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Zion-Benton Township High School

COURSE GUIDE Classes of 2010, 2011, 2012

The ZB Way: Respect & Responsibility


ZION-BENTON TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL W MISSION X To promote self-worth, social responsibility and lifelong learning in partnership with our community

SERVICE AND COMMUNITY

EFFECTIVE SCHOOL

Promote genuine pride in our school and encourage students to become responsible and active members and leaders in our school and community.

Demonstrate the joint presence of excellence (high level of achievement) and equity (little achievement difference among subsets of students).

INNOVATION AND EQUITY

MOTIVATION

Celebrate our diverse population by guaranteeing equity in learning opportunities and ensuring access to innovative technology and teaching practices.

Motivate students through consistent, caring teaching that emphasizes creativity, cooperation and academic achievement.

CORE COMMITMENTS DISCOVERY

SAFETY

Nurture a passion for discovery that fosters an inviting, challenging and enjoyable learning experience.

Provide and support an emotionally and physically safe environment free from substance abuse.

ROLE MODEL Model adult behaviors of honesty, citizenship, ethical behavior, dignity and respect.

CURRICULUM Provide a curriculum that is rigorous and relevant for all students.

Note: The Course Guide is approved annually by the Board of Education.


PURPOSE . . . The purpose of the Course Guide is to provide information important for choosing an appropriate learning pathway and selecting courses needed to achieve educational and career goals. DESCRIPTION . . . The Course Guide is in two parts. The first part, the Introduction, includes general information about graduation requirements, selecting a learning pathway, "building" a schedule of classes, as well as additional important information. The second part, beginning on page 1, lists the various courses offered by department. USING THE GUIDE . . . Please take a few minutes to "leaf through" the guide to get an idea of the contents and layout. After you have looked through the guide, follow the outline below to help you prepare for registration. 1.

Turn to page i and read about "Preparing a Four-Year Instructional Program." In order to plan your program, it is necessary to understand the "learning pathways" and the placement process.

2.

See pages ii and iii for a description of each pathway. As you read about what is expected, seriously consider (a) which pathway will best help you fulfill your goals, and (b) whether you can meet the requirements for entrance to the pathway and courses as well as the demands for keeping up with the work. Selecting a pathway should not be a status or social decision.

3.

See page iv on "Choosing Electives." Select the "elective" course(s) which will help you toward your personal and career goals. Do not choose electives as "filler" courses. Read about the electives offered in each department.

4.

See page iv on "Building a Class Schedule." With the help of your parents, advisor, and counselor choose your courses for next year. Your next step is registration.

5.

Students will complete the registration forms during their advisory period. Your careful attention and advance planning will pay off in making sound decisions rather than last minute choices.

6.

The school reserves the right to cancel or eliminate courses for any given school year. Inclusion of a course in this handbook does not assure it will be offered at a future date.


INTRODUCTION - pages i - x Information to assist in understanding the mission of the school and the procedures for selecting courses and successfully completing the district requirements and personal goals for graduation and beyond. Graduation Requirements........................................................................................................................ i Carnegie Units Required......................................................................................................i Definition of a Carnegie Unit ..............................................................................................i Preparing a Four-Year Instructional Program..................................................................................... i Selecting a Learning Pathway.................................................................................................................. i Learning Pathways............................................................................................................................... ii-iii - Life Pathway ..................................................................................................................ii - Integrated Pathway .........................................................................................................ii - College Preparatory Pathway ........................................................................................ii - Technology Academy....................................................................................................iii - Accelerated Pathway .....................................................................................................iii College/Post Secondary School Admission Guidelines........................................................................iv NCAA Requirements ...............................................................................................................................iv Building a Class Schedule................................................................................................................... iv-vi Class Load ...........................................................................................................................v Physical Education..............................................................................................................v The Four-Year High School Plan Worksheet (also on back inside cover)......................vi The Advisory Program ......................................................................................................vi Additional Information....................................................................................................................... vii-x Homework.........................................................................................................................vii Fees....................................................................................................................................vii Early Graduation ...............................................................................................................vii Pass-Fail Course Options..................................................................................................vii Second Grade Option...................................................................................................... viii Schedule Changes ........................................................................................................... viii Alternative to High School Attendance-College Credits During Senior Year............. viii Concurrent Enrollment at Zion-Benton and the College of Lake County.................... viii Lake County High Schools Technology Campus ......................................................... viii Summer School..................................................................................................................ix Evening School ..................................................................................................................ix Special Services .................................................................................................................ix Title IX Compliance...........................................................................................................ix Honors Recognition................................................................................................................................... x Determining Grade Point Average.....................................................................................x Grade Weighted Courses....................................................................................................x Academic Letters ................................................................................................................x Honor Roll...........................................................................................................................x Rank-In-Class......................................................................................................................x

COURSE OFFERINGS - pages 1 - 53 A comprehensive listing of course offerings by field of study including prerequisites, fees, and course descriptions. Business Education and Family .................................................................................................................. 1 Driver Education.......................................................................................................................................... 4 English and Reading.................................................................................................................................... 5 English Language Learners (ELL) ...........................................................................................................10 Family and Consumer Science..................................................................................................................12 Foreign Language......................................................................................................................................14 Health and Physical Education..................................................................................................................18 Industry and Technology...........................................................................................................................21 Mathematics...............................................................................................................................................25 Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) ......................................................................29 Science .......................................................................................................................................................30 Social Studies.............................................................................................................................................33 Special Education ......................................................................................................................................38 Visual and Performing Art ........................................................................................................................42 Lake County High School Technology Campus......................................................................................48 Additional Course Offerings .....................................................................................................................52

T A B L E

O F

C O N T E N T S


INTRODUCTION This section provides students and their families the necessary information for meeting the requirements for graduation, preparing a four-year program of studies and choosing the instructional learning pathway and electives to help you achieve your goals. Additional information is provided on credits, grade point average, rank in class, class standing, fees, homework, early graduation, alternatives to high school attendance and courses. If you have questions, ask your advisor and/or counselor.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS CLASSES OF 2010, 2011, 2012 To be eligible for a diploma from this high school, a student must have completed eight semesters of high school attendance with the final semester as a full-time student at Zion-Benton Township High School. In the course of eight semesters, students must meet the minimum graduation requirements of 22 credits. (Two exceptions to this condition are contained in the sections on Early Graduation and Alternative to High School Attendance.) Starting with the class of 2012, all students must successfully complete a minimum of three years of science; one of the three years must be a biological science class.

DEFINITION OF A CARNEGIE UNIT A unit of credit is given for a successfully completed 36-week full-credit course or two 18-week courses meeting one period each day, five days weekly. Summer School and Night School courses earn a semester of credit of 0.50 except for Driver Education, which is 0.25 credit.

CARNEGIE UNITS REQUIRED Curriculum Area Units Required English - 1, 2, 3, English Elective 4.00 Mathematics (Including Geometry) 3.00 Science 3.00 Beginning with the class of 2012, all students must successfully complete three years of science. Social Studies Social Studies 1.00 United States History 1.00 United States Government 1.00 (Includes the required state mandate for Consumer Education by passing this required course.) Physical Education* (Six Semesters Required)* 3.00 Health 0.50 Driver Education 0.25 Computer Tech.** 0.50 Electives 5.75 Beginning with the class of 2012 – 4.75 credits Total Required Credits 22.00

*This requirement can be met by enrolling in NJROTC or Marching Band or by participating in Varsity Athletics. See your counselor for details. If a waiver is granted, the course must be replaced with another credit. See page v for details. ** This requirement can be waived for incoming freshmen by passing a proficiency test measuring keyboarding speed and efficiency, document formatting using MS word, spread-sheeting using Excel, and presentation using PowerPoint. If a waiver is granted, the course must be replaced with another credit. Contact Jesse Michmerhuizen for details at 847-731-9440.

PREPARING A FOUR-YEAR INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM Each student is required to plan a four-year program of courses to achieve the desired educational and career goals (see page vi). Selecting and following the sequences of courses for that pathway will meet graduation and learning pathway requirements. Read and study carefully the explanation of each pathway and the requirements for the courses in that pathway. Pay attention to course prerequisites and when semester and year courses are offered. Planning a four-year program reduces the chance of missing courses and electives needed. We know that students’ plans do change, and we encourage them to seek the advice of their parents, advisor and counselor throughout their high school career so as to maintain an updated relevant plan.

SELECTING A LEARNING PATHWAY The Board of Education provides a comprehensive instructional program organized into Learning Pathways. For incoming freshman, placement test scores determine the level of the student’s core academic courses. Teacher recommendations and prerequisites determine student placement for those currently enrolled. Instructional departments offer courses to meet students' needs in completing a chosen learning pathway. The pathway you choose should help you toward achieving your goals after graduation. All pathways meet or exceed the minimum graduation requirements. However, students planning to attend college should pay particular attention to the entrance requirements of the colleges they are considering and be certain they are taking the right courses.

Students will enroll in one of the following pathways: LIFE; Integrated; College Preparatory; Accelerated; Technology Academy

Pathways _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction i Selecting a Pathway


L E A R N I N G The Learning for Independence, Family and Employment (LIFE), or standard, pathway is designed for students entering the work force on completion of high school. It starts the student on the goal of LIFE long learning, whether it is to pursue a two year degree at a junior or community college, a certification program at a Learning for Independence, Family and trade/technical school, preparation for the military, or planning for a job right after Employment high school. The ultimate purpose of LIFE is making the most of the high school years to help prepare for further schooling, employment and family life. Students have a wide option of opportunities available by combining courses from across the curriculum, which may include "CP" or "AC" classes plus technical or applied academics. Course offerings allow students to select classes that are appropriate for their interests and abilities. Beginning in the freshman year, it is imperative that students plan a four-year sequence of courses that will lead to future success. Careers of today and tomorrow expect students to master the basic skills in order to compete in a very global, technical work environment. The LIFE or standard curriculum will prepare students for a productive life.

LIFE (STANDARD) PATHWAY

The Integrated Pathway is for those students who would benefit from working with a team of teachers who collaborate on lessons and allow flexibility for the students to INTEGRATED complete their assignments. In the Integrated Pathway, some courses are blocked together so that the teachers and students can study their subjects with greater depth PATHWAY thus encouraging maximum success. The program is designed to allow those students who have motivation but need additional direction to achieve academically. The courses are aligned with the Illinois State Learning Standards and designed to allow students the opportunity to meet those standards by the completion of junior year. The courses that are thematically integrated at each grade level are: freshman year - English and social studies, sophomore year – English and biology; and junior year – English and United States History (American Studies). Each quarter, students in the Integrated Pathway produce a project that allows them to exhibit many of the skills learned in each class. Technology is a major component of the Integrated Pathway with at least one project at each of the three grade levels designed to utilize computer knowledge and the Internet. This pathway is for students contemplating post high school education and those who are still unsure.

COLLEGE PREPARATORY PATHWAY

The College Preparatory Pathway is for the student who seeks a demanding academic load with emphasis on the development of analytical, critical thinking and communication skills. This pathway provides the knowledge and skills required to successfully compete a four-year college or university program.

All students who are contemplating post high school education are encouraged to participate in this level. The school tries to accommodate as many students in this pathway as possible. If a student has a low grade point average but expresses a strong desire to begin pursuing academics seriously, that desire will be given serious consideration. No single item is ever the sole criterion for selecting the college preparatory student. Answers to the following three questions are basic in considering a student for admission: a. b. c.

Does the student have sufficient general ability? Does the student have adequate academic preparation? Does the student have sufficient motivation and maturity?

Guidelines for courses in this pathway include: 1. A commitment to academic achievement. 2. A grade point average of C or better. 3. An understanding and acceptance of the time and effort these courses will require for study and homework.

Selecting a Pathway

4. 5.

ii

A teacher recommendation may be needed with some courses. A teacher-directed interview and/or a writing sample may be requested.

Introduction


6.

Ranking at the 60th percentile or higher on the Explore Tests administered to the 8th graders.

Selecting a Pathway

ii

Introduction


P A T H W A Y S TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY

The Technology Academy is a four-year school-within-a-school opportunity. Students enter the Academy their freshman year following an application and interview process. The program places emphasis on the utilization of technology in the classroom through the daily use of a student-purchased laptop computer. The Academy will offer a specified curriculum parallel to the College Preparatory Pathway, which will be presented by a team of teachers specially trained in

incorporating technology into teaching. Students will participate in theme-based, student-centered projects that blend two or more subjects and utilize their laptops for research, production, and presentation of their projects. Graduates of the Academy will be well prepared for numerous opportunities, including: four-year colleges and universities, junior colleges, technical schools, special apprentice programs, or direct entry into the world of work. Students interested in the Technology Academy must minimally: 1.

Apply for enrollment, complete the required screening process, and be accepted into the program.

2.

Purchase/possess a laptop computer that meets the minimum requirements for the program.

3.

Be concurrently enrolled in Algebra or have successfully completed Algebra previously.

4.

Be committed to maintaining a record of excellent attendance and a minimum grade point average of “C�.

5.

Be respectful of equipment, software, and other related materials.

6.

Work well with peers, in groups, and with staff.

The Accelerated Learning Pathway seeks to challenge and stimulate the most able and ambitious students. It is designed to provide excellent academic preparation for ACCELERATED college and to offer students the opportunity to do college level work and receive PATHWAY college credit while still in high school. This pathway is for self -motivated students who have demonstrated academic ability and a willingness to work. Students electing courses in this pathway will be expected to think, read, write and perform at higher cognitive and creative levels. This pathway requires students to commit additional time to studies including regular homework. Guidelines for admission to courses in this pathway include: 1.

A commitment to academic achievement. Accelerated placement classes may not be taken with a pass/fail option.

8.

Students not enrolled in this Pathway but who wish to take an A.C. course must meet the prerequisites for that course.

2.

An understanding and acceptance of the time and effort these courses will require for study and homework.

9.

3.

Students electing two or more advanced placement courses are encouraged to carry only four academic courses. It is suggested they have at least one scheduled study hall.

To remain in Accelerated Placement courses, students must continually meet the guidelines and prerequisites set by the respective departments for the A.C. and C.P. courses.

4.

A score at or above the 75th percentile on the Explore Test.

5.

Teacher recommendations where feasible and/or necessary - either from previous instructors or the Accelerated Placement Pathway teacher when deemed necessary.

6.

A commitment to pay for and to take the specific Advanced Placement exams after appropriate courses. Each exam costs approximately $86.00.

7.

Parental approval acknowledging the investment of time, work and dollars that will be expected of their son or daughter.

10. Transfer students will be individually counseled into this pathway on the basis of the transcripts, grades, achievement test scores, and any accompanying recommendations from their previous schools. Tentative status in Accelerated Placement will be granted until official records are received by counselors and subject to meeting the stated requirements by the next enrollment period.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction iii Selecting a Pathway


COLLEGE/POST SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSION GUIDELINES These guidelines provide direction in planning for college or post high school instruction and career decisions. Students must choose pathway courses and electives that will help them meet the entrance requirements of the college or post secondary school of their choice. Not all schools and colleges have the same admission requirements. Parents, counselors, and advisers must work jointly with students to help them choose the proper courses to achieve their desired goals for entrance to the institution of their choice and their career objectives.

Listed below are guidelines for requesting courses. As you select courses, keep in mind such things as career goals, teacher recommendations, test scores, and previous grades. 1.

REVIEW classes and credits earned from previous years and current year class registration. a. Review graduation and pathway requirements. b. Develop or review your Four-Year Plan of Studies. c. Check departmental course prerequisites and placement recommendations. d. Students in upper grades may request courses indicated for lower grades if they meet the course prerequisites.

2.

Generally, students are required to abide by course sequencing and prerequisites as noted in this Course Guide. However, District 126 recognizes that each student has unique needs and desires. For students, who desire to accelerate their high school education, or who have unique talents in some academic areas, an individualized high school plan can be developed. In these cases, approval from a parent, the counselor, and the Assistant Principal of Student Services is required.

3.

IDENTIFY and SELECT any special program requests, such as: a. Lake County High School Technology Campus courses b. Music courses c. Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) d. Special Education

4.

English, mathematics, science, and social studies courses are based upon placement tests and teacher recommendations.

5.

Check departmental course offerings to select elective courses.

6.

Select two alternative courses in case it is impossible to schedule all the first choice electives.

Students planning to attend college will generally have to meet the following admission requirements: English Mathematics Science Social Studies Foreign Language

4 years 3 years 3 years 3 years 2 years

However, it is important to consult the college/university the student plans to attend for requirements specific to that institution. Please see your counselor with questions or concerns regarding admission guidelines.

NCAA REQUIREMENTS Students who plan to practice and play their freshman year at an NCAA Division I or Division II College must satisfy the requirements of NCAA Bylaw 14.3, commonly known as Proposition 48. Some courses within our school curriculum, night school, and correspondence may not satisfy NCAA requirements. See your counselor or Athletic Director, for additional information.

Opportunity is provided for students to be exposed to a variety of courses in addition to those required. Elective courses will help students focus on post-high school career decisions and guide the student in choosing other courses. Students should choose electives that will help them in their personal and career goals and not just to "fill out" a schedule of courses. Study each department listing of available electives carefully before making a decision.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Building a Class Schedule iv Introduction


IMPORTANT INFORMATION for building a class schedule . . . CLASS LOAD For all four years all students must request a schedule of six courses including Physical Education. A study hall can be added to a student's schedule. Music courses may be taken as either part of the normal load or as an extra subject. Students must obtain special permission to carry less than the normal number of subjects. Students electing two or more Advanced Placement courses are encouraged to carry only four academic courses. It is suggested they have at least one scheduled study hall. Students with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher may carry an additional course(s). Enrollment will be granted on a space available basis only.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION All students are required to take physical education. It is recommended that freshmen take physical education for the entire year. Parents who desire that their student be excused from physical education for religious reasons must request special permission from the Assistant Principal for Student Services. Students may request exemption from physical education for the following reasons: A. A junior or senior student enrolled in two or more Advanced Placement courses may request a waiver. B. A junior or senior student who is participating in athletics may request a waiver. C. A student enrolled in Marching Band may request a waiver for the fall semester each year. D. A student enrolled in Naval Science may request a waiver.

E. The student provides written evidence from an institution of higher education that a specific course not included in existing state or local school minimum graduation standards is required for admission. School district staff must verify that the student's present and proposed schedule will not permit completion of the needed course. F. The student lacks sufficient course credit, or one or more courses required by state statute or local school board policies for graduation. Students who have failed required courses, transferred into the district with deficient credits or who lack credits due to other causes will be eligible to apply for this exemption. Each request for exemption from physical education instruction is to be verified and eligibility determined on a case-by-case basis by school district staff. Every student excused from physical education course requirements will be provided with a schedule that meets minimum school day requirements and other policies of the district. No credit is issued for P.E. exemptions or waivers. Approvals of exemptions will be for one semester only, but may be renewed for additional semesters if circumstances warrant. Please see graduation requirements on page i in the introduction. MEDICAL EXCUSES FROM P.E. A. A parent may request in writing for their son/daughter to be excused from P.E. up to three days. B. Students who need to be excused from P.E. longer than three days must have an excuse from the doctor. C. Students who are excused from P.E. for more than nine weeks by a physician will be medically excused. Credit for P.E. will not be given and the student will not have to make up that semester of P.E.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction v Building a Class Schedule


THE FOUR-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL PLAN ¾ An Additional Working Copy is Available on the Last Page½ SEMESTER 1

SEMESTER 2 FRESHMAN ENGLISH

ENGLISH

.

MATH

MATH

.

SOCIAL STUDIES

SOCIAL STUDIES

.

SCIENCE

SCIENCE

.

PHYS ED*

COMPUTER TECH*

.

LUNCH/ADVISORY 9

LUNCH/ADVISORY 9

.

SOPHOMORE ENGLISH

ENGLISH

. .

MATH

MATH

.

SCIENCE

SCIENCE

.

PHYS ED*

DRIVER ED*

.

HEALTH*

________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

LUNCH/ADVISORY 10

LUNCH/ADVISORY 10

.

JUNIOR ENGLISH

ENGLISH

.

MATH

MATH

.

UNITED STATES HISTORY

UNITED STATES HISTORY

SCIENCE

SCIENCE

.

PHYS ED*

PHYS ED*

.

.

. . LUNCH/ADVISORY 11

LUNCH/ADVISORY 11 SENIOR ENGLISH

ENGLISH UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

PHYS ED*

PHYS ED*

. . . . . . . .

LUNCH/ADVISORY 12

LUNCH/ADVISORY 12

.

Students take six (6) courses each semester. *Phys Ed, Computer Tech, Driver Ed, and Health are semester length courses Phys Ed can be taken both semesters during the Freshman and Sophomore year.

THE ADVISORY PROGRAM Advisory is a “small school within a large school” that provides the more intimate relationship of a small school community during the four years of high school. The advisory system strives to provide each student with an advisor/advocate in order to nurture, inform, protect, and promote each advisee’s best interest. At the heart of the system is the relationship between advisor and advisee—where students have a person who: knows them, cares about them, assists them, and will help them fulfill their educational and personal potential. The advisor, a certified teacher, is paired with 30 students, and they meet each school day for 20 minutes during an “advisory period.” Advisors serve several important functions for their advisees. These include being a mentor, acting as a coach, and as an advocate. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Building a Class Schedule vi Introduction


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION . . . 他HOMEWORK

他PASS-FAIL COURSE OPTIONS

Homework done outside the classroom period is necessary and valuable. It helps students become confident and independent learners and thinkers. Completed homework maintains the integrity of the classroom.

