Page 1

TECTONIC SYSTEMS JOSHUA MILLIST - 101 704 345


PART I: INITIAL STUDIES AND PROTOTYPING PRECEDENT STUDIES

6 8

PRECEDENT10

- ENDOCASTING - QATAR NATIONAL CONVENTION CENTER, DOHA - FATTYSHELL BY KYLE STURGEON, CHRIS HOLZWART AND KELLY RACZKOWSKI - CAST THICKET BY CHRISTINE YOGIAMAN AND KEN TRACY 

10 11 12 13

PROTOTYPING14 • PROTOTYPE ONE

16

FINAL RESULT

18

• PROTOTYPE TWO

19

FINAL RESULT

21

DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK

22

• DIGITAL MODELS

24

- CONTOURS - FIELDS - SURFACES

25 26 28

- PROTOTYPE ONE IDEA - CONSTRUCTION PROCESS - DURABILITY TEST - REFLECTION

CONTENTS

- PROTOTYPE TWO IDEA - CONSTRUCTION PROCESS - DURABILITY TEST - REFLECTION

WEEK 4 TASK - INITIAL IDEAS - CONCEPT - DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION

16 16 17 17

19 19 20 20

30 32 32 33


PART II GROUP STUDIES AND PROTOTYPING

36

GROUP PERCEDENT STUDIES

38

• PRECEDENT STUDY - FABRIC CASTING

40

DIGITAL REMODELLING

42

• DIGITAL REMODELLING

44

- STGILAT PAVILION - MARS PAVILION

- MARS PAVILION REMODELLING FINAL RESULT

40 41

44 45

PROTOTYPES46 • PROTOTYPE ONE

48

• PROTOTYPE TWO

50

• PROTOTYPE THREE

52

• PROTOTYPE FOUR

54

• PROTOTYPE FIVE

56

- FABRIC HOLDER - PROTOTYPE ONE FINAL - CONCRETE CAST WITH FABRIC - PROTOTYPE TWO FINAL - PATTERN - PROTOTYPE THREE FINAL

- JOINING METHOD 1 - PROTOTYPE FOUR FINAL

- JOINING METHOD 2 - PROTOTYPE FIVE FINAL

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57

TESSELLATIONS58 • TESSELLATION60 - TESSELLATION ONE - TESSELLATION TWO - TESSELLATION THREE - TESSELLATION FOUR - TESSELLATION FIVE

60 61 63 64 65


PART III: IS BUILDING SITE VISIT • SITE VISIT - IS BUILDING

- EAST SIDE - NORTH SIDE - SOUTH SIDE - WEST SIDE - INTERIOR - WHAT WE LEARNED

67 •

68 70

70 71 72 73 74 75

ITERATIONS76 • SKETCHES

- FLOOR PLANS - SCULPTURAL PIECE ADDITION

78

78 79

• ITERATIONS80 - ITERATION 1 - ITERATION 2 - ITERATION 3 - ITERATION 4 - ITERATION 5 - ITERATION 6 - FLOOR PLAN ITERATION 1 - FLOOR PLAN ITERATION 2

80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87

• IDEA REFINEMENT 88 • • REFLECTION90 • • FINAL FORM 92 •

PROTOTYPING94 • PROTOTYPE ONE

96

• FABRIC PROTOTYPING

98

- FABRIC CASTING BOX - PROTOTYPE ONE FINAL - POLYESTER - LYCRA - CANVAS

96 97

98 99 100

• CONCRETE 

101

- GLASS FIBRES - CEMENT - REINFORCEMENT

101 102 103


PART IV: FINAL DESIGN FINAL PIECES

• DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL 

- PROCESS  - FINAL PIECES

104 106

108

108 111

1:100 MODEL

112

DRAWING SET

116

• • • • • • • • • •

ROOF PLAN 118 FLOOR PLAN 119 EAST ELEVATION 120 NORTH ELEVATION 120 SECTION ONE 121 SECTION TWO 121 3D PERSPECTIVE 122 AXONOMETRIC123 JOINERY METHOD DETAIL 124 FABRIC CASTING DETAIL 125

