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Vol. 3 Issue 1

January/February 2014

5th District Events Martin Luther King Jr. Day Federal holiday observed Bloomington MAC Meeting Ayala Park 18313 Valley Boulevard, Bloomington Call (909) 387-4565 for details

Jan. 20 Feb. 4 @ 6:00 PM

Free Career Expo Feb. 12 @ 10:00 AM California State University San Bernardino 5500 University Parkway Call (909) 537-3265 for details Give Kids A Smile Event Feb. 22 @ 8:00 AM Free dental treatment children 6-18 Dental Care of San Bernardino 322 North H Street, Call (909) 888-1301 for details State of the County 2014 Feb. 24 @ 4:30 PM 4000 E. Ontario Center Pkwy Call (909) 387-4700 for registration information or visit SBCountyAdvantage.com

County Government Center 385 N. Arrowhead Avenue, 5th Floor San Bernardino, CA 92415

The Office of Homeless Services is striving to achieve a number of goals to resolve homelessness within the county. Some of those goals are: –Increasing homeless assistance funding resources throughout the county. –Increasing permanent supportive housing. –Educate the community on homeless issues and seek community involvement in addressing homeless concerns. –Establish regional integrated homeless services and assessment centers.

There have been many scholarly peer-reviewed journal articles on the impact of homelessness on society. A 2009 Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority report called, “Where We Sleep: Costs when Homeless and Housed in Los Angeles.” When you compare the monetary cost of providing housing and supportive services with the cost of leaving people in homelessness, the costs are high. The average cost to taxpayers per month to house an individual in permanent supportive housing was $605, compared to the cost per month of leaving the individual homeless, $2,897. According to the San Bernardino County Homeless Point-In-Time Count, there were 2,321 individuals and families counted as homeless on Jan. 24, of which 441 were chronically homeless. If we just look at our chronically homeless individuals and families, based on data from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority report, San Bernardino County taxpayers would save over $12 million per year by housing the chronically homeless in permanent supportive housing rather than leaving them homeless on the streets.

What is the most effective solution to homelessness?

What can residents do to really help with homelessness?

Email: supervisorgonzales@sbcounty.gov Website: www.sbcounty.gov/gonzales

Scan the code above and join us on Facebook! Photo courtesy of SP8254 | Flickr Creative Commons

Affordable housing, library coming to Bloomington .... 1 Hopeless to housed, a local family’s journey …….……. 1 Josie’s Journal, homelessness in SB County ………….... 2 The importance of solving homelessness in San Bernardino County see page 2

CityLIFT helps homebuyers afford new local homes … 3 Q&A with the County’s homeless services manager …. 4

What is the real impact of homelessness in our county?

A housing first approach has statistically proven itself to be a solution to ending homelessness throughout the country. Communities should take an inventory of their resources to identify and encourage permanent supportive housing and address street homelessness by adopting and supporting homeless outreach programs. When communities work with their homeless and support organizations, everyone benefits.

Contact us at (909) 387-4565

In this issue

What is the county’s Office of Homeless Services’ mission?

The National Coalition for the Homeless suggests that we can help end homelessness by simply CAREing. Contributing resources to a local homeless service provider through volunteerism, and donations of material assistance, such as “Welcome Home” kits to homeless individuals and families moving into permanent supportive housing. Advocating for systemic changes needed to end homelessness by promoting policies and programs on the local, state, and federal levels for positive solutions. Reaching Out by working directly with organizations that serve people experiencing homelessness is one of the best ways to learn about homelessness and help to meet immediate needs at the same time. Educating the public about the root causes of homelessness and coming up with usable solutions to effectively make positive changes for homeless families and individuals and those at-risk of homelessness.

an Bernardino County has big plans for Bloomington, and it starts with the new Bloomington Affordable Housing Community. The 13,993 square foot development, located near the corner of Valley Boulevard and Locust Avenue, is the first of its kind in the unincorporated area. “It’s wonderful, we needed it!” said Jackie Cox, longtime local resident and chair of the Bloomington Municipal Advisory Council. “It’s the best thing that has happened since I’ve lived here. We need housing, we need a library, and we need it period.” When completed, it will include a new Bloomington Branch Library, senior and community centers, and 190 affordable housing units. The project was approved in December 2013 and is headed by the county’s Community Development and Housing Department. During planning, the county held multiple public meetings in Bloomington to solicit input from local residents on the architecture style and address any direct concerns.

