIS RESIDENTS AUGUST 09–22, 2018

INSIDE PAGE 5

BIZ BUZZ: WARNERS’ STELLIAN

NO CHARGES

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FLAVOR: EDWARDS DESSERT KITCHEN

for officers who

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SHOT BLEVINS WHETHER OR NOT BLEVINS FIRED HIS GUN WAS ‘IRRELEVANT,’ County Attorney Mike Freeman said

GET OUT GUIDE: PREDICTION ERROR @ Mia

By Dylan Thomas / dthomas@journalmpls.com

The activists who broke up a county attorney press conference included John Thompson, second from right, a friend of Philando Castile. Photo by Dylan Thomas

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he Minneapolis police officers who shot and killed a man earlier this summer as he fled through a North Minneapolis alley will not face criminal charges, Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said July 30. Freeman said the officers’ decision to use deadly force against 31-year-old Thurman Junior Blevins complied with state law. He presented video and eyewitness evidence that Blevins was armed with a loaded handgun when he ran from officers Ryan Kelly and Justin Schmidt, and the officers told investigators they fired after Blevins pointed the gun in their direction. Mayor Jacob Frey released footage from the body cameras worn by Kelly and Schmidt the day before Freeman’s announcement. He described the video as “traumatic” but said its release was an important step toward transparency. SEE BLEVINS / PAGE 14

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‘Drag Race’ alum brings the glam in ‘Georgia McBride’ Costume designer Patrick Holt, aka Tempest DuJour, talks ‘drag fabulousness’ of Guthrie show By Eric Best / ebest@journalmpls.com RuPaul Charles’ often-quoted phrase, “We’re born naked, and the rest is drag” is especially relevant for a costume designer. Perhaps no one more so than Patrick Holt. The work of Holt, a University of Arizona theater professor by day and “RuPaul’s Drag Race” star Tempest DuJour by night, shines — literally — in the Guthrie Theater’s “The Legend of Georgia McBride,” a show that has him designing rhinestone-studded Elvis jumpsuits and mountainous floral wigs that look like they came straight out of “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.” Holt isn’t shy about calling this one of the gayest plays the Guthrie has ever done. “I think what’s great about this play is that people who have never seen drag before will get something from it and people who see drag all the time will get something from it

in equal doses,” he said. “I think audiences are obviously ready for (drag).” The coming-of-age comedy-meets-folk tale, which, unsurprisingly, doubles as a drag performance, was written by playwright Matthew Lopez (“The Whipping Man,” “Reverberation”) as an homage to the drag queens who helped his own coming-out process. “The Legend of Georgia McBride” follows Casey ( Jayson Speters), a struggling Elvis impersonator who, after he finds out his wife Jo (Chaz Hodges) is pregnant, is coerced into doing drag when performers Tracy (Cameron Folmar) and Anorexia Nervosa aka Rexy (Arturo Soria) take his time slot at Cleo’s, a Panama City Beach bar run by Eddie ( Jim Lichtscheidl), Tracy’s cousin. When their drag revue starts bringing in customers and money to pay his landlord Jason — played SEE PATRICK HOLT / PAGE 12

Veteran drag performer Tracy Mills, played by Cameron Folmar, puts on her makeup on stage as part of “The Legend of Georgia McBride.” Photo by Dan Norman


2 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018

News

‘The downtown party store’ finds new home With a renovation looming over its current warehouse, Litin’s Party Value plans new store location By Eric Best / ebest@journalmpls.com

Litin’s Party Value is leaving its current home on Lakeside Avenue near the Minneapolis Farmers Market. Photo by Eric Best

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Litin’s Party Value has been known as “the downtown Minneapolis party supply store” for about 60 years. Even as its current home transitions to another use under new ownership, Ned Litin, the store’s second-generation owner, plans to keep it that way. “We want to continue to be the downtown party store,” he said. The business has been forced to leave its home for the past 15 years, an aging warehouse near the Minneapolis Farmers Market. In an effort to keep the store open, Litin has been on the hunt since March for a new space near the city’s urban core that can accommodate all the needs of a party supplier, such as a loading dock, parking, lots of traffic and plenty of room for themed party supplies, balloons, cardboard cutouts, gift wrap, office supplies and everything else downtowners need to host an event. “We have very unique requirements,” he said. But Litin has found a new home for the party store, which, while technically outside of downtown, will keep his family business open. The space, at 913 Plymouth Ave. N. in the Near North neighborhood, is less than a five-minute drive away from the store’s current 16,000-square-foot warehouse. It’ll be a new chapter for the business that’s been responsible for festivities across the city for several decades. Ned’s father, Donald Litin, started a distribution business that’d later become Litin’s Party Value in 1947 at 7th & Park downtown. Over the next 20 years he was “scratching and clawing” his way into business, Litin said, opening to the public in 1967 as the party store it is today. Since then, it has bounced around several locations, including the current home of the Freehouse in the North Loop, but Litin’s has remained a source for “all the weird stuff,” he said. Litin said they are a destination for specialty items, such as tableware in every color of the rainbow — even ivory, magenta and burgundy. “Another way I see it is, Costco and Sam’s Club carry 20 percent of the products that represent 80 percent of the sales and we’re left with carrying 80 percent of the products that represent 20 percent of the sales,” he said. The store’s days in its current home are numbered. Hopkins-based Jacobs Management Corp. is buying the 1961 warehouse building with a plan to turn it into a self-storage facility with about 900 climate-controlled storage units. The project, tentatively named Lakeside Self-Storage for its 434 Lakeside Ave. address, calls for renovating the building and adding about 33,500 square feet to it through a

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two-story addition. Plans submitted to the City Planning Commission earlier this year show an updated façade with metal paneling, burnished brick and rock face block, as well as upgrades to landscaping. “It’s a tired 1960 industrial building that has not been well maintained, and we’re going to invest significantly in updating the curb appeal of the property,” said Todd Jones, vice president of real estate development, in a June interview. The facility could open by March, though Jones said it could partially open as soon as January following the renovation. Jacobs Management developed a storage facility on Washington Avenue in the North Loop that it later sold. It recently developed similar facilities in St. Louis Park and New Hope. Jones said with a population base of 256,000 within a few miles of the site, the area is a “very desirable market.” “This is something we’ve been doing for about 30 years now,” he said. “We’ve done more of these self-storage facilities over that period of time than everyone else.” The 434 Lakeside Ave. building is also home to Accent Store Fixtures. Manager Mike Iwaskewycz, whose father owns the store, said the fixtures retailer moved earlier this summer to 701 Plymouth Ave. N., just two blocks over from the future Litin’s store. The party store’s lease means that Litin’s can continue outfitting parties across the metro. The new location is a few thousand square feet smaller, Litin said, which means the store will go “on a little bit of a diet.” In keeping with the store’s current home, Litin said he wanted something that would fit its “warehouse image.” “We’ve always been in these weird warehouses, and so the people are kind of expecting us to be in a weird warehouse, so we continue to look for these weird warehouses,” he said. Litin said they’ll begin moving products and breaking down the store around Aug. 20 with an anticipated reopening around Sept. 10, though no specific dates are set. During those “disruptive” weeks, Litin said, they plan to have as much product available. But these weeks as summer begins to wane are typically slow for business. “It’s a weird lull,” he said. “Everybody is up at the cabin.” Litin’s Party Value, at 434 Lakeside Ave., is hosting a moving sale with tagged products 30 percent or 50 percent off in the store. It’s open 8 a.m.–7 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Sunday.


journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 3

News By Eric Best ebest@journalmpls.com @ericthebest

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Liz Olson and Anders Lundberg are turning a passion for all things related to gaming into a brick-and-mortar business in Sheridan. All Systems Go will be a nearly 1,300-square-foot center for a vast array of games and media, from strategy board games to new and retro video games. It’s a spinoff of Lundberg’s All Systems Go Games, an eBay-based market he’s developed over the years with thousands of new and used pieces of niche merchandise. Think VHS tapes of retro cartoons or old CDs in their original packaging — even highly specialized DVDs for learning how to raise donkeys. “Going thrift store shopping with him is really intimidating. He’s like a machine. He just knows what he’s doing,” said Olson, who will manage the store full time. “It’s so insane what this guy can find.” The inventory of the shop will be quite a bit more mainstream. In addition to some of these retro finds, All Systems Go will carry new and used board games, video games, cards, consoles, figurines and more. Olson envisions having an area dedicated for interactive gaming and tournaments so customers can sit down and play “Mario Kart,” or another game on the shelves, right there

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Circa Gallery is moving out of its North Loop storefront, but its director says this isn’t the last of the art gallery, which has operated downtown for nearly three decades. Krista Anderson-Larson, Circa’s new director, said the contemporary abstract art gallery has lost its lease with its current approximately 2,300-square-foot space on 1st Street. She’s now looking for a new home for the gallery, possibly near Edina where there are more galleries nearby and more parking. Circa opened nearly 30 years ago near the Target Center. Since then, it has moved to Hennepin Avenue in Loring Park and then to its current home in the North Loop. Anderson-Larson said in addition to the gallery’s fourth, likely smaller, location, Circa is open to partnerships to bring work from its roster of artists to pop-up spaces while expanding its online presence. The gallery’s previous director, Teresa Engeltjes, recently stepped down after about five years operating Circa. Anderson-Larson said the gallery, which is owned by Russell Belk, represents about 30 mid-career and well-established abstract artists, about onethird of who are from Minnesota. Circa will have one more exhibition at

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in the store. In today’s gaming culture full of online multiplayer games, the two said they’d like to see people playing together in person. “I just think that that’s so lost lately, that people don’t do that anymore,” she said. All Systems Go will have board games available to rent for a day, so customers will be able to check out a game before buying it and take it home or to the nearby Dangerous Man Brewing Co. where Lundberg works. In keeping with the spirit of the eBay store, the brick-and-mortar shop will buy or trade used games and merchandise. The store replaces Ann Meyers’ Gumball Boutique, a shop that was filled with local art, vintage clothing and Northeast-themed gifts. Meyers said in an email that she’s decided to focus on producing apparel that she makes from vintage T-shirts. Meyers now works out of a studio not far away near Lowry & 2nd. Olson and Lundberg are building out the space and plan to open All Systems Go this September at 158 13th Ave. NE along the neighborhood’s popular 13th Avenue Business District. They are posting updates on their Facebook page at facebook.com/ allsystemsgogames.

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4 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018

News

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Warners’ Stellian Warners’ Stellian’s new Northeast facility is its first to combine a showroom, offices and a distribution center. Photo by Eric Best

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Warners’ Stellian has opened its 10th store in Northeast Minneapolis, a move the Twin Cities-based appliance retailer hopes will help it reach the city’s growing urban population. The familiarly red-painted facility, located along Broadway Street Northeast in the MidCity Industrial neighborhood, is the company’s second largest outside its 160,000-squarefoot headquarters and warehouse in St. Paul. President Robert Warner, a second-generation employee, said having a Northeast location puts the them in an “area of opportunity.” “Being close to a major artery in a dense area with robust home improvement is very exciting. From a fulfillment standpoint, it’s an attractive location,” he said in a statement. The store, which opened in late June in a space formerly occupied by Boyer Trucks, carries major kitchen appliances like refrigerators, dishwashers and stoves; washers and dryers; HVAC products like air conditioners; grills and other appliances. At 10,000 square feet, the showroom is larger than Warners’ Stellian’s Minneapolis outlet store and about half the size of its Edina location. The new facility has 70,000 square feet of bulk storage and some offices for sales and other staff. It will serve as an auxiliary distribution center to support the other nine stores in the Twin Cities metro. The store has an in-house Styrofoam recycling service — though it’s not open to the public — and offers free local delivery. Joe Warner, the new store’s manager and a third-generation staff member, said he estimates they toured 100 buildings to find something that could balance needs for a showroom, a warehouse and a central location. Plus, the new store has plenty of parking and is visible from the highway.

“This facility will take some of the burden off the other facility where we hear that we’re limited because we can’t make these buys that we want to make because we don’t have anywhere to put the stuff,” he said. Joe, who’s from Northeast, said the store’s proximity to downtown and the North Loop, as well as neighboring cities like St. Anthony and Columbia Heights, will attract new business. “I think because of the density of those areas … we are going to see a new customer that maybe wouldn’t have given us a shot before,” Joe said. The expansion also puts them close to competitors like Costco, which recently opened a small business-focused store in Northeast, and Home Depot in the Quarry shopping center. Joe said the competition can help the company, whose main business is replacing old appliances, by setting them apart. He said a customer has come in looking for something different after a negative big-box experience. Nearly five decades after Joe’s grandfather, Jim Warner, bought his employer Steve Farkus’ business, Stellian (a portmanteau of Steve and his wife Lillian’s names), the company remains a family business. In addition to its second-generation leaders, Joe estimates roughly three-dozen third-generation family members and in-laws are a part of the business today. Warners’ Stellian’s Northeast appliance store, at 2605 Broadway St. NE, is open 8:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Saturday and noon–5 p.m. Sunday. A grand opening is slated for later this year.

“(Customers) come in saying, 'We’re looking for this package,' and we have all that stuff here,” said Joe Warner, general manager of Warners’ Stellian’s Northeast store. Photo by Eric Best


journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 5

News

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Number 12 Cider is planning a taproom and brewing facility in the North Loop near Target Field. Concept drawings of Number 12 Cider’s new facility show high ceilings and a variety of seating. Submitted images Colin Post and Steve Hance, co-owners of Number 12 Cider, are set to open a new taproom in the North Loop this October. The 7,000-square-foot taproom will be located at 700 N. 5th St., a block-and-a-half away from Target Field, and will operate as a commercial winery. “[Our] focus is on real apples and real cider made in a traditional method,” Post said. “We think the city is ready for that.” Post and Hance are childhood friends from New Brighton. In 2012, the two decided to enter in the Minnesota State Fair’s home brew competition, after home brewing their own cider for many years. “We won a blue ribbon with some of the products and that kind of started us thinking a little of what this could become,” Post said. The two partnered with Yuri and Jill Preugschas, owners of Deer Lake Orchard in Buffalo, Minnesota, and expanded into an orchard taproom. Now with the rise in popularity of cider, the Number 12 Cider founders said they feel ready for an expansion. “Even in a smaller community like [Buffalo] people were pretty excited about cider in general,” Post said. “Some of our busy weekend days out there we just thought, ‘What kind of crazy potential could there be for this in an urban setting?’” The Deer Lake Orchard taproom is currently closed for renovation but will reopen at the end of the summer. It will continue serving Number 12 Cider products, even as Post and Hance move their production and focus into the North Loop. Post said breweries are trying to fill the growing demand for cider with apple beers while the ciders currently on the market tend to be simple and highly sweetened. “Count on different with us,” he said. “We think anybody that comes into our space is going to really appreciate what

cider is and how it’s made and what the possibilities are with that.” He said cider can be just as interesting and complex as beer with variations in the fruit and yeast. Post said they’re aiming to have all 16 taps running when the taproom opens this fall, with some ciders they’ve previously served at their orchard taproom and some making their debut. The two are separating from their partnership with the Deer Lake Orchard owners and starting the North Loop taproom on their own. They’re taking the relocation as an opportunity to rebrand with different packaging and a new name and logo. The cidery will now just be Number 12 Cider. “It’s a new venture, it’s a new project, its new ownership … so we just felt like a fresh start was important, but we didn’t want to lose the heritage of what we used to be and where we came from completely,” Post said. Number 12 Cider has three ciders in distribution across the state and the two hope to add a fourth soon. Post said they’re leaning toward adding one that rotates seasonally. “[The taproom] will be kind of our playground to try some things, experiment with different types of yeasts and ciders and apple blends,” he said. “What is received well at the taproom might eventually become distributed products as well.” Whether they’re newbies or “cider snobs,” Post and Hance are hoping to educate cider’s growing customer base on its production and variations. “(The new taproom) is kind of the culmination of everything that we’ve done to this point,” Post said, “and we’re extremely excited about being in the North Loop and developing some of these concepts further.”

