Page 1

1 2

Vol.+3+Issue+2+

March/April+2014+

5th(District(Events( !

American!Lung!Association’s!!!!!!!!!March!29!@!9:30!AM! Respiratory!Rally! Arrowhead'Regional'Medical'Center,'400'N.'Pepper'Ave.'' Call'(909)'321F3290'to'register'or'for'details'

In(this(issue(

+

Bloomington!MAC!meeting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!April!1!@!7:00!PM! Ayala'Park,'18313'Valley'Blvd.'' Call'(909)'387F4565'for'more'information' +

Free!Tax!Preparation!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!April!10!@!1:00!–!5:00!PM! provided(by(County(of(San(Bernardino( Grand'Terrace'Branch'Library,'22795'Barton'Rd.' Call'(909)'252F4903'to'schedule'an'appointment'

What motivates you in your job? I am motivated by what could be should be. I am an idealist. I draw inspiration from those with the same motivation. I get that from my mom. My mother raised me and my six brothers and sisters on her own after my father died when I was 7. She went back to school and eventually retired as a Community College President.

Local'mom'helps'start'grassroots'nonprofit'………………......''1' Terrance'Stone,'the'story'of'his'path'to'youth'advocacy'….''1' Josie’s'Journal,'the'power'of'community'leaders'….………....''2' Goodwill'and'Jessica'Rodriguez,'Transforming+Lives+Through+the+Power+of+Work'' see+page+3+

'

Goodwill’s'Jessica'Rodriguez:'her'passion,'their'mission'…''3' Q&A'with'SB'County'Fire'Chief'Mark'Hartwig'……………..….''4'

Jr.!Fishing!Workshop!(ages!7–15)!!!!!April!12!@!7:30!AM! Prado'Regional'Park,'16700'S.'Euclid'Ave.'' Call'(909)'387F2461'for'details'and'registration''

What is SB County Fire doing that is new and innovative?

' IRS!tax!filing!deadline!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!April!15!! Call'(909)'252F4903'for'free'tax'filing'services'' +

+

We have a few innovative programs right now. As mentioned above, we are working with the Sheriff to use some of the AB 109 detainees in hand crews to fight fire and fire hazard abatement. It also provides the hand crew members with skills that are valuable upon release form detention. We are also working with County Public Health and Arrowhead Regional Medical Center to provide in-home medical care and education to recently discharged patients from ARMC through a Statewide Pilot Study.

What greatest challenge do you think SB County Fire faces and what are we doing to combat it? County Government Center 385 N. Arrowhead Avenue, 5th Floor San Bernardino, CA 92415

Contact us at (909) 387-4565 Email: supervisorgonzales@sbcounty.gov Website: www.sbcounty.gov/gonzales Editor: Louis.penna@bos.sbcounty.gov

Long-term financial sustainability and future leadership are our biggest challenges and highest priorities. We are actively cultivating future leaders through the County Management and Leadership Academy and transforming the culture to push decision making down to the most appropriate level and by enabling them. We are encouraging our employees to make decisions and helping learn through their success and failure. We maintain a corresponding level of accountability with the increased decision making authority. We are seeking non-traditional ways to be innovative and competitive as we create a foundation for long-term financial sustainability. We are also implementing strategies to improve our efficiency and effectiveness with new programs together with the Sheriff’s Office, Public Health, and ARMC.

What words of advice do you offer to aspiring firefighters and first responders? Set yourself apart. Be different and attractive. Set your expectations a little higher than you think you can reach then set a course to achieve them. Then when you reach those take a break and reset the bar.

What would you like to see change to make SB County Fire better as a whole? We are moving together in the right direction. We’d all like to be more and more responsive to our local communities. We push each other to be better each and every day.

Scan the code above and join us on Facebook!

ennifer Araiza is part of the change we wish to see in the world, a Supermom of the 21st century. If working full-time and taking care of four children wasn’t enough—two years ago Araiza and a group of local supporters started a nonprofit organization from the grassroots up, called The REC Center. What started as a few local parents coming together to find quality afterschool instructors for their own community quickly became a high demand recreational program in both Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. “Many families, including myself, were taking our kids to Riverside or Redlands for quality recreation and art programs. It was important for me to bring these programs closer to home,” said Araiza.