In order to encourage students to explore areas of interest that might otherwise be avoided, a pass-fail course option is offered. The pass-fail option is not available for advanced placement courses and all required courses.

It is essential that students complete their homework assignments honestly, carefully, and on time. Students must strive to eliminate personal distractions, have a personal area for study, and set aside time on a regular, daily basis for completion of homework.

Pass-fail options generally benefit those students who fear a low grade might affect their rank-in-class, those who are apprehensive about taking a very difficult subject, and those whose fears about grades interfere with their ability to learn.

From freshman through senior year, students must complete all assignments.

1. Physical Education. 2. One elective course per semester.

他FEES All students must pay a standard fee that includes book rental, towel fee, consumables and lab fees, student handbook, and purchase of a lock. The exact fee is announced in the ParentStudent Guide. Some courses require additional material fees, workbooks, and/or supplemental reading texts. As soon as the instructor informs students what is needed, students should pay the fee or purchase the materials.

Pass-fail options available:

Rules and guidelines for the pass-fail option: a.

Pass-fail courses are considered as a part of the normal academic class load.

b.

All course prerequisites remain in force.

c.

Parental consent forms are required for any pass-fail course request. No changes will be permitted once the pass-fail option is approved and the course begins.

d.

Students taking a pass-fail option will be subject to the same grading standards as any other student in the class. A student must earn a passing grade in order to receive a "P." The teacher will keep a regular grade record, but will report the quarter and semester grades as a "P" or "F."

e.

Pass-fail subjects will count for credit toward graduation, but will not be used in computing grade point average or rank-in-class.

f.

The student must declare in writing to the teacher the passfail course option within the first six weeks of the semester.

他EARLY GRADUATION Students who choose to graduate in less than the required eight semesters (covering four calendar years) must meet the following conditions and have special/extenuating circumstances to warrant consideration. A. Make application to the appropriate counselor for approval of a plan to complete high school in this manner. This must be done prior to the first semester of their junior year. This plan requires written parental permission unless the student is eighteen years old. The Assistant Principal of Student Services makes the final decision. B. Have and maintain a "B" (3.0) grade average in the year immediately preceding the request for early graduation. C. Pass all required subjects.

Students are cautioned to find out in advance if pass-fail courses will be acceptable to the specific college or university they plan to enter. Pass-fail application blanks are available from a student's counselor. Counselors should be consulted before a pass-fail request is made.

D. Earn sufficient credits in summer/night courses and by carrying extra full-credit subjects during regular semesters to meet minimum graduation requirements.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction vii Additional Information


¾SECOND GRADE OPTION Students may repeat courses at ZBHS to improve a grade. a.

This option may be used only once per course.

b.

Students may not repeat courses at other institutions and transfer the grade to Zion-Benton High School.

c.

This option may be used only if the first grade was a "C" or lower.

d. Pass-Fail courses cannot be repeated for a grade. e.

This provision may apply to a maximum of two (2) units of credit per student.

¾SCHEDULE CHANGES Students must take responsibility with their parents and counselor for the registration and scheduling process. Courses selected during the spring registration process may not be changed after the confirmation deadline of July 1 unless a compelling reason exists and only if there is room in the course. The fee is $25.00. Schedule changes may be made for one of the following reasons: A. Student failed a required course needed for graduation B. Course completed by attending Summer or Alternative School

¾ALTERNATIVE TO HIGH SCHOOL ATTENDANCE - COLLEGE CREDITS DURING SENIOR YEAR Students may elect to substitute college attendance for their regular senior term or second semester of their regular senior term under the following conditions: A. Make application to the Assistant Principal of Student Services for approval of a plan to complete high school in this manner not later than the first semester of the junior year in high school. B. Have and maintain a B (3.0) grade average, based on all full-credit subjects completed. C. Have passed all required subjects or agree to take in a posthigh school institution (college) the same required subjects or acceptable college equivalents for any required senior subjects unless taken by special permission in prior years of summer terms. D. Have written parental permission, unless eighteen (18) years old. E. Present evidence of completion of at least 12 semester hours of post-high school credit for each semester of high school missed. F. The Zion-Benton High School diploma will be issued after the student has completed the requirements noted in A to E of this section.

C. Data error in a student's schedule requiring a change School Administrators may request schedule changes to be made at any time for one of the following reasons: A. To balance class enrollments, student disciplinary problems and other B. Placement in Special Education (Instructional and TAB) or ELL. Students who drop a course after the first ten school days of a semester are warned that it may not be possible to add a replacement class to their schedule to meet the minimum class load requirement. Students who drop a course after the first ten school days of a semester are also warned that they may, depending on the circumstances, be assigned a grade of "F" for that course. Students who drop a course after the first quarter of each semester may be assigned a grade of "F" for that course.

Elective schedule changes may be made only if there is room. The fee is $25.00.

¾DUAL ENROLLMENT AT ZION-BENTON AND THE COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY Students who wish to earn college credits while in high school must make prior arrangements with and have approval of the Assistant Principal of Student Services. Counselors must be consulted for possible restrictions affecting class rank, grade point average and athletic eligibility. Students are cautioned that some colleges will not accept courses under dual enrollment.

¾LAKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOLS TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS ZBTHS offers juniors or seniors the opportunity to enroll in occupationally oriented programs at the Lake County High Schools Technology Campus in Grayslake. All programs are two-year programs, however, students may take only the first year of the sequence if they desire. There are no tuition costs to the student for LCHS-TC. Some programs will require the purchase of tools. The Technology Campus is located next to the campus of the

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Additional Information viii Introduction


College of Lake County in Grayslake. The Technology Campus offers excellent educational opportunities to students who wish to obtain specialized vocational-technical skills. Students taking courses at the Technology Campus will divide their school day between the home school and the Technology Campus. Students will not be permitted to drive their own cars. Credits earned at the Technology Campus apply to graduation credits. The district will provide bus transportation to the Technology Campus for programs during the school day. Students attending the 3rd session are required to provide their own transportation home from the campus at the end of the day or take the late bus. Students interested in programs at the Technology Campus must request special application forms from their advisor/counselor. Once accepted for placement in a Technology Campus program, the student must remain enrolled for a minimum of one semester. Note: Students withdrawing from the Technology Campus program before the September cut-off deadline will be charged $50. Students withdrawing without valid cause after the September cut-off will be assessed a $500 charge due to the District’s liability to pay full-year tuition cost.

COURSES OFFERED AT LCHS-TC Communications Programs Game/Java/C++ Programming Graphic/Web Design Photographic Design Television Production Human Services Programs Certified Nurse Assisting (seniors only) Cosmetology Criminal Justice Culinary Arts Early Childhood Education Emergency Medical Services Fire Fighting Medical Assisting Manufacturing/Industrial Programs Building Trades Computer Electronic Repair Computer Networking (CISCO) Welding-Fabrication Transportation Programs Automotive Service Collision Repair

classroom hours to earn credit.

¾EVENING SCHOOL Zion-Benton Township High School offers evening course options (similar to summer school) each semester based on sufficient enrollment. Students may enroll, on tuition basis, for enrichment or to make up courses missed or failed. Course offerings and additional information are available in Student Services.

¾SPECIAL SERVICES A wide range of special services is available to those students who have a demonstrated need for eligibility. These services include: Homebound/ hospitalized instruction, educational and psychological testing, substance abuse counseling, services of school-home social worker, and accommodations for the 504 Plan. The Student Assistance Program (SAP) is a special support program that is available to assist students in dealing with issues related to alcohol, other drugs, and other related issues that may disrupt the student’s ability to achieve academically. Various support groups are offered to qualifying students. Students may be referred to the SAP through means of a selfreferral or a referral from a teacher, parent, or friend. A team of specially trained educators screens each referral, interviews the student, and recommends an appropriate support program. Students who desire more information should talk with their counselor or advisor. Any student or parent, who believes that there is a learning problem or a need for special service, should contact the student's counselor for further information.

¾TITLE IX COMPLIANCE Zion-Benton Township High School is in compliance with all federal and State Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Laws, Orders and Regulations. The school will not discriminate against any of its educational programs and activities. Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and regulations issued there under require Zion-Benton Township High School not to discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs and activities including the areas of employment. Questions may be directed to the Coordinator at 847-731-9361 or write One Z-B Way, Zion, Illinois 60099.

¾SUMMER SCHOOL The high school conducts a tuition based summer session, which students may take a maximum of one unit of credit either for enrichment or to make up courses missed or failed. A separate bulletin describing the summer term is published in May. Students will be required to attend a minimum number of _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Introduction ix Additional Information


.

HONORS RECOGNITION ¾DETERMINING GRADE POINT AVERAGE Weighted Grade Point Averages are determined by averaging honor points awarded for grades earned. Earned Honor Points are based on the level of difficulty of the courses taken. Grades earned in driver education and courses taken on a pass/fail basis will not be used in computing grade point averages or rank-inclass.

¾GRADE WEIGHTED COURSES Introduction to AP Studio Art AP Studio Art AC English 1 AC English 2 AP English Language and Composition AP English Literature and Composition

The table below illustrates honor points earned for grades: Normal Honor Points Weighted Honor Points

A B C D Pass Fail 4 3 2 1 0 0 5 4 3 1 0 0

¾ACADEMIC LETTERS At the end of each semester, students who have earned a 3.60 grade point or higher for that semester are eligible for an academic letter.

¾HONOR ROLL At the end of each grading period an Honor Roll and a High Honor Roll will be computed and published. Students achieving a 3.10 to 3.74 weighted grade point average will be listed on the Honor Roll. Students with weighted averages of 3.75 and above will be listed on the high honor roll.

French 3 French 4 German 3/4 Spanish 3 Spanish 4

First and Third Quarter Honor Roll will be based on grades for the respective quarters. Second and Fourth Quarter Honor Roll will be based on semester grades for the term.

AC Geometry AC Algebra 2 AC Pre-Calculus AP Computer Science A AP Calculus BC AP Statistics

Students receiving "incomplete" grades may not have their name published although they may make Honor Roll status after the incomplete is removed. Also, any student earning a grade of "F" in any course will not qualify for the honor roll.

Physics (Beginning with the Class of 2012, Physics will not be grade weighted.) AC Biology AP Biology AC Chemistry AP Chemistry AP Physics AC Social Studies AP United States History AP United States Government and Politics AP Psychology

Grades in Driver Education and pass/fail courses are not included in honor roll computations.

¾RANK-IN-CLASS Class rank and honors at graduation will be based upon the seventh semester cumulative grade point average. Final rank is based upon the completion of all graduation requirements. Rank at the end of six semesters will be available as soon as possible so that students may audit and verify class rank computation. Seventh semester rank will be released as quickly as possible following the close of the seventh semester. Valedictorian and salutatorian recognition will be based on the top two seventh semester cumulative grade point averages. In the event of an exact tie, those students will be honored, as co-valedictorians and salutatorian recognition will be dropped.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Additional Information x Introduction


Y COURSE OFFERINGS Z Department of BUSINESS EDUCATION …………….

Department of MATHEMATICS .....................page 25 page 1

Department of DRIVER EDUCATION ........... page 4

Department of NAVAL SCIENCE ....................page 29 Naval Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC)

Department of ENGLISH & READING .......... page 5

Department of SCIENCE .....................................page 30

Department of ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELL) .................page 10

Department of SOCIAL STUDIES ..................................... page 33

Department of FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE ……………..….………page

Department of SPECIAL EDUCATION…………………page 38

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Department of FOREIGN LANGUAGES ………….………page 14

Department of VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ........... page 42

Department of HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION ....page 18

LAKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS …page 48

Department of INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY ......................page 21

ADDITIONAL COURSE OFFERINGS.......................... page 52

Selections Follow

)


BUSINESS EDUCATION The Business Education Department has the opportunity to provide specialized training as the job market and student needs dictate. We see these needs as the following: All students should learn the essential skills of keyboarding and computer use taught in the Computer Tech and Computer Applications classes. We feel that this is a must for every ZB graduate. Students should be exposed to the different areas of Business Education. Over 40% of college students are business majors. (Note: Business Education courses meet the State of Illinois college requirements for admission.) Students should also take advantage of the Business Education training offered in: secretarial, accounting, marketing, and clerical fields -- all of which provide quality employment and career opportunities. Our goal is to equip our students with essential business and computer skills and knowledge, thereby enhancing their ability to compete successfully in this technological era. Jesse Michmerhuizen, Division Chair 847-731-9440; michmerj@zbths.org

COMPUTER TECH 1A

skills and knowledge gained in Computer Tech1. It provides a solid background in developing a higher level of proficiency in computer, application software, and keyboarding skills. More advanced applications in Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, will be covered. It is also suggested for those preparing for the occupational field or for those preparing for entry-level job positions involving inputting data.

BE515

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Meets Graduation Requirement*. Suggested for 9, also available for 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: By Special Placement Only Fees: None Course Description: This course is designed for the student who has very little or no experience with keyboarding and/or computer operation and needs instruction to develop these basic skills. Students who have experienced difficulties in gaining these fundamental skills in Junior High will also benefit from this slower paced course. Microsoft Word will be the primary software used with a brief introduction to the other Microsoft Office applications of Excel and PowerPoint.

COMPUTER TECH 1

ACCOUNTING Prerequisite: None Fees: Lab materials & workbook

Course Description: A skill-level course of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business. Accounting principles, procedures, use of accounting tools, and computer applications are taught with emphasis on concepts, attitudes, and career opportunities in the business/accounting world. Career activities center on realistic case work and problem solving. The course goal is to provide a foundation for those seeking employment or advanced training in the business/accounting field and to provide personal and financial economic education. The course serves as a stepping-stone to positions in accounting, payroll, and information processing.

BE516

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Meets Graduation Requirement* Suggested for 9, also available for 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Placement Fees: None Course Description: This course is designed for the student entering ZBTHS who has had no formal keyboarding instruction or those that have had some keyboarding and computer instruction, but can benefit from additional reinforcement, refining keyboarding skills and formatting documents using Microsoft Word. As these skills are improved they will move on to other Microsoft Office application including Excel and PowerPoint.

COMPUTER TECH 2

BE501

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

BUSINESS CONCEPTS

BE503

Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10 Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook Course Description: This course will introduce students to the world of business and help prepare them for the economic roles of consumer, worker and citizen. Topics include: basic economics, business ethics, potential business ownership, employer/employee relationships, human resource issues, business technology applications, and the role of consumers in our economy. The course emphasizes skills, knowledge, and resources needed for careers of the 21st Century.

BE517

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective - suggested for 9, also available for 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Computer Tech 1 Fees: None Course Description: This course is a continuation of the 1


BUSINESS LAW

ENTREPRENEURSHIP BE527 EXPLORING YOUR OWNERSHIP POTENTIAL

BE504

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 11, 12 or 10 with permission from instructor

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 11, 12

Prerequisite: None Fees: Optional field trip cost (bus fee)

Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook/Textbook Helpful Course(s): Business Concepts, Marketing, and Business Law

Course Description: This course is designed as an introduction to law and its application to everyday life. Emphasis will be placed on both criminal and civil laws and their influence on contracts, employment, minors, and property. Group discussion is an integral part of daily class requirements. Participation in the preparation and presentation of a mock trial may be included. Career opportunities are highlighted throughout the semester.

Course Description: Acquire the skills that will permit you to become your own boss. Begin to develop the knowledge and confidence necessary to build your own business. Entrepreneurship offers exceptional opportunities for men/women who work hard to find new and better ways to serve the needs and wants of the customer. Various topics include: entrepreneurial options for the new century, analyzing elements for success, dealing with your competition, creating a business plan for success, basic accounting and management decisions, influences of marketing, business ethics, and student entrepreneurs. Textbook, teacher-prepared materials and input from actual business entrepreneurs/guest speakers will serve as sources of information.

COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 1 BE520 Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Computer Tech I Fees: None Course Description: This course provides in-depth activities in PowerPoint, Excel, and adds Access to round out the complete Microsoft Office Pro suite. These activities will integrate databases, spreadsheets, and graphics. Proficiency in these Microsoft Office applications is an extremely valuable skill for employment and further educational pursuits.

MARKETING

BE509

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook Helpful Course: Business Concepts

COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS 2 BE521

Course Description: This course explores occupations relating to the marketing field. This course is designed to give interested students knowledge and understanding in the business areas of marketing and distribution. Areas such as promotion, selling, advertising, product planning and marketing research will be covered. Microsoft Office will be used on a regular basis for creating brochures, flyers, pamphlets, and reports.

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Computer Tech 1 (it is not necessary to take Computer Business Applications 1 to take this course) Fees: None Course Description: In this course, students learn desktop publishing using Adobe PageMaker. They will create advertisements, newsletters, fliers, brochures, newspapers, yearbooks, magazines, etc. Students will develop layout and design elements with eye appeal. They will emulate tasks in the publishing, graphics industry, and offices. Data will be created, manipulated and retrieved using templates, digital camera images, Internet data, and scanned images. This is a valuable course for students interested pursuing interests in computer graphics and publishing.

BUSINESS SKILLS FOR THE WORKPLACE

BE522

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook Course Description: A program designed to help students succeed in the classroom, the community and the work place. Course work includes a flexible, interactive curriculum providing students with the opportunity to participate in activities that promote personal development skills, attitude and work skills as well as, research and

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career development skills and the basic skills required for jobs and new technologies.

BUSINESS EDUCATION SEMINAR

GAME/JAVA/C++ PROGRAMMING

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 12 - may be repeated for a total of one credit Prerequisite: Written counselor, teacher and Division Chair approval Fees: To be set Course Description: This capstone course is designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Business credit. Includes an in depth project in the seminar area of study.

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TC679


DRIVER EDUCATION The purpose of Driver Education is to enhance a student’s ability to physically drive an automobile, to develop a mental process of decision-making and to interact emotionally and socially with other highway users. Jesse Michmerhuizen, Division Chair 847-731-9440 – michmerj@zbths.org

DRIVER EDUCATION

BASIC DRIVER EDUCATION

DE427/DE428

DE425/DE426

Either Semester -.25 Credit - Required - 10

Either Semester - .25 Credit – 10

Prerequisite: Student must be 15 years of age. If student’s 15th birthday is later than January 31, 2010, student should sign up for Driver Education second semester. Driver Education is available to students who have obtained sophomore status and a passing grade in at least eight courses during the previous two semesters prior to enrolling. Fees: Student driving permit $20 (Secretary of State) Driver Education fee: $275

Prerequisite: By placement only Fees: Student Driving Permit $20 (Secretary of State). Driver Education fee: $275 Course Description: Same as Driver Education

ELL DRIVER EDUCATION

EL047

Either Semester – 0.25 Credit – 10

Course Description: Driver Education is made up of two phases: 1) classroom, required for graduation; 2) behindthe-wheel must be successfully completed which is needed to obtain an Illinois Driver’s License. Students who have not achieved their Driving Permit by the 15th day of class will revert to Class Only status. The behind-the-wheel fee will be refunded. NOTE: Driver Education make-up is offered only during Summer School.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs). Designed for identified English language learners, the content is the same as mainstream Driver Education, but the instruction and materials are modified to meet the needs of limited English proficient students. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

Note: Grade reported on the report card is for classroom only.

4


ENGLISH AND READING As adults, today's students will encounter tremendous change during their lifetimes. Our goal in English is to help students learn skills that will allow them to meet and adapt to an American culture that science, technology, business and the media reshape daily. Therefore, we believe that students must think, read, and write at more than a functional level; they must do so at a creative and critical one that will give them an independence of mind. Michelle Standridge, Division Chair 847-731-9370 - standrim@zbths.org

SEVERAL NOTES 1)

2) 3)

Students must be aware that some colleges require English at a level of College Prep or higher in order to meet the rigor of their admissions requirements. Many colleges are now requiring that those students whom they admit have completed a four-year College Prep Program. As a general rule, students should begin their study of English by choosing the highest pathway for which they are suited so as to maintain their opportunities. All English courses may require the purchase of a computer storage device. All required core courses require a summer reading.

ENGLISH 2A

criticism, communication skills, vocabulary study, preparation for the College Board and A.C.T. exams, and a wider range of reading and writing with an expectancy of commitment and quality.

EN105

All Year - 1 Credit - 10 Prerequisite: Freshman English. By Special Placement Only Fees: Paperback text. Summer reading required.

ENGLISH 2 (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

Course Description: This course reinforces and further develops reading and writing strategies, study skills, and clear communication. Assignments are designed to help students understand themselves and their responsibility to their work.

INTEGRATED ENGLISH 2

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 1 (Technology Academy). See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements. Acceptance into the sophomore level of the Academy - Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”), materials for projects, and paperback texts. Summer reading required.

EN106

All Year - 1 Credit - 10 Prerequisite: Freshman English - Placement Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required. Course Description: This course is the English portion of the Sophomore Integrated Pathway. By integrating science and English, this course continues to develop communication skills by using a thematic approach. With the help of a reading specialist, study skills, reading comprehension and writing strategies will continue to be emphasized.