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The cidery is a tenant in Schafer Richardson’s 700 5th project, a roughly 56,000-square-foot office and commercial redevelopment. File image

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6 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018

Government

Volume 49, Issue 16 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@journalmpls.com Co-Publisher & Sales Manager Terry Gahan tgahan@journalmpls.com General Manager Zoe Gahan zgahan@journalmpls.com Editor Dylan Thomas 612-436-4391 dthomas@journalmpls.com @DThomasJournals Assistant Editor Eric Best ebest@journalmpls.com @ericthebest Staff Writers Michelle Bruch mbruch@journalmpls.com @MichelleBruch Nate Gotlieb ngotlieb@journalmpls.com @NateGotlieb Editorial Interns Sonya Chechik Austen Macalus Contributing Writers Carla Waldemar Sheila Regan Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@journalmpls.com Creative Director Valerie Moe 612-436-5075 vmoe@journalmpls.com Senior Graphic Designer Micah Edel medel@journalmpls.com Graphic Designer Kaitlin Ungs kungs@journalmpls.com

CIVIC BEAT

By Dylan Thomas dthomas@journalmpls.com @dthomasjournals

Police charter amendment advances on council vote A charter amendment that would transfer to the City Council some of the mayor’s exclusive authority over the Minneapolis Police Department won council approval Aug. 3, but it is unlikely to go before voters soon. The proposed amendment would strike from the charter language that gives the mayor “complete power” over the department, clarifying that the mayor has “executive” power over police and that the council “may make rules and regulations” for the department. Council members approved the amendment on a 7-5 vote and forwarded a ballot question to the Charter Commission for review. The commission was scheduled to meet Aug. 8, just after this issue went to press. Speedy approval would keep alive the possibility that the question appears on the November ballot, but Charter Commission Chair Barry Clegg cast doubt on that scenario. Clegg said commission members raised concerns in an Aug. 1 meeting that there had been too little time for the public to debate what has proven to be a controversial proposal. Ward 2 City Council Member Cam Gordon introduced the police charter amendment in late June, a week after two police officers shot and killed 31-year-old Thurman Blevins as he fled through a North Side alley. That left just an eight-week window for both the Charter Commission and City Council to agree on the wording of a ballot question and forward it to the Minnesota Secretary of State’s Office before an Aug. 24 deadline. Clegg said there were also calls for additional research into how similar cities organize oversight of police. “That takes time, we’re not going to compress that into a one-hour meeting,” he said.

City Council Member Cam Gordon (Ward 2) has proposed an amendment to the city’s charter that would reorganize control of the Minneapolis Police Department. Photo by Dylan Thomas That much was clear to City Council members before they voted to approve the ballot language on Aug. 3, leading one of the dissenters, City Council Member Lisa Goodman, to ask: “What is the rush to pass this today?” “It feels like making a point, not like making a difference,” Goodman said. “It feels political, not policy-oriented. And it has served to divide us rather than unite us.” She said there was a “mutual understanding” among council members that change needed to come to the police department but insisted: “This is not the way to do it.” In voting against the charter amendment, Goodman was joined by City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins and council members Abdi Warsame, Linea Palmisano and Alondra Cano. Voting in favor were City Council President Lisa Bender and members Phillipe Cunningham, Jeremiah Ellison, Andrew Johnson, Jeremy Schroeder, Gordon and Steve Fletcher, who tweaked Gordon’s original proposal, crafting the version of the proposed charter amendment that was ulti-

Short on drivers, Metro Transit cuts trips

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Metro Transit announced reduced trips on 40 bus routes beginning July 31. The transit service is facing a driver shortage. The trips will be suspended indefinitely while Metro Transit aggressively recruits to fill about 90 open positions. In its announcement, Metro Transit said the suspended trips amounted to about 1 percent of all scheduled weekday trips. The move “will help reduce the number of trips that are being canceled at the last moment, after exhausting all available options,” the statement added. Routes 2, 3, 5, 17 and 18 are among those affected. For more information, go to metrotransit.org.

mately adopted. (Council Member Kevin Reich was absent from the meeting.) Mayor Jacob Frey said he and Chief Medaria Arradondo remained “adamantly opposed” to the amendment, adding that Arradondo believed its passage would make his job more difficult. Frey said council members didn’t even have enough information to act. Noting the council had instructed City Attorney Susan Segal to analyze the charter’s current language and clarify the council’s present role in police department oversight, Frey said it would be inappropriate to advance the proposal without that “baseline information.” “Clearly there’s confusion,” he said. “Clearly there’s a lack of understanding both about the present law as well as the implications of this charter amendment if passed.” Council Member Ellison said the issue wasn’t that he and his colleagues didn’t understand their role in police department oversight. “The truth is there is genuine gray area,” he said, adding later that the amendment would “provide that clarity.”

Primary election is Aug. 14 A primary election on Aug. 14 will narrow the races for local, state and federal offices ahead of the general election in November. Only the top vote-getters in the primary will advance to the Nov. 6 election. Offices on the ballot in Minneapolis include U.S. senator and representative, state representative, governor and lieutenant governor, attorney general, Hennepin County commissioner, sheriff and at-large school board member. There are no primaries for races with just two candidates. The Minneapolis Early Vote Center opened June 29 for no-excuses absentee voting. It will remain open through Aug. 13 at 217 3rd St. S. For more information, including sample ballots and directions to polling places, go to vote.minneapolismn.gov.


journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 7

Voices

Dateline Minneapolis / By Steve Brandt

GRADING MINNEAPOLIS’ WOONERFS

T

he streets of Minneapolis have changed markedly in the nearly 25 years since residents near Lyndale Avenue South had to turn out several hundred people to block plans to widen the street. Their alternative design was largely followed when the street was redone. Bike lanes have proliferated since, along with color-marked crosswalks for pedestrians and other features intended to tame motorized traffic and encourage other means of getting around. The motor still is king in practice on city streets, although driving has the lowest priority the city’s two-year-old “complete streets” hierarchy. But motorized traffic is no longer quite so dominant. The latest evidence of that can be found in the three shared-use spaces that have cropped up in the past several years in Minneapolis. Also called woonerfs, from the Dutch term, they’re designed to encourage pedestrians, cyclists and slowermoving motorized vehicles to coexist in the same space. The best-executed woonerf is tucked away in a two-block-long passageway once dominated by railcars serving the former Pillsbury milling complex. It’s a half block uphill from Southeast Main Street and its dominating A-Mill, not far from the east end of the Stone Arch Bridge.

A second shared-use space lies in another rail corridor on the other side of the river, between South 2nd Street and the downtown riverfront. It bisects two new housing developments. The third is the city’s revamp of a twoblock-long street in LynLake that overlooks the Midtown Greenway; it’s due to be extended three more blocks in a few years. Here’s what I like and don’t about the three: • The Pillsbury area woonerf does the best job of making pedestrians feel like the street is their space. That’s partly because the abutting mill and elevators in the complex redeveloped by Dominium give the passageway an intimate feeling, one that’s extended to the next block, redeveloped by Doran. The space also uses a variety of surfaces, from poured concrete to paver blocks to crushed granite to define edges and guide drivers. “I make a point of walking through it on my daily pilgrimage to the Stone Arch Bridge,” said Marcy Holmes resident Ted Tucker. Most of the motorized traffic through here, aside from service vehicles, consists of low-speed access to parking garages by residents of the complex. The design negotiated by city heritage preservation officials and landscape architect David Motzenbecker, a Kingfield resident,

preserves some of the corridor’s heritage, such as the route by which grain hoppers delivered and dumped their loads to serve the complex. Remnant rails follow the historical rail-switching pattern; rusting artifacts of the mill complex remain, most notably in the catwalk-spanned dumping pit area. The most arresting feature consists of a row of elongated conical screens that were used to filter in the milling process.