J

Close to home is right. After recognizing the impact of not having a Parks and Recs department in her community, Araiza saw the need in her hometown of Grand Terrace and made it the birthplace of The REC Center. But it didn’t stop there. Other communities and organizations learned about the program and worked with Araiza to bring the The REC Center to their area as well. Now, after the Feb. 1 Grand Opening of the Bloomington site located at 18604 Jurupa Avenue, The REC Center has three sites (Grand Terrace, Highgrove, Bloomington) that offer recreational opportunities to local residents of all ages. According to RECstar.org, The REC Center seeks to bring educationfocused recreation programs to communities that may otherwise not have them. Araiza says the focus this year is to attract more teenagers to their classes where they can learn a skill like disc jockeying or painting that may not be offered at their middle school or high school. Continued on page 3

From youth delinquency to advocacy, the story of CEO Terrance Stone and Young Visionaries A former gang member turned community leader, Terrance Stone has lived a story you’d expect to see in a movie. But instead of lending his story to Hollywood, he’s given his life to empowering the lives of thousands of young men and women in our community. Stone is the CEO of Young Visionaries Youth Leadership Academy (YVYLA), a nonprofit he started in 2001 that’s dedicated to steering young people away from the kind of life that cost Terrance much of his own. “I try to use myself as an example. I’m very transparent when I’m out and talking to kids.”

Continued on page 2

CEO+Terrance+Stone+of+YVYLA+


1 2 3

for mourning, the lthough the time has passed the lost of a trusted community will long endure a. Born and raised Veg and respected leader, Bobby o, Bobby’s life is din nar Ber on the Westside of San one person can have in our a testament to the real impact community. t of the San Bernardino In a detailed interview as par can find on sbcity.org, you Oral History Project, which ries of community Bobby detailed his first memo to a Ramona, a nonprofit close involvement, starting at Cas th ona Ram a Cas w (no et where he lived on West 8 Stre his mother and grandmother Academy). He remembered starting his first summer job volunteering all the time, and there as a kid in the 70s. of were the mentors he had. What he made special note mbers Esther Estrada and People like former councilme at ando Navarro, now professor Robert Castaneda; Dr. Arm et me by Bob ped hel o man wh UC Riverside and the same . vez Cha ar Ces late the praise them, but to bring I mention these names not to n, a great community leader attention to the fact a great ma his own. It took a family, a like Bobby did not happen on

A

e rk of mentorship and positiv neighborhood, and a netwo k the too It e. am bec the leader he support to shape Bobby into a d len to me and you ple like small initiative of decent peo an in l to see something specia hand in the community and the ure of our region. That is fut the eager child who will be e ssiv gre pro a as to ted himself same notion Bobby commit te. and working youth advoca a h you to remind us all that wit ts ugh tho se the re sha I n ow our in g in our hands, world of difference is waitin citizens. Those of us who ng rki wo as rise personal enterp ple we ity ers in becoming the peo have faced struggle and adv our nd sce er that should tran are today hold a special pow youth. our rate generation and invigo orated life, Bobby never dec and d live ll we Even in his the person he became to me fra ped forgot the people who hel lity and ortance of their dependabi be. He understood the imp bility of lica app life l erstood the rea their stewardship. He und .” the idiom “it takes a village is an transient being in itself, it a not is nity mu com r Ou en ldr chi our all l domain that ever evolving and influentia ves dri at wh is g din understan learn and grow from. That of us be the force that moves all it Let ga. Ve . Mr people like to see in the world. to be the change we wish in the community, visit eer unt vol If you’d like to the search tool to find local VolunteerMatch.org and use choose that interest you. opportunities on issues you

The story behind Young Visionaries Youth Leadership Academy Continued from page 1

“We just try to spark that inspiration in young people so that they know they can do it, they can be whatever they want to be,” said Stone in a 2010 interview. In an area blighted by systemic challenges of poverty and chronic unemployment, YVYLA has helped take local youth off the streets and onto a track of success, serving over 10,000 young men and women to date. “It’s just trying to fill a need and a void in the community. Every time we start a program. It’s based off what the needs are of the community—right now,” said Stone. YVYLA and its expansive services are indicative of that belief. In addition to the personal development and youth mentoring programs they provide, YVYLA operates the only runaway youth homeless shelter in the San Bernardino area, one of two County-wide. This March marks the shelter’s third year in operation. “We just wanted to come in and see how we can address that problem. Making sure that kids are not on the streets. This is one of the best ways we can do it—provide them a home.” With over a decade of experience working with transient and troubled youth, Stone knows the right approach in working with individuals who find 2

