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Print
and
Graphics
 • Checkmate • Art School • Ethnic Tribe

Menswear
 • Printed
Outerwear

 • Indigo
Denim

 • The
New
Camouflage



Brand
Extension




Checkmate. Where
has
it
come
from?
 With
the
return
of
the
country
gentlemen
thanks
to
brands
like
Barbour
and
Hunter
 becoming
staple
in
everyman’s
wardrobe,
we
greet
old
friends
such
as
tartan,
over‐scaled
 plaids
and
‘graph
and
grid’
like
checks,
with
open
arms.

 Perhaps
the
most
prominent
of
these
sub‐trends
is
 tartan.
Tartan
has
become
synonymous
with
Scotland
 and
ScoMsh
history.
However,
tartan
was
originally
a
 style
of
cloth
intended
to
be
decoraNve.
As
tartan
 comes
back
this
season
in
the
world
of
high
fashion,
 it’s
less
about
funcNonal
highland
dress
and
more
 about
senNmentality,
with
nods
to
the
naNonalisNc
 checks
being
picked
out
here
there
and
everywhere.
 But
don’t
let
yourself
be
lulled
into
a
false
sense
of
 nostalgia,
there’s
nothing
retro
about
it,
in
fact
there’s
 something
about
the
reinvenNon
of
tradiNonal
tartan
 that
makes
this
trend
that
liPle
bit
rebellious
–
giving
 a
nod
to
one
of
tartan’s
closest
friends,
punk
culture.




Where
is
it
going?
 With
designers
such
as
John
Galliano,
Pringle
of
Scotland
and
Moschino
all
exhibiNng
‘graph
 and
grid’
checks
and
tradiNonal
tartan
this
season,
it
is
somewhat
refreshing
to
see
brands
 of
a
completely
new
caliber
developing
their
own,
unique
interpretaNon
of
the
paPern.

 Vans
have
translated
tartan
into
 skate‐Scot
with
lePering
picked
 out
of
a
tartan
skateboard,
and
 other
skate
style
brands
have
 followed
suite
by
neon‐izing
the
 colours.
Zoo
York
have
even
given
 tartan
a
gangster
style
remake.
 This
Nme
tartan
is
less
Balmoral,
 and
more
Billy
Connolly.


The
‘checkmate’
family
have
also
given
birth
to
patchwork
prints.
Varying
placements,
Nling
 floral
prints
and
mixing
colour
blocking
with
stripes
to
create
a
fresh,
allover
print.




Art School. Where
has
it
come
from?
 As
the
name
suggests,
the
trend
originates
 from
printed
pictures,
fine
art
and
paint
 explosions,
to
large‐scale
abstract
paPerns,
 creaNve
mixtures
and
Bauhaus
expression.
 InspiraNon
arNst
José
Lerma,
created
a
 mixture
of
painNng
and
intricate
installaNons
 combining
non‐tradiNonal
materials
from
 non‐reflecNve
fabrics,
commercial
carpet,
 thickly
layered,
and
biro
pen.
Some
of
these
 images
feature
Baroque
style
portraits
of
 historic,
famous
French
Bankers
from
18th
 Century
sporNng
over‐exaggerrated
sketchy,
 doodle
wigs
with
distorted
and
blank
faces.

 It
is
arNsts
like
José
Lerma
who’s
Nmeless
 work
has
inspired
the
Art
School
trend.




Where
is
it
going?
 In
a
convergent
world
where
everything
is
 constantly
changing
and
technology
is
becoming
 evermore
advanced,
it’s
not
hard
to
see
the
prints
 in
this
trend
evolving
into
digitally
enhanced
 images.
The
techniques
used
by
arNsts
like
José
 Lerma
will
get
lost
in
factories
filled
with
digital
 prinNng.
The
mix
of
tradiNonal
imagery
and
 technology
will
no
doubt
result
in
more
confident
 experimentaNon
with
scale
and
colour.

 Conversely,
the
art
school
trend
will
also
merge
with
 the
patchwork
trend
to
create
a
unique
looking
sub‐ trend
that
incorporates
both
of
these
bold
looks.
 Mixing
Nled
panels
of
intricately
printed,
Baroque
 inspired
images,
with
colour‐blocked
panels
to
 create
the
perfect
balance.




Ethnic Tribe. Where
has
it
come
from?