RENDERS126 • • • • • •

STREET VIEW EAST FACADE NORTH FACADE INSIDE SCULPTURE INTERIOR IN THE MORNING INTERIOR IN THE AFTERNOON

128 129 130 131 132 133


PART I


INITIAL STUDIES AND PROTOTYPING


PRECEDENT STUDIES


CAST THICKET BY CHRISTINE YOGIAMAN AND KEN TRACY


10 | 1.1 PRECEDENT STUDIES | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PRECEDENT

ENDOCASTING

I wanted to explore ant and termite endocasting which involves the pouring of molten metal, concrete or resin down a ant hill or termite mound. The surrounding hill is then scraped away revealing an extravagant and complexity of the pathways that ants create. This process creates an aesthetic shape in which, it starts off as an almost solid and, as it goes deeper down, it spreads out further and gets more and more complex. I want to explore other methods to achieve a similar aesthetic.


11 | 1.1 PRECEDENT STUDIES TECTONIC SYSTEMS TECTONIC SYSTEMS | 1.1 |PRECEDENT

QATAR NATIONAL CONVENTION CENTER, DOHA

I was very intrigued by the supports on the front canopy. The tree-like structure used to hold up the canopy strongly resembles the endocasting method. It provides an interesting take on an entrance separating from the norm. Although the construction method is not my aim, the result strongly resembles the pattern I’m looking for


12 | TECTONIC 1.1 PRECEDENT STUDIES TECTONIC SYSTEMS SYSTEMS | 1.1 | PRECEDENT

FATTYSHELL BY KYLE STURGEON, CHRIS HOLZWART AND KELLY RACZKOWSKI This project was created by a team of students at the University of Michigan. These students used a method of stitching together two sheets of rubber to create a mold which concrete was then poured in stages to fill up the sleeve. This method interests me as it can create abstract shapes with concrete that would be difficult with any other method

10


13 | 1.1 PRECEDENT STUDIES TECTONIC SYSTEMS TECTONIC SYSTEMS | 1.1 |PRECEDENT

CAST THICKET BY CHRISTINE YOGIAMAN AND KEN TRACY This structure was created with limestone aggregate, limestone powder and white fiber reinforcement. The designers used a plastic mold which deformed once filled to create a more aesthetic appearance and unique texture. A plastic mold could be effective in creating shape with smooth sides rather than a texture created from a fabric.

10


PROTOTYPING


16 | 1.2 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE ONE PROTOTYPE ONE IDEA For my first prototype, I wanted to see how a clear-casting solution mixed with a catalyst hardener and sand would hold once it had set after being curved. Testing the durability of resin and how it would hold its shape once set.

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

I used loose sand and water initially to try and figure out a shape to test. I wanted it to have thin parts to see how they would react once pressure is applied. Once I had an idea of my end goal, I placed pieces of wood to contain the resin once mixed with the catalyst hardener and sand. I put a cylindrical shape below a mat to get the curvature of the cast i was aiming for. After that, I used tools such as a Stanley knife and a spoon to carve out the desired shapes i wanted. This was a difficult method as the resin was very runny and the shape was hard to maintain. 24 hours later the mold had fully hardened and cured and there was a few fixes required such as edges and minor pieces that needed to be broken off and loose sand was brushed off resulting in a finished prototype.


17 | 1.2 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

REFLECTION I was happy with the strength and durability of the final result and how i could make thin pieces that wouldn’t snap with pressure applied. The texture unfortunately came out rougher then i would’ve liked and the shape wasn’t quite what i was trying to achieve but with a proper molding procedure, this could be managed better. Resin and a catalyst hardener can also be quite an expensive product so to avoid large expenses in a larger scale, the clear-casting resin could be an outer coating on a cheaper material.

DURABILITY TEST

After the prototype had plenty of time to harden and cure, I wanted to test the durability to see how it would hold with a force applied. This was done by using a small weight and placing it on top of the model. It showed great flexibility and was left undamaged.


18 | 1.2 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL RESULT


19 | 1.2 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE TWO PROTOTYPE TWO IDEA I wanted to explore the idea of testing the fabric casting method used in the Fattyshell construction process. This involves using fabric or waterproof plastic sleeve with a seal on its edges to create a mold with more of a texture and easier to shape and manipulate.

CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

I started the construction by first testing the waterproof plastic by applying a stitching and duct tape to see if there was leakage once water was put into the mold. They both worked perfectly but i decided to steer toward the duct tape seal as it is a much easier process. I changed to a more durable plastic to avoid punctures from the aggregate. The plastic was cut into the desired shape with two layers were used and they were stuck together with duct tape. I had to unfortunately make the end parts wider than I would’ve liked to give it more strength and limit any cracking.


20 | 1.2 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

REFLECTION The end result was not at all how I pictured it with a rough and messy texture and one piece completely broken off from the structure. Even after making the legs larger than desired, it still wasn’t enough. However, the plastic method worked creating the exact shape that was intended without expanding or warping and resulted in minimal to no leakage.

Once the mold was made, the concrete was then mixed with 3 parts aggregate, 3 parts sand, 1 part cement and appropriate amount of water. This mix was then carefully placed into the mold and placed over a cylindrical object to get the desired curvature need to test the resilience of the concrete material. After a few days, the plastic was then cut off and removed from the cylindrical object. Upon examination, it did not come out in the desired texture being lumpy and looking brittle. There was also a noticeable crack on one of the side legs before i even touched it.

DURABILITY TEST

Even though the model was already broken, I still wanted to see if an applied force would cause any additional damage. Although it was brittle, there was no additional damage caused by the weight remaining unaffected.


21 | 1.2 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL RESULT


DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK


24 | 1.3 DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

DIGITAL MODELS


25 | 1.3 DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

CONTOURS

I wanted to explore the use of playing with contours onto a variety of curved surfaces representing movement of shapes and emphasizing the directions in which the shape is bending. The shape shows a 3D form without a solid fill colour needed.


26 | 1.3 DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FIELDS

Evaluating the fields gives an interesting effect that expands curves from a focal point. This has the appearance of a tree branch and could make an interesting pavilion.


27 | 1.3 DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK | TECTONIC SYSTEMS


28 | 1.3 DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

SURFACES

I wanted to explore the use of different shapes onto different surfaces and curvatures and how the shapes alter in size while being stretched and twisted wrapping around and how they react at different angles.


29 | 1.3 DIGITAL SKETCHBOOK | TECTONIC SYSTEMS


WEEK 4 TASK


32 | 1.4 WEEK 4 | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

INITIAL IDEAS

When we started designing, we were looking at different angles and shapes but decided it was too difficult to do such sharp angles and triangulations. If we proceeded with some of these structures, the construction wouldn’t work.

CONCEPT

After exploration into different concepts and ideas, our group wanted to look at the complexity of creating a fluid, organic form from geometric shapes. We explored a sold shape such as a rocky mountain and contrasted that form by creating triangle holes and allowing light to pass through in a beautiful way.


33 | 1.4 WEEK 4 | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

DEVELOPMENT AND CONSTRUCTION

When it was all put together, we had to bend and twist the project into the shape we created in Grasshopper. Since it was such a large structure, this was a difficult process resulting in some aluminum wire reinforcement needed to keep it upright and from collapsing.

Once the digital testing was done and we had a model we were all happy with developing, we unrolled all of the pieces in a format to be cut and exported it to Illustrator ready to be laser cut. The three sheets were laser cut with appropriate tabs and rivet holes to be easily assembled.

After all of the sheets were finished being laser cut, we then assembled the loose pieces with a pop rivet gun using pop rivets in the holes on the tabs created. To do this, we had numbers on each piece to cross-reference to the digital model so we knew which piece attached to which.


34 | 1.4 WEEK 4 | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL RESULT


35 | 1.4 WEEK 4 | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL RESULT AS A LIGHT SHADE


PART II


GROUP STUDIES AND PROTOTYPING


GROUP PRECEDENT STUDIES


MARS PAVILION BY FORM FOUND DESIGN


40 | 2.1 GROUP PRECEDENT STUDIES | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PRECEDENT STUDY - FABRIC CASTING

STGILAT PAVILION

The Stgilat Pavilion designed by Art Center College and Cloud 9 was created using an inflated balloon with a large sheet of laser cut fabric and pieces of wood draped over the top to shape the concrete once poured. While this method is intriguing and creates a highly aesthetic result, it is quite costly and impractical if something is broken during construction.