This formerly was one of the worst maintained streets in Minneapolis. It has been replaced with twin 8-foot driving lanes, each bordered by a 2-foot noncurbed edge of darker concrete. They create a visually narrower surface. I’ve found few cars parked there during my several daytime visits. Ditto for pedestrian and bike traffic. Visibility has improved with new pedestrian-scale lights. One disappointing development has

The only flaw I found in this privately owned public space is a lack of signs interpreting the history of the complex. • The corridor at Mill City Quarter has excellent signs explaining the history of a rail yard that’s sprouted buildings over the past 20 years of redevelopment. It also scatters railcar axles on the former rail corridor’s margins. This shared-use space was created to satisfy the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board’s park dedication requirement of land or money for new developments. But some question whether it feels like a woonerf. The car is still king here. By day, workers in nearby offices park here, with their head-in parking maximizing the autocentric feel of the corridor. By night, the same spaces are open for public parking. The arrangement will make more sense for walkers and cyclists when a planned link from the northeast end of this space connects to riverfront parkway trails along the river as part of the Park Board’s Water Works remake of parkland on the west end of the Stone Arch Bridge. That scheduled 2020 completion will give pedestrians and cyclists more reason to use this corridor. • Meanwhile, the city’s sole entry in the shared-use street realm lies in LynLake on the two blocks between Lyndale and Bryant avenues on 29th Street. This shared-use street had the most community input and adjoins new housing that has sprung up along the street.

been the die-off of the saplings planted along the verges of the street, especially in front of Lime Apartments, where one would think that someone would take responsibility for watering. It’s also evident that the curb-less design has some problems. At winter’s end, the thawing turf beside the pavement edge was riven with tire ruts. A moving truck recently was parked not in one of the six pay parking spaces but half blocking the driving lane, overlapping the grass. Another disappointment is that no entity has stepped forward to assume the programming of the space that was widely desired by those who showed up to brainstorm this street. They envisioned such ideas as markets and street fairs. The project was handed off politically from departing Mayor R.T. Rybak to area Council Member Lisa Bender. Maybe the planned 2021 extension of the concept to three of the four blocks to the west (a fourth was unfortunately vacated by the city) will help the street meet Rybak’s ambition for a “great place for pedestrians.”

Steve Brandt retired from a 40-year career at the Star Tribune in 2016. He lives in Southwest Minneapolis.


8 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018

Voices

Moments in Minneapolis By Cedar Imboden Phillips

STATION NO. 2

T

he Minneapolis Fire Department’s Station No. 2 at 13th & Main has been located at its current intersection since 1858. The building shown here was constructed in 1892 and was designed to be large enough to hold a new steam engine. It was one of two stations built in that year. The expansion of stations across the city came in response to both growth and political pressures. Minneapolis was growing rapidly in terms of both development and population. In addition to providing general fire protection to the surrounding neighborhood, this station served the east side lumber businesses. The current station, located across the street, opened in 1961.

Cedar Imboden Phillips serves as executive director for the Hennepin History Museum. Learn more about the museum and its offerings at hennepinhistory.org or 870-1329.

Image from the Hennepin History Museum’s collection


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News

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2323 JACKSON ST. NE YELLOW TREE CORP.

Nicollet Hotel tower

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United Properties has submitted a new vision for its Gateway tower proposal, now a 30-story tower without a hotel and more than 790,000 square feet of office space anchored by RBC Wealth Management. The 458-foot tower, which would technically be 36 stories under the city’s zoning code, would feature 23,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space split between the main and skyway levels and approximately 500 parking spaces on three underground parking levels, according to preliminary plans submitted to the City Planning Commission Committee of the Whole. The Minneapolisbased developer plans to connect it to the skyway via the Minneapolis Central Library and possibly Marquette Plaza. The tower site, the former Nicollet Hotel Block on the north end of Nicollet Mall, would have an outdoor plaza and a terrace on its podium.

Yellow Tree Corp. is proposing a 65-unit apartment building in the Holland neighborhood of Northeast Minneapolis. The Minneapolis-based developer is planning to build the four-story building on a vacant lot at 24th & Jackson, according to plans submitted to the City Planning Commission for its July 30 meeting. The first floor will have 32 enclosed parking spaces and six residential units with walk-up entrances. The second and third floors will have 20 units each, and the fourth will have 19 units and an amenity deck. The building, clad with brick, fiber cement and metal panel, would have a mix of studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units. The project as proposed will require rezoning the site to R5 from R4, or to a high-density multi-family district from medium density, and variances for setbacks, the maximum lot coverage and maximum impervious surface coverage.

528 WASHINGTON AVE. N. DOMINIUM

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Iron Store Dominium has unveiled its vision for the Duffey Paper buildings along Washington Avenue in the North Loop. The Plymouth-based developer is planning to renovate and convert the three warehouse buildings, including one mid-rise building and two smaller ones, between 5th and 6th avenues into about 200 units of affordable housing. Nick Anderson, vice president and project partner, said they’ll likely close on the sale of the buildings next summer and could break ground soon after. The project, currently referred to as Iron Store for the main building’s original use, would have a wide range of affordability with rents as low as 30 percent or less of the area median income or as high as 80 percent, Anderson said, which would put them at $500–$2,000. Dominium is seeking state and federal historic tax credits and affordable housing tax credits.

315 NICOLLET OPUS GROUP

Ritz Block The Opus Group now has control of the remaining 1.5 acres of the Ritz Block, a site on the north end of Nicollet Mall where it is finishing work on the 30-story 365 Nicollet luxury apartment tower. “Opus has acquired the remainder of the land next to 365 Nicollet known as Ritz Block for a future development. It’s a continued pleasure to work with the city of Minneapolis and the downtown community in support the city’s vision to double the downtown population by 2025,” said Opus Vice President and General Manager Matt Rauenhorst in a statement, hinting at what could be another residential project in addition to the developer’s Nic on Fifth, 4Marq and 365 Nicollet apartment towers.

D E


journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 11

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Carvana, an online used car marketplace, is proposing a “hub” site in Northeast Minneapolis to facilitate delivery of local online car purchases. The Arizona-based startup has submitted plans to the City Planning Commission for the delivery site, which under the zoning code is defined as a motor freight terminal. Cars on the site, located on the north end of the Mid-City Industrial neighborhood, may be stored for up to 48 hours, according to the proposal. The property is vacant and most recently used for commercial truck sales.

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365 Nicollet The first residents of 365 Nicollet are now able to move into the 30-story luxury apartment tower on the southern portion of the Ritz Block, a block on the north end of Nicollet Mall between 3rd and 4th streets. Opus Vice President and General Manager Matt Rauenhorst said work on the building will wrap up this fall. Amenities include a 24-hour concierge service, dog spa and run, fitness studio and terrace with a pool, outdoor theater and gaming lawn.

1001 N. 3RD ST. SCHAFER RICHARDSON

North Loop ramp Schafer Richardson’s parking ramp in the North Loop is now open. Director of Development Maureen Michalski said the 349-stall ramp is used mostly for contract parking, which will free up sites in the neighborhood so the Minneapolis-based developer can build housing. Interstate Parking manages the parking, including some hourly parking open to the public. Schafer Richardson plans to build 104 units of affordable housing across the street at the former Zuccaro’s Produce site, a project known as The Redwell. The developer is replacing part of a surface parking lot along 3rd Street with an approximately 139-unit market-rate apartment building, which Michalski said they plan to break ground on by January 2019.

