Issuu on Google+

1.


You Can't Make a Wolf Vegetarian.


4.

Per

vasive Severe

You Can't Make a Wolf Vegetarian. 6-7 8-9 10-11 12-13 14-19 20-23 24-25

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Eastern Seaboard Blackout Rajendra Kumar Pachauri What is the IPCC? John Kerry Edward Davey James Hansen Decision time

Ple es as

top

going in circles

Irrevers

ible.

Lo st

in rh etoric


Days before the 1965 Eastern Seaboard blackout. Maintenance personnel incorrectly set a protective relay on one of the transmission lines between the Niagara generating station Sir Adam Beck Station No. 2 in Queenston, Ontario.

U.S.A

As was common on a cold November evening, power for heating, lighting and cooking was pushing the electrical system to near its peak capacity. Transmission lines heading into Southern Ontario were heavily loaded. At 17:16 Eastern Time a small surge of power coming from the Robert Moses generating plant in Lewiston, New York caused the improperly set relay to trip at far below the line’s rated capacity, disabling a main power line heading into Southern Ontario. Instantly, the power that was flowing on the tripped line transferred to the other lines, causing them to become overloaded. Their protective relays, which are designed to protect the line from overload, tripped, isolating Beck Station from all of Southern Ontario.

The excess power from Beck Station that had nowhere to go then switched direction and headed east over the interconnected lines into New York State, creating a domino effect, overloading them as well and isolating the power generated in the Niagara region from the rest of the interconnected grid. The Beck generators, with no outlet for their power, were automatically shut down to prevent damage. The Robert Moses Niagara Power Plant continued to generate power, which supplied Niagara Mohawk Power

Corporation customers in the metropolitan areas of Buffalo and Niagara Falls, NY. These areas ended up being isolated from the rest of the Northeast power grid and remained powered up. The Niagara Mohawk Western NY Huntley (Buffalo) and Dunkirk steam plants were knocked offline. Within five minutes, the power distribution system in the Northeast was in chaos as the effects of overloads and loss of generating capacity cascaded through the network, breaking it up into “islands.” Station after station experienced load imbalances and automatically shut down. The affected power areas were the Ontario Hydro System, St Lawrence-Oswego, Upstate New York, and New England. With only limited electrical connection southwards, power to the Southern States was not affected. The only part of the Ontario Hydro System not affected was the Fort Erie area next to Buffalo, which was still powered by older 25 Hz generators. Residents in Fort Erie were able to pick up a TV broadcast from New York where a local backup generator was being used for transmission purposes.

To those involved the event proved beyond a shadow of a doubt the extent to which our advanced society is dependent on technology.

1965 - Eastern Seaboard Blackout

7.

6.


8.

Rajendra Pachauri chairs the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and is director general of The Energy & Resources Institute “I have always believed if you want action in the field of climate change, it has to be driven by understanding, an application of what science has told us, what the IPCC has be telling us.” “We’re living in a free world and people will interpret things in the way that perhaps suits them, perhaps that they’ve a predisposition for it. But it think in the ultimate analysis, if sane voices were to look at truth for what it is then I think people will realise that what we’re saying and what the scientific community globally is saying is something that you cannot ignore, and the longer you delay taking action on it, the more complex the challenge is going to become.” “Natural Systems are currently bearing the brunt of climatic changes. Nobody on this planet is going to be untouched by the impacts of climate change. The climate changes that have already occurred have been widespread and have really had consequences. It’s not the case that climate change is a thing of the future.”

US president should push for improving public understanding of man-made global warming says Rajendra Pachauri

9.


UN

What is the IPCC?

International Panel on Climate Change

12

The IPCC is a bell tower

The IPCC is there to provide the world with a clear scientific view on the current state of knowledge in climate change and its potential environmental and socio-economic impacts. The offspring of two UN bodies, the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Programme, it has issued four heavyweight assessment reports to date on the state of the climate. These are commissioned by the governments of 195 countries, essentially the entire world. These reports are critical in informing the climate policies adopted by these governments. The IPCC itself is a small organisation, run from Geneva with a full time staff of 12. All the scientists who are involved with it do so on a voluntary basis. The buck essentially stops with them when it comes to climate policy. It it trying to allow the world to climb up to a high point so that it can see far and clearly into the future and to let people make smart decisions for their own purposes to use science to build a better world.


12.

John Forbes Kerry is the current United States Secretary of State; A position generally regarded as one of the four most important cabinet members of the federal government. He has the influence to make a real shift in the politics of one of the most polluting countries on earth.

The costs of inaction on climate change will be "catastrophic", according to US Secretary of State John Kerry.

13.

“Unless we act dramatically and quickly, science tells us our climate and our way of life are literally in jeopardy. Denial of the science is malpractice. There are those who say we can’t afford to act. But waiting is truly unaffordable. The costs of inaction are catastrophic.”


15.

14.

Edward Jonathan Davey is the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change in the UK and a senior member of the British government.

Edward Davey calls for new deal on emissions as UN warns of a catastrophe.

“We need a worldwide, large-scale change to our energy system if we are to limit the effects of climate change”. Please stop going

in

vasive

cir c

to

Per

“The science has clearly spoken. Left unchecked, climate change will impact on many aspects of our society, with far reaching consequences to human health, global food security and economic development. The recent flooding in the UK is a testament to the devastation that climate change could bring to our daily lives”

in

e rh


“Truth to Power�

16.