 A
truly
global
trend
that
sees
inspiraNon
 spanning
from
every
corner
of
the
earth.
 VariaNons
of
prints
from
Indonesia,
China
 and
India
all
have
a
prominent
place
 within
this
trend.
It
mixes
bold
ethnic
 imagery
such
as
decorated
Indonesian
 paPerns
and
and
resisted
baNk
dye
 designs,
with
Ikat
expressionism
and
 classic
baNk
paPerns.

 Many
designers
have
already
showcased
 these
ancient
ways
of
dying
fabric
within
 their
latest
collecNons.
And
it’s
fair
to
say
 that
the
cultural
diversity
of
the
designers,
 reflects
the
global
diversity
of
the
trend.
 Vivienne
Westwood
has
been
flying
the
 flag
of
England,
while
Yohji
Yamamoto
has
 for
Japan.
Other
designers
also
include
 Henri
Vibskov,
Missoni
and
 Miharayasuhiro.





Where
is
it
going?

 As
with
the
art
school
trend,
the
ethnic
 tribe
trend
will
evolve
with
the
aid
of
 technology.
The
natural
techniques
that
 designers
have
been
using
will
be
 replaced
with
mass
printed
graphics.
 However,
this
enables
designers
to
 experiment
with
the
idea
of
scale
and
 colour
–
potenNally
creaNng
more
 abstract
designs
that
sNll
take
strong
 inspiraNon
from
ethnic
tribe
paPerns.

 With
the
use
of
eco‐friendly
fabrics
and
 sustainable
fashion
on
the
increase,
it
is
 enNrely
possible
that
this
trend
may
sit
 at
the
forefront
of
global
sustainability
 due
it’s
hugely
diverse
global
influence.




Printed Outerwear. What
is
the
trend?

 Think
foulard
moNfs,
and
border
details.
The
more
 clashing
the
bePer
with
this
trend,
as
trousers
and
 blazers
are
adorned
with
fine
prints
and
moNfs.
Suits
 are
given
a
twist
with
printed
fabrics
and
small
scale
 geometrics
take
center
stage.
Already
seen
on
the
 catwalk,
Burberry
Prorusum
and
Versace
have
 showcased
print
galore,
giving
the
tailored
 menswear
a
well
deserved
twist.
 Where
has
it
come
from?
 As
the
boom
of
skatewear
trend
is
coming
 slowly
to
an
end,
designers
are
taking
 influence,
and
making
it
current.
Clashing
 prints
and
textures
have
been
printed
on
tees,
 adorned
trainers
and
matched
skateboards
 everywhere.
This
printed
outwear
trend
gives
 the
look
a
mature
edge.
Its
print‐all
grown
up.
 Finer
moNfs
and
simplisNc
border
details
 weave
their
way
onto
bomber
jackets,
roll
up
 trousers
and
blazers.



Where
is
it
going?
 The
clash
maybe
a
bit
daring
for
the
high
 street‐but
we
predict
it’ll
be
filtered
and
given
 a
go.
Longer
shorts
and
tees
will
see
foulard
 moNfs,
and
the
classic
suit
will
gain
a
twist
with
 paPern
clashing.
Small
scale
geometrics
will
be
 everywhere
for
retail
theatre
and
graphics.



Indigo Denim. What
is
the
Trend?
 Denim
is
a
staple,
and
this
season
indigo
will
 be
the
colour
of
choice.
BaNk
paPerning
and
 woven
indigo
Ikats
will
be
create
on
the
classic
 denim
jacket
as
the
indigo
clashes.
Bleached
 effects
and
denim
mixes
will
be
teamed
 together.
Already
seen
by
Phillip
Limm
and
 Missoni,
denim
is
given
a
collaged
paPern
 overhaul
and
indigo
blue
shades
are
mixed
into
 every
denim
garment
available.
 Where
has
it
come
from?
 Every
season
denim
needs
an
overhaul.
A
 menswear
staple
needs
an
on
trend
update
 and
indigo
is
this
seasons
choice.
More
of
a
 darker
shade,
this
denim
reflects
other
trends
 surrounding.
As
darker
and
more
mature
 trends
surround
autumn
|
winter
’13,
denim
 garments
reflect
this.
Easily
used
to
clash
and
 collage,
indigo
will
be
seen
as
a
fresh
way
to
 double
and
even
treble
up
your
denim.