themselves without a place to stay. “It doesn’t matter how much education you want to give them or intervention prevention programs, if they’re homeless and they’re hungry, none of that is going to work. We figured let’s get them off the streets, house them and feed them, and have enough time to be able to work with them and get them back with a productive part of their family.” Stone makes it known that the shelter isn’t simply a “flop house.” Children (ages 14 to 17) who enter the shelter are required to be enrolled in or back attending school within 48 hours. Every participant is in the home for up to 21 days, giving YVYLA case managers time to assess an individual’s immediate needs and establish short-term goals with the intention of leading to the person's long-term success. The shelter does not hold a wait list, but Stone assures, “No kid is left, we’ll find you a place to stay. I don’t know what we’re here for if we don’t go to the full extent of making sure that every kid has a place to stay, a place to sleep, something to eat. Our main goal is what can we do to drastically change this kid’s direction in life.“ To learn more about Terrance Stone and YVYLA’s education and employment programs, youth shelter, and more, visit yvyla-ie.org or email info@yvyla-ie.org.

Transforming Lives Through the Power of Work

their job, hearing their stories, looking at their successes, that’s why I continue to come every day to work. Why I motivate and inspire my staff to do the best that they can, it’s those successes,” said Rodriguez. In her 10 years with the organization, Jessica has been focused on Transforming Lives Through the Power of Work, as is the mission of Goodwill. Goodwill serves local businesses and individuals through their multifaceted career development programs, several of which Rodriguez manages. According to GoodwillSocal.org, Goodwill is committed to helping people with disabilities “secure sustainable employment and enjoy a greater sense of independence, dignity, purpose and pride,” and is Jessica+Rodriguez+(above)+stands+on+the+work+floor++ helping thousands of people of+the+Goodwill+Southern+California+Inland+Empire+campus.++ achieve career success every year. Goodwill provides services hen you drive by a local Goodwill you might see racks of through their Career Resource Center at no cost. They prepare job clothes, shoppers darting to-and-fro to find a hip outfit at a seekers for employment through resume workshops, interview great price, or a neighbor making an in-kind donation. What coaching, job search tools, and a host services that are focused on you may not see are the Goodwill employees and the unique role helping their clients not just find a job, but sustain a career. they play in the community that’s worth far more than anything you Whether you’re a teenager looking for experience to build a can buy in a store. resume, an individual with a specific barrier to employment, or a Jessica Rodriguez is one of those special Goodwill employees that veteran seeking help transitioning into the civilian workforce, you just won’t see at the local retail store. She works behind the Goodwill wants to help give you the tools you need to succeed. scenes as program manager at Goodwill’s San Bernardino Career For the road ahead, Rodriguez sees Goodwill expanding its reach Resource Center (located at 444 S. Waterman Ave.) and also throughout our region, continuing to partner with local businesses manages multiple workforce and career development programs that and helping many more people in our community reach the success are dedicated to helping individuals with disabilities and other they want to achieve. vocational barriers prepare for and find stable employment. “When we hear that one success story that day or that week, we With that much responsibility, you’d think work motivation know that it’s worth it.” would come at a premium; but if you ask Rodriguez, she’ll say it’s For more information on Goodwill Southern California business and easy. All she has to do is step out of her office. career services in the Inland Empire, call (909) 885-3831 or visit “If I look onto the work floor, looking at the participants doing goodwillsocal.org.

The REC Center brings afterschool programs to communities Continued from page 1

For many residents, Araiza and her supporters represent a Parks and Rec coalition that fill a big void in the neighborhood. “Smaller and unincorporated communities shouldn’t have to travel so far for the resources larger communities have at their fingertips,” said Araiza. The REC Center serves all age groups and offers these classes and more through May: clay, yoga, crochet, computers, theatre, piano, art, guitar, vocals, dance, tae kwon do, and cheer. Visit their website at RECstar.org for the complete schedule. If you would like to support The REC Center you can help sponsor a child in need of financial assistance or become an instructor, email info@recstar.org or call (909) 728-1081 for more information. 3