CP ENGLISH 2

EN142

All Year 1 Credit – 10

Course Description: This course continues and advances the initial goals of English 1 (Technology Academy) by focusing on the elements of fiction in prose and poetry analysis and literary criticism, communication skills, vocabulary study, preparation for the College Board and A.C.T. exams, and a wider range of reading and writing with an expectancy of commitment and quality. Technology and a laptop computer are major learning tools for critical thinking. In addition to using themes consistent with other courses in the Academy, this course will be taught using interdisciplinary projects.

EN107

All Year - 1 Credit - 10 Prerequisite: Freshman English. Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required. Course Description: This course continues and advances the initial goals of C. P. English 1 by focusing on the elements of fiction in prose and poetry analysis and literary 5


AC ENGLISH 2

EN108

CP ENGLISH 3

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 10

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

Prerequisite: An “A” average in CP English 1 or a “B” average in AC English I and/or teacher recommendation. Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required.

Prerequisite: Freshman & Sophomore English. Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required. Course Description: This course prepares the student for an understanding of American Literature and stresses an awareness of the American spirit and society as expressed by American writers of various eras. Critical reading, extensive writing, and further development of vocabulary and communication skills are expected of the student. Intense preparation for the A.C.T. exam is emphasized.

Course Description: This course focuses on the techniques of close reading and analysis of major works of literature. Language, writing and analytical thinking are developed as a means of creating critical standards for the independent reading of any literary work. Methodology of writing compositions that respond to Advanced Placement examination questions is introduced. Preparation for the College Board and A.C.T. exams is emphasized. Teachers use open inquiry and Socratic methods. It is the most rigorous and challenging course in the Sophomore English Program.

ENGLISH 3A

ENGLISH 3 (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

EN143

All Year – 1 credit – 11 Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 2 (Technology Academy). See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements. Acceptance into the junior level of the Academy - Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”) and materials for projects. Paperback texts. Summer reading required.

EN109

All Year - 1 Credit - 11 Prerequisite: Freshman and Sophomore English. By Special Placement Only Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required.

Course Description: This course continues and advances the goals of English 2 (Technology Academy) in an American Studies approach and prepares student for an awareness of the American spirit and society as expressed by American writers of various eras. Critical reading, extensive writing, and further development of vocabulary and communication skills are expected of the student. Intense preparation for the A.C.T. exam is emphasized. When appropriate, collaboration on projects in Biology (Technology Academy) may be required.

Course Description: Using a thematic and multicultural approach, this course will examine American culture and its importance to the student’s own life. The course will analyze social problems, the effect of the media, and the responsibilities of individuals. Students will learn how to find information and use it to support their ideas. The course is designed to improve communication skills necessary for success after high school graduation. This class is team taught by a regular English teacher and LD specialist.

AMERICAN STUDIES

EN111

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

EN110

EN112

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 11

All Year - 2 Credits - 11 - Meets graduation requirements for United States History.

Prerequisite: Freshman and Sophomore English. An “A” in CP English 2 or a “B” or above in AC English 2 and/or teacher recommendation Fees: A.P. Exam required. Paperback texts required. Summer reading required.

Prerequisite: Freshman and Sophomore English. Placement. Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required.

Course Description: This college level course focuses on an in-depth study of various literary genre and critical/analytical writing. Entering students should be competent writers and responsible workers since fewer grades will occur. Regularly assigned timed writings, formal compositions, research projects, and active reading will be used to stimulate the kind of thinking and writing that will prepare students for the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam given each May. This is the most challenging course in the Junior English program. Students who receive a 4 or 5 on the AP Exam typically receive credit for both semesters of freshman college English. Depending on the college, students are receiving from 3 to 9 hours of English credit. Preparation for the ACT and PSAE exams is emphasized.

Course Description: The American Studies course is designed for the student interested in studying History and English together in a team-taught environment using a “thematic and multicultural” approach to teaching. The class uses literature and technology to explore what it means to be an American and the development of the nation, past and present, through the contributions of African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics as well as European Americans.

6


ENGLISH 4A

drive”), materials for projects, and paperback texts. Summer reading required.

EN113

All Year - 1 Credit - 12 Course Description: Instruction focuses on the methods of reading, analyzing and writing about classical literature that will be expected in college. The course provides the inquiring student with the opportunity to explore a variety of ideas and interpretations on the nature of man and his human situation. Students will broaden, deepen and clarify their own thinking and be required to formulate and express their ideas in organized multi-media and traditional forms. Engaged Learning and interdisciplinary projects will be required.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of three years of English. By Special Placement Only Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required. Course Description: This advances the groundwork established in the past three years. The course focuses on the essentials of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking that are necessary for success in the world of work in everyday life after high school and exposes students to a wide variety of literature, both classic and contemporary. This class is team taught by a regular English teacher and LD specialist.

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

EN116

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 12

WORLD LITERATURE

EN114 Prerequisite: B average in AC English 3 and/or teacher recommendation Fees: Paperback texts. A. P. examination required. Summer reading required

All Year – 1 credit – 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of three years of English Fees: Paperback texts

Course Description: While teaching those skills necessary to do well on the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam, AP refines the knowledge and skills for thinking and decision-making. This college level course examines a wide range of American, British and world literature and requires students to write analytical papers about their readings. The class refines skills in writing, research procedures and critical reading. Teachers use open inquiry and Socratic methods. Generally, AP develops those skills necessary for college and professional success. Students who receive a 4 or 5 on the AP Exam typically receive credit for both semesters of freshman college English. Depending on the college, students are receiving from 3 to 9 hours of English credit.

Course Description: This course examines a variety of literature, both classic and contemporary. Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of ideas and interpretations regarding the nature of man, the human situation, issues facing society, and the personal journey. This course will help students to broaden, deepen, and clarify their own thinking and help them formulate and express these ideas through their own writings and class discussions

CP ENGLISH 4: CLASSICAL HUMANITIES

EN115

All Year - 1 Credit - 12

ENGLISH ELECTIVE PROGRAM

Prerequisite: Successful completion of three years of English Fees: Paperback texts. Summer reading required.

The English Elective Program is designed for those students who enjoy reading and writing. Due to the highly specialized nature and/or the more mature reading and writing levels of some courses, students should select carefully from the elective options.

Course Description: Instruction focuses on the methods of reading, analyzing and writing about classical literature that will be expected in college. The course provides the inquiring student with the opportunity to explore a variety of ideas and interpretations on the nature of man and his human situation. It should also help students to broaden, deepen and clarify their own thinking and require them to formulate and express these ideas in an organized and concrete form.

Students should discuss their selections with their current English teacher so that they will choose appropriately.

ENGLISH 1 R

EN1311/EN1313

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Grade 10 only

All Year – 1 credit – 12

Prerequisite: Replaces corresponding semester of English 1 Fees: None.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 3 (Technology Academy). See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements. Acceptance into the senior level of the Academy - Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump

Course Description: This course is designed to fulfill the respective semester of the required English 1 course. It may not be used more than once for each particular semester. Students from all learning pathways will use this course to replace the respective semester of the English 1 course failed.

ENGLISH 4 (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

EN144

7


after school may be required to meet plant deadlines. Students need to be responsible, frequent attendees, and self-motivating. Quarter and semester grades will be based on the student’s ability to meet deadlines and submit pages that meet established publishing standards. This course fulfills the fourth year English requirement.

Students may take this course concurrently with a required English 2 course. Students may not repeat this course.

MYTHS AND LEGENDS

EN126

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: None

ADVANCED YEARBOOK

EN119

All Year - 1 Credit - Lab Course- Elective - 10, 11, 12 Course Description: This course introduces the various elements of myths and legends in a multi-cultural setting. The class will, from week to week, study lore from all over the globe throughout many different time periods. Creative composition techniques and strategies are stressed. In this course there will be abundant opportunities for learning key Language Arts skills such as research, formal presentation, and author study. This course is both very engaging in its content as well as innovative in its approach. It is an excellent opportunity to explore the story-telling traditions of the world.

JOURNALISM

Prerequisite: Must complete an application, have successfully completed a full year of Introduction to Yearbook, and have the recommendation of the current English class instructor or Yearbook instructor. Also requires a B average in previous English courses. Fees: Three-ring notebook, writing supplies and computer disks. Helpful Courses: Journalism, Photography, Computer Tech 1, Computer Business Applications 1 and 2, and Creative Writing. Course Description: This course is designed for students with experience in yearbook production. It continues the study of publishing through production of the yearbook, the Nor’easter. Students will refine skills in designing page layout and writing feature stories. Students enrolling will be expected to take on the role of editor and be responsible for cohesiveness of a section in the yearbook. Students enrolling in this course must be self-motivated with the ability to work together with less experienced staff members in order to produce an accurate record of school life at ZBTHS and must be able to spend out-of-class time working on the Nor’easter. May be taken for elective credit and may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s approval. This course fulfills the fourth year English requirement.

EN117

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 - Lab Course Prerequisite: Requires a "C" average in previous English courses. Fees: Partial Chicago Tribune subscription. Helpful Courses: Yearbook, Printing, Computer Tech 1 Course Description: This course is the study of print and broadcast media with a strong emphasis on writing in news style. Students will practice skills in news, features, editorial and sports writing and also work with layout and photography. Mini-workshops will also simulate daily newspapers, television news and public relations’ staffs. This class will produce all issues of the school newspaper. Students must be interested in what is happening in and around school. May be taken a second time for elective credit. This course fulfills the fourth year English requirement.

INTRODUCTION TO YEARBOOK

SPEECH

EN122

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: None Course Description: This course meets the need of students who (1) desire a background of speech activities in anticipation of post high school studies, and/or (2) because of aptitude and interest in speech, desire further development of their oral communication abilities. Basic fundamentals of communication as well as specific techniques of group discussion, public speaking, debate and oral interpretation will be covered. Fundamentals and techniques will be applied through in-class oral presentations. This course fulfills one semester of the fourth year English requirement.

EN118

All Year - 1 Credit - Lab Course-Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: B average from junior high or previous high school English courses and written recommendation by current English instructor. Fees: Three-ring notebook, writing supplies and computer disks. Helpful Courses: Journalism, Photography, Computer Tech 1, Computer Business Applications 1 and 2, and Creative Writing. Course Description: This course is designed to expose students to the world of publishing via the responsibility for the production of the ZBTHS yearbook, the Nor’easter. Students enrolling in this course will learn the fundamentals of layout and design, photography, editing, and marketing. Students must have competent writing skills and a sincere interest in school activities and events. Additional time

DEBATE First Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: None 8

EN125


CREATIVE WRITING 2 Course Description: This course is for students who enjoy a challenge and wish to work in a cooperative and competitive environment. It provides opportunities for logical argumentation through formal debate and parliamentary discussion. This course also develops research skills, knowledge of parliamentary procedures, and speaking confidence. This course fulfills one semester of the fourth year English requirement.

CREATIVE WRITING

EN1201/EN1203

Either Semester - .50 Credit Elective 10, 11, 12 (one semester only counts toward the 4th year English requirement.) Prerequisite: None Fees: None Course Description: This course develops an awareness of the quality of the human experience through creative writing in a writer’s workshop setting. Students will write in the genres of nonfiction personal essay, poetry, opinion pieces, flash fiction, one-act drama, and reader’s theatre. This course fulfills one semester of the fourth year English requirement.

EN121

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Elective 10, 11, 12 (one semester only counts toward the 4th year English requirement; may be repeated without limit for elective credit.) Prerequisite: Creative Writing Fees: None Course Description: This course will focus on developing advanced creative writing skills that build on and extend skills developed in Creative Writing. Special emphasis will be placed on writing for specific audiences and for basic and sophisticated understandings. Students will also develop their own material to present in a workshop setting. Units of study include philosophies of editing in all genres, children's stories, flash fiction, and a unit of independent study to be determined by the student.

ENGLISH SEMINAR

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective -10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course once. Prerequisite: Written teacher and Division Chair approval Fees: To be set Course Description: This course is designed for students wishing to obtain specialized English credit. It includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

9


ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING (ELL) English Language Learning courses are for students who are learning English as a second or other language. The ELL English classes fulfill the English requirements for graduation while providing instruction and assistance in English language acquisition. Sheltered content classes are available for students with very limited English proficiency who are unable to succeed in mainstream content classes. These courses also meet graduation requirements. The goals of the program are to help students acquire language proficiency while simultaneously gaining the academic skills needed for success in school and the workplace. Registration in ELL classes is restricted to students identified as English Language Learners through language proficiency testing and teacher recommendation. Michelle Standridge, Division Chair 847-731-9370 -standrim@zbths.org

ELL ENGLISH I (BEGINNER LEVEL)

(ELLs).

EL011

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Students enrolled in ELL I may also attend ELL Resource Center for credit.

Course Description: This course is for advanced learners of English. The emphasis is on the development of academic language proficiency in preparation for students to take mainstream English classes.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs).

ELL ALGEBRA Course Description: This course is designed for students with very limited proficiency in English. The course provides individualized work in language development including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It emphasizes the development of both conversational and academic vocabulary.

EL055

All Year - 1 Credit – 10, 11, 12 The course will meet the algebra requirement. Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs) and prerequisites as required by the mathematics department.

ELL ENGLISH II (INTERMEDIATE LEVEL) EL012

Course Description Designed for identified English language learners, the content is the same as mainstream Algebra but the instruction and materials are modified to meet the needs of limited English proficient students. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Students enrolled in ELL II may also attend ELL Resource Center for credit. Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs).

ELL GEOMETRY

EL057

All Year - 1 Credit - 11 Course Description: This course is for students with limited English proficiency who have some fluency but need to continue to develop their English language skills. It builds on the language introduced in the beginner level course and further expands writing and reading skills. It emphasizes the development of both conversational and academic proficiency.

ELL ENGLISH III (Advanced Level)

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs). Course Description: Designed for identified English language learners, the content is the same as mainstream Geometry but the instruction and materials are modified to meet the needs of limited English proficient students. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

EL013

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Students enrolled in ELL III may also attend ELL Resource Center for credit. Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners 10


ELL BIOLOGY

EL021

ELL U.S. HISTORY

All Year - 1 Credit – 10, 11, 12 The course will meet the biology requirement.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs).

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs) and prerequisites as required by the science department.

Course Description: Designed for identified English language learners. The content is the same as mainstream junior U.S. History classes, but the instruction and materials are modified to meet the needs of English language learners. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills

Course Description Designed for identified English language learners, the content is the same as mainstream sophomore Biology but the instruction and materials are modified to meet the needs of limited English proficient students. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

ELL HEALTH

ELL DRIVER EDUCATION

EL042

EL047

Either Semester – 0.25 Credit – 10 The course will meet the driver education requirement.

Either Semester – 0.5 Credit – 10 The course will meet the health requirement.

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs).

Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs).

Course Description: Please see the Driver Education section of the course guide.

Course Description Designed for identified English language learners, the content is the same as mainstream Health but the instruction and materials are modified to meet the needs of limited English proficient students. Students will simultaneously learn the content of the course and improve their English language skills.

ELL RESOURCE CENTER

EL032

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

EL0911/EL0913

Either Semester - .25 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course. Prerequisite: Students identified through testing and teacher recommendation as English Language Learners (ELLs). Course Description: Designed to help the individual ELL student in daily classroom work. Supplementary academic materials will be made available to students along with tutoring.

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FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES The sequential and integrated programs in Family and Consumer Sciences are planned to prepare students for employment in entry-level occupations with the greatest employment potential. To assist today's students in achieving success in tomorrow's jobs, Family and Consumer Science programs emphasize the development of skills and knowledge that are transferable to a wide variety of settings. Students also acquire the competencies and prevention strategies necessary to improve the quality of life in the family, the community and the work place. Jennifer Brown, Division Chair 847-731-9570; brownj@zbths.org

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE CAREERS

FC551

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 2

FC553

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective -10, 11, 12

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10 Prerequisite: Child Development 1 Fees: Workbook and material fees required

Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook and material fees required

Course Description: This course is an in-depth study of the child and his/her parents from preschool age through teenagers. Topics include:

Course Description: This course is designed to reflect today’s concerns, issues and information throughout all units by developing lifelong learning skills to become a responsible and/or employed community leader. Emphasis is placed on basic skills and their application to daily living for the individual, family, the community and the environment in which they function. Activities, some competency-based, are included to help students recognize and utilize the resources that can guide them through change and prepare them for life skills in the areas of: Personal Development; Relationship Skills; Families and Friendships; Child Care and Development; Management and Consumer Decisions; Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, Clothing and Textiles; Housing and Living Space; and Employment.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1

preschoolers guiding children’s behavior television influences work & money values school-aged children children’s education and health teen parents alcoholism & other drug abuse decision-making skills positive self-concept and self-esteem honesty & lying sibling relationships divorce peer violence/influence death and illness families relocating unemployment exceptional children child abuse challenge of a child-related career teenage runaways developing responsibility teenagers effects of family structures stealing domestic violence suicide substitute child care balancing work and family

The preschool, school age and teenage units include physical, intellectual, social and emotional development. Students will be expected to interact with children ranging in age from three through the teen years. The learning experiences will prepare the student for the L.C.H.S. Technology Campus "Early Childhood Education" program, world of work and / or parenting roles.

FC552

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective -10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook and material fees required Helpful Course: Family and Consumer Science Careers

ADULT LIVING

Course Description: This course is an in-depth study of the child and the parents. Topics include: parenthood readiness, qualities of a good parent, environmental and hereditary factors affecting the child, reproduction and parenting responsibilities. The student will study the young child from conception through the birth process plus infancy through the toddler stage. The prenatal unit stresses fetal development and maternal care. The infant through toddler units includes physical, intellectual, emotional and social development for the different stages. Students do participate in hands on experiences to develop good parenting and childcare skills as well as explore careers in the childcare field.

FC554

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11,12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook and material fees required Course Description: The philosophy that an individual develops personality, style, individuality, self-esteem, a personal and professional presence, and general success as an adult through education and refining ones’ appearance guides the instruction and material covered in this course. Initial discussion focuses on establishing the student’s identity and developing character. For those desiring to become more fashionable, we look at how to use elements and principles of design. Future trends and directions will be discussed. “Your home is your castle”….so we give students opportunities to put interior design skills and consumer-based housing to use. 12


MEDICAL ASSISTING EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

TC655

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) FOODS AND NUTRITION 1

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 11, 12

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTING

FC559

Prerequisite: None Fees: Workbook and material fees required Helpful Course: Family & Consumer Science Careers

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES SEMINAR

Course Description: This is an orientation level course in the nutrition and food preparation sequence. It is designed to develop an accurate knowledge of applied nutrition for fitness/wellness and an understanding of basic principles of food preparation and meal planning. Students must pass competency-based tests before entering the laboratory experience. Students will develop skills in using equipment to produce simple, nutritious and attractively served meals and snacks. Emphasis is placed on developing management techniques to aid in combining the roles of homemaker and wage earner. Nutrition, food buying, safety, sanitation, meal preparation, meal service and careers will be stressed. Food laboratory participation is mandatory for success.

Prerequisite: Written teacher and Division Chair approval Fees: To be set Course Description: Designed for student wishing to obtain specialized Family and Consumer Science credit. Includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

FC560

Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition 1 Fees: Workbook and material fees Course Description: This the second, of the sequential courses pays more attention to the value, appetite appeal, social significance and cultural aspects of food. Advanced nutrition information and meal planning is expanded upon from Foods & Nutrition 1; laboratory participation is mandatory for successful completion. Laboratory assignments will include nutritious snacks, quantity food preparation, food preservation, variation yeast bread rolls, pork, poultry, fish, fruits and vegetables, cakes, candies, pastries, beverages, a restaurant operation, a cultural lab, plus special ways with food. Competency based test on quantity food computation, foods from weights to measurers.

TC656

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) COSMETOLOGY

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 - May be repeated for a total of 1 Credit

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective -10, 11, 12

CULINARY ARTS

TC653

(Seniors Only) (See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

FOODS AND NUTRITION 2

TC654

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

TC657

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

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FOREIGN LANGUAGE In our society the study of a second language is an important skill to acquire not only for college purposes, but also for career development as well as for cultural enrichment. The opportunity to enroll in French, German or Spanish further enhances communication skills in a verbal and in a written format. In acquiring a language, students learn to adapt to different cultures and experience literature, art, music and history. Although it is recommended that students be reading at or above grade level in order to succeed in a second language class, attitude, motivation and personal goals are often more important in determining a student’s rate of success. Glenn Simon, Division Chair 847-731-9540 – simong@zbths.org

FRENCH 1

FL350 Prerequisite: French 2 and teacher recommendation. Fees: Workbook (approximately $1).

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: The student should be reading at or above grade level. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15) & French dictionary.

Course description: French III is designed for students who have successfully completed two years studying the rudiments of the French language and francophone culture. The goal of this course is to guide students as they transition from beginning French to an intermediate level of language acquisition and proficiency. Class will be conducted primarily in French. Students will continue to develop communication skills in French. Students will also continue their study of French vocabulary and grammar and francophone culture as well as improve their reading comprehension and writing skills in French. Cultural enrichment is offered on a daily basis via music, videos, articles, and other regalia pertinent to the current topics of study. Daily homework can be expected.

