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When the lack of supporting data is mentioned, many express fears that telling young people and single adults about these uncertainties or quoting published condom failure rates will cause people to stop using condoms. There is no anecdotal or scientific evidence to suggest that telling people the truth would result in fewer people using condoms.” “In contrast, The Medical Institute believes individuals must know all the facts about condoms, including condom failure rates (when known) and the lack of supporting data regarding risk reduction for most non-HIV STDs. This information is needed so that individuals can make educated and informed decisions. The messages provided to young people and unmarried adults about sexual activity and condoms need to stress that abstinence from sexual activity and sex while using a condom are not equally safe behaviors.” “Sexual abstinence, that is, ‘the calculated decision and deliberate action to refrain from sexual activity,’ eliminates the risks of both pregnancy and STD making it clearly the healthiest and preferred sexual behavior for unmarried adolescents and young adults.” “In keeping with efforts to present all the facts about condoms, The Medical Institute also believes it is important to avoid exaggerating condom failure rates or making inaccurate statements about STD and pregnancy risks. The scientific facts speak for themselves. There is no need to exaggerate or misstate the evidence about condoms and the risk of either STD or pregnancy. Such inaccuracies ultimately hurt our young people and the credibility of the abstinence message.” “As mentioned earlier, the questions asked in this Sexual Health Update are typical of the questions The Medical Institute's research department receives on a weekly basis. Too often, by the time people call us with a question, incorrect information has already been given and cannot be corrected. Misinformation frequently results in harsh criticism of abstinence supporters by opponents of the abstinence message. Abstinence supporters may be labeled ‘fear-based,’ ‘medically inaccurate,’ ‘religiously-based’ or just plain ‘ignorant.’” “The truth about condoms is that, if used consistently and correctly—100 percent of the time— they do reduce the risk of HIV and for a short period of time gonorrhea. They may reduce the risk for chlamydia, but the research is unclear. For other STDs, there is simply not enough information to make any statements of protection or non-protection. Most unmarried sexually active individuals do not use condoms consistently and correctly. (According to the Centers for Disease Control, in order for condoms to be effective, they must be used consistently and correctly—which means 100 percent of the time.)” “These non-monogamous sexual partners are therefore at high risk of non-marital pregnancy and STDs. Even the most careful unmarried sexually active condom users are at consider able risk for STDs and some risk for a non-marital pregnancy if they continue to participate in sexual activity.” “Sexual abstinence is, and will remain, the only way unmarried individuals can eliminate and not just reduce the risk of sexually transmitted disease and non-marital pregnancy. Condoms do not

Condoms – Research 2005 and prior

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Condoms research 2005 and prior  
Condoms research 2005 and prior