Developer Daniel Oberpriller has reworked the design of a new apartment building in the Marcy-Holmes neighborhood where he’s planning a three-part project that would change the look of 8th Street. North Bay Cos. is proposing a five-story apartment building at 8th & 6th that would have about 51 studio and one-bedroom units ranging from about 400 to 800 square feet. The building, designed by DJR Architecture, would have a bike storage room, a fitness studio and 17 enclosed parking spaces on the ground floor, according to revised plans that the Marcy-Holmes Neighborhood Association’s Land Use Committee will review in early August. An additional six stalls would be located outside near a dog run.

700 5TH ST. N. SCHAFER RICHARDSON

700 5th Schafer Richardson has completed its part in renovating the former Weather-Rite building for new office and commercial tenants. Work has begun on tenant improvements, said Director of Development Maureen Michalski. About 7,000 of the 56,000 square feet available is leased, she said. The project has attracted Number 12 Cider, which is currently building a commercial brewing facility and taproom in the project.

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12 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 Casey (played by Jayson Speters) and Tracy (played by Cameron Folmar) perform in beachy and Fourth of July-themed drag in “The Legend of Georgia McBride.” Photos by Dan Norman

FROM PATRICK HOLT / PAGE 1 by Soria in a sort of straight drag — Casey, a heterosexual man, begins to embrace his drag alter ego Georgia McBride, a name combining the state where his mother was born and the last name of the girl he first kissed. This is the Guthrie debut for Holt, who grew up in North Carolina and has taught theater for the past two decades. He met “Georgia McBride” director Jeffrey Meanza, the Guthrie’s associate artistic director, while Meanza was a graduate student at the University of North Carolina. Holt said when he got the call from the Guthrie to design costumes for the show, it was a no-brainer. “Anyone in their right mind would jump at the chance to work at the Guthrie. It’s considered to be at the top of the pyramid of regional (theater) — American theater, period. It was an honor to be asked,” he said. Decades of performing as Tempest DuJour, including a stint on the seventh season of Charles’ reality TV show, prepared Holt for designing Tracy’s over-the-top elegance, but not necessarily Casey’s kingturned-queen transformations. “He is a tricky one. I never in my entire life have met a straight man that does drag. I think he’s sort of a unicorn,” he said. Even in drag, Casey, who goes from denimclad streetwear to glammed-out couture on stage a handful of times throughout the nearly two-hour show, never really loses his masculine features, Holt said, like exposed arms and strong facial features. “We were never going to convince the audience that he was a woman, and that was never the intention. It was important to always remember who he was under the wig and the makeup,” he said. Tracy, on the other hand, was a different story. Her style, Holt said, is a lot like DuJour’s. Tracy lip syncs to a tongue-twisted Liza Minnelli tune shimmering in red in one scene. Another has her performing “Sisters”

from “White Christmas” — whose reprise was lip-synced by Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye — as the older sibling with Casey in Panama Beach-inspired outfits complete with an extra-long hot dog. Layered in her looks are moments from drag history. “She’s the drag culture. She’s the magic bag of goodies of this play. She represents what

her style of drag is, which is very similar to me,” he said. “She should always look the most grand, the most theatrical. Your eye should always go to her on stage. She commands that.” Rexy plays new school to Tracy’s old school. The show’s fiery, younger drag queen — a “body queen,” Holt said, who uses her looks to her advantage — is reminiscent

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of the up-and-coming performers he sees around his current town of Tucson. “She was very easy to me because I know so many Rexy’s,” he said. The importance of the show’s diversity of drag specialties, from campy comedy queens to energetic stunt performers, isn’t lost on Holt. “Twenty years ago when you were doing drag you had to find your lane. (Now) you can be more than one. You don’t have to pick a category. You can be whoever you want,” he said. Even for a drag veteran like Holt, the defiant spirit of the play’s LGBT characters hits home in his own personal and professional lives. In academic circles, Holt said he’s been told to tamp down his drag career, something that’s laughed off like it’s not art. “You have no idea what we do if that’s your opinion. It needs to be respected,” he said. When Casey has to come to terms with being a drag performer, he said, his shame and how the world, including his wife, looks at him are genuinely uncomfortable, but in a good way. Holt said it took him back to growing up and becoming a performer. “We had to hide. We were scared. We wanted everyone to get along and be nice,” he said. But, as Rexy exclaims, “drag is a raised fist inside a sequined glove.” And, in “The Legend of Georgia McBride,” Holt said the audience is going to see plenty of thought-provoking “drag fabulousness.” “This kind of play is important whether you want to embrace it or think about it again or not. We’re giving you something to think about while you’re there for two hours,” he said.

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journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 13

LOCAL

FLAVOR

SWEET EATS

BY CARLA WALDEMAR

TALK ABOUT PRETTY! Edwards Dessert Kitchen, a new tenant on North Washington Avenue’s restaurant row, is as much a ‘concept’ store as an eatery. Cheers for the renovation of a long-vacant building into a destination for the ’hood’s trendsters to strut (and slurp) their stuff. Picture this: an interior showcasing pale brick arches lit by ceiling spots, rising above a polished wood floor and the window wall’s passing parade. Add in a curvaceous bar anchoring a high-style setting of purple velvety chairs and matte-black lounges, attended by cocktail tables for your Tattersall-spiked designer beverage (cocktails $12; wine and beer, too). If you’re an “eat dessert first” kind of person, step right in. (After all, what’s the point of supping righteously on skimpy salads when you could be hit by a bolt of lightning before you next step on the scale? Might as well enjoy your last few bites on earth.) If that’s not your style, nip over after a meal elsewhere, or après-performance, for the evening’s grand finale. But if you crave a takehome treat, I’ll be honest: You’ll find equally good quality (and in some cases, better) — and more friendly pricing — elsewhere. (Patisserie 44 and Rustica, I’m talking about you.) Will EDK have a future as rosy as its strawberry-red wine sorbet? You tell me. Meanwhile, I’ll tell you. Bars and cookies ($5 each) range from mole-spiked brownies to a salted butter (i.e. regular, right?) chocolate chunk cookies — buttery and boasting a nice crumb but, frankly, generic. The curried scotcheroo involving mango and cashews is a chocolate-frosted improvement on a Rice Krispie bar. A caramel and five-spice snickerdoodle was generic in taste and texture, similar to what comes out of my own oven. Maybe you crave a pudding ($10)? The mocha tiramisu employs a chocolate cake base as its twist, along with the addition of bergamot. Fine, but not life-altering. Didn’t try the vanilla-bean mousse yet, but the miso caramel pudding, with its infusion of soy into the mixture, and set upon a black sesame sponge, to me (and I emphasize that this is a highly personal reaction) was so off-tasting that I couldn’t finish it. House-made ice creams ($10, meant for sharing) again proved just fine but not better nor more unusual than many another elite venue’s, either in quality or flavor profiles. (This time I’m calling out Sebastian Joe’s and World Street Kitchen’s frozen-goodies annex.) The blackberry-raspberry crumble delivered sweet, fruity swirls embedded in

Mango coconut cream pie puff (above); Melon Pavlova (top). Submitted photos vanilla, while the avocado-lime sorbet (I had high hopes) proved overwhelmingly strong on the citrus part of the equation. The menu section called “In our Case” highlights five signature selections ($10 each), and they fare best of all. A hazelnutchocolate mousse number is attended with rich chocolate sable awakened with a pleasant hazelnut praline crunch, while the hands-down winner of the list (and entire menu) is a tender creampuff filled, gloriously, with a suave and captivating mangococonut cream and a whiff of lemongrass. There’s also a menu section entitled “Made Just for You” (the others weren’t? $15), featuring a summertime tasting assembly of melon pavlova, stone fruit-cherry tart, yuzu curd and baba au gin, which sounds promising. You’ll find a cheese plate here, too. More savories: A quartet ($10) includes a vegetable quiche, a tartine based on sourdough rye, a ham and gruyere panino and gougere, those savory creampuffs, here filled with smoked salmon and cream cheese mousse. EDK’s open kitchen is in the hands of pastry chef Christina Kaelberer, who studied at the Art Institutes International Minnesota and served as pastry chef of the former Chambers Kitchen, among other positions. Give her a smile as you step up to the counter.