41 | 2.1 GROUP PRECEDENT STUDIES | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

MARS PAVILION

The Mars Pavilion designed by Form Found Design was created using Kangaroo to create ‘Y’ shaped pieces formed with robot arms shaping laser cut lycra fabric for concrete to be poured into. The beautiful part of this is that the joining method used allows the structure to be easily assembled and disassembled. Other features taken from this method was the non-linear shape created and the Helix steel reinforcement used to create a stronger hold.


DIGITAL REMODELLING


44 | 2.2 DIGITAL REMODELLING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

DIGITAL REMODELLING

MARS PAVILION REMODELLING

The Mars Pavilion creation method uses an extension on Grasshopper named Kangaroo to apply pressure and inflate a hexagonal grid and create an opening for access inside. This helps give an image on how the concrete would act once poured into the fabric.


45 | 2.2 DIGITAL REMODELLING| TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL RESULT


PROTOTYPES


48 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE ONE

FABRIC HOLDER

For our first prototype, we wanted to look at creating a structure to hold the fabric in place as we do not have access to two robotic arms to shape and stabilize the fabric while the concrete is being poured in. One stem would be attached to the top and left unstitched for the concrete to be poured into. The other two would be tied to the sides to hold it in place.This initial prototype was create with just bolts, nuts and two end plates but was then developed into a shape to hold one of the ‘stems’ of the ‘Y’ shape.


49 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE ONE FINAL


50 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE TWO

CONCRETE CAST WITH FABRIC

On this prototype we wanted to try and recreate the concrete ‘Y’ shaped stem by cutting canvas into shape and stitching the sides to seal the concrete in. We also wanted to test the helix steel rod reinforcement used in the Mars Pavilion by using nails and mixing them into the concrete mix. The result was a much stronger piece of concrete with tensioning being more unlikely to chip or break. The canvas gave an interesting


51 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE TWO FINAL


52 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE THREE

PATTERN For prototype we wanted to focus on the pattern and how it could be reinforced. We used a triangular pattern and tied the reinforcement together with wiring. This could then go on to be placed into a fabric sleeve for concrete to be shaped around. Although, with a pattern such as this, the pieces would be tied together differently as a piece like this would not be easily cast with fabric.


53 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE THREE FINAL


54 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE FOUR

JOINING METHOD 1 For the third prototype we wanted to look at creating a way in which two pieces of concrete can be simply screwed together and assemble like a puzzle piece to form a pavilion. To create this we used two 3mm thick pieces of aluminum, a bolt, a nut with a long thread and a cardboard packing tube. Firstly we used a grinder and drill to get the end plate to the correct size and to allow the bolt to pass through. To keep the bolt in correct position we attached a sleeve and nut either side to make sure it doesn’t move. Once both pieces were in place they were then duct taped to the packaging tube to create a seal and stopping the concrete from leaking out the bottom and keep everything secure. The concrete was then poured in and steel rods (coat hanger pieces) were used as reinforcement. Once the concrete was set, the cardboard was then peeled away. We decided not to use this joining system as it becomes too difficult to put the last pieces in place of a structure.


55 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE FOUR FINAL


56 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE FIVE

JOINING METHOD 2 For this prototype we wanted to recreate the join used in the Mars Pavilion which allows three stems to be joined together. For the purposes of the prototyping stage we used timber to represent the steel and foam to represent the concrete. We drew the shape analyzed from the Mars Pavilion which is essentially a triangular prism with the corners cut off allowing the bolts to fit into the gaps and fastened into the concrete. The wood was laser cut into shape with the holes drilled into each side piece. Once the wood was laser cut and the bolts were in place, the foam (concrete) was attached to represent the stems connected by the join.


57 | 2.3 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE FIVE FINAL


TESSELLATIONS


60 | 2.4 TESSELLATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

TESSELLATION

TESSELLATION ONE We wanted to explore a sharp edge tessellation to provide a unique and aesthetic look. After some thought, we realized these shapes will be quite difficult to cast with the fabric casting method and if it did work, the edges would become too narrow and prone to breakage.