Course Description: An introductory course in French that develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear French in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials: textbook, workbook, aural and visual aids (CDs, slides, films), interactive CD-ROM program in the computer lab, and by practical experiences. French culture is an integral part of this course covering topics such as major holidays, seasonal activities, customs, music, geography, history, and contemporary daily living in French-speaking countries. Daily homework can be expected.

FRENCH 2

FRENCH 4

FL356

All Year, 1 credit, (Grade weighted) – Elective 11, 12 Prerequisite: French III and teacher recommendation Fees: Readers, possible field trip fee, optional AP French Language Exam

FL352

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Course Description: French IV is designed for students who have successfully completed three years of French study and who are interested in deepening their understanding of the French language and francophone culture. The goal of this course is to guide students as they proceed to an advanced level of language acquisition and proficiency. Class will be conducted in French so as to give students the best possible advantage as they strive to comprehend oral French and communicate in French. Students will continue to deepen their knowledge of the French language via activities involving vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, and speaking. Students will read various forms of literature such as novels, short stories, and magazine articles. Students will also focus on the art, geography, and history of francophone countries and regions. Cultural enrichment is offered on a daily basis via music, videos, articles, movies, and other regalia pertinent to the current topics of study. Students may choose to do extra work outside of class in order to prepare thoroughly for the AP French Language exam. Daily homework can be expected.

Prerequisite: French 1 and teacher recommendation. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15). Course Description: In this course, students continue their study of the French language and of francophone culture. Conversation in French is stressed and class is conducted mostly in French. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials: textbook, workbook, aural and visual aids (CDs, slides, films), interactive CD-ROM program in the computer lab, and by practical experience. Included also are cultural topics such as geography, customs, music, history, and contemporary life in French-speaking countries. Students progress from structured practice to creative, personalized expression. This program provides students with the tools and the confidence to express themselves in French. Daily homework can be expected.

FRENCH 3

FL354

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective 10, 11, 12. 14


GERMAN 1

GERMAN 3/4

FL358

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: The student should be reading at or above grade level. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15) and German dictionary.

Prerequisite: German 2 and teacher recommendation. Fees: Optional Advanced Placement exam fee. Workbook and/or novel, required purchase (approximately $15-$30). Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: An intensive study of the German language and culture, including coverage of the major grammar elements for conversational and written German. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students are required to speak German in class on a daily basis in order to be successful. After taking German 1 students should be able to converse on the topics of: introductions, names and ages, school, grades, classes, transportation, food, clothing travel, asking for directions, throwing a party, hobbies, free time, shopping and a range of other areas. Basic German grammar will be introduced to facilitate this discussion. Cultural units include: German speaking countries, European countries and languages, Post W.W.II German, the Berlin Wall and Reunified German. Students will also look at cultural differences between Germany and the U.S. in everyday situations. Daily homework can be expected.

GERMAN 2

FL360

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this class once.

Course Description: The course is the continuation of the study of German speaking countries and their language. Major grammatical points and vocabulary not covered in German 1 and 2 will be covered through a variety of speaking and writing projects leading to fluency in the target language and a broadened knowledge of the cultures of German speaking cultures. Classes will be conducted entirely in German unless the instructor feels the need to facilitate understanding of grammatical points in English. Students will also have oral presentations and a variety of written projects, which will encourage creative use of the target language and culture. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials: textbook, worksheets, aural and visual aids (tapes, films, slides) and by practical experience. Cultural topics covered will include, but not be limited to geography, history, music, customs, and contemporary life in German, Austrian, and Swiss society. Note: In order to accommodate both German 3 and 4 students, the curriculum will be on a two-year rotation. Preparation for the optional Advanced Placement Exam is provided. Daily homework can be expected.

FL359

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective – 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: German 1 and teacher recommendation. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15).

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS, BEGINNING LEVEL

Course Description: A continued study of the German language and culture. The remaining major grammatical topics are covered to facilitate acceptable fluency in speaking and writing. All classes are conducted in German unless the instructor feels the need to facilitate understanding of grammatical points in English. Writing projects include dialogues and essays. Regular reading is accomplished through a supplemental reader. Course content will be presented through textbook materials, oratory and visual aids (tapes, slides, films) and by practical experience. Included also are cultural topics including geography, customs, music, history and contemporary life in Germany. Career-related materials are also covered. Daily homework can be expected.

FL367

All year – 1 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Students comprehend spoken Spanish and desire to develop their language skills in Spanish. Placement test required. Fees: Workbook (approximately $20) and supplemental paperback texts. Course Description: This introductory course for the native speaker of Spanish is designed for those students who are able to speak and understand Spanish comfortably but are deficient in their reading and writing skills. Support will be given to students in developing the academic skills necessary for success with respect to the student’s goals and abilities. Activities will include the development of basic writing, reading, and listening skills. Students will gain a greater understanding and appreciation of their own culture while developing skills that will enable them to become part of the school culture and community.

15


Costo: Cuaderno de actividades (aproximadamente $16).

ESPAÑOL PARA HISPANOHABLANTES, NIVEL PRINCIPIANTE FL367 Todo el año-1 crédito- electivo Grados 10, 11, 12

Descripción del curso: Este curso está diseñado para aquellos estudiantes que hablan y entienden el español moderadamente pero necesitan desarrollarlo más, especialmente la lectura y escritura. Se pondrá un énfasis en aprender la manera correcta de escribir el lenguaje, incluyendo la gramática. Se continuará el desarrollo total del idioma. Comprensión de lectura se hará a través de actividades extensivas. Temas de instrucción igual que temas de carreras serán discutidas en conjunto.

Prerequisitos: Los estudiantes comprenden el español hablado y desean desarrollar sus habilidades en español. Se necesita tomar una prueba para determinar el nivel de habilidad. Costos: Cuaderno de actividades (aproximadamente $20) y un libro suplementario. Descripción del curso: Este curso introductorio es para los nativos de español. Esta clase está formada para los estudiantes que son capaces de hablar y entender español con comodidad pero estar falto de lectura y escritura. Se ofrece apoyo para los estudiantes en su cuesta de realizar sus metas, aún más, el apoyo les ayuda a desarrollar las hábiles académicas necesarias para tener éxito. Las actividades en la clase forma el desarrollo básico de las hábiles de escritura, lectura y auditiva. Los estudiantes se benefician y aprecian el conocimiento de su propia cultura, mientras tanto, ellos desarrollan hábiles que les permite ser parte de la cultura de la escuela y de la comunidad.

SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS, INTERMEDIATE LEVEL

SPANISH 1

FL362

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: The student should be reading at or above grade level. This course is for students beginning their study of the Spanish language. It is NOT intended for students who communicate with their family in Spanish. Este curso es para estudiantes que no hablan español en su casa; es un curso principiante del idioma español. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15) and Spanish dictionary.

Course Description:

An introductory course in Spanish that develops the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is on speaking and listening using the communicative approach to teaching. Students have the opportunity to speak and hear Spanish in class on a daily basis as they interact with classmates and the teacher. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials: textbook, workbook, aural and visual aids (CDs, slides, films), interactive CD-ROM program in the computer lab, and by practical experiences. Latino culture is an integral part of this course covering topics such as major holidays, seasonal activities, customs, music, geography, history, and contemporary daily living in Spanish-speaking countries. Daily homework can be expected.

FL361

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Fluent Spanish speaking and comprehension skills with moderate reading and writing skills. Placement test or instructor’s permission. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15-$20). Course Description: This course is designed for those students who are able to speak and understand Spanish comfortably but need to develop further their reading and writing skills. An emphasis will be placed on learning correct grammar and proper writing skills while continuing the development of overall language fluency. Reading comprehension will be emphasized through extensive reading activities. Career topics will be discussed in conjunction with instructional topics.

ESPAÑOL PARA HISPANOHABLANTES, NIVEL INTERMEDIARIO FL361 Todo el año-1 crédito- electivo Grados 10, 11, 12 Prerequisitos: Hablar y entender el español con fluidez. Tener algo de conocimiento en la lectura y escritura. Una evaluación para determinar el nivel de habilidad o permiso previo del /a instructor/a.

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SPANISH 2

SPANISH 4

FL364

FL368

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective 11, 12

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 and teacher recommendation. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15).

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or consent of instructor Fees: Optional Advanced Placement exam fee. Paperbacks and workbook required. Possible field trip fee.

Course Description: In this course, students continue their study of the Spanish language and of Latino culture. Conversation in Spanish is stressed and class is conducted mostly in Spanish. Course content will be presented through a variety of materials: textbook, workbook, aural and visual aids (CDs, slides, films), interactive CD-ROM program in the computer lab, and by practical experience. Included also are cultural topics such as geography, customs, music, history, major holidays, seasonal activities, and contemporary life in Spanish-speaking countries. Students progress from structured practice to creative, personalized expression. This program provides students with the tools and the confidence to express themselves in Spanish. Daily homework can be expected.

SPANISH 3

Course Description: Communication is conducted in Spanish. The students will continue to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Various writing projects and oral presentations are integral parts of the curriculum. Course content will be presented through textbook and supplemental materials and aural and visual aids (CD’s, slides, videos). Areas of concentration include Spanish Art with an Internet project related to the artist as part of the curriculum. Other areas include: cultural topics, history and geography of Spain and Latin America, and music and contemporary life in Hispanic countries. Students will read a classic adaptation of Don Quijote de la Mancha and various Hispanic short stories. Students will have the opportunity to partake in a “Mexican Cultural Experience.” Preparation for the optional Advanced Placement Spanish Language Exam is provided. Daily homework can be expected.

FL366

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective 10, 11, 12

FOREIGN LANGUAGE SEMINAR

Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or consent of instructor. Fees: Workbook (approximately $15).

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this class once.

Course Description: The course is a continued study of the Spanish language and culture. The remaining major grammatical topics are covered to facilitate acceptable fluency in speaking and writing. All classes are conducted in Spanish, including the regular use of popular music. Various writing projects, oral presentations, and a technology project are integral parts of the curriculum. A more intensive study of cultural topics, geography and history will be included. Daily homework can be expected.

Prerequisite: Must have written teacher and Division Chair approval. Fees: To be set. Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Foreign Language credit. Includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Webster defines health as a "state of physical and mental well being, a condition of body or mind." It is because we feel that a healthy body is a prerequisite for participation in and enjoyment of the many activities provided by the school and the total society that we place a high value upon our Health and Physical Education Programs. The demands upon the youth of today are increasing and continually changing. Our concern goes beyond that of physical conditioning alone. It extends to the development of and appreciation of activity as a means of reducing tensions inherent in a highly technical and swift-moving society. It also encompasses the teaching of these types of recreational activities that will enable the individual to remain an active participant rather than a passive spectator in the years beyond one's high school experience. Jennifer Brown, Division Chair 847-731-9570 – brownj@zbths.org In all regular physical education classes, instructional swimming and physical fitness testing are required.

Every physical education class fulfills .50 credits of the 3.00 graduation requirement. school Fees: Proper physical education uniform required

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 (Male) PE4031/PE4033 (Female) PE4041/PE4043

Course Description: This course meets at 7:00 a.m. each morning. Emphasis will be on physical fitness. Activities will include running, swimming, cardiovascular conditioning, weight training and some individual/team sports. A student should take this course if they need flexibility in their class schedule during the school day, or if they want to improve their fitness level.

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Required 10 Prerequisite: None Fees: Proper physical education uniform required Course Description: Emphasizes skill development and physical fitness through instruction and large group games. Major emphasis is on team or group activities rather than the individual.

MODIFIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 & 4 (Male) PE4071/PE4073 (Female) PE4081/PE4083

Prerequisite: Placement Fees: None

Required Both Semesters 11 & 12 - .50 Credit per Semester

Course Description: This course is designed to meet the needs of students who cannot handle the physical demands of a regular-paced physical education class and/or would benefit from more individualized attention. The emphasis will be on improving conditioning and lifetime activities as deemed appropriate for the student's physical condition. This course satisfies graduation requirements.

Prerequisite: None Fees: Proper physical education uniform required Course Description: In this junior and senior course the emphasis shifts from mass group activities to individual or carry-over activities. The majority of the program will emphasize fitness and individual sports, although some team sports will be offered. Electives may be offered and some activities will be co-recreational.

EARLY BIRD PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 AND 4

PE4181/PE4183

HEALTH & PHYSICAL PE423/PE424 EDUCATION (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY) All Year - 1.00 Credit - 10

PE4131/PE4133

Prerequisite: Placement. See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements. Student must have acceptance into the sophomore level of the Academy purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop.

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Provide own reliable transportation to

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mental disorders, effective communication, family crises, abstinence and relationships, reproductive systems, the life cycle, sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS, communicable and non-communicable diseases, tobacco, alcohol, and medicines and drugs.

Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”), possible field trip fees Course Description: A yearlong course that combines the curriculum of Health Education and Physical Development. Meets graduation requirements for both Health and one semester of Physical Education. Most of the Physical Education will involve Adventure Education activities that deal with improving self-esteem and team building.

HEALTH A

ADVENTURE EDUCATION

PE4211/PE4213

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 11, 12

PE425

Prerequisite: Instructor approval required Fees: Required fees for field/camping trips and materials. Proper PE uniform required

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Course Description: Juniors and seniors willing to work with others in a team oriented atmosphere. A variety of activities will be used to improve the student’s selfesteem, their ability to take risks, and improve the student’s ability to cooperate and work well with others through the use of Adventure Education, challenge activities, camping/outdoor skills, physical fitness, swimming, rock climbing, rappelling, and community service. Note: This course may be taken up to 2 semesters (for regular students) to 3 semesters (for student leaders).

Prerequisite: By special placement only Fees: None Course Description: This course encourages an application of one’s individual health and provides opportunities for students to acquire knowledge, which will enable them to achieve and maintain their optimal level of health. Curriculum materials and related activities will stress the fact that one’s personal health is largely a matter of his/her own responsibility and that choices about lifestyle during one’s teenage years have definite long-term effects on one’s health. The course will provide a heavy concentration on vocabulary and word usage. It will help students make positive health decisions and help them attain reachable goals. Topics covered include: 1) an understanding of mental-emotional health; 2) personal health care; 3) human growth and development (from conception through aging and death); 4) use and abuse of alcohol-tobacco drugs; 5) an understanding of causes, treatment and prevention of prevalent diseases; 6) overview of health care in the United States.

HEALTH

ATHLETIC TRAINING

PE4141/PE4143

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective (DOES NOT MEET P.E. Graduation Requirement) - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Instructor approval required. Students must have a strong desire to be a student athletic trainer with the Z-B Athletic Teams putting in time outside of the classroom at athletic contests. Academically strong students will be required to study anatomy and physiology. Fees: Lab fee for taping supplies. Athletic Training Manual purchased by the student to keep.

PE422

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: None Course Description: Health is a wellness-based class, which offers students an opportunity to improve and maintain their health status both by increasing their health literacy and developing life-long, healthy habits. Students will cultivate and utilize College Readiness academic skills as they learn factual information to help them develop healthy behaviors. Topics include wellness, character development, nutrition, body composition and weight management, mental health, managing stress and anxiety,

Course Description: Students will develop a broad knowledge of Sports Medicine. This course will provide a stepping-stone and strong base of knowledge for those students that will pursue a career in sports medicine. Topics will also include: basic first aid, C.P.R. certification, injury recognition, basic knowledge in care and evaluation of injuries, assisting in rehabilitation programs set up by certified staff, taping, and bandaging techniques. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete 20 hours of field experience.

WELLNESS TRAINING

PE4201/PE4203

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Juniors/Seniors who will be serious about improving their personal fitness level. Qualified sophomores with a P.E. teacher’s recommendation and 19


front crawl and breaststroke. Note: There is no time requirement for this skill. Prospective participants must show only that they can swim 300 yards using the above strokes without stopping. (2) Swim 20 yards using the front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive to a depth of 7 – 10 feet, retrieve a 10 lb. brick, return to the surface, and swim 20 yards back to the starting point with the brick. This test must be completed in 1 minute 40 seconds. Fees: Students must purchase the Lifeguarding Manual, CPR Mask, Whistle and Lanyard for $51.

passing two semesters of Physical Education. Fees: Proper P.E. uniform required Course Description: Students will study and work to improve their own personal fitness level. Daily workouts may include running, aerobics, circuit training, interval training, swimming, weight lifting, etc. Also included will be discussions on nutrition, weight control, diet, exercise physiology, anatomy and kinesiology. This course is designed for all junior and senior students regardless of their current fitness level or athletic ability.

Course Description: The course consists of professional life guarding and injury prevention, patron surveillance and emergency preparation, water rescue skills, breathing emergencies, cardiac emergencies, first aid, caring for head spinal injury, skills scenarios, and written examinations for each area. Upon completion and satisfactory performance on skills and written tests, the participant receives certification for lifeguard training, first aid, C.P.R. training, A.E.D. Defibrillation use, bag valve masks, and disease transmission.

STRENGTH TRAINING AND CONDITIONING PE4291/PE4293 Either Semester - .50 Credit - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors Fees: Proper P.E. uniform required Course Description: This course is designed for students willing to work as individuals to improve overall fitness and muscular strength. Daily workouts may include but are not limited to: resistance training, with universal weights; free weights; medicine balls; resistance tubing; body bars and isometrics. Other workouts may include: aerobic activity; circuit training; plyometrics; aquatic training; running and flexibility. Discussions covering heart rate, nutrition, proper hydration, specificity, overload, progressive resistive exercise principles and safety rules and guidelines in the weight room will be covered. This course is designed for all junior and senior students regardless of current fitness levels or athletic ability.

LIFEGUARD TRAINING

WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION

PE4121/PE4123

2nd Semester - .50 Credit - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Recommendation by Aquatics Director, written exam of basic water safety knowledge, swimming skills test include the following: front crawl, back crawl, sidestroke, breaststroke, elementary backstroke, butterfly. Students must be 16 years of age and have Junior or Senior status on or before the beginning of class. Fees: Students must purchase the Water Safety Instructor’s Candidate Kit for $55.

PE4111/PE4113 Course Description: A course designed to train instructor candidates to teach American Red Cross swimming and water safety courses. Successful completion will enable the student to teach the following courses: American Red Cross Swimming Courses, Levels 1 thru 6; Water Safety Instructor Aide; Infant and Pre School Aquatics; Community Water Safety; Safety Training for Swim Coaches. Students will write block and lesson plans, learn various teaching and instructional methods, safety precautions, dealing with cultural diversities, teaching those with disabilities, student teaching experience in the ZBTHS Physical Education Classes, and Saturday Learn to Swim Program for Children. May only be repeated once.

Either Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Students must be 15 years of age and have sophomore, junior, or senior status on or before the scheduled beginning of the class. The course may only be repeated once. Instructor approval is required. Students must be able to do the following: (1) Swim 300 yards continuously using these strokes in the following order: (a.) 100 yards of front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabilizing, propellant kick. Rhythmic breathing can be performed either by breathing to the side for front crawl or the front for breast stroke. (b.) 100 yards breaststroke (c.) 100 yards of either front crawl using rhythmic breathing or breaststroke. These 100 yards may be a mixture of

20


INDUSTRY AND TECHNOLOGY Welcome to the ZBTHS Department of Industry and Technology. The programs presented here reflect the high school’s commitment to technology education through practical application. Our goal is to involve students in the learning process. Our programs in the communication, manufacturing, service and transportation sector are full of options to review and reinforce the skills students need to succeed in today’s technological world. Hands-on learning activities joined together with comprehensive materials and instruction will enhance student problem solving capabilities. These employability skills are needed by today’s teens that use technology to make a positive impact on society. Jesse Michmerhuizen, Division Chair 847-731-9440 – michmerj@zbths.org

EXPLORATION IN TECHNOLOGY

concepts of drafting. The student will gain practical experience in board drafting as well as using the software AutoCAD. Through multi-view drawings, pictorial drawings, lettering, dimensioning, drawing to scale and extensive use of computers with AutoCAD the student will attain the basic skills needed for a future in engineering.

IA6011/IA6013

Either Semester - .50 Credit -Elective- 10, 11, 12 (May be taken up to 3 semesters) Prerequisite: Twenty-five percentile or above on the Reading section of the Explore and/or Plan Assessment. Fees: Fee card as needed

PRE-ARCHITECTURE

Course Description: Choose this challenging, exciting, motivational career survey course if the student is interested in working with industry standard equipment while creating in-depth projects. The student’s specific explorations will help gain a full understanding of relevant careers for the 21st century. This applied technology course will introduce the student to career areas in MANUFACTURING, (Digital Mfg.-Computer numerical codes) POWER & ENERGY, (Rocketry & Space- Flight Simulator- Electronics) TRANSPORTATION, (4 stroke engine- aerodynamics) CONSTRUCTION, (Residential wiring, plumbing, and construction) and communication, (Desktop publishingvinyl sign making- graphic designs).

Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology and 1 year of Math Fees: Fee card as needed Course Description: This course is of particular value for students interested in the following expectations: architectural drafting, interior design, the building trades, or other residential architecture areas. This course introduces the student to tools and techniques used in the field of architecture. The student will draw a set of plans for a house including floor plans, foundation plans, elevations, site plans and perspectives. A computer and AutoCAD software will be used to complete many of these tasks.

During this class the student will be problem solving in teams of active learners. There are career explorations in 34 Technology Units. Students functioning below the 25th percentile on Explore are strongly encouraged to take skill level courses first, e.g. Woods, Metals, etc.