1 2 3

for mourning, the lthough the time has passed the lost of a trusted community will long endure a. Born and raised Veg and respected leader, Bobby o, Bobby’s life is din nar Ber on the Westside of San one person can have in our a testament to the real impact community. t of the San Bernardino In a detailed interview as par can find on sbcity.org, you Oral History Project, which ries of community Bobby detailed his first memo to a Ramona, a nonprofit close involvement, starting at Cas th ona Ram a Cas w (no et where he lived on West 8 Stre his mother and grandmother Academy). He remembered starting his first summer job volunteering all the time, and there as a kid in the 70s. of were the mentors he had. What he made special note mbers Esther Estrada and People like former councilme at ando Navarro, now professor Robert Castaneda; Dr. Arm et me by Bob ped hel o man wh UC Riverside and the same . vez Cha ar Ces late the praise them, but to bring I mention these names not to n, a great community leader attention to the fact a great ma his own. It took a family, a like Bobby did not happen on

A

e rk of mentorship and positiv neighborhood, and a netwo k the too It e. am bec the leader he support to shape Bobby into a d len to me and you ple like small initiative of decent peo an in l to see something specia hand in the community and the ure of our region. That is fut the eager child who will be e ssiv gre pro a as to ted himself same notion Bobby commit te. and working youth advoca a h you to remind us all that wit ts ugh tho se the re sha I n ow our in g in our hands, world of difference is waitin citizens. Those of us who ng rki wo as rise personal enterp ple we ity ers in becoming the peo have faced struggle and adv our nd sce er that should tran are today hold a special pow youth. our rate generation and invigo orated life, Bobby never dec and d live ll we Even in his the person he became to me fra ped forgot the people who hel lity and ortance of their dependabi be. He understood the imp bility of lica app life l erstood the rea their stewardship. He und .” the idiom “it takes a village is an transient being in itself, it a not is nity mu com r Ou en ldr chi our all l domain that ever evolving and influentia ves dri at wh is g din understan learn and grow from. That of us be the force that moves all it Let ga. Ve . Mr people like to see in the world. to be the change we wish in the community, visit eer unt vol If you’d like to the search tool to find local VolunteerMatch.org and use choose that interest you. opportunities on issues you

The story behind Young Visionaries Youth Leadership Academy Continued from page 1

“We just try to spark that inspiration in young people so that they know they can do it, they can be whatever they want to be,” said Stone in a 2010 interview. In an area blighted by systemic challenges of poverty and chronic unemployment, YVYLA has helped take local youth off the streets and onto a track of success, serving over 10,000 young men and women to date. “It’s just trying to fill a need and a void in the community. Every time we start a program. It’s based off what the needs are of the community—right now,” said Stone. YVYLA and its expansive services are indicative of that belief. In addition to the personal development and youth mentoring programs they provide, YVYLA operates the only runaway youth homeless shelter in the San Bernardino area, one of two County-wide. This March marks the shelter’s third year in operation. “We just wanted to come in and see how we can address that problem. Making sure that kids are not on the streets. This is one of the best ways we can do it—provide them a home.” With over a decade of experience working with transient and troubled youth, Stone knows the right approach in working with individuals who find 2

themselves without a place to stay. “It doesn’t matter how much education you want to give them or intervention prevention programs, if they’re homeless and they’re hungry, none of that is going to work. We figured let’s get them off the streets, house them and feed them, and have enough time to be able to work with them and get them back with a productive part of their family.” Stone makes it known that the shelter isn’t simply a “flop house.” Children (ages 14 to 17) who enter the shelter are required to be enrolled in or back attending school within 48 hours. Every participant is in the home for up to 21 days, giving YVYLA case managers time to assess an individual’s immediate needs and establish short-term goals with the intention of leading to the person's long-term success. The shelter does not hold a wait list, but Stone assures, “No kid is left, we’ll find you a place to stay. I don’t know what we’re here for if we don’t go to the full extent of making sure that every kid has a place to stay, a place to sleep, something to eat. Our main goal is what can we do to drastically change this kid’s direction in life.“ To learn more about Terrance Stone and YVYLA’s education and employment programs, youth shelter, and more, visit yvyla-ie.org or email info@yvyla-ie.org.