61 | 2.4 TESSELLATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

TESSELLATION TWO This tessellation is similar to the Mars Pavilion with hexagon shapes being cast with ‘Y’ shaped pieces. The idea was to have the hexagons turn into a circular shape with no sharp edges. These pieces would be easy to cast, can be easily joined at the three-point endings and durable with a dense centre.


62 | 2.4 TESSELLATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS


63 | 2.4 TESSELLATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

TESSELLATION THREE For these tessellations, we wanted to explore a different abstract of shapes from a triangular grid structure as the base. We played a rough with a more organic casting shape with less sharp edges and wanted to try and achieve a circular shape from the original grid shape. The pieces could be divided to be cast in fabric with a mixture of two-edge and three-edge joins. The joining methods would become a lot more difficult with this layout.


64 | 2.4 TESSELLATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

TESSELLATION FOUR We wanted to experiment with the use of a square grid to create a diamond shape with four ends instead of three. These pieces could be cast quite easily but the joinery method becomes more complex with up to four ends meeting at certain points.


65 | 2.4 TESSELLATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

TESSELLATION FIVE For this tessellation, we wanted to go back to the tri-grid concept but with separate pieces in the pattern rather than it all interconnecting. These pieces could be easily cast but many joins would need to be put in place with two-end joining the piece together and three-end joins joining each piece.


PART III


IS BUILDING


SITE VISIT


70 | 3.1 SITE VISIT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

SITE VISIT - IS BUILDING

EAST SIDE The Eastern side contains the access point to the site and access to the building on the facade with an average looking canopy. The overall shape of the building is quite interesting with three skillion pitched roofs dividing it into three. There is a quite beautiful tree that we want to keep as it adds character to the structure.


71 | 3.1 SITE VISIT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

NORTH SIDE The Northern side contains a large car park and a fenced off area with waste. The facade on North side is quite simple with only one window and a shed extension that doesn’t match the rest of the structure. This side should be improved to look more interesting from the car park and nearby train station


72 | 3.1 SITE VISIT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

SOUTH SIDE The Southern side is built right up to a fence with an access way to another building and the site boundary preventing it from extending any further. The windows can be seen extending from one end to the other starting at the bottom of the roof pitch to allow a large amount of light to the inside.


73 | 3.1 SITE VISIT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

WEST SIDE The Western side is also built right up to the fence with a small outside patio available. The shed extension used as an equipment can be seen here with a quite average look. This could be better managed to blend better with the overall building.


74 | 3.1 SITE VISIT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

INTERIOR The Interior space was quite closed off with a narrow hallway through the middle of the building. The photography booth is quite interesting with its connection to the roof allowing light if necessary. There is a problem with storage. All of the storage and equipment rooms are filled equipment without much room for access or anything additional.


75 | 3.1 SITE VISIT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

WHAT WE LEARNED The building has many interesting qualities but could definitely be improved on the Eastern side. Other things to be considered in the improvement would be creating more storage space and improve the spacial quality by making it more of an open plan.


ITERATIONS


78 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

SKETCHES

FLOOR PLANS Initially we wanted to add some curves into the plan to give it a more organic flow and connect it with our sculptural piece we were intending to add. The photography booth was a good place to investigate as it really stands out when you walk into the room. We also wanted more curves on the Eastern side to add more character to the plain facade.


79 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

SCULPTURAL PIECE ADDITION We wanted to add a sculptural piece to the eastern facade with a proposed new extension and entrance to allow a more ease of access when entering the building. At first, we looked at connecting the sculpture with the extension with pieces of glass in between the cast pieces but the fabric casting technique would have been too impracticable for that application.