PRE-ENGINEERING

IA604

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

IA602

ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE

IA605

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology and one year of Math Fees: Fee card as needed

Prerequisite: Pre-Engineering and Pre- Architecture Helpful Courses: Exploration in Technology and Math Fees: Fee card as needed Course Description: This course is an expansion and continuation of Pre-Engineering and Pre-Architecture. This course was developed to give students a deeper in

Course Description: This class will let the student explore the possibilities in the engineering field, by exposing basic 21


procedures, metal pattern making and molding. Other areas of study include Computer Numerical Control (CNC).

depth study of Engineering and Architecture. Students will computer use along with the combined AutoCAD software to further their knowledge in Engineering and Architecture by creating more detailed and in depth drawings.

POWER MECHANICS 1 COMPUTER REPAIR / A+ CERTIFICATION TRAINING

TC680

Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology Fees: Fee card as needed

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) ELECTRONICS 1

IA608

Course Description: An introductory to auto-power field, this course covers the basic concepts power technology. Study in power technology includes various accessory systems common to the transportation industry. This will include engine rebuilding, valve and seat grinding, carburetor work, tune-ups and various repairs. Work is done on small 2 and 4 cycle engines.

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Helpful Courses: Exploration in Technology and one year of Math Fees: Fee card as needed Course Description: Electricity/Electronics is the study of AC and DC current fundamentals and their application. In addition, the construction of three projects will provide practical experience in electronic application and soldering techniques. Other topics will include the use and properties of semiconductors. Students will be required to perform mathematical computations.

ELECTRONICS 2

POWER MECHANICS 2 Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Power Mechanics Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology Fees: Fee card as needed

Course Description: This course is a continuation of Power Mechanics with emphasis on the repair and overhauling of 2-cycle and OHV engines, fuel delivery, electrical diagnosis, and product safety. Students will train for technician certification by the Engine & Equipment Training Council.

IA628

Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Electronics Fees: Minimal material fees of $40 required Course Description: A continuation of studies in electronics and circuit analysis. Topics include semiconductor theory and digital electronics. Three projects approved by the teacher must be constructed.

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE

TC670

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY

IA609

TC659

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology Fees: Fee card as needed

PRINTING 1

IA614

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

Course Description: This course is an introduction to basic machining, metal forming, and metal artwork. Areas of study include basic lathe and millwork procedures, arc and oxygen acetylene gas welding, metal forming, sheet metal manufacturing and tinwork. Shop safety and basic math skills are integrated throughout the areas of study.

METALS 2

IA612

Either Semester Only - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

METALS 1

IA610

Either Semester Only - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology, PreEngineering Fees: Fee card as needed Course Description: Printing is an introductory course for all students who are interested or curious in graphic arts. Basic skills such as manual and computer layout work, design work, darkroom procedure, and presswork in offset lithography will be covered. Projects to be completed are personalized notepads and business cards. Knife-cut screen-printing will be covered and projects in this area will include posters, stickers and T-shirts if the student wishes. The final project will be planned out by the student from start to finish and then approved by the

IA630

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Metals Fees: Fee card as needed Course Description: A continuation in metalworking studies. Areas of study include advanced lathe and milling machine process, M.I.G. and T.I.G. welding, plasma arc 22


Students who are highly motivated and self-driven should excel in this innovative educational setting.

instructor.

PRINTING 2

IA615 WOODS 2

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Printing (Suggested) Fees: Fee card as needed

Prerequisite: “C” or higher in Woods Fees: Fee card as needed

Course Description: Printing 2 picks up where Printing left off. The semester will start off with a focus on the design process. Projects will be looked at from all angles starting with the concept stage and finishing with the final product. Projects will include personalized 12-month calendars and concept board games. Students will look into the principles and reasons for engraving and create their own personalized key chain using the engraving process. Individual projects will allow the student to emphasize an individual interest and to create their own projects such as 2 color business cards, personalized notepads, screen-printing T-shirts, and interested seniors may attempt to create and produce their own graduation announcements. The student will also have a chance to produce a product from the new digital platemaker. Job entry skills within the field will be developed in all areas with all of the available equipment in the lab.

GRAPHIC/WEB DESIGN

Course Description: Woods II is will have the opportunity to continue using proper methods and skills to create student chosen projects. The course content includes materials estimation, cost estimation, project design and composition and the use of specialty tools and finishes. Students will also have access to the laser engraver to produce pictures on different mediums, wood inlay construction, intarsia, wooden models, and puzzles. Woods II allows the student to create projects using their artistic and hands on ability to further refine their woodworking skills to use in the industries of today.

INTRODUCTION TO CARPENTRY BUILDING TRADES CONSTRUCTION 1 & 2

TC663

Prerequisite: None Helpful Courses: Exploration in Technology Fees: Fee card as needed

TC687

Course Description: This introductory course is for students interested in exploring the building trades. Units of instruction the first semester include gaining knowledge and skills using fixed woodworking machines, hand tools, and portable power tools used in the carpentry profession. Projects are required. Second semester instruction involves learning an understanding of architectural drawing, blueprint reading, using and maintaining hand and power tools, understanding and using building materials, and understanding construction procedures and processes. Throughout the year, student will construct a model house. This introductory course is for students desiring to gain knowledge and skills required for admission to the building trade’s capstone occupational course.

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) TELEVISION PRODUCTION

TC665

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) COMPUTER ELECTRONIC REPAIR

TC680

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) WELDING-FABRICATION TC667 (See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

BUILDING TRADES WOODS 1

IA618

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) PHOTOGRAPHIC DESIGN

IA619

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 - May be taken independently with instructor approval

IA617

TC682

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective - 10, 11, 12 - May be taken independently with instructor approval

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES TC651 (See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

Prerequisite: None Fees: Fee card as needed

FIRE FIGHTING TC686 (See Lake County High School Technology Campus)

Course Description: This course is for any student who wants to learn the proper methods and skills for furniture/cabinet-making. Course content includes selecting, planning, constructing and finishing a project. Machine operations, hand tool processes and portable power tool operations are required laboratory learning experiences. Instruction will be individualized with each student taught according to knowledge and skill development needs.

PHOTOGRAPHY

IA616

One Semester Only - .50 Credit - Elective -10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology 23


Fees: Fee card as needed

TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective- 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated for a total of one credit Prerequisite: Written Division Chair approval Fees: Variable

Course Description: Students will have the opportunity to discover the world of Digital Photography and Digital Imaging. We will be using the program of Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Photo Delux to process the photographs. During the class, student will develop the skills of using a camera, developing film and the process of making prints from negatives. Areas of composition of pictures, creative techniques, studio portrait photography and introducing the different artistic ways of photography will be included.

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized technology credit. This course includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

24


MATHEMATICS The Mathematics Department teaches students the skills necessary to live and work productively as well as provide the strong background needed to pursue future mathematics studies. The department's offerings provide options for meeting the individual needs and goals of a broad range of students. Mathematics is a tool with a wide diversity of applications in other disciplines. The department's curriculum reflects this through courses that stress applications and problem solving, and emphasizes a transfer of skills learned. Electives encompass wide interests and needs. The sequential nature of mathematics education requires a strict interpretation of course prerequisites. It would be to the student’s advantage to have earned a grade of “C” or better to advance to the next level. The Z-BTHS graduation requirement is three years of mathematics. The State of Illinois also requires that all students successfully complete Geometry for graduation. In order to provide access to higher levels of mathematical thinking, we require each student to purchase their own TI-84 Plus graphing calculator for all courses except Technical Geometry, Geometry and Survey of Math.

Jesse Michmerhuizen, Division Chair 847-731-9440 – michmerj@zbths.org

The following grid should help in determining which classes are open to which grade levels.

Math Course Grid

Algebra 1 Technical Geometry Geometry Accelerated Geometry Survey of Math Algebra 2 Accelerated Algebra 2 Trigonometry Probability & Statistics AP Statistics Pre-Calculus Accelerated Pre-Calculus Calculus AP Calculus BC Intro to Programming

25

MA 155 MA 173 MA 156 MA 157 MA 166 MA 158 MA 159 MA 172 MA 178 MA 182 MA 160 MA 162 MA 164 MA 161 MA 174

10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 10 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 11 12 12 10 11 12


ALGEBRA 1

required.

MA155

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Course Description: This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of geometric relationships in a plane and in space. Students will develop critical thinking and deductive reasoning skills with an emphasis on the study of proofs in mathematical situations. Geometry is integrated with arithmetic, algebra, and numerical trigonometry.

Prerequisite: None Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required Course Description: Students will learn how to express themselves mathematically, how to manipulate and write algebraic expressions, how to solve and graph equations, and how to simplify and graph inequalities. Students will also learn to read graphs, compute probability, and compute combinations. Graphing technology is used throughout this course, so a TI -84 plus graphing calculator is required.

TECHNICAL GEOMETRY

SURVEY OF MATH

MA166

All Year - 1 Credit – 11 & 12 Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and Geometry Fees: A scientific calculator with a fraction key is required.

MA173

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Course Description: Students will learn about graph theory, voting and apportionment, statistics, geometry and consumer math. The course is an applied mathematics course with emphasis placed upon practical applications. The course stresses the connections between contemporary mathematics and modern society. The course will give students the skillbuilding and practice that is essential, along with the applications and technology needed to foster an appreciation of mathematics.

Prerequisite: Algebra 1 with math teacher recommendation Fees: A scientific calculator with a fraction key is required. Course Description: This course presents the core concepts of geometry; students will learn to problem solve from an investigative and algebraic standpoint. This course includes a study of plane geometric figures (triangles, rectangles, circles, parallelograms, etc.) as well as figures in space (rectangular solids, pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres). Relationships between geometric figures will be studied, including congruency and similarity.

GEOMETRY

ALGEBRA 2

Prerequisites: Algebra 1, Geometry, or Technical Geometry with teacher approval Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required Course Description: Students will learn about functions, inequalities, systems of equations, matrices, polynomials, powers, roots, radicals, trigonometry, and logarithms. Emphasis is placed on understanding the concepts and mastering the manipulative skills necessary for mathematical problem solving. The graphing calculator is used extensively in this course to enhance understanding.

MA156

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and math teacher recommendation Fees: A scientific calculator with a fraction key is required.

AC ALGEBRA 2

MA159

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 10, 11, 12

Course Description: Students will learn to solve problems using geometric properties through visualizing and analyzing geometric relationships in two and three dimensions; investigating connections of geometry to algebra, probability, and trigonometry; and developing inductive and deductive reasoning skills. This course is designed to provide students a strong background in the various types of mathematical reasoning and problem solving.

AC GEOMETRY

MA158

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required Course Description: Students will learn about polynomials, functions (quadratic, linear, exponential, and logarithmic), logarithms, arithmetic and geometric progressions, the binomial theorem, conic sections, and matrices. Emphasis is placed on understanding the concepts and mastering the manipulative skills necessary for mathematical problem solving.

MA157

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) 10 Prerequisites: Algebra 1 with recommendation by Algebra 1 instructor Fees: A scientific calculator with a fraction key is

TRIGONOMETRY Either Semester - .50 Credit - 11, 12 26

MA172


Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra 2 Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required

CALCULUS

Course Description: Students will learn how to evaluate trigonometric functions using the unit circle and right triangles; how to graph trigonometric functions; and how to apply the trigonometric identities for problem solving. The course is designed for students who desire more high school math but do not feel prepared for pre-calculus.

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

MA164

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 11 - 12 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required Course Description: Students will learn about functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, and the applications of integration. This course is intended for students who have a solid foundation in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and pre-calculus. The course will emphasize the application of calculus to a variety of disciplines.

MA178

Either Semester - .50 Credit – 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra 2 (or concurrent enrollment in Accelerated Algebra 2). Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required

Note: Students cannot receive credit for both AC Precalculus MA162 and Calculus MA164.

AC PRE-CALCULUS

MA162

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 11, 12 Course Description: Students will learn about the major concepts and tools of elementary statistics and probability. This course includes an introduction to statistics, descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, and correlation and regression. Students will use the graphing calculator extensively to enhance understanding.

AP STATISTICS

Prerequisite: Geometry and AC Algebra 2, or Precalculus, or teacher recommendation Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required Course Description: Students will learn about exponential, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric functions. Students will also be introduced to AP Calculus topics such as limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. This course emphasizes the theory of mathematics as well as its applications. This course prepares students for AP Calculus BC.

MA182

All Year – 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) –11, 12 Prerequisite: Geometry and AC Algebra 2 (or concurrent enrollment in either Precalculus) Fees: A.P. examination fee. TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required

AP CALCULUS (BC)

Prerequisite: AC Precalculus ("B" or better each semester) Fees: A.P. examination fee. TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to provide students with tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from raw data. Students will learn the concepts of randomness, probability, anticipating patterns and statistical inference in addition to the proper techniques necessary to plan a study. The goal of the course is to have all students earn a grade of a three or higher on the AP Exam.

PRE-CALCULUS

MA161

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 11, 12

Course Description: This course is the equivalent of a typical first year college calculus course. Students will learn to differentiate and integrate functions, to work with series, to use parametric notation, and to express trigonometric functions using polar coordinates. The goal of the course is to have all students earn a grade of a three or higher on the AP Calculus BC Exam.

MA160

All Year - 1 Credit - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra 2 Fees: TI-84 Plus Graphing calculators are required

MATHEMATICS SEMINAR

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated for a total of one credit

Course Description: Students will learn about factoring, graphical representations of functions, trigonometry, and conic sections. Emphasis is placed on understanding the concepts and mastering the manipulative skills necessary for mathematical problem solving. The graphing calculator is used extensively in this course to enhance understanding.

Prerequisite: Written teacher and Division Chair approval Fees: To be set Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized mathematics credit. Includes an indepth project in the seminar area of study. 27


INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING

learn about data types, Strings, math operations, decision making, loops, arrays, and applets. The course ends with the students working on a project of their choosing over a two-week period and a short presentation of the program to the class.

MA174

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Any Geometry course or concurrent enrollment in Geometry Fees: Lab materials required. Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the Java programming language. Students will

28


(NJROTC)

NAVAL JUNIOR RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS The NJROTC Program is a four-year program conducted to provide an opportunity for secondary school students (Freshmen through Seniors) to learn the basic elements and requirements for national security and their personal obligation as Americans. The specific objectives of NJROTC are to: a. Promote patriotism. b. Develop informed and responsible citizens. c. Promote habits of orderliness and precision and develop respect for constituted authority. d. Develop a high degree of personal honor, self-reliance, individual discipline and leadership. To participate in the program a student must: a. Be at least 14 years old in grades 9 through 12. b. Be of good moral character. c. Be physically fit to participate in NJROTC training. A student is considered to meet this requirement if able to fully participate in the school physical education program. d. Comply with established personal grooming standards. e. Students must wear uniforms on selected days. Michelle Standridge, Division Chair 847-731-9370 – standrim@zbths.org

NAVAL SCIENCE I

NS530 Prerequisite: Passing grade in Naval Science 2 or recommendation of the Naval Science Instructor (NSI).

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and parent permission. Fees: Name Tag, NJROTC polo shirt, and T-shirt (Cost $25.)

Course Description: A continuation of those disciplines introduced in Naval Science 1 and 2, with greater emphasis on increased leadership roles within the Cadet Corps. Naval History studies include World War I and II, the Korean Conflict, the Cold War and Vietnam. Continued study in the areas of navigation, astronomy and weather coupled with advanced seamanship are presented during this year.

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the precepts of citizenship, the elements of leadership, and the value of scholarship in attaining life goals. The course is designed to engender a sound appreciation for the heritage and traditions of America. Included with the classroom instruction will be a weekly drill session to incorporate discipline, pride and precision into the student's life.

NAVAL SCIENCE 2

NAVAL SCIENCE 4

NS533

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 12 Prerequisite: Passing grade in Naval Science 3, or approval of instructor and parent permission

NS531

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Course Description: A continuation of advanced leadership concepts with emphasis on leadership by example. Leadership studies to include (1) application of leadership traits and principles, (2) a better understanding of human motivation based upon Maslow’s principles, (3) an in-depth knowledge of group behavior and (4) better and effective communication skills. This course will require the student to analyze, discuss and document various leadership scenarios and vignettes. All NS4 students will be assigned positions of responsibility in the Battalion organization, and will be expected to lead the Battalion throughout the year.

Prerequisite: A passing grade in Naval Science I or recommendation of the Naval Science Instructor (NSI). Course Description: A continuation of leadership and citizenship training with emphasis on the role of sea power in world history. The principles of navigation, astronomy, climatology and basic seamanship are introduced during this year. Leadership opportunities in academic, drill and orienteering teams, as well as the color guard, increase as the student advances in knowledge and gains greater responsibility.

NAVAL SCIENCE 3

NS532

Each semester of participation in Naval Science a student may waive one physical education semester graduation requirement.

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 11, 12

29


SCIENCE “The aim of science education is to develop in learners a rich and full understanding of the inquiry process; the key concepts and principles of life science, physical science, and earth and space sciences; and issues of science, understandings and their interactions with the natural world”- ISBE In our ever changing world students need the skills necessary to evaluate and understand the wealth of new information that is created every day. The goal of the science program is to help students acquire content knowledge while increasing their scientific literacy skills. The science courses will introduce students to new content while integrating College Readiness Standards to increase science literacy. Zion-Benton also strives to follow the NSTA's recommendation that 40 percent of science instruction time be spent in laboratory and hands on activities. Jennifer Brown, Division Chair 847-731-9570 – brownj@zbths.org

Course Description: Introductory lab course in which emphasis will be placed on man and his need to understand nature and his relation to it. Among the topics included are: ecology and community relationship, microorganisms and disease, plant/animal structure, function of genetics, and human heredity. Students will participate in both dissection and research projects.

Sample Science Sequence Options for Students Note: ZBTHS requires two years of Science for graduation for the Classes of 2010 and 2011. Beginning with the Class of 2012, three years of science will be required for graduation; one of the three years must be a biological science class. A minimum of three years may be required for admission to a four-year university.

INTEGRATED PATHWAY BIOLOGY AC

SC200

All Year - 1 Credit – 10

TA

CP

IP

TA Physics TA Chemistry

Earth Science

Earth Science

Earth Science

Prerequisites: Placement. Fees: Computer disk, and materials for projects.

CP-Bio

IP Bio

Life Science

TA Biology

CP Chem

CP Chem

Physics AP Bio Ecology

Ecology Physics

Ecology Physics

Course Description: This science course is an interdisciplinary approach to man's search for truth about his world. This class focuses on primarily biological issues and concepts but some physical science is covered throughout the school year. Students can expect “handson” laboratory work, experiences on the Internet, and investigative work in the IMC. The goal of the IP science is to cover science in thematic units. Projects are required to successfully complete the course. Students must be concurrently enrolled in IP English.

Life - A 9th

AC Bio

10th

AC Chem.

11th 12th

Physics AP Chem. AP Biology AP Biology AP Physics AP Chem.

LIFE SCIENCE A

SC211

1 Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: By Special Placement Only Fees: None

CHEMISTRY (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY) All Year – 1 Credit – 10

Course Description: Activity oriented course designed so students can easily learn the basic concepts in Biology. Among units covered are the scientific method, cell structure, genetics, plants, animals, and ecology. You cannot take Life Science if you have had Biology or are currently enrolled in Biology.

CP BIOLOGY

SC203

Prerequisite: See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements. - Acceptance into the sophomore level of the Academy. Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”) notebook, index cards, folders, and materials for projects, scientific calculator. Course Description: In this course students will study the following topics: classification of matter, energy changes in matter, phases of matter, atomic structure, electron configurations, the Period Table of Elements, bonds between atoms, chemical formulas and nomenclature, and the mathematics of chemistry, kinetics, energy, pH, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The goals of the

SC201

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisites: Placement Fees: Computer disk and materials for projects

30


Fees: Materials for projects

course are to integrate the study of mathematics (especially algebra) into chemistry, to improve problem-solving skills and reasoning ability.

CP CHEMISTRY

Course Description: This course is designed to fulfill the respective semester of the required Earth Science course. It may not be used more than once for each particular semester. Students from all learning pathways will use this course to replace the respective semester of the Earth Science course failed. Skill focus will be on data interpretation used on the ACT exam. The content of the course will be a combination of topics from chemistry, geology, meteorology, and astronomy. Students may not repeat this course.

SC204

All Year - 1 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisites: Pass CP Biology/AC Biology and Algebra 1 with a C or higher, concurrent enrollment in a math course is strongly recommended. Fees: Computer disk, notebook, index cards, folders, scientific calculator, and materials for projects

BIOLOGY (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

Course Description: In this course students will study the following topics: classification of matter, energy changes in matter, phases of matter, atomic structure, electron configurations, the Period Table of Elements, bonds between atoms, chemical formulas and nomenclature, and the mathematics of chemistry, kinetics, energy, pH, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. The goals of the course are to integrate the study of mathematics (especially algebra) into chemistry, to improve problemsolving skills and reasoning ability.

AC CHEMISTRY All Year

Prerequisite: See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements. - Acceptance into the junior level of the Academy. Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”), notebook, index cards, folders, and materials for projects, scientific calculator. Course Description: Introductory lab course in which emphasis will be placed on man and his need to understand nature and his relation to it. Among the topics included are: ecology and community relationship, microorganisms and disease, plant/animal structure, function of genetics, and human heredity. Students will participate in both a dissection and research projects. Students will use graphing programs and spreadsheets.