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8/3/18 1:49 PM


14 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 FROM BLEVINS / PAGE 1

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Freeman announced his decision not to charge in mid-morning press conference on the 20th floor of the Hennepin County Government Center, where he praised the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension for conducting a “thorough, professional and expedited investigation.” He said police officers, including Kelly and Schmidt, were “promptly” available for interviews after the shooting. “These cases tear our community apart,” Freeman said. “No one wins today. A young man is dead, our officers face increasing criticism and scrutiny and the community is devastated.” The county attorney had made it through barely two pages of an 11-page prepared statement when a group of family members and activists took control of the meeting, shouting over Freeman, who left the room. “You have justified police murder since you’ve been in office, Mike Freeman,” said Nekima Levy Armstrong, an attorney and 2017 mayoral candidate. Sydnee Brown, Blevin’s first cousin, said the family was “devastated” by his death. Brown said they anticipated Freeman would not file charges against the officers and were prepared for the news. “I don’t want the media and the world to think we are angry. We’re not angry. We’re more so disgusted,” Brown said. “We’re disgusted by the leaders of the world. We’re disgusted by the leaders of Minneapolis and Minnesota. And at the end of the day, we want the cops arrested within the next 48 hours and prosecuted to the fullest degree of the law, because this is murder.” Michelle Gross, president of Communities United Against Police Brutality, said based on the video the officers clearly used excessive force in the confrontation with Blevins. LevyPounds said the officers’ reaction demonstrated a “hyper-fear of black men with guns.” Before he left the room, Freeman emphasized that his department had a “limited role” in setting police policy, adding that he could bring charges “in only the most egregious cases.” “We are not the guardians for enforcing or making police policy. We do not have the jurisdiction or the authority to discipline police officers who act in a manner which we dislike,” he said. According to the narrative provided by the county attorney’s office, the incident began just before 5:30 p.m. on June 23 with a 911 call reporting a person with a gun near the intersection of 46th & Lyndale. The caller said a man who appeared intoxicated had fired the weapon in the air and into the ground. Responding to the call in their patrol vehicle, Kelly and Schmidt came across Blevins several blocks away at the corner of 48th & Camden. The body-worn camera footage shows Blevins sitting on a curb next to a woman, a young child in a stroller and a dog on a leash. In documents provided by the county attorney’s office, the woman is identified as Olya Weseman, the mother of Blevins’ child. In the video, the officers note as they approach in their car that the man on the

curb has a bottle of liquor and matches the description given by the 911 caller. Schmidt then yells “He’s got a gun” and quickly exits the vehicle, followed by Kelly. Blevins runs away down the street as Schmidt and Kelly follow. The officers order Blevins to drop the weapon and put his hands up, warning that they will shoot. “I didn’t do nothing, bro,” Blevins is heard to say as he flees on foot, denying that he has a gun. Blevins shouts “Please don’t shoot me” and “Leave me alone” as he turns down an alley. Schmidt told investigators he saw Blevins drop the bottle of liquor and then reach into his pocket. Schmidt said he saw the gun and feared for his life, and that’s when he stopped running, aimed and fired at Blevins. Kelly told investigators that he followed Schmidt and Blevins into the alley and at one point thought he saw Blevins’ handgun pointing directly at him, adding that he was “pretty sure” he heard Blevins fire a shot. Kelly also fired on Blevins. An autopsy conducted by the Hennepin County Medical Examiner determined Blevins died of multiple gunshot wounds. He was struck by four bullets. A Smith & Wesson pistol was found near Blevins’ body. Investigators also recovered two cartridge casings they said were fired from the pistol: one at 46th & Bryant, near the location of the original 911 call, and another in the alley where Blevins was killed. Chris Case, a witness who was in the alley during the foot chase, told investigators he saw Blevins pull a gun out of his the waistband of his pants as he was running. But Case said he didn’t see Blevins fire the gun. Freeman said it was “irrelevant” to his charging decision whether Blevins actually fired at the officers or not. He said it was possible but unlikely that the casing found in the alley came from a cartridge fired earlier near 46th & Bryant. Freeman said “the mere act of turning and pointing a handgun” was “sufficient” for the officers to use deadly force. “We don’t have to prove that he shot at them to conclude our analysis that the police officers were authorized in using deadly force to respond,” he said. Freeman said he made the decision not to charge late in the week prior to his announcement, which took place on a Monday morning. He said he “slept on it” Friday night and concluded it was the right decision Saturday morning. In a joint statement, state Reps. Fue Lee and Raymond Dehn and state Sen. Bobby Joe Champion, all legislators representing the North Side, said their hearts were with Blevins’ family, adding that they would “continue looking comprehensively at our state laws and use-of-force policies to keep both our communities of color and police officers safe.” “It’s not a crime to drink in our society and it’s not a crime to have a gun, but there are many things that could have been done differently — by Thurman Blevins and by Officers Justin Schmidt and Ryan Kelly,” the statement read. “It seems that officers choose other options with white suspects than they do with suspects of color, and we must change that.”

A closer look at the case file By Michelle Bruch / mbruch@journalmpls.com Over the course of five weeks, investigators from the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension canvassed 424 addresses, interviewed 46 police officers and reviewed hours of surveillance and body camera footage. The following summarizes portions of the investigation.

The police response Thurman Blevins was not the only suspect officers encountered June 23 as they searched for a man who allegedly fired shots into the sky and ground.

Officers in a squad on Lyndale approached 46th Avenue North and found a man wearing a gray tank top with a backpack containing a small BB gun. When they received word of shots fired and one down nearby, they released the man from handcuffs without getting an ID, saying he didn’t fully match the caller’s description. The 911 caller identified Blevins by name as the suspect later that night. Officer Justin Schmidt spotted Blevins with a backpack on the corner of 48th & Camden shortly before 5:30 p.m. He was sitting next to Olya Weseman, the mother of his child, with her SEE A CLOSER LOOK / PAGE 15


journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 15 FROM A CLOSER LOOK / PAGE 14 own daughter in a stroller. Officer Ryan Kelly said Blevins fit the suspect description “almost to a T,” and Schmidt noticed what appeared to be a handle of a gun in his right pocket. Investigators separately interviewed both officers on June 25. “So I drew my firearm because at this point we were only, I estimate ten to fifteen feet away from him,” Schmidt told investigators. “So for my safety I drew my gun, exited the squad and I said put your f---ing hands up.” Schmidt said Blevins’ eyebrows raised in surprise, and he grabbed a bottle and took off running. Kelly said he also drew his gun because he thought Blevins had a hand on the butt of a gun. Blevins wasn’t in a dead sprint, he said. Weseman told investigators that Blevins is scared of police, and she didn’t know any reason for him to run. “I didn’t do nothing, bro,” Blevins said as he ran. “… Please don’t shoot me. Leave me alone.” Schmidt said he saw Blevins pull the gun out of his pocket, and Schmidt stopped, aimed for “center mass,” and fired until Blevins fell to the ground. “To me he had every bit of intent on shooting my partner and I,” Schmidt said. Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman

said a spent cartridge in the alley would lead one to believe that Blevins fired his gun. The National Center for Audio and Video Forensics determined at least 14 shots were fired. The autopsy indicated Blevins was struck by four bullets. A man standing outside his car discovered that one bullet went through the driver’s side windshield of his Chevy Malibu; he told investigators his girlfriend was in the passenger seat. Both officers said they watched their body camera videos prior to their interviews with state investigators. Schmidt said Minneapolis Internal Affairs provided access to the video about an hour before the interview, and he watched it with his attorney, pausing the video to review key moments. Some other officers who responded to the scene also reviewed body camera video prior to interviews, and several said the practice is within the bounds of Minneapolis Police Department policy.