S

“I am very excited for the residents of Bloomington. The Board’s approval is an important step towards building this beautifully designed mixed-generational housing community. The new library and housing community exemplifies the Countywide Vision in action,” said Dena Fuentes, Director of the Community Development and Housing Department. The development is one of three major investments—affordable housing, public library, and the Valley Corridor Specific Plan—that San Bernardino County is making in the Bloomington community. The Bloomington Affordable Housing Community incorporates a range of capital improvements outlined in the Countywide Vision that provide economic benefit to the community. Continued on page 3

The Mahan family had spent countless nights sleeping in the park, camped out in their suburban truck. This followed after an exhausting effort to keep their home that ended to no avail. Mom, Keyina Mahan, was unemployed—laid off from her job after giving 7 dedicated years to the company. Dad, Anthony Mahan, a US Army veteran, was unable to contribute much more to his family's need due to a disability. Knowing he had to find some kind of resource for his family, Anthony spoke to an outreach worker at the Loma Linda VA who directed them to Vision of Hope. At the time, there was no shelter available for a family of that size. Continued on page 2


4 1 2 3

challenge in our omelessness has long been a me long after first e tak n’t did area. However, it gnitude of the being elected to realize the ma actually suffer day after day problem for both those who individuals and living on the street, and the e assistance. organizations trying to provid Board of Supervisors to This was the catalyst for the Services in 2007 and with create the Office of Homeless o County Homeless it forming the San Bernardin oration of community and lab col a Partnership (SBCHP), -profit organizations, faith-based organizations, non ate industry, and federal, educational institutions, priv collaborating and working state, and local governments and resources to all who are together to provide services ing homeless. homeless or at-risk of becom d a more concentrated These two initiatives forme ng homelessness in San approach to issues surroundi to creating our 10-Year Bernardino County and led ss in the County of San Strategy to End Homelessne the goal to end Bernardino. Some consider ossible, that we are better homelessness as mission imp eless population instead of off simply ignoring this hop ial services. wasting more money on soc n, I remind myself of all When faced with this opinio uals and families that I the faces of homeless individ ned single-mom that have come across; an abando erwater mortgage, a couldn’t keep up with an und ily to return to, a widower disabled veteran with no fam This is the changing face with a failing small business. of homelessness. nt examples, those Though all of these are differe

H

ly or t are chronically, temporari individuals or families tha the er ss, are best served und at-risk of becoming homele t. Evidence shows that a firs g same approach—housin g best practice in eliminatin housing first model is the . ive ect ably cost eff homelessness and is remark es based study (Flaming et gel An s Lo a According to to be in homelessness was found al., 2009), leaving people t than providing permanen almost 5 times more costly rage cost for leaving an supportive housing. The ave , 897 per month to taxpayers individual homeless is $2, nent ma per in l house an individua while the average cost to 5 per month. supportive housing was $60 for effective proven strategy an is g sin Permanent hou ess illn l nta me h wit ls individua many homeless, including of all end the be not y ma ms. It and substance abuse proble on. uti it, but it is part of the sol homelessness as we know t Lake City were the two Recently, Phoenix and Sal elessness. By making the first cities to end veteran hom are g resources, much like we commitment and organizin ir the and y no County, the doing here in San Bernardi job done. Now let San the got ers respective provid job. first county to do the same Bernardino County be the ution is you, the people. Another big part of the sol ssness pact on addressing homele Everyone can make an im ng ovi rem rts with identify and in the community and it sta we ser clo e being homeless. Th the stigma associated with we ntity of the issue, the closer ide e are to realizing the tru . are to finding real solutions can do in our Q&A on you at wh ut Read more abo of rnardino County of Office page 4, or call the San Be 01. -40 252 Homeless Services at (909) | sy of ab.photo, Rain Rannu rte cou 1 e pag on s Photo Flickr Creative Commons

CityLIFT helps homebuyers in San Bernardino County

W

hat do five city mayors, a congressionally chartered nonprofit organization, and a multinational bank have in common? Answer: they all have partnered to help median income families and individuals achieve homeownership right here in the Inland Empire. Among Corona, Moreno Valley, and Riverside, homebuyers in Fontana and San Bernardino can qualify for $15,000 in down payment assistance through the CityLIFT program, a down payment assistance program provided by Wells Fargo and NeighborWorks America. From 2008-2011, San Bernardino County experienced over 100,000 foreclosures according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. This downturn dislocated residents, lowered property tax revenues, and took a long-term toll on the real estate market. This was a housing crisis that severely impacted middle-class earners like Regina Velasco. After going from living in a 2,500 square foot home with her son, to a renting a 750 square foot apartment, local Inland Empire resident Regina Velasco began working towards buying a home in 2011. Two years later, she was given approval for a $350,000 home loan. A friend told her about the CityLIFT program, and Regina contacted CityLIFT representatives at the Neighborhood Housing Services of the Inland Empire (NHSIE), an organization started in 1978 by three World War II veterans that wanted to make homeownership an opportunity for underserved populations in San Bernardino.