SC205

- 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: AC Biology, a “C” or better in Algebra 2 and/or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 and had received a “B” or higher in Geometry. CP Biology students need to gain approval from the science Division Chair and/or AC Chemistry teacher.

ENVIRONMENTAL ECOLOGY

SC220

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 11, 12 Prerequisite: Pass Biology and Chemistry or Earth Science with a “C” or better. Fees: Minor costs of field trips

Fees: Computer disk and scientific calculator required (approximately $100). Materials needed for quarter projects.

Course Description: The interrelationship of organisms and their environments is explored with an emphasis on human impacts. An exploration of rivers, streams, and groundwater takes place through outdoor field studies. Students should be prepared to participate in outdoor field work on and off campus as these are integral to the course content.

Course Description: This is a lab-oriented course intended for motivated students planning on pursuing a science career. It encourages students to think independently, to derive generalizations and to solve problems. Through inquiry, reasoning and interpretation, the student will gain a better understanding of what a chemist does and how chemistry inter-relates with the quality of life, and the degree of technology and socialpolitical climate throughout the world. Units of study include: atomic theory, mole concept, chemical bonding, energy changes, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, and acid-base theory. Students will participate in quarterly research projects.

EARTH SCIENCE R

SC214

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

PHYSICS

SC209

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – Elective 11, 12 (Beginning with the Class of 2012, Physics will not be grade weighted.)

SC2161/SC2163

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Grade 10 only Prerequisite: Replaces corresponding semester of Earth Science 31

Prerequisites: Biology, Chemistry, and a "C" or higher in Algebra 2, or concurrently enrolled in Algebra 2 having received a "B" or higher in Geometry. Written permission of the physics teacher is required if qualifications are other than those listed above. Fees: Scientific calculator (approximately $15 - 100).


AP PHYSICS Course Description: Algebra and geometry based course with an emphasis placed on problem solving skills. Topics of study include: motion, mechanics, energy, light, waves, electricity and magnetism. The entire universe is analyzed from celestial bodies to sub nuclear particles. Concepts are reinforced through laboratory investigations.

Prerequisites: Physics, Precalculus or concurrent enrollment in Calculus. Written permission from the Physics teacher is required if qualifications are other than those listed. Fees: Scientific calculator required (approximately $100), Advanced Placement Examination fees

AP COURSES AVAILABLE FOR THE ACCELERATED PLACEMENT PATHWAY

Course Description: Course is designed to be the equivalent of freshman college physics. Students should be self-motivated and have good study habits. Nightly homework is very common. This course will further the student's understanding of the physical world. Areas of study include mechanics, heat, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, as well as modern physics.

The A.P. courses require additional time for laboratory experiences, thus one and one-half periods of class time is scheduled. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam. Passing this course does not assure college credit; college credit depends on the score received on the A.P. Exam and the discretion of the college.

AP BIOLOGY

SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR

SC207

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated for a total of one credit.

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 11, 12 Prerequisites: AC Biology, Accelerated Chemistry, enrollment in Physics is recommended. Fees: Purchase Cliff’s Notes Study Guide to AP Biology, AP Biology Lab Manual, and AP Examination fees

Prerequisite: Science Division Chair/Technology Coordinator approval, by special permission only. A written plan of study and an agreement with a teacher to serve, as mentor must be completed. Fees: Materials for project

Course Description: Designed to be equivalent to freshman college biology. A thorough presentation of the concepts of biology including laboratory investigations will be undertaken. Topics to be studied will include: microbiology, cell physiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics and evolution.

AP CHEMISTRY

SC210

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) – 12 Offered for 2009-10 and 2011-12 School Years

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized science/technology credit and help prepare classroom laboratory materials and support technology (i.e. Pasco Science-Technology lab). The plan of study may include an in-depth laboratory project in the area of study as well as a review of scientific literature to support the project

SC206

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 11, 12 Offered for 2010-11 and 2012-2013 school years Prerequisites: AC-Biology, Accelerated Chemistry, Algebra 2. Enrollment in Physics is recommended. Fees: Required materials—bound lab notebook, scientific calculator (approximately $100), Cliff Notes Study Guide to AP Chemistry, AP Examination fees Course Description: Designed to be the equivalent of freshman college chemistry. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam. Kinetics, thermodynamics, inorganic and organic chemistry and reaction predictions are among the topics to be covered. Labs are scheduled an average of twice weekly. Occasionally students may be required to meet before or after school for additional lab preparation.

32


SOCIAL STUDIES The philosophy of the Social Studies courses at Zion-Benton Township High School is that we promote the dignity and worth of each individual who lives in the society and provide students with an understanding of their culture and its values, along with the necessary skills and attitudes to make choices. Glenn Simon, Division Chair 847-731-9540 - simong@zbths.org

SPECIAL NOTES 1) All Social Studies Classes for freshmen are by placement based on school district sponsored 8th Grade testing. 2) All Social Studies classes require that students purchase materials for projects. Several courses also require the purchase of computer disks. 3) Several AP courses require summer reading. 4) ALL Social Studies courses require that students complete assigned homework.

UNITED STATES HISTORY A

English together in a team-taught environment using a “thematic and multicultural” approach to teaching. The class uses literature and technology to explore what it means to be an American and the development of the nation, past and present, through the contributions of African Americans, Native Americans, Asians, and Hispanics as well as European Americans.

SS304

All Year - 1 Credit - 11 Prerequisite: By Special Placement Only Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: This course is an adaptation of the general American History class. It is a survey of United States History from foundation to present, covering major events and concepts of our heritage. It affords the student additional assistance that would not be available in a general course. The class is co- taught by a regular Social Studies teacher and a L.D. Specialist. Some areas are: (1) Establishment of a National Government; (2) Sectionalism and Nationalism; (3) Extension of democracy; (4) How our Union was endangered and preserved; (5) Industrialism and westward expansion; (6) Democratic reforms of the 20th century; (7) 20th Century foreign affairs; (8) 21st Century challenges and triumphs on the domestic front. The student will study the history of women in America and events of Black History.

AMERICAN STUDIES

CP UNITED STATES HISTORY

SS306

All Year - 1 Credit - 11 Prerequisite: Reading at or above grade level Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: An in-depth study of United States History from the Colonial Era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on outside primary and secondary source readings and/or a research paper. Tests will include essay responses ranging from the analytical to the descriptive. Students in this course must meet the College-Prep Pathway requirement. Some areas of study are: 1. Establishment of Colonies in North America 2. Sectionalism and Nationalism 3. Rise of Democracy 4. How our Union was endangered and preserved 5. Rise of Industry and Westward expansion 6. Democratic Reforms of the Twentieth Century

UNITED STATES HISTORY (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

SS305

SS312

All Year - 1 Credit - 11

All Year - 2 Credits - 11 - meets graduation requirements for United States History.

Prerequisite: See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements - Acceptance into the junior level of the Academy. Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”) and materials for projects

Prerequisite: Placement Fees: Materials for projects and paperback texts required Course Description: The American Studies course is designed for the student interested in studying History and

Course Description: This interdisciplinary course will 33


Social Studies teacher and a L.D. specialist. Units of study will include: (1) Basic Concepts; (2) The United States Constitution; (3) Political Parties; (4) Congress; (5) The Presidency; (6) Consumer Education; (7) Civil Rights; (8) the Federal Judiciary; (9) the Illinois Constitution; (10) Proper display of the United States Flag. Students may be required to participate in community service projects.

be combined with English 3 (Technology Academy) and delivered in a team-taught environment using a “thematic and multicultural� approach to teaching. In-depth study of American History from the Colonial Era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on outside readings and/or a research paper. Tests will include essay answers ranging from descriptive to analytic answers. Some areas are: 1) establishment of a National Government; 2) Sectionalism and Nationalism; 3) extension of democracy; 4) How our Union was endangered and preserved; 5) industrialism and westward expansion; 6) democratic reforms of this century; 7) 20th Century foreign affairs; 8) 21st Century challenges and triumphs on the domestic front. The student will study the history of women in America and events of Black History.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

In addition, the student will complete the state-required unit on history of women in America, events in Black History, and Consumer Economics. Within the Consumer Economics unit students will learn how to write a resume, balance a checkbook, reconcile a bank statement, read an amortization chart, and participate in investment strategies by the use of the Internet Investing Simulations and Economic Literacy activities. THE CONSUMER ECONOMICS UNIT IS COMPLETED DURING THE 3RD QUARTER.

SS307 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 11

SS309

All Year - 1 Credit - 12 Prerequisite: Must have received an "A" or "B" in CP or AC Social Studies, must read at the 10th grade level, must have a "B" or better in Accelerated English or a "B" or better in CP English, and may need approval of the instructor. Fees: A.P. examination required

Prerequisite: Placement Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: Survey of United States Government divided into: (1) Basic Concepts and Foreign Relation; (2) the United States Constitution; (3) Political Parties; (4) Congress; (5) the Presidency; (6) Consumer Education; (7) Civil Rights; (8) the Federal Judiciary; (9) the Illinois Constitution; (10) proper display of the United States flag. Students may be required to participate in community service projects.

Course Description: College-level survey course tracing the development of the American experience from the Age of Exploration and Discovery to the present. Emphasis is placed on a variety of interpretations of important periods in American history, such as the War for Independence, the Age of Jackson, the Civil War and its aftermath, the Progressive Era, and the New Deal. Students will read about 150 pages per week and will write required essays in preparation for the AP Exam in May. In addition, the student will complete the state required units on history of women in America and events of Black History.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT A

SS308

All Year - 1 Credit - 12

In addition, the student will complete the state-required unit on history of women in America, events in Black History, and Consumer Economics. Within the Consumer Economics unit, students may learn how to write a resume, balance a checkbook, reconcile a bank statement, and participate in investment strategies through the use of the Internet and Economic Literacy activities. THE CONSUMER ECONOMICS UNIT IS COMPLETED DURING THE 3RD QUARTER. Students must also pass the state required U.S. Constitution and Illinois Constitution tests.

Prerequisite: By Special Placement Only Fees: Materials for projects

CP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

Course Description: This course is an adaptation of the general American Government class. It affords the student additional assistance that would not be available in a general course. The class is team taught by a regular

All Year - 1 Credit - 12 Prerequisite: Placement

34

SS310


Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: The major goal of this course is to increase the students’ political knowledge and awareness of our political system. Students will be required to do outside reading from several supplementary sources, complete individual projects and reports, and participate in small group activities and simulations.

Congress; 5) the Presidency; 6) Consumer Education; 7) Civil Rights; 8) the Federal Judiciary; 9) the Illinois Constitution; 10) Proper display of the United States Flag. Included in this course is the Proficiency Test on the United States and Illinois Constitutions and flag code that is required by state law.

The course is divided into: 1) Basic Concepts; 2) the United States Constitution; 3) Political Parties; 4) Congress; 5) the Presidency; 6) Consumer Education; 7) Civil Rights; 8) the Federal Judiciary; 9) the Illinois Constitution; 10) Proper display of the United States Flag. Included in this course is the Proficiency Test on the United States and Illinois Constitutions and flag code that is required by state law. Students may be required to participate in community service projects.

In addition, the student will complete the state-required unit on history of women in America, events in Black History, and Consumer Economics. Within the Consumer Economics unit students will learn how to write a resume, balance a checkbook, reconcile a bank statement, read an amortization chart, and participate in investment strategies by the use of the Internet Investing Simulations and Economic Literacy activities. THE CONSUMER ECONOMICS UNIT IS COMPLETED DURING THE 3RD QUARTER.

AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

In addition, the student will complete the state-required unit on history of women in America, events in Black History, and Consumer Economics. Within the Consumer Economics unit, students will learn how to write a resume, balance a checkbook, reconcile a bank statement, and participate in investment strategies by the use of the Internet Investing Simulations and Economic Literacy activities. THE CONSUMER ECONOMICS UNIT IS COMPLETED DURING THE 3RD QUARTER.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

SS311

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - 12 - Meets graduation requirement, U.S. and Illinois Constitution Requirement, and State Consumer Education requirement. Prerequisite: Must have received an "A" or "B" in AP or CP American History, must read at the 11th grade level, must have a "B" or better in Accelerated or CP English, and may need written approval of the instructor. Fees: A.P. examination required.

SS313

Course Description: The Advanced Placement Course in United States Government and Politics is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that make up the American political reality.

All Year - 1 Credit - 12 - Meets graduation requirement, U.S. and Illinois Constitution Requirement and Consumer Education requirement Prerequisite: See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements - Acceptance into the senior level of the Academy. Student must purchase / possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”) and materials for projects

The subjects that the course covers include Constitutional Arrangements, policy making institutions such as the Legislature, the Executive, the Bureaucracy, and the Courts, Public Opinion and the Media, Political Participation and Voting Behavior, Political Parties, Interest Groups, Election Laws and Election Systems, Civil Liberties and Rights, and accelerated Budget Making. THE CONSUMER ECONOMICS UNIT IS COMPLETED DURING THE 3RD QUARTER.

Course Description: The major goal of this course is to increase the students’ political knowledge and awareness of our political system. Students will be required to do outside reading from several supplementary sources, complete Engaged Learning and interdisciplinary projects, and participate in small group activities and simulations. Students may be required to participate in community service projects.

Tests are designed to simulate the AP Exams. Questions, both multiple choice and essay from past exams are used. Students will interpret charts, graphs,

The course is divided into: 1) Basic Concepts; 2) the United States Constitution; 3) Political Parties; 4)

35


CP United States History, CP English 3, AC English 3, AC Biology or AP Biology. Students must read at 11th grade level. Students may need the written approval of the instructor. Fees: Advanced Placement Examination

and political cartoons. This kind of practice will make students less apprehensive for the real AP Exam. In addition, the student will complete the state-required units of the United States and Illinois Constitutions, the flag code, and Consumer Education. Within the Consumer Economics unit, students will learn how to balance a checkbook, reconcile a bank statement, and participate in investment strategies by the use of the Internet Investing Simulations and Economic Literacy activities. The Advanced Placement Examination is a course requirement for credit.

Course Description: Advanced Placement Psychology is designed for the highly motivated student and will provide a solid background for college psychology courses. This course deals with the study of human behavior. Topics to be developed include: History and Approaches of Psychology, Research Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Psychology, Treatment of Psychological Disorders, and Social Psychology. Research projects are required. The Advanced Placement Examination is a requirement for credit.

Students who receive a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Exam may receive from 3 to 9 hours of college credit in history or political science, depending upon the college and its departmental policies. Students may be required to participate in community service projects.

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES PSYCHOLOGY I

SS315

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 12 Prerequisite: Open only to qualified 12th grade students who earned a “C” average or above in United States History. Fees: Materials for projects

SOCIOLOGY I Prerequisite: None Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: This course deals with the study of human behavior. Topics to be developed include: Introduction / History / Research Methods of Psychology, Biological Bases of Behavior, Consciousness, Sensation and Perception, Motivation & Emotion, Learning, and Life Span Development.

PSYCHOLOGY II

Course Description: This course deals with the study of society. Sociology is concerned with groups – how they are formed and how they change – and with the actions of individuals within groups. Topics to be developed include Introduction to Sociology, Sociologists Doing Research, Culture, Socialization, Social Structure and Society, Social Stratification, Inequalities of Race and Ethnicity, and Inequalities of Age and Gender.

SS316

Second Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 12 Prerequisite: Psychology 1 Fees: Materials for projects

SOCIOLOGY II

SS324

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11, 12

Course Description: This course deals with a reinforcement of the foundations acquired during Psychology I. Topics to be developed include: Personality and its Assessment, Stress and Health, Psychological Disorders, Treatment of Psychological Disorders, and Social Psychology. A research project may be required.

AP PSYCHOLOGY

SS321

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11, 12

Prerequisite: Sociology I Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: This course deals with a reinforcement of the foundations acquired during Sociology I. Sociology II is a study of contemporary social problems that plague different levels of society. Students will examine these problems using the conflict, symbolic interactionist, and functionalist perspectives. Topics to be developed include, but are not limited to, Social Institutions, Population and Urbanization, Collective Behavior and Social Movements, and Social

SS317

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective 12 Prerequisites: Open only to qualified 12th grade students who have received an “A” or “B” average in one of the following courses: AP United States History,

36


Change and Modernization. A research project may be required.

SOCIAL STUDIES R

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

SS3001/SS3003

Either Semester - . .05 credit - Grade 10 only.

TC690

(See Lake County High School Technology Campus) SOCIAL STUDIES SEMINAR

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated for a total of 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Replaces corresponding semester of Social Studies Fees: Materials for projects

Prerequisite: Division Chair approval Fees: To be set

Course Description: This course is designed to fulfill the respective semester of the Social Studies course. It may not be used more than once for each particular semester. Students from all learning pathways will use this course to replace the respective semester of the Social Studies course failed. This course does not full United States History or the United States Government graduation requirements. This course will use workshop strategies. The content of the course will not necessarily repeat any specific content of any other required course.

Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Social Studies credit. The course includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study. Written teacher and department head approval is required.

Students may not repeat this course.

37


SPECIAL EDUCATION Zion Benton Township High School provides all students with disabilities a free and appropriate public education. Student’s parents/guardians serve as team members with the public school in determining eligibility for and provisions of special education services. Every identified student will be assigned a case manager to facilitate registration, monitor state-required documentation and provide assistance to students, teachers, and parents. Zion-Benton Township High School offers a full curriculum to those students needing special educational services. On-campus educational programs are available for students with special needs in the categorical areas of learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities, emotional disturbances, autism, physical disabilities, other health impairments, hearing and vision impairments, and speech and language disabilities. The major goals of the District Special Education Department are: 1) To provide the specialized instruction necessary for a student with identified special needs to have an opportunity to earn a high school diploma in the least restrictive environment needed for success. 2) To ensure, as much as possible, that each student is encouraged: a. To identify strengths and to minimize weaknesses, b. To accept a major portion of the responsibility for the quality of his/her life, c. To view oneself as a capable human being able to contribute to the home and school community, d. To actively engage in planning a post-high school career. In order to achieve these goals, the District Special Education Department has designed a continuum of resource and instructional services that can be adapted to meet the needs of identified handicapped students. Students will be registered for general education classes unless the student’s individual educational plan (IEP) specifies a more restrictive environment. The goal is to meet the education and emotional needs of student using the least restrict environment appropriate to the individual child. To offer a full continuum of special education options, Zion Benton Township High School works with the Special Education District of Lake County (SEDOL), to provide special education services unique to individual children and their families. Dr. Susan Lichter, Director of Special Education 847-731-9501 – lichters@zbths.org

BASIC MATH 2 BASIC ENGLISH 2

SP255

All Year - 1 Credit - 10

SP251

All Year - 1 Credit - 10 Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission. L.D. Math 1, or other math credit (one credit) Fees: None

Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission and English 1 Fees: None Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with I.E.P. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.

BASIC ENGLISH 3, 4

Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.

SP252 BASIC MATH 3

All Year - 1 Credit - 11, 12

SP257

All Year - 1 Credit - 11 Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission and English 2 Fees: None

Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission and Basic Math 2. Fees: None

Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with I.E.P. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student.

Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. This math class is designed to develop students understanding of basic math concepts. Students in this class will learn 38


oceanography, mineralogy, and the earth’s natural resources. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student. This course is designed to meet Illinois State Learning Standards in Science.

introductory pre-algebra and geometry concepts as well as practical math skills that have real world applications.

BASIC UNITED STATES HISTORY

SP259

All Year - 1 Credit - 11 Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Fees: None

LEARNING SKILLS CENTER

Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student. The student will study the contributions of women and minorities in American history and politics.

BASIC UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Fees: None Course Description: Designed for the individual student. It is the intent of the Learning Skills Program to assist students in all areas. The main academic concern will be in language arts and math.

SP260

All Year - 1 Credit - 12

BASIC HEALTH

Prerequisites: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Fees: None

Prerequisite: Identified special education students with sophomore status and approval of Director. Fees: None Course Description: Basic Health is designed to meet state health goals and learning outcomes, as well as graduation requirements. Methods and materials are meant to meet each student's individual educational needs while providing instruction in the required areas of mental and physical health and well being.

SP256

All Year – 1 credit – 10, 11

BASIC HEALTH 2

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Department head and parent permission Fees: None

SP2631/SP2633

1 Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Basic Health 1 and approval of Special Education Department Fees: None

Course Description: Basic Biology is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Activity oriented course will allow students to easily learn the basic concepts of Biology. Among units covered are scientific method, cell structure, plants, animals, and ecology. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student. This course is designed to meet Illinois State Learning Standards in Science.

BASIC ECOLOGY

SP262

1 Semester - .50 Credit - 10, 11, 12

Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student. The student will study the contributions of women and minorities in American history and politics.

BASIC BIOLOGY

SP2611/SP2613

Either Semester - .25 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated

Course Description: A continuation of Basic Health 1, reviewing major body systems and expanding discussion to include nutrition, physical fitness, mental and emotional health, parenting, and drug and alcohol related topics. This course may be taken as a science credit and may be repeated with the permission of the instructor and Director.