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People said they would kill the person who snitched, he said. He explained that he knew Blevins personally as “June.” Earlier that day, he said he greeted Blevins, who had a bottle of liquor in his hand. “Next thing you know” Blevins shot into the air in the alley at 46th & Lyndale, the caller said. “A drunk dude in the neighborhood with a gun and kids around, hell yeah I was nervous,” the caller said. Blevins had reportedly been angry with a friend of his, Willie, for drinking his liquor, and punched Willie in the face. Blevins fired a second shot into the ground near 46th & Bryant, the caller said. A police report describing the initial 911 call said no ShotSpotter activation was found. The gunshots are not captured on surveillance video, according to Freeman. Freeman’s office said those factors are not significant, because the 911 caller reported being near Blevins, and ShotSpotter doesn’t pick up every block in the city. “Nobody heard any gunshots prior to it,” said one resident who spoke with investigators, requesting to remain anonymous in the Southwest Journal out of fear for her safety. “We want people to know the truth. … The family wants justice, we all want justice, and we just want some type of normal policing in our neighborhood. Period.”

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After midnight on June 24, BCA investigators recovered a gold 9mm casing from the northwest corner of 46th & Bryant, a location described by the 911 caller. The Hennepin County Attorney’s office said the cartridge case was later determined to have been fired from a Smith and Wesson 9mm handgun, the gun Blevins carried. Cartridge casings linked to the Smith and Wesson were also recovered nine days before the shooting at the 4500 block of Bryant Avenue North as part of a burglary crime scene, according to the BCA. A police report stated that on June 14 a man wearing a dark backpack allegedly entered the basement window of a home owned by Weseman, the woman sitting with Blevins when police encountered him days later. A man sleeping in the house told police he heard a window break and confronted a suspect that he couldn’t identify. The suspect fled the scene and pointed a handgun into the sky and fired one round, according to the report. A firearms trace by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms indicates the Smith and Wesson gun Blevins carried on June 23 was purchased by Anthony De Lawrance Ruffin in 2014. De Lawrance said he didn’t know his gun was missing until BCA investigators knocked on his door.

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16 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018

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Siama’s Congo Music One of the great joys of summer is listening to music at Lake Harriet Bandshell. Could anything be better than good tunes, a view of Lake Harriet and people watching galore? Siama’s Congo Music promises to be a great show for music lovers of all ages. Don’t be afraid to get your body moving to the music as Siama plays rhythms from the heart of Africa.

OUT

When: 2 p.m.–3:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19 Where: Lake Harriet Bandshell, 4135 W. Lake Harriet Parkway Cost: Free Info: mplsmusicandmovies.com

GUIDE

By Sheila Regan

Autoptic Over 120 artists from around the world and right here in Minnesota will be showing off their zines, comics, posters and more at the 2018 Autoptic Festival. It’s sort of like a comic convention but with a big emphasis on printed, hand-made and limited edition media, so hopefully you’ll come across some new artists that will delight you. Follow the festival on Facebook for additional information about panel discussions and readings the day before at Moon Palace Books. When: 11 a.m.–6 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 19 Where: Aria, 105 N. 1st St. Cost: Free Info: autoptic.org

Nazli Dinçel: Note to Self

‘Prediction Error’

See the work of experimental filmmaker Nazlı Dinçel, whose riveting handmade films are both provocatively intimate and deeply critical of western society. Born in Turkey and currently based in Milwaukee, Dinçel’s works as a filmmaker are layered, brutal and fascinating. In total seven short films, all done in 16 mm, will be shown.

Beth Dow’s captivating photographs, which sometimes play with your perception, are currently on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s Minnesota Artist Exhibition Project gallery, which highlights artwork by local contemporary artists. The museum hosts a public reception for the show, “Prediction Error,” in conjunction with the Third Thursday event. Have a drink and listen to some music downstairs, then saunter up to the MAEP galleries for Dow’s experiential photography.

When: 7 p.m.–9 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20 Where: Bryant Lake Bowl, 810 W. Lake St. Cost: $0–12 suggested Info: bryantlakebowl.com

When: 6 p.m.–9 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16. Where: Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2400 3rd Ave. S. Cost: Free Info: artsmia.org

Building Bridges and Breaking Bread Neighborhood organizations and businesses that surround the 38th Street bridge over Interstate 35W will gather in celebration of its re-opening with food, conversation, live music and kids’ activities. The event will feature a community meal with halal, vegan and gluten-free options catered by Eat for Equity. There will also be a discussion facilitated by Marnita’s Table. Get to know your neighbors and congratulate yourself for being done with the annoying detour! When: 4 p.m.–8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16 Where: 38th & I-35W Cost: Free Info: facebook.com/events/1901481466821843/ CONDO FINANCING

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The Minnesota State Fair MINNESOTA’S GET-TOGETHER IS HERE, your chance to fall in love with all that’s amazing about our state. Whether you’re there for the rides, the animals, the incredible food, the technology demonstrations or the music, there’s something for everyone at the Fair.

When: Thursday, Aug. 23–Monday, Sept. 3 Where: State Fairgrounds, 1265 Snelling Ave. N., St. Paul Cost: $11 in advance, $14 at gate Info: mnstatefair.org

Tower of Power 50th-anniversary show

Cambria Kitchen

R&B Legends Tower of Power kick off the music extravaganza at the Fair. Going strong since 1968, their free show is one not to miss.

See cuisine demonstrations by local chefs like Andrew Zimmern, Scott McGillivray and The Sioux Chef’s Sean Sherman at the new state-of-the-art demonstration kitchen in the Creative Activities Building.

When: 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23 and Friday, Aug. 24 Where: Leinie Lodge Bandshell, 1311 Cosgrove St. Cost: Free with State Fair admission

When: 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Where: Creative Activities Building, 1342 Cosgrove St. Cost: Free with State Fair admission

New pet pavilions and outdoor demonstration area Pets of the State Fair get a brand new location, just west of the former Pet Center, where you will find purebred dog breed booths and a pet surgery suite. When: 8 a.m.–8 p.m. Where: Pet pavilions, Underwood & Hoyt Cost: Free with State Fair admission

Photo by Iryna Liveoak / Shutterstock.com

Experimental Aircraft Association’s Spirit of Aviation Experience a 360-degree virtual reality simulation of flying at this brand new spot, where you can also try out your own aircraft design, build foam gliders and learn about aviation principles. When: 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Where: Judson & Nelson Cost: Free with State Fair admission

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Crossword answers on page 18

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18 journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018

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Minneapolis-based Gully Boys — Nadirah McGill, Kaytee Callahan and Natalie Klemond — will debut the band’s first record, “Not So Brave,” at First Avenue’s 7th Street Entry on Aug. 12. Photo by Eric Dimac