80 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ITERATIONS

ITERATION 1


81 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ITERATION 2


82 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ITERATION 3


83 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ITERATION 4


84 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ITERATION 5


85 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ITERATION 6


86 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FLOOR PLAN ITERATION 1

STORAGE

STUDY/EDITING AREA

OPEN OFFICE

CLASSROOM

PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

BATH BATH KITCHENETTE


87 | 3.2 ITERATIONS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FLOOR PLAN ITERATION 2

STORAGE

STUDY/EDITING AREA

OFFICE

CLASSROOM

PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM

BATH BATH KITCHENETTE


88 | 3.3 IDEA REFINEMENT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

IDEA REFINEMENT


89 | 3.3 IDEA REFINEMENT | TECTONIC SYSTEMS


90 | 3.4 REFLECTION | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

REFLECTION


91 | 3.4 REFLECTION | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

Through different form explorations and altercations of the floor plan, we decided to add an extra entrance on the Eastern facade while still maintaining the existing entrance. The floor plan seemed to work better as a functional space and to blend better with the exisitng structure by adding an extension with a geometric shape to match the existing rather than curving the wall. The sculptural piece worked better as a piece attaching to the building rather that using it as a structural wall as the fabric casting method was not the best casting method for this use. For the sculptural piece to be a functioning space, we wanted to connect the two entrances to allow clear direction to the street and car parking.


92 | 3.5 FINAL FORM | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL FORM


93 | 3.5 FINAL FORM | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

This design for the sculptural piece provides an interesting aesthetic with an ease of access from both the street and the car park. For the floor plan we decided to remove the curved wall to have a better use of space and provided a better appearance from the exterior acting as if it was already there. We still are looking into putting a light render over the brickwork and changing the roof to a darker colour instead of the existing brown colour.


PROTOTYPING


96 | 3.5 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE ONE

FABRIC CASTING BOX For the first prototype we wanted to create a box so we could tie the ends of the ‘Y’ stem to get the desired shape and leave an open top to pour the concrete into the sleeve. This was created by firstly laser cutting top and bottom pieces with a hole in the top to leave it open for the concrete pour. The side pieces were drilled with a series of evenly spaced holes to allow the sides to be fastened at different angles and heights to get an accurate shape. Smaller pieces were then laser cut to act a an end plate and allow the fabric sleeve to be compressed between the plate and side pieces of the box to prevent the concrete from leaking. We made three versions of this prototype at different scales to allow experimentation with different shapes.


97 | 3.6 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

PROTOTYPE ONE FINAL


98 | 3.5 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FABRIC PROTOTYPING

POLYESTER The polyester experimentation came out as a smooth texture holding its shape very well when placed into the casting box. The creases added a nice character to the piece but were difficult to manage and control their appearance. Overall, the polyester sleeve was a success.


99 | 3.6 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

LYCRA The Lycra casting didn’t go too well with the fabric being too flexible causing all of the concrete to fall to the bottom and not set evenly. This may have been due no tension stretching the fabric to limit the excess expansion. The Lycra testing was a failure and was not explored any further.


100 | 3.5 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

CANVAS The canvas experimentation went very well with the shape being maintained and minimal expansion once the concrete was poured in. The crease lines from the stitching came out perfectly and were easily managed. We also noticed, when taking off the fabric, that the canvas texture was left imprinted into the concrete adding an interesting aesthetic and showcasing the construction process rather than trying to hide it.


101 | 3.6 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

CONCRETE

GLASS FIBRES We gathered some glass fibres to allow for more flexibility in the pieces shape and to remove the aggregate to get a more aesthetic look. When mixing the fibre into the concrete, it was found that if we used too many fibres, they would all gather together providing a cotton ball appearance and a lumpy surface. It took many attempts to get the perfect ratio for the concrete mix. The best result we achieved was with: • • • •

1 part glass fibre 2 part white cement 3 part sand Approx. 2 part water


102 | 3.5 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

CEMENT We looked at different coloured cement and sands as the regular cement provided a more dark grey colour (left) which did not match our final design. After getting white cement, after completing a cast, we noticed that the regular sand made a more yellow colour (middle) which also didn’t match our design. After gathering white cement and white sand, we did a cast which turned out perfectly turning white.


103 | 3.6 PROTOTYPING | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

REINFORCEMENT The reinforcement became too difficult to create with just straight pieces seen in a standard slab. Instead we invested in some steel wire rope which was flexible and could be welded where necessary. This worked well but it was still difficult to keep in a curved position resulting in pieces sticking out the side.