VOCATIONAL CAREERS 9-10

SP267

All Year - 1 Credit

SP266

All Year – 1 credit – 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Fees: None

Course Description: Designed to give the student basic pre-vocational skills. Course will include an appropriate on-campus job. During the sophomore year, students will participate in the vocational assessment program at the Lake County High School Technology Campus. Course can be repeated for credit.

Course Description: Basic Earth Science is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. The Earth Science course is designed to increase student’s awareness of the universe they live in. Among units covered are astronomy, geography, geology, meteorology, 39


VOCATIONAL CAREERS 11-12

Course Description: COP Basic Math 9-10 is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of math ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to student. Course can be repeated for credit.

SP278

All Year - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

COP MATH 11-12

Course Description: Focus is on the continued development of pre-vocational skills. Course can be repeated for credit.

COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

SP279

Variable Schedule and Credit

Course Description: COP Basic Math 11-12, designed, as a continuation of Basic Math 9-10, is to accept eligible students at their present level of math ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to student. Course can be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Course Description: Provides on-the-job training. Course can be repeated for credit.

COMMUNITY WORK EXPERIENCE

SP273

All Year - 1 Credit

SPWORK

COP LIFE SKILLS 2

Variable Schedule and Credit

SP239

All Year - 1 Credit - may be substituted for science

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

Prerequisite: Special Education Junior or Senior with Director approval

Course Description: A special cooperative program between the District and the Special Education District of Lake County. Appropriate students are referred to the program by their Pre-Vocational Coordinator and case manager. Selected students are bused from school to a designated site in the community. Provides on-the-jobtraining. Course can be repeated for credit

Course Description: COP Life Skills 2 is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course will focus on Independent Living, Life Skills, and Survivor Economics. Course utilizes materials, methods, and objectives appropriate to the student. May be substituted for one credit of science for eligible students.

VETERANS/ADMINISTRATION/TRAINING PROGRAM CAREERS CLASS (VATP)

SP280

COP LANGUAGE ARTS 9-10

SP270

Variable Schedule and Credit

All Year - 1 Credit

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

Course Description: A special cooperative program between the District and the Veterans Administration. Appropriate students are referred to the program by their Pre-Vocational Coordinator and base team. Selected students are bused from their home to the VA Medical Center in North Chicago where they work in selected areas at the hospital. They are provided a cafeteria-style lunch, and then returned by bus to the high school for courses in the afternoon.

Course Description: COP Language Arts 9-10 is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of language ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course utilizes materials, methods and objectives appropriate to student. Course can be repeated for credit.

COP MATH 9-10

COP LANGUAGE ARTS 11

SP271

All Year - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Course Description: COP Language Arts 11 is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of language ability. Student will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP.

SP268

All Year - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

COP LANGUAGE ARTS 12 All Year - 1 Credit 40

SP272


Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

COP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Course Description: COP Language Arts 12 is designed to accept eligible students at their present level of language ability. Student will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP.

COP SOCIAL STUDIES 9-10

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course includes study of state and U.S. Constitutions. The student will study the contributions of women and minorities in American history and politics.

SP274

All Year - 1 Credit Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course will focus on geography and map skills.

COP UNITED STATES HISTORY

SP276

All Year - 1 Credit

TEACHING APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR PROGRAM COURSES

SP275

All Year - 1 Credit The Teaching Appropriate Behavior Program adapts regular level courses to materials and methods appropriate to the individual student.

Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education Director and parent permission

COURSES OFFERED:

Course Description: Designed to accept eligible students at their present level of ability. Students will work toward completion of course goals consistent with IEP. Course will focus on history, government, mass communications and transportation skills within the community. The student will study the contributions of women and minorities in American history and politics.

TAB Language Arts TAB Reading TAB Math TAB Social Studies TAB Health

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TAB Science TAB Learning Resource Center TAB Vocational Careers TAB Family &Consumer Science


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS The Visual and Performing Arts Department provides students with the opportunity to grow artistically and to develop the skills necessary to creatively express themselves through their art. Students are encouraged to find their own modes of self-expression by developing creative solutions to problems in music, art and drama. We believe the arts are an important part of a well-rounded education and we welcome students of all ability levels to explore the arts with us. Glenn Simon, Division Chair 847-731-9540 – simong@zbths.org

INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO ART: INTRODUCTION TO ART

VP701

VP717

PORTFOLIO PREPARATION

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

All Year - 1 Credit - (Grade Weighted) - Elective 11

Prerequisite: None Fees: Materials for projects

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art. Written approval from instructor Helpful Courses: Drawing and Painting 1, 2, Ceramics, 3-D, Jewelry Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: A lab class designed for the student interested in learning basic skills in art. Areas of study will include both two-dimensional and three-dimensional work in drawing, painting, ceramics, and jewelry. Students will work with various art media, including pencil, colored pencil, marker, watercolor, clay and metal. This course is a prerequisite to other art courses for freshmen, sophomores and juniors and is recommended, but not required, for seniors.

3-D ART 1

Course Description: The course is preparatory for the senior year when the AP Art student will prepare his/her art portfolio. Students choose to work on projects for the Drawing Portfolio, 2-D Design Portfolio, or for 3-D Design Portfolio. The course will emphasize drawing skills and spatial relationships. A variety of drawing media will be used. Sketchbook drawing homework will be assigned weekly.

VP714

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

AP STUDIO ART Prerequisite: Introduction to Art (Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors) Seniors – no prerequisite Fees: Materials for projects

Prerequisite: Introduction to AP Studio Art. Written approval from instructor Helpful Courses: Drawing and Painting 1, 2, Ceramics, 3-D, Jewelry. Fees: Art materials and AP exam required

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in working three-dimensionally. Students will work with various media, including metal, wood, clay, plaster, textiles and paper. Areas of study will include design, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, textiles and jewelry.

3-D ART 2

VP718

All Year - 1 Credit (Grade Weighted) - Elective 12

Course Description: A course for students preparing an art portfolio (Drawing, 2-D Design, or 3-D Design) for the AP Studio Art exam. The course is individualized to student needs. Each student will prepare and submit an outline of proposed projects of his/her choice to be completed. The teacher will act as a resource person to the student as projects progress.

VP715

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

CALLIGRAPHY Prerequisite: 3-D Art 1 Fees: Materials for projects

VP702

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Student supplies pen and ink.

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in advanced three-dimensional study. Students will complete longer term, more extensive, and more sophisticated three-dimensional art pieces using various media. This course may be repeated.

Course Description: A lab class designed to teach useful skills in hand lettering. Students learn basic Italic alphabet, both capital and lower case. Students will produce hand lettered and decorated art works. Class involves homework. 42


Design Web Site.

CERAMICS 1

VP703 DRAWING 1

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

VP707

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Art (Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors) Seniors – no prerequisite Fees: Materials for projects

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art (Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors) Seniors – no prerequisite Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in working with clay. Students will experience hand-building, sculpture, "throwing on the potter's wheel," and glazing techniques. Useful and ornamental objects will be built.

CERAMICS 2

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in expanding and improving their drawing skills. Experiences include work in pencil, colored pencil, pastel, scratchboard and ink. Sketchbook drawing homework will be assigned weekly.

VP7041/VP7043 DRAWING 2

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this class.

VP7081/VP7083

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 Fees: Materials for projects

Prerequisite: Drawing 1 Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: A lab class designed for the student wishing to expand skills in clay. Hand building skills will be expanded and more emphasis will be placed on improved techniques of "throwing on the potter's wheel." Useful and ornamental objects will be built.

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in advanced drawing skills. Students will explore studies in still life, landscape, portraiture, and perspective. Students may also use printmaking techniques to create multiples of their images. May be repeated. Sketchbook drawing homework will be assigned weekly.

GRAPHIC ART DESIGN 1

VP705

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

JEWELRY 1

Prerequisite: Drawing 1 Fees: Materials for projects

Prerequisite: Introduction to Art (Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors) Seniors – no prerequisite Fees: Materials for projects

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in basic graphics arts techniques. Students will learn design, layout and computer applications that are used in the advertising industry. Adobe Illustrator and MacroMedia Dreamweaver as well as other applications will be explored. Illustrations will be designed and produced on the computer and the final work will be compiled into a web site that the students create. Curriculum content can be viewed on the Graphic Art Design Web Site. This course is open to Technology Academy students in their junior or senior year without the prerequisite art classes.

GRAPHIC ART DESIGN 2

VP709

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in developing skills in jewelry making with metals and craft jewelry. Students will learn techniques in sawing, soldering, stone setting, casting and finishing. Useful and/or ornamental objects will be designed and built.

JEWELRY 2

VP7101/VP7103

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course.

VP706 Prerequisite: Jewelry 1 Fees: Materials for projects

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Graphic Art Design 1 Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in advanced graphic design techniques. Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, MacroMedia Dreamweaver as well as other applications will be explored. Illustrations and computer-generated images created in Photoshop will be compiled into a student generated web site using Dreamweaver. Art students wishing to attend college majoring in graphic arts will be able to have a portfolio of digital images for admissions into college programs. Curriculum content can be viewed on the Graphic Art

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in improving skills in metal work. Emphasis will be placed on advanced soldering and casting techniques.

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PAINTING 1

presentations. Field trips to an art museum and a live musical performance will be included. This course is recommended for all students, but especially for those planning to go on to college.

VP711

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Introduction to Art (Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors) Seniors – no prerequisite Helpful Course: Drawing 1 Fees: Materials for projects

ART SEMINAR

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in expanding and improving their painting skills. Students will work in both abstract and realistic styles using watercolor and tempera paints. Sketch/Paint book homework will be assigned.

PAINTING 2

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11, 12 - May be repeated for a total of one (1.0) credit. Prerequisite: Written approval from instructor and Division Chair Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: A lab class designed for students wishing independent study in a specialized art area. The student and instructor will establish course objectives.

VP7121/VP7123

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Painting 1 Fees: Materials for projects

TELEVISION COURSES

Course Description: A lab class designed for students interested in advanced painting skills. Students will explore studies in both abstract and realistic painting, using watercolor, tempera and acrylic paint. May be repeated. Sketch/Paint book homework will be assigned.

INTRODUCTION TO TELEVISION

SURVEY OF ART AND MUSIC 1

Prerequisite: None Fees: Materials for projects Course Description: A lab class designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of television production. Students learn to operate audio and video equipment and perform exercises to develop technical skills in the studio and on location. Regular seminars explore the production aspects of communication technologies, require homework, and will include afterschool commitments. Students become members of a TV studio crew and must be willing to accept assignments and work independently and in groups to meet deadlines. Introduction to Television is the prerequisite for Television.

VP741

First Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Required field trip fees Course Description: This course will provide students with an overview of art and music in Western civilization from prehistoric times to the 19th Century. Students will explore the characteristics of the art and music in each historical period and the contributions of the major artists and composers. There will be no drawing or singing activities; classes will consist of lectures and audio-visual presentations on painting, sculpture, architecture, instrumental and vocal music, ballet and opera. Field trips to an art museum and a live musical performance will be included. This course is recommended for all students, but especially for those planning to go on to college.

SURVEY OF ART AND MUSIC 2

VP724

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

TELEVISION

VP7251/VP7253

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course. Prerequisite: Introduction to Television Fees: Materials for projects

VP742

Second Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 11, 12

Course Description: A lab class designed to continue the study of television production by crewing and creating programs for ZBTV Channel 19. Students gain further expertise in producing, directing, and using the camera, character generator, audio board, special effects buss, and editing console during both studio and remote shoots. Students will fulfill in-school and after-school commitments with maturity and dedication to excellence.

Prerequisite: None Helpful Courses: Survey of Art and Music 1 Fees: Required field trip fees Course Description: This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore the major trends in art and music of modern times. Twentieth Century revolutions in art and music that will be covered include Impressionism, Abstraction, Op Art, atonality and electronic music. Special attention will be given to the contributions of American artists and composers. There are no drawings or singing activities; classes will consist of lectures and audio-visual

ZBTV MEDIA PRODUCTION All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course.

44

VP728


House.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Television Fees: Materials for projects

ACTING SEMINAR

VP7221/VP7223

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Course Description: ZBTV Media Production is a course designed to introduce the student to the many facets of media production, focusing on the practical application of videotaping and editing. The student will be involved in event planning, shooting exercises, specific sport’s coverage, Sports Journalism, graphic design, editing, Hi-light production and marketing of Hi-light videos. Every student will be involved in shooting, logging, editing, and final productions. This course will require students to participate in after school shooting assignments.

Prerequisite: Acting 1 and 2. Student must have written approval from instructor and Division Chair. Fees: Required field trip fees Course Description: A lab course for advanced acting students who wish to further their skills in vocal and body interpretation of a script. May be repeated. Students are required to attend school plays, Fine Arts Fest and Parent Open House.

STAGECRAFT

THEATRE COURSES INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE

VP727

Prerequisite: None Fees: None

Either Semester - .50 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Required field trip fees

Course Description: Introduces students to the non-acting areas of theatre: set, lights, costume, makeup, and publicity. Designs and projects related to a specific play are required. Acting students will find this course of particular value. This is a hands-on working lab class. Students will use tools and try out make up. Students will be required to try all activities.

Course Description: Introduction to Theatre is designed to give the students with an interest in theatre an overview of the basic skills of this performance art. The students will be immersed in the history of the theatre for one half of the course, and will be exposed to basic acting and stage technical principles for the other half of the course. Attendance at school plays, Fine Arts Fest and Parent Open House is mandatory.

ACTING 1

MUSIC COURSES

VP720

CONCERT BAND

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12

VP731

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 - may be repeated with consent of instructor

Prerequisite: None Helpful Course: Introduction to Theatre Fees: Required field trip fees

Prerequisite: 1) Junior High Band experience/Junior High instructor recommendation. 2) Audition based on note accuracy, rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, and musicianship. 3) Instructor approval. Fees: Required field trip fees and instrument supplies as needed, including a Music Theory workbook.

Course Description: A lab course for beginning acting students that explores a performer's inner resources to create believable action, develop concentration, and strengthen imagination. Acting 1 and Acting 2 students may be members of the same class. Students are required to attend school plays, Fine Arts Fest and Parent Open House.

ACTING 2

VP7231/VP7233

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor.

Course Description/Requirements: Intermediate band participating in the majority of band commitments. Study of fundamentals, performance techniques, and a variety of band music from difference composers and periods. Concert Band students are required to participate in the following rehearsals and performances: 1) Labor Day Parade 2) All home football games 3) Basketball Pep-Band 4) Two Marching Band rehearsals per week (Monday and Thursday 7:00 – 9:00p.m.) 5) Summer Marching Band Camp 6) Concerts (TBA) 7) Honors and Awards Night. 8) Graduation. Note: All Summer rehearsals, Summer Band Camp, and any extra dress rehearsals are required of all band students, including color guard members (Flag Team). Students failing to participate in scheduled summer practices, or do not report to pick up their band uniform without approved excuse from the band director may be requested to drop

VP721

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Acting 1 Fees: Required field trip fees Course Description: A lab course for intermediate acting students that uses scripted material to improve the actor's voice and movement. Analyzing and creating believable characters are emphasized. Movement and voice are studied through pantomime, improvisation, monologue, and memorized scene exercises. Acting 1 and Acting 2 students may be members of the same class. Students are required to attend school plays, Fine Arts Fest and Parent Open 45


band during registration.

SYMPHONIC BAND

techniques and a variety of wind ensemble literature from many different time periods and composers. Wind Ensemble members are required to participate in the following rehearsals and performances: 1) Labor Day Parade 2) All home football games 3) Basketball Pep-Band 4) Two Marching Band rehearsals per week (Monday and Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.) 5) Summer Marching Band Camp 6) Concerts 7) Solo and Ensemble Contest 8) Honors and Awards Night 9) Graduation.

VP732

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course consent of instructor. Prerequisite 1) Junior High Band experience/Junior High instructor recommendation. 2) Audition based on note accuracy, rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, and musicianship. 3) Instructor approval.

Note: All Summer rehearsals, Summer Band Camp, and any extra dress rehearsals are required of all band students, including color guard members (Flag Team). Students failing to participate in scheduled summer practices, or do not report to pick up their band uniform without approved excuse from the band director may be requested to drop band during registration

Fees: Required field trip fees and instrument supplies as needed, including a Music Theory workbook. Course Description/Requirements: Advanced band, with balanced instrumentation, responsible for the majority of band commitments. Study of fundamentals, performance techniques, and a variety of band music from different composers and periods. Symphonic band students are required to participate in the following rehearsals and performances: 1) Labor Day Parade 2) All home football games 3) Basketball Pep-Band 4) Two Marching Band rehearsals per week (Monday and Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.) 5) Summer Marching Band Camp 6) Concerts (TBA) 7) Honors and Awards Night 8) Graduation.

Participation in Concert Band, Symphonic Band, or Wind Ensemble may waive one semester of the physical education semester graduation requirement per year.

MUSIC THEORY 1

Prerequisite: Currently enrolled in or formerly enrolled in a high school band program or choir program. Students must pass a placement exam. Fees: Students will be required to purchase a Music Theory Workbook.

Note: All summer rehearsals, Summer Band Camp, including color guard members (Flag Team). Students failing to participate in scheduled summer practices, or do not report to pick up their band uniform without approved excuse from the band director may be requested to drop band during registration.

BEGINNING GUITAR

Course Description: A music class that focuses on developing a better understanding of musical concepts, i.e. reading music, writing music, harmonic analysis, formal analysis, melodic structure, form, understanding the history of music, and implementation of these ideas into a performance group both inside and outside of class.

VP7381/VP7383

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor Prerequisite: None Fees: Students must purchase two Music Theory workbooks, one Guitar book and guitar picks.

MUSIC THEORY 2

VP747

Sememster2 - .50 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: Music Theory 1 Fees: Students will be required to purchase a Music Theory Workbook

Course Description: Basic instruction in fundamentals of acoustic guitar combined with the study of musical notation, style and form for guitar.

WIND ENSEMBLE

VP746

Semester 1 - .50 Credit – Elective 10, 11, 12

Course Description: An extension of Music Theory 1 that continues to focus on developing a better understanding of musical concepts, i.e. reading music, writing music, harmonic analysis, formal analysis, melodic structure, form, understanding the history of music, and implementation of these ideas into a performance group both inside and outside of class.

VP733

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: 1) Junior High Band experience/Junior High Band instructor recommendation. 2) Audition based on note accuracy, rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, and musicianship. 3) Instructor approval. Fees: Required field trip fees and instrument supplies as needed, including a Music Theory workbook.

ZB CHORUS

VP7391/VP7393

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Prerequisite: None Fees: Students must purchase a Music Theory workbook.

Course Description: Advanced band with balanced instrumentation and one on a part. The Wind Ensemble will focus on the study of music fundamentals, performance

Course Description: This one-semester non-repeatable 46


Course Description: This all-female group is for advanced singers who wish to perform at festivals, contests and community events as well as the Winter and Spring Concerts. Students will learn advanced vocal techniques and develop their solo and ensemble singing skills. Performance literature will include madrigals, spirituals and folk songs, classical choral music, popular, jazz, and show tunes. Experiences in music listening and appreciation and preparation for college music theory are also included.

course will provide students with the opportunity to develop vocal technique and music reading skills. Required performances include the Fall, Winter and Spring Concerts and Fine Arts Festival. Students will sing a variety of music, including traditional, contemporary and popular songs. Experiences in music appreciation will also be included.

TREBLE CHOIR

VP734

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor.

NEW HORIZONS SWING CHOIR Prerequisite: None Fees: Students must purchase a Music Theory workbook.

Prerequisite: Audition required. Admission based on vocal quality, musicianship, stage presence, and voicing needed for choral balance.

Course Description: Beginning female singers will have the opportunity to learn the basics of vocal technique, music notation, and sight singing in this choir. Students will learn to work together as an ensemble through the singing of popular and traditional choral literature. Required performances include the Fall, Winter and Spring Concerts and Fine Arts Festival. Experiences in music listening and appreciation are also included.

VARSITY SINGERS

Fees: Students must purchase a Music Theory workbook. Required field trip fees and purchase of performance attire are also required. Helpful Courses: ZB Chorus, Varsity Singers, Treble Choir, or previous choral experience. Course Description: The Swing Choir is an advanced performing group for male and female singers who wish to perform at festivals, contests and community events as well as the Winter and Spring Concerts. Students will learn advanced vocal techniques and develop their solo and ensemble singing skills. Performance literature will include madrigals, spirituals and folk songs, classical choral music, popular, jazz, and show tunes. Experiences in music listening and appreciation and preparation for college music theory are also included.

VP736

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor Fees: Students must purchase a Music Theory workbook. Helpful Courses: ZB Chorus, Treble Choir or previous choral experience Course Description: This mixed chorus will provide students with an opportunity to develop their vocal technique and music reading skills. Required performances include the Fall, Winter and Spring Concerts and the Fine Arts Festival. This group will perform a variety of literature, including traditional, contemporary, and popular music. Experiences in music listening and appreciation are also included.

SWEET HARMONY SINGERS

VP737

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor.

MUSIC SEMINAR

TBA

Either Semester - .50 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 – Students may repeat this course. Prerequisite: Written teacher and Division Chair approval Fees: None Course Description: Designed for students wishing to obtain specialized Music credit. Includes an in-depth project in the seminar area of study.