“Our goal is to make sure that homebuyers are able to successfully sustain homeownership,” said Dawn Lee, Executive Director of NHSIE. To achieve that, NHSIE provides CityLIFT participants with prepurchase and home maintenance education, financial coaching, and other real estate services in addition to down payment assistance. Regina, now a homeowner in Riverside, has been living in her new home for three months. “Not only was CityLIFT staff very knowledgeable and efficient, but the turnaround for loan approval, underwriting, and document preparation was quick,” said Velasco. “My expectations were more than fulfilled.” Regina found out she was qualified for assistance soon after her first call; she met the income guidelines (as low as $48,900 for an individual or high as $96,200 for a family of eight) and other conditions. Now three months after the move-in, CityLIFT still calls to make themselves available to answer any questions about her loan and provide assistance in budgeting costs. “They truly have a desire to help families through the homeowner process in its entirety, not just with the loan. CityLIFT goes above and beyond the call of duty to better serve their clients,” said Velasco. If you would like more information on the CityLIFT program, visit nhsie.org/CityLIFT or call (909) 884-6891 to see if you qualify and find out how the CityLIFT program can help you become a homeowner in the Inland Empire.

…homebuyers in Fontana and San Bernardino can qualify for $15,000 in down payment assistance…

Local family finds hope in a helping hand and a new home Continued from page 1

2

However, with the assistance of partnering agencies, the Community Action Partnership of San Bernardino County, a nonprofit human service agency that provides services to low-income individuals and families, was able to get the family temporary motel vouchers while they sought additional assistance. Then amazingly, a nonprofit organization called Vision of Hope received a call from a family in their Hope For Heroes Permanent Supportive Housing Program. The family was moving out the next day because they had received additional income support and wanted to be closer to relatives. Anthony Mahan was praying quietly to himself when suddenly, his phone rang, "Mr. Mahan, you and your family can move into your new home today." On the other end was Victor Myles, the Director of Housing at Vision of Hope. Anthony began to weep, and agreed to meet with them at the apartment unit. There waiting for them was a fully furnished three bedroom, two-bath unit, complete with balloons, chips, sandwiches, and a cake that said "Welcome Home Hero."

Today, the Mahans are doing well and all children are thriving in schools within the Rialto Unified School District. Currently Anthony Mahan is attending school at Ashford University where he is studying business administration. “Without the County of San Bernardino and Vision of Hope, I would be without my family and without a future,” said Anthony Mahan. They thank Vision of Hope for their efforts, passion to help and the faith to believe. Vision of Hope is joined with the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership to provide a system of care this is inclusive, well planned, coordinated, evaluated and accessible to all who are homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless. This story is just one of the many differences they make in our community each day. For more information on Vision of Hope, please call (909) 3861620 or email info@ourvisionofhope.org. The San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership can be reached at the Office of Homeless Services by calling (909) 252-4001.

Continued from page 1

“This project is more than just housing, it is a long-term investment that will deliver senior services, improve education, provide jobs, and expand local business opportunities for a growing community we serve,” said Supervisor Josie Gonzales. Construction will take progress in two phases. Phase one, projected to begin construction in fall 2014, will consist of 70 units for seniors, 6,950 square foot public library with medical and counseling facilities, and 2,200 square foot senior community space. It will also include 36 family units, and a 2,625 square foot community center within it that will house a classroom facility.

Phase two will consist of the remaining 84 family units. One, two, and three-bedroom units will be leased to qualified renters. The family housing is proposed in two-story buildings containing two-bedroom townhomes and in three-story buildings containing twobedroom, two-story townhomes over three-bedroom stacked flats. The common open spaces, including pool, playground area, and patio seating are proposed within family areas; but would be accessible to all residents of the development. For more information about the Bloomington Affordable Housing Community please visit affordablebloomington.com or call (909) 3874700.