MUSIC

Tomboy band

Kaytee Callahan, Nadirah McGill and Natalie Klemond are up-and-comers in the Minneapolis music scene who cut their teeth on No Doubt covers. Callahan (vocals, guitar), McGill (drums) and Klemond (bass) started their band Gully Boys together in a snowy spring two years ago. Klemond and Callahan, two La Crosse natives who have been friends since middle school, clicked with McGill, Callahan’s coworker, when they found out they shared a passion for music. “We all had pretty similar tastes in music. We all like different things, but the things we agreed on, we really like those things,” she said. “We’ve always tried to start bands, but had never actually done anything.” Gully Boys was born. The band, partially named after 1992 animated feature “FernGully: The Last Rainforest,” plays harmonic rock with punk, garage and pop elements. “We refer to ourselves as a boy band, just jokingly,” Klemond said. The trio, who didn’t have much experience playing their instruments in bands previously, started by playing covers of bands like indie-pop duo Lucius and alternative rock band Hole. Much of their playing is self-taught. Because they didn’t grow learning to play like certain musicians or bands, Klemond said, their collective sound as a band isn’t based off any one genre. Their sound is their own. So, when you ask what kind of music the band plays, it’s a hard question to answer, she added. “We didn’t set out trying to sound like this (or that) band,” Klemond said. “I feel like we’d be pretty classic indie rock, but the vocals take it to something else.” Gully Boys is set to release its debut album “Not So Brave,” a collection of 11 songs about romancing and “thoughts about thought,” Klemond said, but nothing too cutesy. “Dizzy Romantics” manages to be gritty and melodic, filled to the brim with Callahan’s huge voice that cuts over the guitars (Klemond said Callahan learned to sing from choir, yes, but also listening to a lot of Mariah Carey). “Neopet Graveyard” is a slower, groovier garage rock tune. “Greasy,” one of the songs to make the album from the band’s 2017 self-titled EP, is about time spent in bed with thoughts even shampoo can’t clean from your head (“Since when do I sweat so (expletive) much? / even in my sleep”). “Not So Brave” is set to be released Sunday, Aug. 12, the day Gully Boys will play First Avenue’s 7th Street Entry at 7 p.m. Openers of the 18-plus show include local bands Beasthead, Sass and niiice.

Submitted photo

ENTERTAINMENT

DRINKS

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Centro is a one-stop-shop for tasting and trying out agave spirits. The counter-service restaurant and bar from owner Jami Olson and executive chef Jose Alarcon, both local restaurant industry veterans who’ve worked at Lyn 65, is now open at 15th & Quincy, a corner of Northeast many know for Indeed Brewing Co. and throngs of Art-A-Whirl crowds. The idea behind Centro is that it serves cuisine you’d find in the markets of Mexico, but there’s plenty of original personality here too. The bar does lots of wonderful things with agave spirits, from tequila to mezcal and more. The entry-level drink here should be the Guava Goddess Slushy ($10). The frozen cocktail is plenty sweet, but it’s balanced with smoky mezcal for a highly drinkable summer beverage. If you’re feeling adventurous — and maybe if you have a couple friends with you, depending on your tolerance — the five-spirit agave flight ($22) is going to be the advanced lesson. Not only are there mezcal and tequila included in the flight, but there’s bacanora, a Mexican agave-derived liquor; sotol, known as Mexico’s other indigenous spirit; and Avila, a new agave-based spirit. On top of all that, there’s a side of sangrita — meaning “little blood” — a flavorful blend of juices, sauces, spices and herbs. If you get hungry, Centro has a long list of tacos ($3–$5), from a vegetarian cured cactus taco with a smoky peanut-based salsa de cacahuate to a braised lamb taco topped with cilantro and onions. I can attest that the guacamole is worth it, even at $8. Centro opened around the end of June at 1414 Quincy St. NE. You can expect its fine-dining sister restaurant, Popol Vuh, to open soon.

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Brew bash

The Northeast Brewers Block Party is as quintessentially Northeast as tattoos shops, churches and artist studios all on the same block. The Aug. 19 event running 2 p.m.–8 p.m. will bring all your favorite breweries to Sociable Cider Werks for one day. The free festivities — $5 if you’re drinking, so a $5 event — will see about one-dozen breweries, several bands such as Viva Knievel and food from local establishments like Anchor Fish & Chips. Jill Riley from The Current’s “Oake & Riley in the Morning” is set to host the party, which will also feature a pop-up shop of vendors like Solid State Vinyl Records and the Minneapolis Craft Market. Be warned: The Northeast Brewers Block is cash only, but ATMs will be on site in case you forget.

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journalmpls.com / August 9–22, 2018 19

Grilled ratatouille toast

Voices

Recipe by market chef Nettie Colón. Serves 4.

Mill City Cooks / By Jenny Heck

WHAT IT MEANS TO BE CERTIFIED NATURALLY GROWN

M

ike Noreen, a 13-season veteran of the Mill City Farmers Market and owner of Burning River Farm, is no stranger to the question, “Is this tomato organic?” In 2006, Mike chose to certify his farm, now located 80 miles northeast of Minneapolis in Frederic, Wisconsin, as naturally grown rather than USDA Organic. Like organic, Certified Naturally Grown farms do not use synthetic chemicals or genetically modified organisms and manage soil and water responsibly. Unlike organic, Certified Naturally Grown is a non-profit and non-governmental organization that relies on peer reviews rather than third-party organizations to inspect its farms. This system encourages farmer-to-farmer networks and reduces paper work and expenses, which was enough to convince Mike at Burning River Farm. On his 15-acre farm, Mike manages insects with row covers, weeds with hand weeding and disease with crop rotation. He uses compost and cover crops to improve the health and fertility of the soil, growing produce you can feel good about. Burning River Farm specializes in fieldgrown greens and salad mix as well as standard and heirloom varieties of tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, squash, potatoes and more. In addition to farmers markets, Burning

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River Farm has a 200-member community supported agriculture share and several wholesale and restaurant accounts around the Twin Cities. You can pick up the fresh produce you need for the recipe below from Mike and the rest of the Burning River crew 8 a.m.–1 p.m. Saturdays at the Mill City Farmers Market, 704 S. 2nd St., and 4 p.m.–8 p.m. Tuesdays at Mill City Night Market at The Commons, 425 Portland Ave. S. Learn more at millcityfarmersmarket.org

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• Brush the vegetables with olive oil and seasoned with salt and pepper. Place on a sheet pan in a single layer and head back out to the grill. Turn grill down to medium high heat. Place the vegetables on the grill to cook until just about al dente with nice grill marks. Try to not overcook as the vegetables will keep cooking even after being removed from the heat. Allow vegetables to cool to room temperature. • Once cooled place vegetables on a clean cutting board and rough chop away into bite size pieces. Taste, adjust salt, fold in herbs, and drizzle with a little splash of balsamic. You can serve right away or refrigerate until ready to use. If serving later on, make sure to pull from refrigerator 15 minutes before serving. Flavors will be brighter at a slightly warmer temperature. • When ready to serve, slice bread in half lengthwise and warm slightly in the oven if desired. Top bread with the ratatouille, cheese and more olive oil. Cut pieces of bread into toast-size pieces of your liking.

Ingredients 1 large eggplant 1 bell pepper 2 tomatoes 1 zucchini 1 summer squash 1 red onion 5 garlic cloves, sliced or minced Olive oil for tossing and drizzling Salt and pepper to taste Parsley, thyme and basil Balsamic vinegar Crusty bread, baguette, etc. Goat, feta or ricotta cheese Method • Preheat grill to high. • Prep the vegetables: Slice the eggplant lengthwise into 1⁄2 to 1-inch-thick slices. Slice the bell pepper in half and take out the seeds. Cut the tomatoes in half. Slice the zucchini and summer squash lengthwise into 1⁄2- to 1-inch slices. Slice the red onion into 1⁄2-inch-thick slices. Peel the garlic cloves.

Certified Naturally Grown is a peer-reviewed certification that can be more affordable to producers than USDA organic certification. Submitted photo

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The Journal, Aug. 9–22, 2018  

The Journal Vol. 49, Issue 16

The Journal, Aug. 9–22, 2018  

The Journal Vol. 49, Issue 16

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