VP735

All Year - 1 Credit - Elective 10, 11, 12 Students may repeat this course with consent of instructor Prerequisite: Audition required. Admission based on vocal quality, musicianship, stage presence, and voicing needed for choral balance. Fees: Students must purchase a Music Theory workbook. Required field trip fees and purchase of performance attire are also required. Helpful Courses: ZB Chorus, Treble Choir and/or Varsity Singers

47


LAKE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS The Lake County High School Technology Campus is an extension of the twenty high schools in Lake and McHenry Counties. Training at the Technology Campus is “hands on”. You gain skills by actually doing the work. Projects belong to real customers and the quality of your work is measured against industry standards. Studentoriented enterprises in Cosmetology, Automotive Service, Collision Repair and other programs provide real-world training that can lead directly to employment. Learning at the Technology Campus is individualized. You identify your career goals and receive guidance and instruction from your instructor as to how to reach those goals. Your instructor is guided by current business and industry practices. The Technology Campus strives to be a “School of Opportunity” offering excellence in teaching, technology and partnerships. All classes and fees are subject to change. Tadd Galgan, LCHSTC Coordinator 847-731-9494 - galgant@zbths.org

GAME/JAVA/C++ PROGRAMMING

and media. Additionally, students will learn fundamental Internet technologies necessary for today’s marketplace.

TC679

All Year – 3.0 Credits – Elective – 11, 12 During the second year, students will specialize in either print or web design. They will create advanced projects demonstrating full project life-cycle design skills from ideas to productions. Additionally, second year students will be introduced to multimedia and animation concepts. Advanced second year students may be eligible to obtain industry standard certifications.

Prerequisite: Two years of math, including Algebra I and II or Geometry and Keyboarding Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $5 lab fee Course Description: This course is designed to provide instruction in computer science using the Java and C++ languages. Students will be able to develop games and professional programs using realistic hands-on interdisciplinary exercises. This program will prepare students for the Computer Science Advanced Placement (AP) Exam as prescribed by the College Board. The game programming DigiPen curriculum will focus on programming using C++. Open GL, and Foundational Classes. Internships and Job Shadowing opportunities are available through our local business and industry partners.

GRAPHIC/WEB DESIGN

PHOTOGRAPHIC DESIGN

TC687

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 11, 12 Recommended: Advanced Printing and/or Photography Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $45 lab fee, materials, and access to a 35mm single lens reflex camera with a manual setting override. Students will be given a list of additional supplies needed during program orientation. Course Description: This program provides an understanding of the photography and digital imaging industry. Students will receive extensive training in traditional black and white photography, which includes taking, developing and printing black and white photographs. Digital photography, portrait photography and advertising photography skills are also taught as part of the program. Study will also place a major emphasis on digital imaging using the program Adobe Photoshop. Internships are available with local business partners.

TC663

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 11, 12 Recommended: Advanced Printing and/or Photography Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $45 lab fee. Students will be given a list of additional supplies needed during program orientation. Course Description: The Graphic and Web Design program prepares students for a variety of design careers including desktop publishing industry, web design, graphic design for games and entry-level animation. Students will design and produce a variety of print and digital publications utilizing a variety of software applications and technologies including but not limited to Quark XPress®, Adobe® PhotoshopTM, Adobe® IllustratorTM, Macromedia Flash, Macromedia Dreamweaver, BBEdit, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and mySQL.

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

TC665

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 11, 12 Recommendation: Television and/or Graphic Art Design 1 &2 Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $50 lab fee. Students are responsible for purchasing their own tapes. A list of additional supplies needed, will be given during program orientation and the school year.

First year students will concentrate on the core design skills such as color theory, typography, fundamental design elements, design principles, information architecture, project management, web standards and usability. Students will learn basic drawing skills using a variety of art techniques

Course Description: This program will prepare students for a career in the communications industry. The Television 48


available with local business partners.

Production curriculum provides basic training on studio and ENG cameras, technical directing, directing, audio board operation, graphics and editing of videotape. The program provides a fully equipped television studio and control room. Students enrolled in the program will gain skills needed to obtain an entry-level position in broadcast facility. Internships are available with local business partners.

CERTIFIED NURSE ASSISTING

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Prerequisite: Clean discipline record and a police background check. Fees: To be determined by the LCHS Technology Campus

TC653 Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for the criminal justice and law enforcement field. Students will learn about constitutional law, criminal law, trial procedures, correctional institutions, the laws of arrest, and rules of evidence. Hands-on activities include simulated police scenarios, forensic examination, crime scene investigation, crisis intervention, emergency response, search and seizure, and interrogation techniques. The responsibilities of law enforcement personnel and the importance of professionalism will be emphasized in this program. Professionals from the field will share their experiences and specialty training. Writing and language skills are taught due to the mandatory writing test that many local police departments have for entry into their departments.

(Seniors Only) All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 12 Prerequisite: Medical Assisting Fees: LCHS Technology Campus - $10 lab fee $32 workbook. The Mantoux two (2) step Tuberculosis Skin Test is required for all students. Documentation must be submitted by required deadline. Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for employment as nurse assistants. Students are also prepared for future entry into nursing education programs. Training will include the development of basic nursing skills through lecture, laboratory demonstrations, practice, and clinical experience. Students will also gain skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be eligible to take the written examination for nurse assistant state certification, which is required in this field. Instruction in this program includes a minimum of forty (40) clinical hours held in long-term facilities in the community. Attendance at clinical sites is mandatory for state certification. This program leads to a certification of completion recorded with the Illinois Department of Public Health. Students in this program must be seniors.

COSMETOLOGY

TC690

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective 11, 12

CULINARY ARTS

TC656

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective 11, 12 Recommended: Foods and Nutrition 1 & 2 Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $105 lab fee for first year students. $110 lab fee for second year students. The second year lab fee will be reduced if a thermometer and/or chef’s coat is not needed. Course Description: This program provides culinary and hospitality education designed to prepare students for the many positions in the hospitality industry. Students will gain skills and knowledge in food preparation, nutrition, menu planning, sanitation, equipment operation, inventory control, purchasing, and front-of-the-house customer service skills. Students will also be enrolled in the ProStart program, which is co-sponsored by the Illinois Restaurant Association. Students will utilize their skills by planning, organizing, and preparing several culinary creations for guests. Second year students will gain advanced culinary and hospitality experience and will be eligible for ProStart certification skills. Internships are available with local business partners.

TC657

All Year – 4.0 Credits - Elective 11, 12 - must be taken for 2 years Prerequisite: Juniors –. Math and Science courses Helpful Course: Family and Consumer Science Careers, Foods and Nutrition 1 Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – Approximate $451 kit fee for first year students. Students are responsible for professional quality shoes. Second year students may need to purchase a new $22 smock. Summer hours may be required in order to complete the required 1500 hour of experience and the cost is approximately $200 between the Junior and Senior years.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

TC655

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective 11, 12 Course Description: This program presents the theory, principles, and skills necessary to become a licensed cosmetologist in the State of Illinois. Students will acquire the 1500 clock hours of experience required for licensing while learning how to perform shampoos, make-overs, facials, hair styling, manicuring, sculptured nails, permanent waving, hair coloring and cutting. Students will develop skills in each of the areas mentioned while practicing their techniques in a lab setting. Following the lab phase of the program, students will reinforce their training by working on clients in the Technology Campus salon. Internships are

Recommended: Child Development 2 Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – Completion of the Mantoux two (2) step Tuberculosis Skin Test is required for all first-year students, and documentation must be submitted by required deadline. $30 lab fee for first year students - $20 lab fee for second year students Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for careers in early childhood education. Students will implement age-appropriate activities in one of the two 49


all in a safety conscious environment. These skills along with leadership and communication skills will prepare the student for certification thorough employment opportunities with many fire departments.

operating preschool labs. Students will gain skills in developing activities and educational lessons for the preschool children in creative arts, math, science, music, language, social and emotional development. Instruction will also focus on the positive guidance of child behaviors and their development. Advanced second year students with a Tech Campus teacher recommendation will participate in our Infant/Toddler Center. This experience will expand their knowledge of early childhood education; gain additional hands on experiences with infants and toddlers and aide in their employability status. Students will also be introduced to the organization; management and operation of preschools and child care facilities. Internships are available with local business partners.

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES

MEDICAL ASSISTING

Prerequisite: Application required. Helpful Courses: Family and Consumer Sciences, Foods & Nutrition I and II Fees: LCHS Technology Campus - $35 workbook and a white lab coat. The Course Description: This program provides learning opportunities for students to gain understanding of medical theory, principles, and skills to prepare them for entry-level positions in medical offices, clinics, and other medical environments. Students receive their core training in medical terminology, communication and interpersonal skills, basic body structure and function, and the principles of infection control and medical asepsis. Advanced students gain skills to assist the physician and experiences in the performance of basic laboratory and diagnostic testing. Internships are available with local business partners.

TC651

All Year - 3.0 Credits-Elective - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Algebra, Chemistry or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $35 workbooks. $20 program shirt. Purchasing the EMT B book is recommended. Completion of the Mantoux two (2) step Tuberculosis Skin Test is required for all first-year students, and documentation must be submitted by required deadline.

BUILDING TRADES Course Description: This program prepares students to take the licensure examination of the Illinois Department of Public Health to become an EMT-B. This is a course of instruction in basic emergency medical services as prescribed by the State of Illinois and includes classroom instruction, practical demonstrations, testing, and clinical experiences in a hospital emergency department. The emergency services system, the responsibilities of emergency service personnel, and professionalism will be emphasized. Students will learn American Heart Association Healthcare Provider CPR, patient assessment, stabilization, and initial pre-hospital medical treatment of injuries and ill patients. Students will be expected to produce a portfolio to share with potential affiliated departments within the County. Internships are available with local business/industry partners.

FIRE FIGHTING

TC654

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 11, 12

TC682

All Year - 3 Credits - Elective - 11, 12 Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra Helpful Courses: Exploration in Technology, Woods, Electronics and Drafting Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – 16 or 20 oz. Hammer (steel or fiberglass shank), 25’ or longer x ¾” or 1” steel measuring tape, utility knife, nail set 2/32: cat’s paw nail puller, ¾” wood chisel, speed square, compass for scribing, chalk line w/chalk, nail apron, work boots and work clothing, safety glasses, carpenter pencils, a standard and Phillips screwdriver, and a $8 school sponsored lock. Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for careers in the building construction trades. The curriculum is designed to provide the student with hands-on training over a two year period in each of the following areas: safety practices, the proper use of hand and power tools, carpentry, plumbing, roofing, siding, dry walling, masonry, finish trimming, and various other areas. Upon mastery of the skills for the basic hand and power tools used in the field, students will develop basic construction techniques and job planning skills in the lab. All lab work is followed up with applications at the project house built by the students, financed by the school, and sold to the general public. Internships are available with local partners.

TC686

All Year - 3.0 Credits-Elective - 11, 12 Recommended: Algebra Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology & Chemistry Fees: LCHS Technology Campus - $27 workbook, $30 fire hood, and $18 program shirt. Course Description: This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level fire fighter positions. Students will learn through classroom and guided practice activities the essentials of fire suppression which includes: understanding fire chemistry, wearing personal protective clothing, identifying ropes, tying knots, using fire extinguishers, performing forcible entry, carrying and raising ladders, operating self-contained breathing apparatus, employing search and rescue techniques, working with ventilation tools and practicing hose evolutions on an operating fire engine

COMPUTER ELECTRONIC REPAIR

TC680

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12 Recommended: Pre-Algebra, Computer Electronics Repair I Fees: LCHS Technology Campus - $35 tool kit and $4 safety glasses 50


destructive) and DT (destructive) type testing and inspection procedures. The American Welding Society (AWS) recognizes the Technology Campus Welding program as an Educational Instruction Member. Students can certify their welding skills to meet the AWS structural welding code. Internships are available with local business partners.

Course Description: This program will prepare students for careers in computer and electronics fields (radio, radar, fiber optics). Through “hands on” work, students will use schematic drawings, various types of test equipment and the technicians tools required to diagnose, adjust, test and repair computers and electronic devices. Microelectronics, solidstate devises, numbering systems, and logic circuits relating to digital computers will be mastered. Students will install, maintain, upgrade, and repair microcomputer hardware and software on workstations and network systems. This program will prepare students for the A+ Certification Exam, which is a nationally recognized industry based certification for computer technicians capable of providing technical support and service in all PC environments. Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to diagnose hardware or software failures and perform the actions necessary to correct the problems based on knowledge of the system’s operation. Additionally, students will learn how to provide the necessary support services to system users. Internships are available to students with local business partners.

COMPUTER NETWORKING (CISCO)

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE

Recommended: Electrical Power Mechanics Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – approximately $65.00 lab package, dark blue coveralls, tire pressure gauge, tire valve stem remover, 16’ steel tape measure. Additionally, every student will need an approved tool set approximately $153. Instructors will cover tool sets during the program orientation. Course Description: This program will provide students with a solid foundation of skills to enter the automotive service industry. Students will be able to continue their training in factory sponsored training programs at a local community college or private technical school. Training in the program emphasizes the development of skills in the core service areas utilizing factory procedures and industry standards in the school’s fully operational repair shop. Instruction will feature training on brakes, steering and suspension, electrical systems, engine rebuilding, and engine performance. Upon successful completion of this program, students will be prepared to take the ASE certification exams in the areas emphasized in the program. Junior students may choose to participate in the A-YES program (Automotive Youth Education System) or the ACE Pathway (Automotive Career Exploration), designed to integrate basic skill mastery during internships with local business partners.

TC688

All Year – 3.0 Credits – Elective – 11, 12 Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra Fees: LCHS Technology Campus Course Description: This program is designed to develop practical computer networking knowledge and skills in a hands-on environment. Students will learn the principles and practice of designing, building and maintaining computer networks. This program will also prepare students for the Cisco Certified Networking Associate Exam (CCNA), which is an industry-based certification for network technicians who have demonstrated the capability to install, configure and operate simple-routed LAN, routed WAN, and switched LAN networks. Internships are available with local business partners.

WELDING-FABRICATION

TC670

All Year – 3.0 Credits - Elective – 11, 12

COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY

TC659

All Year - 3.0 Credits - Elective - 11, 12 Recommended: Metals 1 & 2 Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – approximately $100 kit fee for first-year students, $30 kit for second-year students, and $4 safety glasses.

TC667

All Year - 3.0 Credits-Elective - 11, 12 Recommended: Metals I Helpful Course: Exploration in Technology and Advanced Metals Fees: LCHS Technology Campus – $125 kit fee for first year students

Course Description: This program is certified by NATEF (National Automotive Teachers Education Foundation). This program provides students with the fundamental skills of the automotive collision repair industry. Instruction in the program emphasizes both the repair and the refinishing skills associated with restoring a damaged automobile to factory specifications. Using an industry-endorsed curriculum, students will develop core skills in automobile construction, sheet metal damage repair, MIG welding, and basic refinishing. Upon mastery of the skills in core areas, students will gain skills in damage estimating, shop management, heavy collision repair, and finish matching. Students will be prepared to take the ASE certification exams in the areas emphasized in the program and will also be eligible to earn I-CAR Gold Class training points. Internships are available with local business partners.

Course Description: This program stresses hands-on experience gained from extensive practice and application of knowledge learned. The Welding-Fabrication Lab organization and operation simulate a “real world” on the job atmosphere. In addition to technical skills, students learn about employeremployee relationships in preparation for the world of work. Units of instruction include shop safety, oxy-fuel welding and burning, arc welding (stick, MIG, TIG), plasma arc cutting, and automatic shape cutting. Layout and fit-up, blueprint reading, and weld symbols are used to fabricate a variety of metal projects. Students use various NDT (non51


ADDITIONAL COURSE OFFERINGS The courses listed below are not listed under an academic department. These offerings are either subject The courses listed below not listed under an academic department. These offerings are either subject area specific or life skillare specific and require special placement through the course’s coordinator/teacher area specific or life skill specific and require special placement through the course’s coordinator/teacher listed within the course description. listed within the course description.

SENIOR SEMINAR (TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY)

Course Description: The Jobs for Illinois Graduates class is an Education-to-Careers course, which teaches employability skills to selected seniors. The goals of the program are to assist participants in graduating from high school and thereafter finding and keeping quality jobs and/or entering post-secondary course of study leading to a career track position. The class is taught by a Career Specialist whose job is to teach prescribed course content material, conduct employer marketing, be a broker of services, facilitate the student-run chapter of the Illinois Career Association, and provide 12 months of follow-up support services following the graduation of the program participants.

TA001

Semester –Credit-.5 and may be repeated upon approval of instructor Prerequisites: See Technology Academy Eligibility and Expectation Requirements - Acceptance into the Academy. Student must purchase/possess the school endorsed Academy laptop. Fees: Storage Device (Floppy disk, CD-R, or “Jump drive”) and materials for projects. Course Description: Senior Seminar is a required course for graduation from the Technology Academy. This course requires students to identify a career field of interest and complete a research project related to that field. Students will be required to write a research project, complete a bound project, create a product, and present their Senior Project before a panel of judges at the end of the semester. As a part of their project, students will identify a mentor and spend time job shadowing in their area of interest. Other skills will be addressed during the semester such as public speaking, interviewing, and resume writing. Finally, students will assemble their Technology Academy Portfolios. Students wishing to enroll in the course for both semesters may choose to complete a similar project related to a different field of study for the second semester, or they may choose to complete a more extensive project, which would span the whole school year.

INTRODUCTION TO LASER/ PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY

Either Semester - .5 Credit - Elective - 10, 11 May be repeated Prerequisites: By placement only Fees: None Course Description: This class is an introduction to the field of fiber optics. We will cover in this allotted time how lasers work and how lasers are used in industry. Students will use lasers and fiber optics in a practical setting and discover many ways these technologies impact their lives.

LASER OPTIC TECHNOLOGY Student internships at area businesses or opportunities at the Technology Campus or College of Lake County may be available during the school day for students to explore a field of interest. Elective credit will be granted similar to the guidelines for receiving credit in a cooperative education program.

SC228

All Year - 1 Credit – Elective – 10, 11, 12 May be repeated Prerequisites: By placement only Fees: None

Student internships may also be after school opportunities for students. Under this scenario, students will attend school for the full eight period day, and work at the internship after school.

Course Description: This class introduces students to Photonics, one of the fastest growing fields. The demand for photonics technicians is the fastest growing of all technical positions. Students will explore the physical control of light with optics during the course of the class. Mirrors, lens and related items will be used for lab work and includes how lasers work. Emphasis will be given on laser safe operation. The demand for these types of positions is currently far exceeding the supply for graduates in this field. This is especially true in the medical field. Careers in lasers and fiber optics technology are not yet well-known, so qualified people are in demand.

In lieu of an internship, students may select to complete the Senior Project only.

JOBS FOR ILLINOIS GRADUATES

SC227

JB583

All Year – 1 Credit – 12 Elective Credit Prerequisites: By placement only Fees: None 52


HELPFUL NUMBERS AND E-MAIL ADDRESSES ADMINISTRATION Superintendent Dir. Curriculum & Instruction Director of Special Education Athletic Director NTHS Principal ZBHS Principal Asst. Principal Student Services Asst. Principal Ops. & Activities COUNSELORS Students’ Last Names A-CA Students’ Last Names CB-F Students’ Last Names G-JI Students’ Last Names JK-MC Students’ Last Names MD-RA Students’ Last Names RB-S Students’ Last Names T-WAR And Career Counselor Students’ Last Names WAS-Z And College Counselor Registrar (Transcripts)

Chris Clark Dr. Gail Worrell Dr. Susan Lichter Lonnie Bible Anne Buck Brian Curtin Steve Richter Jack Niemi

847-731-9792 847-731-9305 847-731-9501 847-731-9361 847-731-9803 847-731-9303 847-731-9351 847-731-9305

clarkc@zbths.org worrellg@zbths.org lichters@zbths.org biblel@zbths.org bucka@ntzb.org curtinb@zbths.org richters@zbths.org niemij@zbths.org

Suzanne Swanson Dr. William Means Nina Tate Allison Zameck Marsha Paulsen Jennifer Marhefka Cal Schneider

847-731-9341 847-731-9342 847-731-9346 847-731-9348 847-731-9344 847-731-9350 847-731-9345

swansons@zbths.org meansw@zbths.org tateni@zbths.org zamecka@zbths.org paulsenm@zbths.org marhefkj@zbths.org schneidc@zbths.org

Dr. Mary Budzik

847-731-9343

budzikm@zbths.org

Sue Phillips

847-731-9353

phillips@zbths.org

DIVISION CHAIRS Jennifer Brown 847-731-9570 Family Consumer Science Health & Physical Education Science Jesse Michmerhuizen 847-731-9440 Business Education Driver Education Industry & Technology Mathematics Glenn Simon 847-731-9540 Foreign Language Social Science Visual & Performing Arts Michelle Standridge 847-731-9370 English & Reading English Language Learning (ELL) NJROTC

brownj@zbths.org

michmerj@zbths.org

simong@zbths.org

standridm@zbths.org


Zion-Benton Township High School

~Board of Education~ William Bassler, President Frank Walker, Vice President Terri Poulsen, Secretary Michael Cliff, Member Loren Karner, Member Kim Leech, Member Justin Stried, Member

~School Office~ One Z-B Way 21 Street & Kenosha Road Zion, IL 60099 847-731-9300 Fax: 847-731-4440 Web Page: www.zbths.org st


Curriculum Guide