James Hansen

17.

Hansen is known for his testimony on climate change to congressional committees in the 1980s that helped raise broad awareness of the global warming issue. Hansen is recognized for speaking truth to power, for identifying ineffectual policies as greenwash, and for outlining the actions that the public must take to protect the future of young people and the other species on the planet. James Hansen was trained in physics and astronomy in the space science program of James Van Allen. He has focused his research on Earth's climate, especially human-made climate change. From 1981 to 2013, he headed the NASA Godard Institute for Space Studies. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


19.

18. We can measure Earth’s energy imbalance precisely by measuring the heat content in Earth’s heat reservoirs. The biggest reservoir, the ocean, was the least well measured, until more than 3,000 Argo floats were distributed around the world’s ocean.

These floats reveal that the upper half of the ocean is gaining heat at an alarming rate. The deep ocean is also gaining heat at a smaller rate, and the energy is going into the net melting of the ice all around the planet. And the land, to depths of tens of meters, is also warming.

Unfortunately, based on polar temperature maxima, we overestimated the warmth of prior interglacial periods.


21.

20.

400.000 The extra energy Earth is gaining each day is equivalent to 400,000 Hiroshima bombs being set off per day 365 days per year. This imbalance needs to be corrected if we want to prevent further warming of our home planet.

Climate change deniers argue that the Sun is the main cause of climate change. But the measured energy imbalance occurred during the deepest solar minimum in the record, when the Sun's energy reaching Earth was least. Yet, there was more energy

coming in than going out. This shows that the effect of the Sun's variations on climate is overwhelmed by the increasing greenhouse gasses, mainly from burning fossil fuels.

x

365 Days/Year


23.

We will not notice as we enjoy our daily lives that the cost of our neglect could soon cause the greatest tragedy in the memory of humankind.

Now consider Earth's climate history. These curves for global temperature, atmospheric CO2 and sea level were derived from ocean cores and Antarctic ice cores, from ocean sediments and snowflakes that piled up year after year over 800,000 years forming a two-mile thick ice sheet. As you see, there's a high correlation between temperature, CO2 and sea level. Careful examination shows that the temperature changes slightly lead the CO2 changes by a few centuries. Climate change deniers like to use this fact to confuse and trick the public by saying, "Look, the temperature causes CO2 to change, not vice versa." But that lag is exactly what is expected. Small changes in Earth’s orbit that occur over tens to hundreds of thousands of years alter the distribution of sunlight on Earth. When there is more sunlight at high latitudes in summer, ice sheets melt. Shrinking ice sheets make the planet darker, so it absorbs more sunlight and becomes warmer. A warmer ocean releases CO2. And more CO2 causes more warming, A self perpetuating cycle. So CO2, methane, and ice sheets were feedbacks that amplified global temperature change causing these ancient climate oscillations to be huge, even though the climate change was initiated by a very weak force.

The important point is that these same amplifying feedbacks will occur today. The physics does not change. As Earth warms, now because of extra CO2 we put in the atmosphere, ice will melt, and CO2 and methane will be released by warming ocean and melting permafrost. While we can't say exactly how fast these amplifying feedbacks will occur, it is certain they will occur, unless we stop the warming. There is evidence that feedbacks are already beginning. Precise measurements by GRACE, the gravity satellite, reveal that both Greenland and Antarctica are now losing mass, several hundred cubic kilometres per year. And the rate has accelerated since the measurements began nine years ago.

Imagine an asteroid on a direct collision course with earth

22.


25.

Demand Change

Severe Nature favours those organisms which leave the environment in better shape for their progeny to survive.

Per

Step into the light These are a selection of scientists and decision makers on whom the fate of human civilisation may well hang. Not only elected or prominent people take responsibility for directing and protecting the longevity of the population. We can demand change ourselves; this is our responsibility to our home planet.

vasive


References 1. Connections - James Burke

Page 5:

2. www.theguardian.com/environment/video/2014/mar/07/rajendra-pachauri-climate-change-video

Page 6:

3. www.theguardian.com/profile/rajendrapachauri

Page7: 4

Page 16:

4. www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/feb/28/climate-change-barack-obama-ipcc-rajesh-pachauri

Page 8:

5

Page 17:

5. www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26824943

Page 9:

5,12

Page 18:

6. www.ted.com/talks/james_hansen_why_i_must_speak_out_about_climate_change

Page 10:

5

Page 19:

7. www.worldwatch.org/node/5775

Page 11:

5,9,12

Page 20:

8. Climate Pain, Corporate gain - New Scientist (29/3/2014)

Page 12:

5

Page 21:

9. www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-31/world-is-ill-prepared-for-global-warming-impacts-un-says.html

Page 13:

10. The Vanishing Face of Gia: A Final Warning - James Lovelock 11. www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0415h9t 12. www.wikipedia.com

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

1

Page 14:

2,3,4,5

Page 15:

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

• vw • • • • • • • • • •

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

5,12

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••

N/a 6,7,10,11,12 6 N/a 6,12 6,7,10 10 N/a


But We Need Vegetarian Wolves.


You Can't Make a Wolf Vegetarian.