PART IV


FINAL DESIGN


FINAL PIECES


108 | 4.1 DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL

PROCESS To get the digital pieces to a physical concrete piece, we firstly selected a few pieces to recreate and isolated them from the model. After it was just the focused pieces, we gathered the measurements and scaled them to a 1:2 size allowing for a lighter and smaller final model. Once we had the new scaled dimensions, we printed out the piece to scale and used it as a guideline for cutting the canvas fabric. Unfortunately this piece was slightly small causing difficulty in getting the concrete to each of the end plates.


109 | 4.1 DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

The joint was also scaled and laser cut to size to be placed in the centre of the three pieces. Unfortunately we weren’t able to get steel and did not have the knowledge to weld so we just used wood as an indicative material. To glue it together we used a mixture of baking powder and super glue which is a very strong bond and emulates a weld. The nut and reinforcement were welded together and glued to the join. After this was all done we could then attach it to the casting box and pour in the concrete mix.


110 | 4.1 DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

After the casting was done, we noticed a few flaws. The concrete didn’t make it all the way to one of the end plates and the reinforcement ended up sticking out the side. We tried to patching up the pieces using a steel brush, more fabric and duct tape to isolate and compress certain areas. The look after the patching was done wasn’t what we were looking for which resulted in us having to repeat the process with a slightly bigger and more simple shape. The result was three pieces that couple be easily assembled with a wrench or appropriate tool. Unfortunately some of the fabric got caught underneath the concrete in the process making it unable to be removed but we removed as much as we could resulting in a near perfect finish.


111 | 4.1 DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FINAL PIECES


1:100 MODEL


114 | 4.2 1:100 MODEL | TECTONIC SYSTEMS


115 | 4.2 1:100 MODEL | TECTONIC SYSTEMS


DRAWING SET


118 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

ROOF PLAN


119 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

MAIN ENTRANCE TO CANOPY

EDITING SUITE

MAIN ENTRANCE

STORAGE ROOM

OFFICE CLASSROOM

LOBBY SIDE ENTRANCE TO CANOPY

LOBBY SIDE ENTRANCE

STUDIO

STUDIO

UNISEX WC

DISABLED WC (UNISEX)

KITCHEN

FLOOR PLAN JOSHUA MILLIST LACHLAN CURTIS NICHOLAS MILLIGAN LEIDY VARGAS ESCOBAR

SHEET NAME:

PROJECT NAME:

IS BUILDING FLOOR PLAN CONCRETE SHELL

SCALE: DATE:

LEGEND:

11-06-2019

DRAWN BY:

A.01.01

PROJECT MEMBERS:

ARC - 20001 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO 2


120 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION


121 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

SECTION ONE

SECTION TWO


122 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

3D PERSPECTIVE


123 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

AXONOMETRIC


124 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

JOINERY METHOD DETAIL


125 | 4.3 DRAWING SET | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

FABRIC CASTING DETAIL


RENDERS


128 | 4.2 1:100 128 MODEL | 4.3 | DRAWING TECTONIC SET SYSTEMS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

STREET VIEW


129 | 4.2 1:100 129 MODEL | 4.3 | DRAWING TECTONICSET SYSTEMS | TECTONIC SYSTEMS

EAST FACADE


130 | 4.3 4.2 DRAWING 1:100 MODEL SET || TECTONIC TECTONICSYSTEMS SYSTEMS

NORTH FACADE


131 | 4.3 4.2 DRAWING 1:100 MODEL SET || TECTONIC TECTONICSYSTEMS SYSTEMS

INSIDE SCULPTURE


132 | 4.3 4.2 DRAWING 1:100 MODEL SET || TECTONIC TECTONICSYSTEMS SYSTEMS

INTERIOR IN THE MORNING


133 | 4.3 4.2 DRAWING 1:100 MODEL SET || TECTONIC TECTONICSYSTEMS SYSTEMS

INTERIOR IN THE AFTERNOON


Profile for Joshua Millist

Semester 1 Final | Tectonic Systems | Joshua Millist | 101 704 345  

Semester 1 Final | Tectonic Systems | Joshua Millist | 101 704 345  

Advertisement