Transforming Lives Through the Power of Work

their job, hearing their stories, looking at their successes, that’s why I continue to come every day to work. Why I motivate and inspire my staff to do the best that they can, it’s those successes,” said Rodriguez. In her 10 years with the organization, Jessica has been focused on Transforming Lives Through the Power of Work, as is the mission of Goodwill. Goodwill serves local businesses and individuals through their multifaceted career development programs, several of which Rodriguez manages. According to GoodwillSocal.org, Goodwill is committed to helping people with disabilities “secure sustainable employment and enjoy a greater sense of independence, dignity, purpose and pride,” and is Jessica+Rodriguez+(above)+stands+on+the+work+floor++ helping thousands of people of+the+Goodwill+Southern+California+Inland+Empire+campus.++ achieve career success every year. Goodwill provides services hen you drive by a local Goodwill you might see racks of through their Career Resource Center at no cost. They prepare job clothes, shoppers darting to-and-fro to find a hip outfit at a seekers for employment through resume workshops, interview great price, or a neighbor making an in-kind donation. What coaching, job search tools, and a host services that are focused on you may not see are the Goodwill employees and the unique role helping their clients not just find a job, but sustain a career. they play in the community that’s worth far more than anything you Whether you’re a teenager looking for experience to build a can buy in a store. resume, an individual with a specific barrier to employment, or a Jessica Rodriguez is one of those special Goodwill employees that veteran seeking help transitioning into the civilian workforce, you just won’t see at the local retail store. She works behind the Goodwill wants to help give you the tools you need to succeed. scenes as program manager at Goodwill’s San Bernardino Career For the road ahead, Rodriguez sees Goodwill expanding its reach Resource Center (located at 444 S. Waterman Ave.) and also throughout our region, continuing to partner with local businesses manages multiple workforce and career development programs that and helping many more people in our community reach the success are dedicated to helping individuals with disabilities and other they want to achieve. vocational barriers prepare for and find stable employment. “When we hear that one success story that day or that week, we With that much responsibility, you’d think work motivation know that it’s worth it.” would come at a premium; but if you ask Rodriguez, she’ll say it’s For more information on Goodwill Southern California business and easy. All she has to do is step out of her office. career services in the Inland Empire, call (909) 885-3831 or visit “If I look onto the work floor, looking at the participants doing goodwillsocal.org.

The REC Center brings afterschool programs to communities Continued from page 1

For many residents, Araiza and her supporters represent a Parks and Rec coalition that fill a big void in the neighborhood. “Smaller and unincorporated communities shouldn’t have to travel so far for the resources larger communities have at their fingertips,” said Araiza. The REC Center serves all age groups and offers these classes and more through May: clay, yoga, crochet, computers, theatre, piano, art, guitar, vocals, dance, tae kwon do, and cheer. Visit their website at RECstar.org for the complete schedule. If you would like to support The REC Center you can help sponsor a child in need of financial assistance or become an instructor, email info@recstar.org or call (909) 728-1081 for more information. 3


1 2

Vol.+3+Issue+2+

March/April+2014+

5th(District(Events( !

American!Lung!Association’s!!!!!!!!!March!29!@!9:30!AM! Respiratory!Rally! Arrowhead'Regional'Medical'Center,'400'N.'Pepper'Ave.'' Call'(909)'321F3290'to'register'or'for'details'

In(this(issue(

+

Bloomington!MAC!meeting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!April!1!@!7:00!PM! Ayala'Park,'18313'Valley'Blvd.'' Call'(909)'387F4565'for'more'information' +

Free!Tax!Preparation!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!April!10!@!1:00!–!5:00!PM! provided(by(County(of(San(Bernardino( Grand'Terrace'Branch'Library,'22795'Barton'Rd.' Call'(909)'252F4903'to'schedule'an'appointment'

What motivates you in your job? I am motivated by what could be should be. I am an idealist. I draw inspiration from those with the same motivation. I get that from my mom. My mother raised me and my six brothers and sisters on her own after my father died when I was 7. She went back to school and eventually retired as a Community College President.

Local'mom'helps'start'grassroots'nonprofit'………………......''1' Terrance'Stone,'the'story'of'his'path'to'youth'advocacy'….''1' Josie’s'Journal,'the'power'of'community'leaders'….………....''2' Goodwill'and'Jessica'Rodriguez,'Transforming+Lives+Through+the+Power+of+Work'' see+page+3+

'

Goodwill’s'Jessica'Rodriguez:'her'passion,'their'mission'…''3' Q&A'with'SB'County'Fire'Chief'Mark'Hartwig'……………..….''4'

Jr.!Fishing!Workshop!(ages!7–15)!!!!!April!12!@!7:30!AM! Prado'Regional'Park,'16700'S.'Euclid'Ave.'' Call'(909)'387F2461'for'details'and'registration''

What is SB County Fire doing that is new and innovative?