3


4 1 2 3

challenge in our omelessness has long been a me long after first e tak n’t did area. However, it gnitude of the being elected to realize the ma actually suffer day after day problem for both those who individuals and living on the street, and the e assistance. organizations trying to provid Board of Supervisors to This was the catalyst for the Services in 2007 and with create the Office of Homeless o County Homeless it forming the San Bernardin oration of community and lab col a Partnership (SBCHP), -profit organizations, faith-based organizations, non ate industry, and federal, educational institutions, priv collaborating and working state, and local governments and resources to all who are together to provide services ing homeless. homeless or at-risk of becom d a more concentrated These two initiatives forme ng homelessness in San approach to issues surroundi to creating our 10-Year Bernardino County and led ss in the County of San Strategy to End Homelessne the goal to end Bernardino. Some consider ossible, that we are better homelessness as mission imp eless population instead of off simply ignoring this hop ial services. wasting more money on soc n, I remind myself of all When faced with this opinio uals and families that I the faces of homeless individ ned single-mom that have come across; an abando erwater mortgage, a couldn’t keep up with an und ily to return to, a widower disabled veteran with no fam This is the changing face with a failing small business. of homelessness. nt examples, those Though all of these are differe

H

ly or t are chronically, temporari individuals or families tha the er ss, are best served und at-risk of becoming homele t. Evidence shows that a firs g same approach—housin g best practice in eliminatin housing first model is the . ive ect ably cost eff homelessness and is remark es based study (Flaming et gel An s Lo a According to to be in homelessness was found al., 2009), leaving people t than providing permanen almost 5 times more costly rage cost for leaving an supportive housing. The ave , 897 per month to taxpayers individual homeless is $2, nent ma per in l house an individua while the average cost to 5 per month. supportive housing was $60 for effective proven strategy an is g sin Permanent hou ess illn l nta me h wit ls individua many homeless, including of all end the be not y ma ms. It and substance abuse proble on. uti it, but it is part of the sol homelessness as we know t Lake City were the two Recently, Phoenix and Sal elessness. By making the first cities to end veteran hom are g resources, much like we commitment and organizin ir the and y no County, the doing here in San Bernardi job done. Now let San the got ers respective provid job. first county to do the same Bernardino County be the ution is you, the people. Another big part of the sol ssness pact on addressing homele Everyone can make an im ng ovi rem rts with identify and in the community and it sta we ser clo e being homeless. Th the stigma associated with we ntity of the issue, the closer ide e are to realizing the tru . are to finding real solutions can do in our Q&A on you at wh ut Read more abo of rnardino County of Office page 4, or call the San Be 01. -40 252 Homeless Services at (909) | sy of ab.photo, Rain Rannu rte cou 1 e pag on s Photo Flickr Creative Commons

CityLIFT helps homebuyers in San Bernardino County

W

hat do five city mayors, a congressionally chartered nonprofit organization, and a multinational bank have in common? Answer: they all have partnered to help median income families and individuals achieve homeownership right here in the Inland Empire. Among Corona, Moreno Valley, and Riverside, homebuyers in Fontana and San Bernardino can qualify for $15,000 in down payment assistance through the CityLIFT program, a down payment assistance program provided by Wells Fargo and NeighborWorks America. From 2008-2011, San Bernardino County experienced over 100,000 foreclosures according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. This downturn dislocated residents, lowered property tax revenues, and took a long-term toll on the real estate market. This was a housing crisis that severely impacted middle-class earners like Regina Velasco. After going from living in a 2,500 square foot home with her son, to a renting a 750 square foot apartment, local Inland Empire resident Regina Velasco began working towards buying a home in 2011. Two years later, she was given approval for a $350,000 home loan. A friend told her about the CityLIFT program, and Regina contacted CityLIFT representatives at the Neighborhood Housing Services of the Inland Empire (NHSIE), an organization started in 1978 by three World War II veterans that wanted to make homeownership an opportunity for underserved populations in San Bernardino.

“Our goal is to make sure that homebuyers are able to successfully sustain homeownership,” said Dawn Lee, Executive Director of NHSIE. To achieve that, NHSIE provides CityLIFT participants with prepurchase and home maintenance education, financial coaching, and other real estate services in addition to down payment assistance. Regina, now a homeowner in Riverside, has been living in her new home for three months. “Not only was CityLIFT staff very knowledgeable and efficient, but the turnaround for loan approval, underwriting, and document preparation was quick,” said Velasco. “My expectations were more than fulfilled.” Regina found out she was qualified for assistance soon after her first call; she met the income guidelines (as low as $48,900 for an individual or high as $96,200 for a family of eight) and other conditions. Now three months after the move-in, CityLIFT still calls to make themselves available to answer any questions about her loan and provide assistance in budgeting costs. “They truly have a desire to help families through the homeowner process in its entirety, not just with the loan. CityLIFT goes above and beyond the call of duty to better serve their clients,” said Velasco. If you would like more information on the CityLIFT program, visit nhsie.org/CityLIFT or call (909) 884-6891 to see if you qualify and find out how the CityLIFT program can help you become a homeowner in the Inland Empire.