Where
is
it
going?
 Indigo
jeans
will
be
produced
for
high
street
 stores,
in
their
wearable
and
most
sold
styles.
 For
high‐end
high
street,
indigo
denim
texture
 will
be
introduced;
such
as
bleached
effects
 and
denim
mixes.




What
is
the
trend?
 You
would
have
thought
it
has
been
done
to
 death,
but
the
fashion
pack
can’t
get
enough,
 and
have
re
hauled
again
for
Autumn
|
Winter
 ’13.
Think
Camouflages
and
animal
skin
mixes,
 with
darker,
more
adventurous
shades
and
 floral
accents.
It’s
a
recurring
theme,
but
the
 trends
are
definitely
growing
up,
as
 camouflage
appears
on
tailoring
and
silk
 materials.
Leading
the
way,
Dries
Van
Noten
 and
Kenzo
both
previewed
the
new
 camouflage.
ConcentraNng
on
repiNve
florals
 and
animal
skins.
 Where
has
this
trend
come
from?
 Camouflage
jackets
were
on
the
back
of
every
 fesNval
goer
last
summer,
taken
from
the
 streets
of
London
fashionistas.
The
trend
was
 picked
up
by
high
street
stores
worn
by
the
 UK’s
hipsters.
The
trend
was
simple
to
copy
 and
not
very
adventurous,
then
along
comes
 the
NEW.
The
fashion
pack
have
not
forgoPen
 about
the
fast
growing
mini
trend,
and
have
 given
it
their
own
twist.


The New Camouflage.


Where
is
it
going?

 Wearable
and
easily
customized,
high
street
 stores
will
jump
on
this
trend
as
soon
as
it
hits.
 Come
Autumn
|
Winter
’13,
this
trend
will
 feature
on
garments
through
darker
colurs,
 and
clashing
animal
and
floral
repiNve
prints.
 Camouflage
jackets
will
be
modernized
and
 given
a
suited
mix
of
colour
and
texture.



Introducing
Trend
to
George
@
Asda
 Who
Are
they
as
a
brand?
 Created
in
1990,
George
at
Asda
is
one
of
the
most
 successful
supermarket
clothing
ranges,
worth
an
 esNmated
£1.75billion.
The
clothing
range
is
aimed
 at
the
‘average’
customer.
CreaNng
clothing
ranges
 spreading
from
menswear,
womenswear,
beachwear,
 sportswear,
children’s
wear
and
even
wedding
 dresses,
George
@
Asda
promises
to
offer
something
 for
everyone.
Wearable
clothes
at
affordable
prices.
 Although
not
know
or
its
trend
following
fashion,
 George
@
Asda
sNll
likes
to
pride
its
brand
on
being
 fashionable,
even
though
not
necessarily
innovaNve.
 Therefore
we
thought
George
@
Asda
would
be
a
 perfect
brand
to
filter
and
dilute
one
of
the
 upcoming
trends
of
Autumn
|
Winter
’13.



Why
Ethnic
Tribal?
 Bold
graphics
and
cultural
influences,
this
 trend
is
a
statement
in
itself.
Worn
in
print
and
 through
accessorized
influences,
ethnic
tribal
is
 classic
trend
meets
fashion
expression.
We
 thought
this
trend
is
easily
recognizable,
 wearable
and
has
to
potenNal
to
be
dilouted
 into
a
supermarket
brand.



How
can
this
be
used?

 Through
garment
graphics
and
adverNsing
 campaigns,
even
to
in‐store
environments,
the
 tribal
trend
has
the
potenNal
to
cover
all
of
the
 bases
for
the
supermarket
brand.
Ethnic
 imagery
could
be
used
on
both
menswear
and
 womenswear
and
mixing
paPerns
could
be
 added
to
wearable
pieces.
AdverNsing
 campaigns
for
George
currently
focus
on
a
 family
ideal,
highlighNng
the
wear
ability
of
 their
clothes
for
everyone
at
any
occasion.
A
 campaign
could
take
influences
from
the
tribal
 trend,
focusing
on
atmospheres
and
scenarios.
 For
example
using
ethnic
tribal
inspired
party
 dresses,
for
the
Christmas
party
dress
range
 they
produce
each
year.



Trend Forecaster's Handbook S/S 2012