' IRS!tax!filing!deadline!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!April!15!! Call'(909)'252F4903'for'free'tax'filing'services'' +

+

We have a few innovative programs right now. As mentioned above, we are working with the Sheriff to use some of the AB 109 detainees in hand crews to fight fire and fire hazard abatement. It also provides the hand crew members with skills that are valuable upon release form detention. We are also working with County Public Health and Arrowhead Regional Medical Center to provide in-home medical care and education to recently discharged patients from ARMC through a Statewide Pilot Study.

What greatest challenge do you think SB County Fire faces and what are we doing to combat it? County Government Center 385 N. Arrowhead Avenue, 5th Floor San Bernardino, CA 92415

Contact us at (909) 387-4565 Email: supervisorgonzales@sbcounty.gov Website: www.sbcounty.gov/gonzales Editor: Louis.penna@bos.sbcounty.gov

Long-term financial sustainability and future leadership are our biggest challenges and highest priorities. We are actively cultivating future leaders through the County Management and Leadership Academy and transforming the culture to push decision making down to the most appropriate level and by enabling them. We are encouraging our employees to make decisions and helping learn through their success and failure. We maintain a corresponding level of accountability with the increased decision making authority. We are seeking non-traditional ways to be innovative and competitive as we create a foundation for long-term financial sustainability. We are also implementing strategies to improve our efficiency and effectiveness with new programs together with the Sheriff’s Office, Public Health, and ARMC.

What words of advice do you offer to aspiring firefighters and first responders? Set yourself apart. Be different and attractive. Set your expectations a little higher than you think you can reach then set a course to achieve them. Then when you reach those take a break and reset the bar.

What would you like to see change to make SB County Fire better as a whole? We are moving together in the right direction. We’d all like to be more and more responsive to our local communities. We push each other to be better each and every day.

Scan the code above and join us on Facebook!

ennifer Araiza is part of the change we wish to see in the world, a Supermom of the 21st century. If working full-time and taking care of four children wasn’t enough—two years ago Araiza and a group of local supporters started a nonprofit organization from the grassroots up, called The REC Center. What started as a few local parents coming together to find quality afterschool instructors for their own community quickly became a high demand recreational program in both Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. “Many families, including myself, were taking our kids to Riverside or Redlands for quality recreation and art programs. It was important for me to bring these programs closer to home,” said Araiza.

J

Close to home is right. After recognizing the impact of not having a Parks and Recs department in her community, Araiza saw the need in her hometown of Grand Terrace and made it the birthplace of The REC Center. But it didn’t stop there. Other communities and organizations learned about the program and worked with Araiza to bring the The REC Center to their area as well. Now, after the Feb. 1 Grand Opening of the Bloomington site located at 18604 Jurupa Avenue, The REC Center has three sites (Grand Terrace, Highgrove, Bloomington) that offer recreational opportunities to local residents of all ages. According to RECstar.org, The REC Center seeks to bring educationfocused recreation programs to communities that may otherwise not have them. Araiza says the focus this year is to attract more teenagers to their classes where they can learn a skill like disc jockeying or painting that may not be offered at their middle school or high school. Continued on page 3

From youth delinquency to advocacy, the story of CEO Terrance Stone and Young Visionaries A former gang member turned community leader, Terrance Stone has lived a story you’d expect to see in a movie. But instead of lending his story to Hollywood, he’s given his life to empowering the lives of thousands of young men and women in our community. Stone is the CEO of Young Visionaries Youth Leadership Academy (YVYLA), a nonprofit he started in 2001 that’s dedicated to steering young people away from the kind of life that cost Terrance much of his own. “I try to use myself as an example. I’m very transparent when I’m out and talking to kids.”

Continued on page 2

CEO+Terrance+Stone+of+YVYLA+

Josie's Press, March/April  
Josie's Press, March/April  

The theme of this issue of Josie's Press is COMMUNITY HEROES. Meet four people in the 5th District of San Bernardino County that make a diff...

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