…homebuyers in Fontana and San Bernardino can qualify for $15,000 in down payment assistance…

Local family finds hope in a helping hand and a new home Continued from page 1

2

However, with the assistance of partnering agencies, the Community Action Partnership of San Bernardino County, a nonprofit human service agency that provides services to low-income individuals and families, was able to get the family temporary motel vouchers while they sought additional assistance. Then amazingly, a nonprofit organization called Vision of Hope received a call from a family in their Hope For Heroes Permanent Supportive Housing Program. The family was moving out the next day because they had received additional income support and wanted to be closer to relatives. Anthony Mahan was praying quietly to himself when suddenly, his phone rang, "Mr. Mahan, you and your family can move into your new home today." On the other end was Victor Myles, the Director of Housing at Vision of Hope. Anthony began to weep, and agreed to meet with them at the apartment unit. There waiting for them was a fully furnished three bedroom, two-bath unit, complete with balloons, chips, sandwiches, and a cake that said "Welcome Home Hero."

Today, the Mahans are doing well and all children are thriving in schools within the Rialto Unified School District. Currently Anthony Mahan is attending school at Ashford University where he is studying business administration. “Without the County of San Bernardino and Vision of Hope, I would be without my family and without a future,” said Anthony Mahan. They thank Vision of Hope for their efforts, passion to help and the faith to believe. Vision of Hope is joined with the San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership to provide a system of care this is inclusive, well planned, coordinated, evaluated and accessible to all who are homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless. This story is just one of the many differences they make in our community each day. For more information on Vision of Hope, please call (909) 3861620 or email info@ourvisionofhope.org. The San Bernardino County Homeless Partnership can be reached at the Office of Homeless Services by calling (909) 252-4001.

Continued from page 1

“This project is more than just housing, it is a long-term investment that will deliver senior services, improve education, provide jobs, and expand local business opportunities for a growing community we serve,” said Supervisor Josie Gonzales. Construction will take progress in two phases. Phase one, projected to begin construction in fall 2014, will consist of 70 units for seniors, 6,950 square foot public library with medical and counseling facilities, and 2,200 square foot senior community space. It will also include 36 family units, and a 2,625 square foot community center within it that will house a classroom facility.

Phase two will consist of the remaining 84 family units. One, two, and three-bedroom units will be leased to qualified renters. The family housing is proposed in two-story buildings containing two-bedroom townhomes and in three-story buildings containing twobedroom, two-story townhomes over three-bedroom stacked flats. The common open spaces, including pool, playground area, and patio seating are proposed within family areas; but would be accessible to all residents of the development. For more information about the Bloomington Affordable Housing Community please visit affordablebloomington.com or call (909) 3874700.

3


2 1

Vol. 3 Issue 1

January/February 2014

5th District Events Martin Luther King Jr. Day Federal holiday observed Bloomington MAC Meeting Ayala Park 18313 Valley Boulevard, Bloomington Call (909) 387-4565 for details

Jan. 20 Feb. 4 @ 6:00 PM

Free Career Expo Feb. 12 @ 10:00 AM California State University San Bernardino 5500 University Parkway Call (909) 537-3265 for details Give Kids A Smile Event Feb. 22 @ 8:00 AM Free dental treatment children 6-18 Dental Care of San Bernardino 322 North H Street, Call (909) 888-1301 for details State of the County 2014 Feb. 24 @ 4:30 PM 4000 E. Ontario Center Pkwy Call (909) 387-4700 for registration information or visit SBCountyAdvantage.com

County Government Center 385 N. Arrowhead Avenue, 5th Floor San Bernardino, CA 92415

The Office of Homeless Services is striving to achieve a number of goals to resolve homelessness within the county. Some of those goals are: –Increasing homeless assistance funding resources throughout the county. –Increasing permanent supportive housing. –Educate the community on homeless issues and seek community involvement in addressing homeless concerns. –Establish regional integrated homeless services and assessment centers.

There have been many scholarly peer-reviewed journal articles on the impact of homelessness on society. A 2009 Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority report called, “Where We Sleep: Costs when Homeless and Housed in Los Angeles.” When you compare the monetary cost of providing housing and supportive services with the cost of leaving people in homelessness, the costs are high. The average cost to taxpayers per month to house an individual in permanent supportive housing was $605, compared to the cost per month of leaving the individual homeless, $2,897. According to the San Bernardino County Homeless Point-In-Time Count, there were 2,321 individuals and families counted as homeless on Jan. 24, of which 441 were chronically homeless. If we just look at our chronically homeless individuals and families, based on data from the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority report, San Bernardino County taxpayers would save over $12 million per year by housing the chronically homeless in permanent supportive housing rather than leaving them homeless on the streets.

What is the most effective solution to homelessness?

What can residents do to really help with homelessness?

Email: supervisorgonzales@sbcounty.gov Website: www.sbcounty.gov/gonzales

Scan the code above and join us on Facebook! Photo courtesy of SP8254 | Flickr Creative Commons

Affordable housing, library coming to Bloomington .... 1 CityLIFT helps homebuyers afford new local homes … 1 Josie’s Journal, homelessness in SB County ………….... 2 The importance of solving homelessness in San Bernardino County see page 3

Hopeless to housed, a local family’s journey …….……. 3 Q&A with the County’s homeless services manager …. 4

What is the real impact of homelessness in our county?

A housing first approach has statistically proven itself to be a solution to ending homelessness throughout the country. Communities should take an inventory of their resources to identify and encourage permanent supportive housing and address street homelessness by adopting and supporting homeless outreach programs. When communities work with their homeless and support organizations, everyone benefits.

Contact us at (909) 387-4565

In this issue

What is the county’s Office of Homeless Services’ mission?

The National Coalition for the Homeless suggests that we can help end homelessness by simply CAREing. Contributing resources to a local homeless service provider through volunteerism, and donations of material assistance, such as “Welcome Home” kits to homeless individuals and families moving into permanent supportive housing. Advocating for systemic changes needed to end homelessness by promoting policies and programs on the local, state, and federal levels for positive solutions. Reaching Out by working directly with organizations that serve people experiencing homelessness is one of the best ways to learn about homelessness and help to meet immediate needs at the same time. Educating the public about the root causes of homelessness and coming up with usable solutions to effectively make positive changes for homeless families and individuals and those at-risk of homelessness.

an Bernardino County has big plans for Bloomington, and it starts with the new Bloomington Affordable Housing Community. The 13,993 square foot development, located near the corner of Valley Boulevard and Locust Avenue, is the first of its kind in the unincorporated area. “It’s wonderful, we needed it!” said Jackie Cox, longtime local resident and chair of the Bloomington Municipal Advisory Council. “It’s the best thing that has happened since I’ve lived here. We need housing, we need a library, and we need it period.” When completed, it will include a new Bloomington Branch Library, senior and community centers, and 190 affordable housing units. The project was approved in December 2013 and is headed by the county’s Community Development and Housing Department. During planning, the county held multiple public meetings in Bloomington to solicit input from local residents on the architecture style and address any direct concerns.

S

“I am very excited for the residents of Bloomington. The Board’s approval is an important step towards building this beautifully designed mixed-generational housing community. The new library and housing community exemplifies the Countywide Vision in action,” said Dena Fuentes, Director of the Community Development and Housing Department. The development is one of three major investments—affordable housing, public library, and the Valley Corridor Specific Plan—that San Bernardino County is making in the Bloomington community. The Bloomington Affordable Housing Community incorporates a range of capital improvements outlined in the Countywide Vision that provide economic benefit to the community. Continued on page 3

The Mahan family had spent countless nights sleeping in the park, camped out in their suburban truck. This followed after an exhausting effort to keep their home that ended to no avail. Mom, Keyina Mahan, was unemployed—laid off from her job after giving 7 dedicated years to the company. Dad, Anthony Mahan, a US Army veteran, was unable to contribute much more to his family's need due to a disability. Knowing he had to find some kind of resource for his family, Anthony spoke to an outreach worker at the Loma Linda VA who directed them to Vision of Hope. At the time, there was no shelter available for a family of that size. Continued on page 2

Josie's Press, January/February  

This issue of Josie's Press focuses in on housing in San Bernardino County. In Bloomington, it's affordable housing everyone's thinking abo...

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